Any recs for good Windows backup software?

So… I have, until my recent upgrade to Windows 8, been using Acronis TrueImage 2012 for my system backups. Then Acronis decided that you’d have to buy TrueImage 2013 in order to get Windows 8 support.

I think that’s bogus, from a product I bought earlier this year.

Shortly after that, TrueImage committed the ultimate sin: a couple of the full-system images that I’d created with TrueImage, of Win7-based GPU test rigs, failed to restore. The program would verify the images were correct and free of errors, but TrueImage refused to restore them onto the very same SSDs from which they were created. Some googling around confirmed that this problem is fairly widespread and extends to TrueImage 2013, as well.

Yeah, I’m done with Acronis.

My backup needs include full-disk imaging and file-based incremental backups. I’ve used the built-in Windows backup tool for that in the past, so even though Microsoft has hidden it in Windows 8, I figured I’d give that a shot. Several weeks have passed. I’ve run several massive, day-long backup attempts to a USB 3.0 external drive, and all have ended in "backup could not be completed" errors. Separately, I ran a similar backup from my wife’s PC over the network, and it failed with the same sort of error. More googling unearthed way, way too many threads started by people who had the same sort of problems, who tried everything the MS "experts" recommended, and who still couldn’t get the backup to finish.

Not worth it, I figured.

So I looked up the latest version of Norton Ghost, and the reviews on Amazon for it are brutal. TrueImage’s restore problems appear to have crept into Ghost, as well, along with various other quirks in too great a measure.

So here I am, asking you all: what do you recommend for Windows imaging and backup software?

The ideal candidate will include full-disk imaging from Windows and/or a bootable USB stick, full awareness of SSDs and TRIM, file backups with incremental updates that run on a schedule, and actual bulletproof operation during backup and restore. Happy to hear your thoughts!

Comments closed
    • adambuck14
    • 7 years ago

    why not just use some cloud based backup like this: [url<]http://bit.ly/12GukE6[/url<] Maybe I'm missing something but it works for me perfectly! All the best.

    • Vasco
    • 7 years ago

    Take a look at Argentum Backup at:

    [url<]http://www.argentuma.com/backup/[/url<] Very easy to use, as well as very fast. I found it very helpful on my Windows computers and notebook. I'm not sure if it supports full disk image backups, but it works great for selective file and folder backups! The best way is to have disk imaging (bigger) tool and file backup (smaller) tool work in couple.

    • HunterZ
    • 7 years ago

    I use (and highly recommend) CrashPlan for incremental backups to my 2TB Caviar Green HDD from all Windows, Mac and Linux computers in my LAN (plus my mom’s laptop over the internet!). It’s free for backing up to your own machines, and/or you can pay for cloud storage.

    I’ve used CloneZilla for full-disk backups. I was able to successfully back up my laptop over my LAN to my 2TB HDD before sending it in for one last warranty service, then later restore Windows XP after the service techs wiped the HDD and installed Vista on it.

    CloneZilla has some pros and cons:

    Pros:
    – Free (Linux-based).
    – Makes compressed images of drives and/or partitions of most any type.
    – Can stream backups/restores over a network.

    Cons:
    – Have to run it from a boot disc.
    – Backups are in a special format that does not allow extraction of individual files.

    • frumper15
    • 7 years ago

    Another vote for WHS for your general storage and backup needs. You can backup all the client computers to the WHS, you can backup the WHS to an external drive for both the OS images as well as data. You can elect to duplicate data on multiple drives as required, and with WHS 2011 NOT having drive extender making things a bit complicated, you can use Crashplan to back up entire folders to the cloud, a remote family member/friend or another computer/drive on your network. I tried a bunch of different solutions before I finally settled on this (mozy, filesync, etc) and this has simply been flawless and completely automated. If you haven’t tried WHS, you owe yourself the opportunity to give it a spin. It makes for a great backup solution, but with some decent hardware driving it you can also have a nice media server and Remote Desktop web gateway as well as searchable remote file access.

    I can’t say enough good about crashplan – even if you don’t subscribe for the cloud backup functionality it gives you additional control over backup sets. I ran the free version in my own little “cloud” for almost a year before taking the plunge. For the 4 year 10 computer family plan I feel like it was money well spent. Maybe the TR editors could set up their own little 3-way “cloud” to have multiple location backup between each other for no cost.

