Small Business Saturday Shortbread

7 Up

  1. X-bit labs: AMD’s Steamroller high-performance core slips

    to 2014, Excavator may face delays and graphics cards makers

    start to roll-out “Tahiti LE” graphics cards

  2. VR-Zone: ARM surges into the PC market and meets Intel in the middle?
  3. Neowin: Nokia’s lead designer talks about the Lumia 920
  4. Engadget: Nexus 4 shown working on Canadian LTE through simple

    carrier menu code (video) and Sharp unveils bright, 90″ LCD for un-

    cannily life-sized signage

  5. ZDNet: Linux Foundation UEFI Secure Boot

    key for Window 8 PCs delays explained

  6. Linux Mint 14 “Nadia” released
  7. Ars Technica on Apple’s iTunes through the ages


Small Business Saturday

  1. VR-Zone: Microsoft developing rival to Project Glass
  2. Dealzon’s deals: $150 coupon for 14″ hp Envy 4 TouchSmart i3-3217U,

    $20 coupon for 14″ hp Sleekbook 14z AMD E1-1200, $200 coupon for

    Alienware Aurora i7-2600 PC, and $209 off Dell Vostro 270s PC with

    monitor

Mobile

  1. Hardware.Info’s Logitech UE Mobile Boombox review

Gaming

  1. Joystiq: Black Ops 2 patched on Xbox 360 and PC
  2. Baldur’s Gate: Enhanced Edition gameplay trailer

Systems, storage, and networking

  1. Phoronix: What Linux users need to know

    when holiday shopping for PC hardware

  2. TweakTown on Intel’s Next Unit of Computing
  3. Ocaholic reviews 8GB Patriot Extreme Masters Viper 3

    Limited Edition DDR3-2133MHz CL11 memory kit

  4. LanOC Reviews on Thecus N5550 NAS with Western Digital Red drives
  5. Legit Reviews on Cisco Linksys EA6500 wireless router

Multimedia, power, and cooling

  1. Benchmark Reviews on RHA CA-200 Black headphones
  2. NikKTech on Das Keyboard Professional Model S keyboard
  3. Hardware Heaven’s Roccat Kone Pure mouse video review
  4. Technic3D reviews 900W Inter-Tech Nitrox Nobility PSU (in German)
  5. KitGuru reviews Corsair H100i and H80i liquid CPU coolers
  6. Guru3D’s Corsair H100i review
  7. HTL’s NZXT Respire T20 & T40 heatsink overview & installation videos
  8. PureOC reviews DeepCool Neptwin CPU

    cooler and EK-FC670 GTX DCII water block

Comments closed
    • albundy
    • 7 years ago

    Went for a bottle of free jameson with the small biz amex deal that gave $25 back on a $25 purchase at any small biz shop.

    • ludi
    • 7 years ago

    I have no idea how Small-Business Saturday came into existence, but I discovered by accident that my favorite coffee roaster was celebrating SBS by running a “Buy $25+, get free drink or half-pound bag of coffee or tea” special. So, I am now a firm supporter.

    • ronch
    • 7 years ago

    From ‘AMD’s Steamroller high-performance core slips to 2014’

    [quote<]AMD Left with Fewer Engineers, but with Higher Number of Projects[/quote<] It was also somewhat implied that Steamroller may slip into 2015. If so, I don't think there's any hope from AMD. AMD just went from 'there's still a small chance of survival' to 'AMD is dead.' I can only hope that ARM makes serious inroads into mainstream computing (read: desktops) and its licensees will find a new battleground which is more level than x86, where Intel has always been doing a stellar job of bullying every other x86 CPU supplier into oblivion as well as the PC OEMs themselves.

      • 0g1
      • 7 years ago

      Yeah, but ARM can’t run x86 apps at more than about 70%. I don’t see how ARM can replace x86.

        • Geistbar
        • 7 years ago

        By convincing people to write software for ARM instead of / as well as for x86?

        • ronch
        • 7 years ago

        That’s where emulation comes in. Hopefully it can be done or at least software developers will port their x86 apps to ARM.

          • Chrispy_
          • 7 years ago

          Well, Intel won’t give up it’s legacy that easily. By the time its x86 market is actually threatened, it will be dropping prices or refocussing on SoC solutions to make intel platforms cost-effective with ARM.

          I think you’d have to be retarded to get into a high position at Intel and not see the threat caused by ARM fulfilling the increasingly-dominant “good enough computing” platform that doesn’t involve the Wintel partnership.

            • ronch
            • 7 years ago

            Ultimately, I think consumers can’t really lose here. Intel can’t just jack prices back up just because AMD is sinking. They have to sell something down the price ladder (good for us) or else ARM will encroach into it more easily (which is also good for us, but I think to a lesser extent due to our dependence on x86). I just hope those aren’t all Pentiums and Celerons though.

