Corsair intros cheaper PSUs with Link software support

Looks like Corsair’s on a roll. Fresh from the launch of its new H80i and H100i coolers, the firm has unleashed four new power supplies, including two units that feature the same Corsair Link mojo—hence the “i” suffix.

The AX760i and AX860i are lower-wattage siblings of the existing AX1200i, which retails for $299.99 right now. Corsair quotes suggested prices of $229.99 and $249.99 for the 760W and 860W models, respectively, so they’re not vastly more affordable. Still, not everybody needs over a kilowatt of power for his PC, so having the option to get a more reasonable model for $70 less isn’t unwelcome.

Both the AX760i and the AX860i boast 80 Plus Platinum certification—the second-highest there is—and efficiency ratings up to 92%. They have modular cabling, 140-mm fans, and of course, Corsair Link functionality. You’ll want to check out Geoff’s look at the AX1200i and the Link software for more details, but here’s the Cliff’s Notes version, in Corsair’s words:

The DSP-based design, combined with Corsair Link™ technology, provides enthusiasts with real-time control over the features and performance characteristics of their PSU all via software. This includes real-time monitoring of temperature, current draw, and power efficiency, as well as the ability to adjust the speed of the internal 140mm fan. These features also allow for a unique level of configurability, such as the ability to switch from the default single +12V rail configuration to a tailored “multi-rail” mode, with the ability to set over current protection set-points on a per-rail basis.

Nifty. The company also claims its digital power circuitry delivers “incredibly stable voltages” as well as “exceptionally low ripple and noise.” Given the asking prices, I’d expect no less.

For folks with (slightly) shallower pockets, Corsair has also launched the non-Link-enabled AX760 and AX860. These are priced at $199.99 and $219.99, respectively. They still tout the 80 Plus Platinum label, but their peak efficiency is slightly lower, at 90%. Not that that’s anything to scoff at. In fact, Corsair says these units are so efficient that their fans don’t even switch on until the electrical load reaches 60% on the AX860 or 70% on the AX760. Barring any chirping or buzzing from the internal components, these things should be totally silent at idle.

You can start looking for the AX760, AX860, AX760i, and AX860i in stores this month. All four units are covered under a seven-year warranty, so you should be set until 2019 if you buy one now.

Comments closed
    • moose17145
    • 7 years ago

    The 760 watt version looks nice. Currently running a 600 watt OCZ ModXtreme. It is only 80 Plus certified, but has served me well since 2008, so I can’t really complain too much. My next build will definitely have one of these corsair units though. I really like what corsair is doing with their Link Technology.

    • Anarchist
    • 7 years ago

    yup, there’s a sucker born every minute …

      • rrr
      • 7 years ago

      You’re populating the world with clones of yourself? OK.

      • liquidsquid
      • 7 years ago

      Hope they are all good-looking! *rimshot!*

    • Bensam123
    • 7 years ago

    I still think this should be standard. All PSUs should be able to interact with the motherboard and vice-versa. There are all sorts of cool things you could do with this from monitoring to tweaking current.

      • Airmantharp
      • 7 years ago

      PSUs really just need to be single, stable 12V rails; Google had Intel do this on their motherboards for their distributed computing crates. The rest of it is just trying to fix something that isn’t broke.

      Also, I’m not saying it isn’t nice, or that I don’t want it, or that isn’t useful- just that it’s entirely unnecessary and that forcing it everywhere would make costs go up needlessly.

        • Bensam123
        • 7 years ago

        I’m not entirely sure why it would result in a ‘needless’ cost hike. It doesn’t matter what Googles doing in their datacenters as far as PSUs inside your computer are concerned. Being able to monitor and diagnose your PSU would be god send. You know those times when people having failing PSUs, but can’t tell? Or when you don’t know how much load you’re putting on the overall system. How much headroom the PSU has, being able to monitor all the ports. Not just information your motherboard may or may not actually decide to share with you… Being able to tell how efficient or inefficient your system is… How much power it uses monthly…

        Standardization of something that is responsible for the longevity and life of all the components in your system.

        I’ve encountered quite a few buggy PSUs and having to pull out the multimeter to test pins as well as finding out which pins those are is silly in this day and age. Let alone if you’re trying to help someone else debug their system. That is data that should be fed to the system so it can alert you if something is wrong. Just the same as there is monitoring on the majority of UPSs.

    • Jambe
    • 7 years ago

    If there was a 300-500W version with the Link stuff I [i<]might[/i<] pay a premium for it just because I think it's neat and a seven-year warranty on a Seasonic-built PSU ain't bad. Alas, Corsair positively won't be making a customer out of me, as I can power a nice assortment of storage devices, a full bank of RAM, a half-dozen fans and a near-flagship CPU and GPU on a ~400W power supply. Sadface.

    • CaptTomato
    • 7 years ago

    My Corsair HX 620 is 4yrs old, and this is now my record breaking PC, ie, it’s the longest any of my PC’s has ever lasted…..I don’t think it’s a coincidence.