    • Glycerin
    • 7 years ago

    I recently started using Macrium Reflect Free. Done several backups and restores, and it works great. The bootable CD/USB key option works well. Although I am using mechanical hard drives only.

    • Coldfirex
    • 7 years ago

    ShadowProtect is perfect.

    • Rza79
    • 7 years ago

    At work I’ve done over one thousand backups and restores with Acronis 2009 to 2013 combined. In my experience if a backup or restore fails with Acronis, the culprit is in 99% of the cases the hardware. That’s why I’m advising you not to be so certain about your setup. Even a bad sata cable can cause data corruption. Acronis (specially the boot-cd) is very sensitive to data corruption which makes it a good test in a way. What are you using for these failed restores? Windows or boot-cd?
    That aside, I also use Macrium Reflect extensively. Great product, has a free edition and even has a boot-cd option (even though you can’t take backups with it, just restore and the Linux version kind of sucks. Luckily there’s a WinPe option). But the Pro edition can do what you want.
    I also use Keriver 1-Click Restore. Great about this product is that it can create a boot menu for your computer. Makes it even easier to backup and restore before Windows starts. Version 4.0 with Win8 support is supposedly almost ready.

    • pogsnet
    • 7 years ago
      • wiak
      • 7 years ago

      O&O has some humor, with their images being .OMG 😀

        • BIF
        • 7 years ago

        LOL

          • wiak
          • 7 years ago

          they should use .lol next time 😀

    • wizpig64
    • 7 years ago

    I’ve got a FreeNAS RAID server that I store all my media on (Movies, Family Photos), and have that run incremental backups offsite to a similar machine at work. For my home desktop, most everything else I need is game saves, and for that I use Game Save Manager: [url<]http://www.gamesave-manager.com/[/url<] which I use to dump periodically to the aforementioned server. If anything is worth backing up, it's probably in google docs or dropbox, or stored on that NAS. I do most of my actual work on my (slowly dying) 2008 MacBook Pro, so luckily I have a back up tool built in to my OS: Time Machine. FreeNAS can host AFP shares that pose as Time Capsules, so that takes care of that. Since I have spare drives though, I also have Carbon Copy Cloner run every day and copy my Mac's boot drive to an external USB drive. This is really only for the rare but alarming case where my normal drive dies altogether, where I can then boot to that drive over USB and just keep working with less than a day's worth of work lost. (and most of that work is on Time Machine anyways, you just can't boot from time machine).

    • tootercomputer
    • 7 years ago

    I have Window 8 Professional 64-bit installed on an old laptop, on a Mushkin 128-G SSD. I pulled out the Mushkin and placed it in a Thermaltake BlackX external storage unit that I then plugged into an eSata port on my home office computer that runs Win7 64-bit. I made a full image of the Mushkin Win 8 drive onto a storage drive on my home office computer using Acronis True Image 2012. The image was created without issue.

    • wiak
    • 7 years ago

    what about O&O DiskImage?
    [url<]http://www.oo-software.com/en/products/oodiskimage[/url<] havent used it my self, but acronis is soo slow to fix problems like a sector error on a external wd my book 3.0 i have, nothing else gives me this error, not even WD dignostics.. so am gonna try it, seems to doo what acronis does like full image and file based backup

    • anotherengineer
    • 7 years ago

    What about hardware?

    Like my Synology 712+?

    Love the 100 MiB/s transfer speeds over the network 🙂

    • mark84
    • 7 years ago

    Not sure if this is of any help.
    [url<]http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2012/12/using-windows-8s-hidden-backup-to-clone-and-recover-your-whole-pc/[/url<]

    • pedro
    • 7 years ago

    I put everything in the cloud, baby!

    • Bensam123
    • 7 years ago

    I know this isn’t helpful, but I use and recommend Acronis. Have you tried earlier versions? I use 2010 (still) and it works fine in w7.

      • tootercomputer
      • 7 years ago

      Same for me on one of my systems, 201o works perfectly. It should, as Win7 came out in late 2009.

