Newegg chimes in on Windows 8 retail success

There’s been some debate out there about early Windows 8 sales numbers. On one side, we’ve heard Steve Ballmer publicly tout early adoption of the operating system. On the other, the rumor mill claims sales aren’t looking so hot, and Microsoft really isn’t happy. So, which is it?

The folks at ReadWriteWeb have found a tie breaker: Merle McIntosh, Newegg’s Product Management chief for North America. McIntosh spoke to the site on record, and his take seems to lend weight to the rumor mongers. See for yourself:

“On the software side it has been slow going, and I think it will be that way until the pricing normalizes sometime next year,” McIntosh said, declining to provide actual sales numbers. “But on the hardware side, we’re starting to see some slow but steady increases in notebooks, and as the tablets become available, we’re starting to see some good sides of the tablet part of the equation as well.”

To be entirely fair, Ballmer was touting early adoption from enthusiasts—and I expect most PC enthusiasts bought their Windows 8 upgrades straight from Microsoft, not in retail-boxed form at Newegg. Buying direct from Microsoft isn’t just quicker; it’s cheaper, too: $39.99 instead of $69.99 for a retail copy.

Nevertheless, McIntosh says Newegg and its partners planned for an “explosion” at the Windows 8 launch, despite internal doubts about just show successful Windows 8 would prove internally. And the doubters turned out to be right. “[Windows 8] did not explode, as I think you know, coming out of the gate,” says McIntosh.

Despite the apparently sluggish adoption, McIntosh seems enthusiastic about Windows 8. It’s just a matter of patience. His take: we’ll have to wait until next Spring before the new operating system “really gets some momentum.”

Comments closed
    • maxpain12
    • 7 years ago

    When I first installed Windows 8 over a month ago it was an odd beast to contend with. I mean it seemed like a Frankenstein made up of different aspects of traditional desktop and mobile operating systems. Coming off Windows 7 which I enjoy, this did not bode well for me and I ended going back. Add to this software incompatibilities. The initial reaction was bitter. This week my Win 7 installation got messed up and I decided to give my Win 8 license one more chance. The learning curve is steep and takes a good week or two to master. However after one gets the hang of it, Win 8 is the best Microsoft OS to date. The trick is to have patience to learn how to use it. Since the RTM release I find most of my problematic software has now been updated for Win 8.

    • Ashbringer
    • 7 years ago

    Pretty much how Windows 8 sales is going to end up.

    [url<]http://cdn.memegenerator.net/instances/400x/29125388.jpg[/url<]

    • HisDivineOrder
    • 7 years ago

    Everyone looks at Windows 8 devices and knows, in their heart of hearts, that these devices are weak and devices designed and fielded in a post-Windows 8 world will better accommodate Windows 8 than a great many of these Windows 7 devices with Windows 8 slapped in.

    Personally, I’m waiting on the reviews for the Surface Pro. I like the idea of a Surface-like tablet that runs all the software I already have. For example, I have quite a few low end Steam games I’d love to run on a tablet and I think would run well. I wish there was an Intel Clovertrail option (ie., Surface Pro Lite) as I’m not sure I need more than that.

    And I wish they were pushing the price point down to a level where they put pressure on the iPad. Instead, they seem content to… let iPad (and to a somewhat lesser extent the Nexus 7/Kindle Fire HD) rule the market.

      • tootercomputer
      • 7 years ago

      When MS first introduced Surface, it was the Pro version that caught my eye. I still think that it might be the “must have” device so long as the price is not too high. But the specs were good, including USB 3.0, which the RT version inexplicably left out.

    • Arclight
    • 7 years ago

    Go home McIntosh,

    You’re drunk.

    • esterhasz
    • 7 years ago

    I will only make up my mind after trying Windows 8 for a couple of days, but usability guru Jacob Nielsen has recently tried to add a more systematic take on the interface: [url<]http://www.useit.com/alertbox/windows-8.html[/url<]

      • kruky
      • 7 years ago

      Too bad this guys has no idea what’s his talking about. He only talks about Metro UI not about win8.

        • sonofsanta
        • 7 years ago

        Given that Jakob Nielsen is expressly a usability expert, I would expect him to talk about the UI and not the architectural underpinnings.

        So quite ironic for you to say that [i<]he's[/i<] the one who has no idea what he's talking about.

          • kruky
          • 7 years ago

          He says that you cannot run more then one window at once or two windows side by side in win8 which is not true as you can run normal desktop there with normal multiple windows (quote: “Windows” no longer supports multiple windows on the screen). Or is desktop architectural underpinning?

      • yogibbear
      • 7 years ago

      Usability UI review written on a WHITE BACKGROUND with BLACK WRITING. OWWWWWWWWWWWWWW MY EYES! WHERE IS THE BLUE MODE?!

