19-nm NAND anchors Kingston SSDNow V300

Add Kingston to the list of SSD vendors offering drives with next-generation NAND. The firm’s new SSDNow V300 features flash memory chips built on a 19-nm process. The NAND is paired with SandForce’s SF-2281 controller, a chip that’s been making the rounds for a while now. Interestingly, the press release claims the controller has been “customized for Kingston.” We’ve asked Kingston about what that customization entails and are waiting to hear back.

Based on its performance specifications, the V300 doesn’t look like the fastest drive on the block. It’s rated for sequential read and write speeds of 450MB/s, which is a little bit slower than the best SandForce-based drives out there right now. The drive is purportedly capable of pushing 85,000 IOps with random reads, while random writes range from 43,000 to 60,000 IOps depending on the capacity. The higher performance ratings apply to the lower-capacity models, which is the opposite of what we see with most SSDs. I suspect that’s an error.

The SSDNow V300 is available in 60, 120, and 240GB flavors. Kingston says those models will endure at least 32, 64, and 128TB of total writes, respectively. All the drives are covered by the same three-year warranty.

Amazon already has a number of V300 models listed, and they all seem to be part of upgrade kits that include mounting brackets and other accessories. The 240GB variant costs $215, the 120GB model can be had for $121, and the 60GB is priced at $80. Kingston is also making the V300 available as a standalone drive, and I’d expect it to cost a little bit less in that form.

Comments closed
    • internetsandman
    • 7 years ago

    Am I the only person who sees the Sandforce name and instantly becomes wary of reliability in a product? I know OCZ drives were notorious for issues but I try to steer clear of the controller manufacturer in general.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      No you’re not the only person, you’re also not the only person to base that on the early firmware problems rather than the current stable firmware. In other words, Sandforce controllers themselves aren’t problematic any more.

    • Farting Bob
    • 7 years ago

    Who is making and selling 19nm NAND? I thought everyone was still producing 2xnm stuff (21-24nm depending on manufacturer) with 1x nm coming next year?

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      Samsung.

      • jjj
      • 7 years ago

      The Toshiba/Sandisk JV transitioned to 19nm a while ago,at the same time Micron/Intel went 20nm.

      Edit:here a press release from april 2011 [url<]http://www.sandisk.com/about-sandisk/press-room/press-releases/2011/2011-04-20-sandisk-announces-19-nanometer/[/url<]

    • MadManOriginal
    • 7 years ago

    Am I doing something wrong or are these drives rated for ~500 P/E cycles at their rated capacity? 😮 Yeah…talk about cheap NAND.

      • just brew it!
      • 7 years ago

      At 19 nm I am not surprised. When the components in your chip are only a hundred (give or take) [i<]atoms[/i<] across, and you write data by punching electrons through an insulating layer (which causes incremental damage by definition), long-term reliability is going to suffer. You can mitigate it with fancy error correction and wear leveling algorithms, but the bottom line is the underlying storage media simply isn't stable.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 7 years ago

        We geeks know all that. But still, 500? That’s terrible when the smallest of 20nm-class flash was at least 1000 and up to 3000. Anand figures that Samsung’s latest 19nm TLC is [url=http://www.anandtech.com/show/6459/samsung-ssd-840-testing-the-endurance-of-tlc-nand<]good for 1000 P/E at least[/url<] so this is either the dirt crappiest TLC or beyond dirt crappiest MLC. It will still last many years in normal consumer use so perhaps much ado about nothing, it just needs to be priced appropriately which isn't the case (yet). It makes me wonder how much longer before we get to a cost/benefit ratio of process shrinks where such a large amount of spare area is needed that there's no longer a net cost benefit to further shrinks.

          • travbrad
          • 7 years ago

          [quote<]It makes me wonder how much longer before we get to a cost/benefit ratio of process shrinks where such a large amount of spare area is needed that there's no longer a net cost benefit to further shrinks.[/quote<] Yep, and there's also the factor of covering the costs of building/designing new fabs, which seem to be getting more and more expensive the smaller we go. Like you said they are still plenty durable for consumer drives (probably more so than spinning disks), but at the rate we are going it could become an issue in the not too distant future.

    • Ryhadar
    • 7 years ago

    Sheesh, those prices are terrible. Don’t get me wrong, I love Kingston for their memory’s reliability and the company’s great customer service.

    That being said, if reliability is your aim you can get SSDs from Intel, Samsung, or Crucial for much less. The fact that they decided to release these a week before black Friday and cyber Monday probably doesn’t help either…

      • alwayssts
      • 7 years ago

      Their list prices are always high.

      Also…yeah on the Intel/Samsung/Crucial.

      It’s pretty apparent how Kingston builds their drives. First with the cheap and crappy Jmicron/24nm Toshiba nand (v200). Then with the market-flooded sandforce and less-than-desirable async 25nm Intel/Micron stuff. (V+200).

      This more-than-likely uses Toshiba 19nm nand…hopefully mlc…probably because it is cheapest.

      Competition and oversupply brought prices down on older (and when it comes to nand arguably better) products. NAND is turning into the new DDR. Contract price is low, market price is often lower. I would deduct they are using the newest and cheapest stuff just to make any money in this over-saturated environment with cheaper nand constantly leap-frogging each other seemingly every couple months driving prices down across all competing drives.

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    Thank god they switched to Sandforce.

    I dumped my V200 because the Jmicron controller was terrible.

      • Ryhadar
      • 7 years ago

      Yeah good point. They used to have a Jmicron/Toshiba chip that was half decent for the price but by today’s standards it just wouldn’t be cutting it.

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