    • NeelyCam
    • 7 years ago

    G*ddammit, Finland is turning into the corporate police state:

    [url<]http://www.dailytech.com/article.aspx?newsid=29253[/url<]

      • anotherengineer
      • 7 years ago

      Wow I would be ashamed if I was one of those police officers, however I guess they did not know all of the facts before raiding the house.

      Who cares about terrorists, rapists and murderers, were too busy raiding 9-yr old kids houses cause they don’t know how to use the internet.

    • sweatshopking
    • 7 years ago

    ok…. so…. that enhanced edition baldurs gate trailer looks an AWFUL lot like the original game…. can anyone tell me exactly what’s “enhanced” about it? i loved the series, just wondering what the difference is…

      • KeillRandor
      • 7 years ago

      Maybe they enhanced the pathing?

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        lol, probably

        • faramir
        • 7 years ago

        Hopefully. There are only few things I really hated about first BG and those were horrible pathfinding algorithm, area under Gullykin with endless hordes of respawning Kobolds with fire arrows and that stupid demon thing under the house in Ulgoth’s Beard. Everything else was trivial compared to these, even the big guy at the bottom of Durlag’s Tower.

        BG2 is just soooo much better in this regard.

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      Better DRM.

      • ermo
      • 7 years ago

      As I understand it, the original story is expanded with new characters and quests and basically runs on a heavily bug-fixed and cleaned up BGII engine with support for kits, higher resolution monitors, better MP (including matchmaking) and a lovingly refreshed UI.

      The fact that you thinks it looks an awful lot like the original game tells me that the team has managed to keep the character and flavour of the original game, while improving on its weaker aspects.

      • chuckula
      • 7 years ago

      ENHANCE!
      ENHANCE!
      ENHANCE!
      Just print the damn thing.

      [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KiqkclCJsZs[/url<]

    • l33t-g4m3r
    • 7 years ago

    Linux Foundation UEFI Secure Boot
    key for Window 8 PCs delays explained

    yeah, the explanation is that MS gave you the shaft and you still haven’t realized it.

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      oh, i realized it. I just [i<] loved it [/i<]

      • yogibbear
      • 7 years ago

      The exaplanation is the Linux community seems to think a SurfaceRT is a windows machine, which it ISN’T.

        • l33t-g4m3r
        • 7 years ago

        logic fail. Linux works on arm. The problem is Secure Boot.

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        It isn’t only RT, the problems lies with some manufacturers, *cough* Acer *cough*, are refusing a way of even disabling UEFI and Secureboot on some models of their laptops. Such as with my recent case with Acer on one of their new Aspire laptops where I asked that the option be enabled. The response from their Tier 2 was

        “Mary B: I understand however if the option is not available and if an update does not offer it, then it is not something that will supported for that model.”

        Secureboot is all about vendor lock in and if the company does not want to allow an option of disabling it so that they do not have to deal with non Win 8 customers then MS signing is required.

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      what? he failed to make a correct cabinet file using some open sourced hack, and so his cab wasn’t functioning it’s MS fault? why not just build the cabs on a windows system and then deploy once completed. if he tried using the proper tools he wouldn’t have an issue. I fail to see how this is MS’ problem.

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        Because without an open way of achieving this, it again boils down to vendor lock in. A windows system should not be a dependency to run an other operating system. BTW, the cab file is correct, it’s that MS’s system rejects it.

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          says who? its his word vs theirs

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            Says the MS cabinet format specification that lcab follows to a t.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            did you see it? it seems strange to me that their own system wouldn’t read their OWN format.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            It’s not surprising at all since MS doesn’t always release their full specification or changes to the public. Hell MS sits on the organization and determines ISO programming standards and most of the time they are out of compliance on their own development products.

            • l33t-g4m3r
            • 7 years ago

            I think you’ve had enough kool-aid for one day.

      • LaChupacabra
      • 7 years ago

      UEFI was developed by Intel, not Microsoft. And it does not affect ARM systems.

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        You do know there are ARM setups using uEFI right? Some of the earliest uEFI work was done on intels xScale ARM line.

        uEFI is not limited to x86.

        [url<]http://wiki.osdev.org/UEFI[/url<] In fact Windows RT devices use it as well. [url<]http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_RT#section_1[/url<] [quote<]Windows RT incorporates changes to the Windows codebase to provide optimizations for ARM-based devices and their internal hardware. UEFI is used in Windows RT devices, and also contain a software-based Trusted Platform Module to allow for device encryption and the implementation of secure boot to protect the boot process from malware; unlike Windows 8 devices, Windows RT devices must have secure boot permanently enabled.[/quote<]

    • sschaem
    • 7 years ago

    “ARM is directly tackling the needs of power-hungry PC users”

    My i7-3770k is to slow, I need more POWER… ARM to the rescue !!!