    • kilkennycat
    • 7 years ago

    I got to play with the Acer Aspire V5 touchscreen notebook and Windows 8 a few days ago. That is a very sweet combo of a great multitouch touch-screen UI with the traditional PC mouse ( or pad ) interface. For my large-screen desktop PC, I’ll stick with Win7, thank you very much… at least until Microsoft finally caves in and makes the Start-screen a user-defined option.

      • cynan
      • 7 years ago

      Yeah. It seems all MS had to do was add an extra set-up screen at install giving users the option of

      1) Booting directly to the Modern/Metro UI OR the desktop AND

      2) Using a traditional start menu.

      (And come up with some nice name for this choice such as “New-Fangled Super-Awesome Touchy-Feely Experience OR Classic Experience”)

      It couldn’t have been much extra work to do something like that and the consumer backlash would have been drastically reduced to non-existent. The fact that they had the audacity to force non-touchscreen users to give up their tried and true UI comforts for pretty much no reason whatsoever is to blame for all the W8 hate/nerd-rage.

    • funko
    • 7 years ago

    Win8 is like Android 3.0.

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      android 3.0 that sold millions!

      • Arag0n
      • 7 years ago

      The difference is that all buyers of android 3.0 were almost dropped with an unstable and shitty tablet for the rest of their device lifespan while Windows RT will keep improving and likely, Surface RT will be able to upgrade to next version without any issue.

    • Anarchist
    • 7 years ago

    despite it all w8 on tablet and phone makes iOS and android look old and stale. Problem with w8 is, other than tablet pricing mistake, it should have had configurable desktop environment to suit users preference. That’s not asking too much is it?

    • flip-mode
    • 7 years ago

    Microsoft should have arranged for a touch screen monitor + OS bundle deal. At least then the Metro interface would have been able to play to its strengths. That could have boosted sales. As it stands, there’s a lack hardware supporting the OS’s headline feature.

      • shank15217
      • 7 years ago

      Metro is very good as an htpc interface, a 10x better than any media center app i’ve used, the desktop is a bit weird and isn’t ready for power users. Windows 8 is also the lightest OS MS made since XP64. Its very clean and very fast, takes full advantage of SSDs, I would say if MS ever decided to provide a traditional program menu for desktop use it would be the best OS they ever made.

        • NeelyCam
        • 7 years ago

        Don’t be callin’ it a “metro”, fool!

    • sweatshopking
    • 7 years ago

    the reality is that windows 7 is still a damn good os. it does 100% of what people want, and unless your a nerd who wants new stuff (me) or somebody buying a new computer, sales are going to be low.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      You must have gotten minused by a nerd who didn’t want to be called a nerd. I corrected it.

        • Jigar
        • 7 years ago

        SSK a nerd ? HAHAHAHAhAHHHAHAHAHAHA / faints

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          awww thanks! <3

      • danny e.
      • 7 years ago

      you’re = you are. your != you are.

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        YEAH, i know that. i was just typing quickly. i’ll leave it so your point has context.

          • Meadows
          • 7 years ago

          Typing quickly is not the same as typing wrong.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            when you’re as dumb as i am it is.

    • Forge
    • 7 years ago

    “Gets some momentum” == “is preloaded on 90%+ of new PC sales, no matter if it’s wanted or not”

      • l33t-g4m3r
      • 7 years ago

      That’s it exactly. People don’t have much of a choice when it’s the default OS offered on every new PC, and the only reason “enthusiasts” are purchasing the OS is because it’s $40, or $15 upgrades for win7 users, and who knows whatever other promotions. Plus, enthusiasts know how to install classic start. You can easily prop up initial sales statistics, but after that artificial boom there will be a big crash. People want 8 less than Vista or ME combined.

      Microsoft really needs to start taking external input before making big changes to their OS, instead of forcing it on everyone and hoping for the best.

    • anotherengineer
    • 7 years ago

    Bought the pro x64 upgrade for 40 bucks, not installed yet. Probably not for a bit until I have more time to learn how to navigate around it.

      • Kaleid
      • 7 years ago

      I would wait for sp1.

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        When they put in a Start menu?

          • l33t-g4m3r
          • 7 years ago

          According to the earlier discussion about service packs, SP1 will likely be W9.

          My thoughts are W9 will be two separate OS’s with Metro for tablets, and the start menu for desktops. Basically how it should have been originally. I think Surface RT will go the way of the Zune too, since there isn’t much reason for anyone to want it.

      • bfar
      • 7 years ago

      I did install it with no regrets – very little difference on the desktop side tbh. The Windows 8 apps are an interesting diversion but many of them still need considerable development. Not much else to say at this time, only that the potential is there.

      I’d definitely caution against Win 8 RT right now, but pro is basically the same as Windows 7 with an additional app environment.

