Corsair brings modular cables to budget CX Series PSUs

Corsair has expanded its line of CX Series budget PSUs to include new models with modular cables. Denoted by a trailing M in their model numbers, the units are available with 430-750W of output power. The specifications appear to match those of the existing, tentacled CX models. Each unit has a single 12V rail, 80 Plus Bronze certification, and a three-year warranty.

According to the press release, the 430, 500, 600, and 750W variants will sell for $60, $80, $85, and $100, respectively. The PSUs don’t seem to be available online just yet, but Corsair’s pricing looks reasonably competitive with that of modular units from other big-name vendors. The CX Series appears to offer modular cables at lower wattages than most PSUs, as well.

Modular PSU cables make it much easier to wire a new build, so it’s nice to see the feature trickling down further into budget territory. The new additions to the CX family appear to be pushing out the existing, non-modular units. Newegg has discounted the older models by 8-15%, and that’s before mail-in rebates of $10-20. If you’re going to be using most of the cables anyway, the original CX units look like decent deals right now.

Comments closed
    • derFunkenstein
    • 10 years ago

    Country Western Television!

    • Zarf
    • 10 years ago

    It allows you to get rid of extra cables. In my build, I’m only using two out of the three available SATA power cables, and only one of the two available Molex power cables. There are spots for two 12-volt rails for GPUs, but I’m only using one. The spare cables are not in my computer at all – they don’t add to the clutter, and they make it a LOT easier to do effective cable management.

    For people who are concerned about the aesthetics of the interior of their custom built machine (I know, it sounds petty, but it’s the only nice thing I own, so I want to keep it looking nice), they are essential. It’s also really nice for people who do lots of upgrades and part exchanges, since those cables don’t get in the way of their swapping out the motherboard or a drive.

    EDIT: Yeah, what Just Brew It said. 😀

    • just brew it!
    • 10 years ago

    It reduces cable clutter inside the case, which makes it easier to add/remove components and improves airflow.

    • willmore
    • 10 years ago

    Can you explain why? I’ve never oned one and, every time I see them in a store, I don’t see why I would want one.

    Edited to say: Thanks for the explanations!

    • just brew it!
    • 10 years ago

    Well, like I said most of the power is being taken from the +12V rail anyway. So even if the +3.3V and/or +5V rails are less efficient than the +12V rail, they’re a small enough percentage of the total power that it isn’t a big deal.

    • insulin_junkie72
    • 10 years ago

    The Rosewills go on sale extremely often, so I suspect the out-the-door price will be a wash. However, the Corsairs are almost always offered with rebate, so they’ll still have a price advantage if those don’t scare you.

    SuperFlower’s platform > CWT DSA II, though.

    • ashleyw2934x
    • 10 years ago
    • Chrispy_
    • 10 years ago

    Maybe it does, but they use that design for Platinum-certified so it can’t be that bad 😉

    • just brew it!
    • 10 years ago

    I bet it hurts efficiency a bit though, since you’re double-converting for the lower voltage rails. Probably not a big deal, given that modern systems draw most of their power from the +12V rail anyway.

    • Jambe
    • 10 years ago

    Nice. I figure modular cables will trickle down to most budget lines eventually….

    Who manufacturers these? This made me think of Rosewill’s Gold-rated modular Capstone-M line (450, 550, 650, etc) which are excellent Super Flower units. They’re $10 more per tier than the new CX line.

    • Chrispy_
    • 10 years ago

    Usually a whole extra vertical circuit board with extra mounting points requiring a more complex internal structure. Seasonic has a better approach which is to carry just one voltage line (12V) up to the modular daughterboard and then just convert the 5V and 3.3V there and there only (reduces component and wire count quite significantly).

