Touchscreen rumored for new, Google-designed Chromebook

Google is well-known for partnering with device makers to build Nexus-branded smartphones and tablets. It works with some of the same companies to produce Chromebooks. However, Google may be handling the hardware development for the next Chromebook on its own. A report from China Times claims that Google has contracted Taiwanese manufacturing giant Compal to build the system. Compal manufactures notebooks for numerous brands, and Google is reportedly contracting the firm directly.

Given how successfully Apple has combined hardware and software development, we shouldn’t be surprised if Google pursues a similar strategy. Even Microsoft is designing its own system hardware these days. Of course, Redmond’s decision to produce Surface tablets has angered some of its hardware partners. Google could also face backlash if existing Chromebook makers like Acer and Samsung feel like they’re being squeezed out. Those companies make an awful lot of Android-based devices, and I’m sure Google wants them on its side.

If there is a Google-designed Chromebook in the works, perhaps it’s more of an experimental product than a harbinger of a broader shift in strategy. The system will purportedly include a touchscreen, which doesn’t strike me as the sort of feature that a Chromebook really needs. Google has long tried to keep its Android and Chrome operating systems separate, but touchscreen input would seem to blur the line between the two. Perhaps the growing number of convertible tablets fueled by Windows 8 has made Google reconsider the relationship between Chromebooks and Android-based tablets. Thanks to TechCrunch for the tip.

Comments closed
    • Deanjo
    • 10 years ago

    There is quite a bit that full linux distro can do that Android doesn’t.

    • Chrispy_
    • 10 years ago

    Chrome OS? Least popular, least compatible, and least useful OS available at the moment?
    What was that, 0.09% marketshare? Something about a dead end?

    No thank you.

    • sweatshopking
    • 10 years ago

    why? it does like nothing android can’t do.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 10 years ago

    Yeah but it’s not native I believe. Isn’t there some sort of emulation layer it needs to run through? (I’m not just talking about the JIT Java stuff)

    • Rand
    • 10 years ago

    Android already runs on x86, there aren’t many such devices out there though.

    • windwalker
    • 10 years ago

    And Microsoft has trademarked the word “windows” and that was several decades ago.
    Surprisingly, the sky hasn’t fallen and neither has Microsoft sued the dictionary.

    But idiots are still everywhere though.

    • moose17145
    • 10 years ago

    [url<]http://tsdr.uspto.gov/#caseNumber=85056807&caseType=SERIAL_NO&searchType=statusSearch[/url<] in later news it is no longer possible to use the word 'Retina" without Apple suing the pants off you... Yes Apple has officially trademarked the word "retina"

    • bthylafh
    • 10 years ago

    What’s the point of that? Stick Android on a 10″ or 12″ screen and lock it down to running Chrome in full-screen. Done.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 10 years ago

    Agreed. It made sense to keep Chrome around at the same time as early Android, but it hasn’t got a big differentiation any more. What Google should do is port Android to x86 🙂 People want real competition? Let’s make everything that can be OS and hardware agnostic. Windows, Linux, or Android on x86 or ARM….fight!

    • Deanjo
    • 10 years ago

    I say the opposite, put Android to bed and use ChromeOS which at least can be used as a linux distro as well.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 10 years ago

    Even in your exception, Chrome on Android is “good enough” for a public kiosk. Let’s just put ChromeOS to bed.

    • Malphas
    • 10 years ago

    Now all the need to do is put Android on it instead and forget about Chrome OS forever, except maybe for selling to the business sector for public kiosks and such.

    • BiffStroganoffsky
    • 10 years ago

    Not sure it is as big a thorn for Google as it doesn’t make a stipend off of the devices that run Android whereas Apple and MS does. The alternative revenue stream seems to not be affected by what OS the devices run. Plus, Apple has shown us that it is not that easy to simply cut the chord between the end user and Google’s many services.

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