    • Game_boy
    • 7 years ago

    >slow but steady increases

    It better be, seeing as it’s November and Christmas buying time. This must be the first time that Windows hasn’t produced a rush on new PCs. Even Vista had the self-professed ‘wow’ factor.

      • flip-mode
      • 7 years ago

      The difference is that a touch screen is needed to access the tangibles of Windows 8. Previous Windows versions have never required anything like that. Some have required CPU or memory upgrades, but those are the kind of upgrades that are readily available (where’s all the touch screens) and that people are usually eager to get anyway.

        • Chrispy_
        • 7 years ago

        Yeah, trying to sell what is essentially [b<][i<]Windows7 Touchscreen Edition[/i<][/b<] to the two-billion* Windows users on the planet without touchscreens is a tough sell. I don't think the phrase [i<]"barking up the wrong tree"[/i<] has ever been so apt. * - couldn't find "number of windows users", but Windows has an install base of [url=http://www.zdnet.com/with-600-million-sales-windows-7-closes-on-xp-4010026342/<]1.4 billion PC's[/url<] and I am [b<]guessing[/b<] that the average household has a user:pc ratio that is >1....

    • MadManOriginal
    • 7 years ago

    Oh, the sweet irony of someone with this name talking about Windows sales.

      • ULYXX
      • 7 years ago

      I was thinking along the same line. I didnt know whether to take this reading seriously after seeing his name.

      • TurtlePerson2
      • 7 years ago

      Better article title: Mr. MacIntosh says that Windows isn’t doing well.

        • NeelyCam
        • 7 years ago

        Bring back those ads! I thought they were funny

      • destroy.all.monsters
      • 7 years ago

      That’s funny – I saw his name and thought nose bleed level home audio.

    • Meadows
    • 7 years ago

    The problem with this one is that it seems to require “getting momentum” at all. Microsoft’s last OS didn’t seem to ask for such patience of salesmen and investors.

      • Noigel
      • 7 years ago

      You hit the nail on the head. I can’t peg down why I wanted Windows 7 so much (what the “tipping point” was…) but I got that sucker just as soon as it came out.

      In hindsight, do you think if Microsoft hadn’t done such a drastic change with Win8… if they had just made a few incremental improvements to Win7 it would have sold better? I almost think Win7 was too good… that they couldn’t really move anywhere else with minor improvements that would have warranted upgrading still. Anyone disagree?

      Noigel’s Tipping Points for Buying Windows 7
      – Windows XP was REALLY, REALLY long in the tooth and feeling outdated.
      – Windows Vista was terrible but I knew that a lot of the Windows 7 kinks were ironed-out due to it’s horrible existence.
      – Gaming concern: 64-Bit and thus… enabling more than 4GB of memory.
      – The Win7 taskbar was an instantly recognizable improvement.

      Noigel’s Tipping Points for Buying Windows 8

    • yogibbear
    • 7 years ago

    I wasn’t impressed by Ivybridge to ditch my Q9450… so… sticking it out till Haswell. Once that happens, I’ll build a new PC, and likely just grab Windows 8 then. I never really see many people “rushing out” to upgrade their OS when their PC already works perfectly fine and there aren’t many compelling reasons to upgrade… an SSD and a 560ti have kept my system running pretty much everything nice and crisp.

      • travbrad
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]I never really see many people "rushing out" to upgrade their OS when their PC already works perfectly fine [/quote<] A lot of enthusiasts bought Win7 as soon as it was released, but that was because most enthusiasts were still using XP which was really starting to show its age at that point (both the UI and the "under the hood" stuff). By contrast Win7 still feels like a completely modern OS (unless you have a touchscreen), so there's less reason for enthusiasts to upgrade. ..and of course the "mainstream" users never upgrade their OS at all anymore. The only time they ever get a new OS is with a new PC, and a lot of people probably feel like their laptop/desktop is still "good enough".

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        exactly, if newegg was expecting an explosion, i’d say wtf to them.

        • yogibbear
        • 7 years ago

        Yeah I was rolling Vista 64-bit up until ~4 months ago… literally Vista was a superb OS with no reason to upgrade to 7 until I nabbed an SSD a few months ago.

    • chµck
    • 7 years ago

    I haven’t bought windows 8 yet, but I’m probably gonna get it when I get my next computer. It’s not that it’s bad, I just have no need to upgrade, the money, or the time to. Do they take customers like me into account?

      • Airmantharp
      • 7 years ago

      Raw numbers are the best numbers- the interpretation doesn’t make them change. If there’s no reason for you to buy it, then you are a statistic against the OS, regardless of why.

        • brute
        • 7 years ago

        i prefer my numbers medium-rare

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          i’ve been enjoying your posts

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