      • shaq_mobile
      • 7 years ago

      My old old old gaming machine from 2006 is still running just fine and it’s got a ocz 400 somethign watt psu. My grandparents still own the machine I built for them and it had a super cheap psu that lasted until last year, so almost 7 years. I’ve actually never had a PSU die on me. Mobos and GPUs are another story 🙂

        • CaptTomato
        • 7 years ago

        I had 2 PC’s die within a few weeks of each other, both had ordinary PSU, so I buy a good one, and here I am 4yrs later still punching away on it.
        This is the first time I’ve gotten more than 3yrs from a PC, granted they’re usually worthy of being destroyed at that point.

      • Airmantharp
      • 7 years ago

      My HX620 went into service for my brother earlier this year! All hail Seasonic, who also produced the X650 Gold in my current machine.

    • BestJinjo
    • 7 years ago

    These are just SeaSonic’s Platinum units.

    SeaSonic SS-760XP Platinum = $179.99 MSRP
    SeaSonic 860W Platinum = $199.99 MSRP ($184.99 after rebate on Newegg)
    SeaSonic 1000W Platinum = $229.99 on Newegg

    Why would anyone pay higher prices for Corsair’s units? Even without Corsair Link, Corsair is already charging a premium. I expect market pricing on these units to fall $30-40 shortly.

      • Airmantharp
      • 7 years ago

      As you said, you are comparing stabilized market prices with announced MSRPs. I expect the ‘dumb’ parts to maintain near price-parity with variances explainable more by supply, and the ‘smart’ stuff to carry a small premium, though they’ll take longer to get there.

      • entropy13
      • 7 years ago

      Except they’re made by Flextronics and not Seasonic.

    • James296
    • 7 years ago

    too bad, 229 and 249 are out of my price range for psu unless I’m going for a good 1000w+ psu

      • Farting Bob
      • 7 years ago

      Why would you need a 1000w+ PSU?

        • Airmantharp
        • 7 years ago

        You need ~800W+ of power from the wall?

        Try and power three 27″/30″ monitors in the latest games with the eye candy turned up. See where that gets you :).

          • rrr
          • 7 years ago

          670 SLI will run just fine on 750W with room to spare for OC, and even then some.

    • Forge
    • 7 years ago

    I’m still rocking my now-geriatric TX750 quite happily. Let me guess, Link is Windows-only? Guess I’ll get more geriatric for a while.

    • eitje
    • 7 years ago

    if i cross my eyes, the picture is 3D.

    • steelcity_ballin
    • 7 years ago

    I have their 650watt offering. I’m a big fan of Corsair lately. Solid components if only a tad on the pricey side. It’s quality stuff though.

    • Bauxite
    • 7 years ago

    Wait until they go on sale for a more reasonable price, just like the original AX launch. When they first came out with opening MSRP or slightly above, not worth it, but maybe 6 months later they could be had for like $50 under on nice sales.

    Since they are PSUs not GPUs and there are plenty of good ones available already, no reason not to wait 🙂

    • jeffcutsinger
    • 7 years ago

    You can get the same base PSU for cheaper direct from the OEM, Seasonic.

    [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&DEPA=0&Order=BESTMATCH&N=-1&isNodeId=1&Description=seasonic+platinum&x=0&y=0[/url<] Although you'll "miss out" on the link software.

      • rrr
      • 7 years ago

      As noted, this isn’t the same PSU, Corsair is made by Flextronics and not Seasonic.

        • cynan
        • 7 years ago

        Actually, the Corsair AX1200i, AX760i, AX860i (and 1200AX) are made by Flextronics.

        The new AX760 and AX860 (without the “i” suffix) are the new Seasonic platform (I think the SS-*60XP2 series).

        So you and the OP are both correct. However, the price listed is MSRP, so it’s yet to be determined if Newegg will sell the Corsair versions for more than the Seasonic ones…

    • Sargent Duck
    • 7 years ago

    C’mon Corsair, you can release one of these bad boys around the 600 watt range. You can do it…

      • Rand
      • 7 years ago

      I’d say 450W. That’d be just fine for me.
      Even 600W is vast overkill for many of us.

        • Theolendras
        • 7 years ago

        Even more so with now that thermal enveloppe and power consumption are gradually going down.

        • Airmantharp
        • 7 years ago

        450W for one GPU, 600W for two, if you’re pushing 4MP-6MP and need all the candy turned on.

          • internetsandman
          • 7 years ago

          650 is the lowest rated AX series I was able to buy, and that had a gold rating. I’m only running a 2600k and GTX 680. Anything lower was either OCZ or less efficient

            • Airmantharp
            • 7 years ago

            Then you’re good for two GTX680’s! I see a Korean IPS in your future…

            • internetsandman
            • 7 years ago

            I’m already running a 2560×1440 panel, it’s a 4GB card, I guess the dream would be to have three of these displays set in portrait mode….

            • Airmantharp
            • 7 years ago

            That’d be nice; cost vs. benefit doesn’t quite work out though, does it?

            Still waiting on these companies to roll out support for asymmetrical displays, so we can use cheaper 20″ panels on the sides for peripheral vision…

        • rrr
        • 7 years ago

        450W PSU for $160-$180? I’m sure many folks would pay for it…

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