    • just brew it!
    • 10 years ago

    [quote<]Aside from the connectors on the PSU there is the additional PCB inside the PSU and additional manufacturing costs for wiring etc. But I think a large part of it is economy of scale. The less niche modular PSUs become, the less the additional cost.[/quote<] Yes, if/when they become more mainstream costs ought to come down. I wonder, though... a few years ago Ultra introduced a line of affordable modular PSUs, but these disappeared from the market after a year or so. Either demand was just not there, or other issues caused the product to flop (not out of the question with Ultra, some of their products are pretty good while others are crap-tastic). [quote<]I read something about Seasonic saying that getting high efficiency with modular was harder too, that seems to be solved, so I suspect as more PSUs become modular the price difference should decrease and eventually all but the cheapest or true OEM PSUs may be modular.[/quote<] Well, additional connectors add resistance to the wiring, which in turn hurts efficiency and makes the voltage regulation less precise. It's not like the CX series is all that efficient either (only Bronze certified), so I'm not sure how "solved" it really is. That said, I'll probably give one of these a try the next time I'm buying a PSU.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 10 years ago

    GUYZ! I think it’s CWT aka Channel Well Tech. AMIRITE?

    • MadManOriginal
    • 10 years ago

    Aside from the connectors on the PSU there is the additional PCB inside the PSU and additional manufacturing costs for wiring etc. But I think a large part of it is economy of scale. The less niche modular PSUs become, the less the additional cost. I read something about Seasonic saying that getting high efficiency with modular was harder too, that seems to be solved, so I suspect as more PSUs become modular the price difference should decrease and eventually all but the cheapest or true OEM PSUs may be modular.

    • chµck
    • 10 years ago

    I just looked on digikey and they’re like $0.08/each when you buy 2,500. That’s the cheapest too.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 10 years ago

    Your link, she is broken. I wind up at the root of the “computer hardware” category at Newegg. Boo!

    • DPete27
    • 10 years ago

    The CX430 fan is a little louder than some of the “nicer” models I’ve worked with, but it’s not bad at all. [url=http://www.anandtech.com/show/6013/350450w-roundup-11-cheap-psus/2<]Anandtech liked it.[/url<] And you can almost always get them for $20 after MIR.

    • PenGun
    • 10 years ago

    Just buy the appropriate Seasonic. Why fool around?

    • DPete27
    • 10 years ago

    Just two more connections to be made for each connector. (one for each side of the connection that is made at the back of the PSU)

    • flip-mode
    • 10 years ago

    This is good. CX 430 looks like it should be my new “go to” PSU for future builds for the office.

    Good job, Corsair.

    • flip-mode
    • 10 years ago

    Nice.

    • just brew it!
    • 10 years ago

    On the one hand, this is a nice feature. On the other hand, I suspect they’re mainly looking for a way to boost their profit margins, since the price differential versus the original CX series appears to be a fair bit more than the cost of a few extra connectors.

    The prices still look pretty reasonable though, provided the quality remains high.

    • nico1982
    • 10 years ago

    Channel Well Tech according to hardwaresecrets, except the older CX400W which was produced by Seasonic.

    • PixelArmy
    • 10 years ago

    CWT (though not off the top of my head)

    • Stickem
    • 10 years ago

    According to jonnyGuru the CX430v2 oem is Channel Well. (and it gets a 9 rating!)

    • Walkintarget
    • 10 years ago

    Those CX430s are perpetual MIR sellers at Newegg. I think I must have bought 3 at least for basic budget builds. For about $20 AR, they performed quite well.

    • esc_in_ks
    • 10 years ago

    I’ve always wondered why modular power supplies are so much more expensive than non-modular. I know the connectors aren’t free, but I can’t imagine they’re that expensive in the quantities purchased. My assumption has been that modular/non-modular is a way to provide product differentiation and to make people like me (who love modular power supplies) pay more.

    Is there anything technical going on that makes them more expensive?

    • Goty
    • 10 years ago

    Does anyone remember off the top of their heads who the CX-series OEM is?

    • Zarf
    • 10 years ago

    This is excellent news! Modular power supplies are fantastic, and now I can put decent quality ones in my budget builds.

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