Release roundup: FM2 mobos, gaming laptops, and heat pipes aplenty

In spite of this morning’s e-mail hijinks, we collected a handful of release announcements in our inbox this week. Biostar, MSI, Spire, and Zotac all tipped us off about new products.

  • Biostar launches AMD FM2 boards with exclusive Hi-Fi Puro technology. Biostar touts the "cost effective" nature of these Socket FM2 boards, so you know they’re going to be cheap. The Hi-Fi A85S3 and HiFi A75S3 are both microATX offerings, and they make use of AMD’s A85X and A75 chipsets, respectively. Notable features include native USB 3.0 and 6Gbps Serial ATA connectivity, support for dual-channel DDR3 memory speeds up to 2400MHz (when overclocked), and Biostar’s Puro Hi-Fi tech, which involves an "integrated independent audio power design with a built-in amplifier." The A85S3 has an HDMI output instead of DVI, but other than that, I don’t see much of a difference between the two models.

  • MSI makes high performance portable gaming affordable with AMD powered GX60. I got to see this chubby gaming notebook in person at AMD’s Markham offices last month. For $1,299.99, the GX60 gets you a 15.6" 1080p display, an AMD A10 processor, 8GB of DDR3-1600 RAM, Radeon HD 7970M graphics, 750GB of mechanical storage, Blu-ray, USB 3.0, and Windows 8. This is quite a portly machine, obviously; it weighs 7.7 lbs and measures 1.77" at its thickest point. Still, that’s not a bad deal for the price. I played a bit of Skyrim on the system, and the game was nice and smooth at the native resolution—not that one would expect any less considering the high-end GPU, of course.

  • Spire introduces X2 9883 HDT 9000 series CPU cooler. This new CPU cooler from Spire has no less than six heat pipes, all designed to be in direct contact with the CPU heat spreader. The heat pipes connect to an array of 46 aluminum fins (each with a nickel finish), and a 120-mm PWM fan cools the whole contraption. Spire says the fan has removable rubber corners and a Nano-Tech bearing that enables lower noise output and increased durability compared to other designs. Oh, and the bearing design lets you pull the fan apart for "dust cleaning convenience," too, which sounds pretty neat. The X2 9883 HDT 9000 series has universal socket support and can cool CPUs with TDPs as high as 150W. Asking price: $56.95.

  • Zotac announces A75-ITX WiFi B-series and A55-ITX WiFi B-series. Remember the A75-ITX Wi-Fi board we reviewed last year? Well, the new A75-ITX WiFi B-series is pretty much the same thing, except with an FM2 socket ripe for AMD’s latest Trinity processors. Zotac hasn’t enlisted AMD’s new A85X chipset, but this little Mini-ITX board still offers 6Gbps SATA and USB 3.0 ports aplenty. The cheaper A55-ITX WiFi B-series has only 3Gbps SATA connectivity, though, and it carries fewer USB 3.0 ports and only one Gigabit Ethernet connector.

It’s nice to see small-form-factor boards adopting the latest sockets. Considering the 100W power envelopes on most of the new A-series APUs, however, Trinity is somewhat of a questionable proposition for a small-form-factor PC. At least AMD makes a few pared-down 65W models like the A6-5400K.

Comments closed
    • crabjokeman
    • 7 years ago

    Note to Zotac: A55 looks like an English word that you probably don’t want on your product (or maybe you do if want to be a badA55).

    • Washer
    • 7 years ago

    The MSI laptop is interesting. A 7970M available in a $1200 laptop is a lot of gaming power for the dollar. However I have to admit I’m a bit apprehensive about an AMD CPU in a $1200 laptop. I look forward to comparisons against the 15.6″ GT60 where $300 extra will nab you a Core i7 3630QM + 675M.

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    That spire HSF has so many heatpipes that they are seriously impeding the airflow through the fins.

    Two of those heatpipes have no hope of ever touching the CPU in the first place, and of the central four, only two of them will ever be above a hot-spot on the chip.

    Those two most important heatpipes look to be the ones most affected by the deadzone behind the fan hub.

    Another classic example of ‘Marketing’ making numbers bigger for all the wrong reasons.

    Bravo, Spire. It’s a wonder you’re not right up there on the performance heatsink charts with stellar efforts like this.

    Oh, wait…..

      • Washer
      • 7 years ago

      [url<]http://www.frostytech.com/top5heatsinks.cfm[/url<]

    • Bauxite
    • 7 years ago

    HDT sucks with current cpus and tiny dies, thought everyone figured that out by now.

    • mockingbird
    • 7 years ago

    Cheap junk Apaq Capacitors. They should learn from MSI and use X-CON (UER and ULR series) polymers on their boards. MSI FM2 and 1155 are just as economical and of higher quality because of this.

    • anotherengineer
    • 7 years ago

    “I got to see this chubby gaming notebook in person at AMD’s Markham offices last month.”

    Cyril, we still refer to it as ATI up here in these parts 😉

      • mockingbird
      • 7 years ago

      Besides lamenting the former days before the acquisition, what do you actually do in the office? Also, I should have never paid $300 for that Radeon ViVo back in 2000.

        • HisDivineOrder
        • 7 years ago

        But… but… it had HyperZ.

          • mockingbird
          • 7 years ago

          I used to use the video input port to watch stuff on the screen.

          ATI’s solution for deinterlacing the picture… get this…. just remove all the odd fields and double up the even fields giving you a very blurry picture.

          Last ATI videocard with video in, Radeon 2900XT, sitting in my drawer here. I wonder how they did deinterlacing with the Rage Theater 200… Never tried it.

            • insulin_junkie72
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]ATI's solution for deinterlacing the picture... get this.... just remove all the odd fields and double up the even fields giving you a very blurry picture.[/quote<] Bob deinterlacing. It's a method that's still around, for speed reasons.

    • tbone8ty
    • 7 years ago

    Gx60 is $1199 at newegg.

    Pretty sweet gaming laptop and it can do 3 monitors for eyefinity

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      Yeah, wow, that’s actually really impressive. According to Notebookcheck.net it’s a Pitcairn based GPU, so it’s like having a desktop 7870 (though at lower speeds) in a laptop.

      Trinity at 2.3GHz is faster than Llano or any Phenom II-based mobile CPU, but that A10 is going to be holding it back unfortunately. In an Ivy Bridge system that’d be a killer gaming setup.

    • sweatshopking
    • 7 years ago

    damn, those zotac boards look nice. if my htpc (phenom 2 920) ever dies, i’ll have to pick one up! i usually find zotac stuff has poor availability, however.

      • phileasfogg
      • 7 years ago

      Yup, those Zotac puppies sure would make for some fabulous HTPCs!

      <blockquote> Considering the 100W power envelopes on most of the new A-series APUs, however, Trinity is somewhat of a questionable proposition for a small-form-factor PC. At least AMD makes a few pared-down 65W models like the A6-5400K. </blockquote>

      There are 19W and 17W Trinity models which are used in notebooks – wouldn’t it be great if some of those trickled down into this market in the next 3 months?

        • MadManOriginal
        • 7 years ago

        I don’t think they are socketed though. What would be nice is if some vendor went out on a limb and made some boards using them. Zotac makes some boards with unique feature sets, maybe they’d be up to the challenge.

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