    • sjl
    • 7 years ago

    You could try having a look at Amanda – a quick check suggests that it should go a fair way towards meeting your requirements. Note: although I do work professionally in the backup/recovery field, my expertise is geared towards “enterprise” level packages – specifically, I know Avamar and TSM, and can probably find my way around Networker if I have to. These are going to be waaaay more expensive than can be justified for home use, though; the words “massive overkill” spring to mind. Hence, this is more a suggestion of the type of “I’ve heard of it, it might be useful for you” rather than a strong recommendation.

    Good luck!

    • Krogoth
    • 7 years ago

    My thoughts on backing up data.

    The first thing to consider before backing up your data is to prioritize what is “mission critical” versus what is “inconvenient to lose”. Once you figure out what is “mission critical” versus “inconvenient to lose” you can adapt your back-up strategies accordingly. Typically, I find that games, pr0n collections, digital copies of videos and other stuff (gray-area material) fall into the realm of “inconvenient to lose” versus important documentation, family related stuff, personal settings and save states which clearly falls into the realm of “mission critical”. The mission critical stuff for the vast majority of non-professional users shouldn’t be any larger than 100GiB.

    The mission critical data should be back-up frequently (daily basis, incremental is okay, full is ideal) with several copies (ideally on different systems if possible different locations). “inconvenient to lose” data doesn’t require nearly as much attention, you probably can get away with monthly, quarterly or even semi-annual incremental back-ups depending on the size, how often you obtain new data etc. You probably just need a single back-up on the same or on a separate system.

    The second most important thing about backing-up data is to make sure that data integrity doesn’t get compromised by errors. Always use hash sum checks. The last thing you need is you have your back-up data being corrupted when you are trying to do a recovery.

    I like to do the entire process manually (compress data into RAR files and copy and paste it to another system while doing MD5 hash checks). So I don’t have any recommendations for backup software solutions.

    • tootercomputer
    • 7 years ago

    I’ve had a weird backup strategy for years, but it works. Lately, I’ve used Acronis, previously used Partition Magic. I use three different methods

    1. For years I’ve had a dedicated clone backup drive. Periodically, I simply made a clone of my current OS drive, so that if I ever experience an OS hdd crash, I could be immediately up and running. The cloned drive does not have to be the same size or make, but must at least be as big as the drive you are cloning.

    2. Any important files I create I always backup on a separate storage drive at the end of that particular work session.

    3. Then I also make regular full disk images. I do not make incremental backups. The full image backups I do every few weeks. I have had to restore these a few times and there have been no problems, again, using Acronis the past few years. I’ve restored Vista drives and Win 7 drives.

    About a year ago, the IT guys at the university where I work told us that our particular network drive had crashed, but no problem because we were backed up. Then they told us that there was a problem with the backups, and it turned out that their “automatic” backups had not been so automatic, and in fact there had not been a backup for two months. We lost reports, scheduled client visits, billing info, all sorts of stuff. It was a real mess, and lots of time went into fixing it. The point is that the best software is fallible as is the human being running it.

    • RhysAndrews
    • 7 years ago

    FBackup – it’s free and fantastic. I’ve tried everything and this is the only one that works well for me.
    It’s simple & lightweight. I don’t do full image backups but I’m pretty sure it can. It will backup over network or external drive no problem. It uses Windows’ scheduled tasks to schedule the backups, and can wake and sleep for a scheduled backup.

    • thorz
    • 7 years ago

    Storagecraft Shadow Protect.

    Have been using it for more than 5 years. Never experienced a problem taking daily incremental images of all my hard disks on my system. They are Windows 8 compatible and is the speediest of all the imaging software I have used.

    I have been in the Acronis, Ghost, WinImage camps and nothing compares with the reliability, versatility and speed this software offers.

    Check it out for yourself:

    [url<]http://www.shadowprotect.com/backup-software/shadowprotect-desktop[/url<] In addition something I really like from them is that they are not into the yearly versioning model. I have only upgraded 2 times in the last 5 years, instead of the crazy 201x stuff that you have to endure with the Nortons, Acronis, etc. The product is tailored to the enterprise but the home edition (Desktop) has everything that is offered in the enterprise version, minus some server options that you most probably don't need. Give a shot to the trial version, you won't regret it.