    “Samsung/Google’s $250 Chromebook, who can overlook the ridiculously attractive price tag of a Chromebook”

    When you can get a netbook with 5 time the storage, twice the ram, 2x faster CPu ,8x faster GPU for 20$ extra ?? and a true 64bit OS (windows7) $250 sound like a ripoff.

    But what do you expect from VR-Zone…

      • nanoflower
      • 7 years ago

      I didn’t know that about the notebooks (don’t keep up on their prices) but I did notice the article read a bit like VR-Zone was acting as a cheerleader for ARM. I have no idea that ARM would love for them to take 10% or more of the market but I’m not so sure that will happen. AMD, even though hurting, still wants a share of that low end marketplace and Intel appears to be seriously going after it next year with Haswell.

        • LocalCitizen
        • 7 years ago

        depends on what you define as the market (ie, if include pads and smarty pants phones)
        [url<]https://twitter.com/levie/status/270392171700555776/photo/1[/url<]

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]and a true 64bit OS (windows7)[/quote<] Even with windows 7, Windows offers a hybrid 64-bit (plenty of 32-bit action going on in it, and no I'm not talking about 3rd party programs). For a [i<] true [/i<] 64-bit OS you have to look towards the *nix world.

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        APPLE IS MORE 64 BIT SO IT’S BETTER!!!!

          • Deanjo
          • 7 years ago

          No OS X is not any better in that regard. I’m talking the likes of a true 64-bit linux or bsd installation.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            OS X seems to be pretty well there, too, with its 64-bit-only kernel and lack of support for 32-bit kernel extensions (drivers). The Core Duo Intel stuff all got left behind with Lion, and Mountain Lion is even more selective. Anything that does’t have 100% 64-bit drivers available is no longer supported.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            I’m not talking about just kexts. In that regard Windows is the same as you cannot run a 32-bit driver with their 64-bit kernel. OS X is still heavily saturated with 32-bit even in 10.8 in many of it’s utilities and supporting libraries (done so for backwards compatibility reasons with older software and why carbon based apps still work). In linux and BSD you can run a true pure 64-bit environment as even the applications have been ported to 64-bit.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            Oh, right, Carbon didn’t go 64-bit. I stand corrected.

            Still, like Windows, I don’t think you can say that OS X “isn’t 64-bit”. It’s 64-bit for what’s native and there are 32-bit things hanging around for compatibility reasons. And I think that’s just fine.

    • Arclight
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]I.Hardware.Info's Logitech UE Mobile Boombox review[/quote<] [quote="The Lonely Island"<]The big apple, where people never dance Spirits go down while profits expand The cops or the dealers, who's got the juice The street benders peddling their boiled goose So many types of people will never get along Till I bust out my boombox and play this song [Julian Casablancas] The music washed away all the hate And society started advancing Every demographic was represented It was a rainbow coalition of dancing Whoa! Everyone was wearing fingerless gloves Whoaaaaaoaaaaaoh! I saw a spanish guy doing the Bartman [/quote<]

      • ludi
      • 7 years ago

      mispost

    • yogibbear
    • 7 years ago

    Hurry up and let me play Farcry 3! Can’t remember when I was sooo not interested in a game that had THIS [i<]amount of[/i<] good scoring embargo [[i<]publisher enforced early NDA lifted[/i<]] reviews... either they have paid everyone off, or it really is amazing and they know it. EDIT: Italicized updates for clarity.

      • sunner
      • 7 years ago

      “that had THIS good scoring embargo reviews..”

      Will someone please translate that bunch of words into understandable English? Thanks.

      Question for the Board here…. what in hell is happening to the English language?
      You Brits over there on the other side of the pond….. is English going down the tubes there, as well?

        • yogibbear
        • 7 years ago

        i.e. there are 23 reviews on metacritic and the game isn’t even out yet. But they somehow got review copies out and had a NDA that expired more than a week before the actual release. Most games don’t follow this model… presumably because they are scared of bad reviews scaring people off.

          • sunner
          • 7 years ago

          Yogi, my apologies for being rude, and Thanks for your gentlemanly reply.

          • Farting Bob
          • 7 years ago

          If you know your game kicks ass and isnt hyped a lot (FC2 was kinda meh, not many were really excited for FC3) letting everyone talk about how much it kicks ass early will be great for business. If your game is simply alright or bad (Warfighter a recent example) or overhyped (Spore being the Patron Saint of this) then it can hurt your game as everyone will ignore it once it comes out.

          Takes a lot of faith in your game to let people review it a week before its available.

      • spuppy
      • 7 years ago

      “THIS amount of good scoring embargo [publisher enforced early NDA lifted]”

      wat?

      All the reviews are out now

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