      • rgreen83
      • 7 years ago

      I also have to give my highest recommendation to Shadow Protect. We use it everyday in the field for servers and workstations and it has never let us down. Its not the prettiest and it certainly isnt cheap, but it is the best. I would use it at home if I could afford it!

      The best feature IMHO and one we use every single day is the HIR (Hardware Independent Restore). Acronis and many others have similar abilities now but I know Shadow Protect has been doing it longer and they do it better in my experience. Ive never had a restore fail from P2P, P2V, or V2V.

      Its also very flexible because they keep up with the latest WinPE versions, 4.0 currently, while many are still on old BartPE based on XP era 1.5.

    • willg
    • 7 years ago

    ImageX for your OS + Apps
    Cloud based sync for your data

      • wiak
      • 7 years ago

      cloudberry online backup is great for cloud backup, dude
      [url<]http://www.cloudberrylab.com/amazon-s3-microsoft-azure-google-storage-online-backup.aspx[/url<]

    • BIF
    • 7 years ago

    Wow! What a timely topic, Scott. I’ll be shortly building a new rig and I haven’t yet decided on a backup/recovery tool. I will be reading these comments with great interest; thank you all for contributing.

    • mcnabney
    • 7 years ago

    Windows Home Server.

    Idiot proof. Will backup ten of your computers automatically.

    Need an old file? Find the date and extract the specific file you need.
    Screwed something up? Choose a date that everything was fine, wipe/restore to the system on that date.

    Oh, and it makes a great file server and remote access point.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      WHS was one of the greatest products MS made but never marketed well. It’s too bad they’ve seemingly abandoned further development, even if support is available for a long time. Storage Spaces is no Drive Extender (I used WHS v1 and never considered WHS 2011 because of the lack of Drive Extender.)

        • ChronoReverse
        • 7 years ago

        It’s like the fate of Great Microsoft Products to end up like that. OneNote is amazing but not many people know of it and what it can do.

          • MadManOriginal
          • 7 years ago

          The sad thing is that unlike many of their products that fade away because the idea is just too far ahead of the implementation, WHS’s timing was *perfect*…the growth of SoHo NASes proves it, and the inexpensive x86 hardware to support it was there.

    • mutarasector
    • 7 years ago

    Scott, have you looked into EASEUS ToDo Backup (v5)? I haven’t used it on Win 8 yet myself, although I understand version 5 does support Win 8:

    [url<]http://betanews.com/2012/08/15/easeus-todo-backup-5-free-supports-windows-8/[/url<] [url<]http://www.todo-backup.com/products/home/free-backup-software-features.htm[/url<]

    • setbit
    • 7 years ago

    Beyond Compare (http://www.scootersoftware.com) is not designed as a backup solution, but I have found it very useful as part of my backup regimen.

    It’s biggest advantage is that it can [i<]intelligently[/i<] compare, synchronize, and merge directory trees, with custom handling of different file types. I haven't found anything anywhere nearly as good at that task. It's partially cross-platform (Windows and several common Linux distros), and is scriptable. I have various preconfigured sessions that I run manually from time to time, but one could set up a Linux cron job or Windows scheduled task to automatically run a scripted sync.

    • [SDG]Mantis
    • 7 years ago

    I use FreeFileSync for file/folder backups and have been using the Windows 7 image utility which is still present, if buried, in Windows 8 for images. You can find the former on SourceForge and the latter under Control Panel\All Control Panel Items\Windows 7 File Recovery

    • crystall
    • 7 years ago

    I’ve used and recommended Create Synchronicity for backing up the contents of user folders mostly because it’s simple, incremental, fast and free. However I tend to backup my own Windows partitions under Linux by using ntfsclone. It’s probably a little heavyweight but it’s the only way I know to preserve everything that comes with a Windows installation, including the registry, files scattered in weird or hidden directories, the boot loader and all the other non-standard stuff that a Windows installation usually carries and which is not easily captured by a backup tool.

      • Prototyped
      • 7 years ago

      ntfsclone at least a few years ago was painfully slow, to the point of being unusable (as in, small fraction of a megabyte per second slow), when backing up to NTFS.

      [url<]https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/linux-ntfs/+bug/538669[/url<]

    • gamoniac
    • 7 years ago

    I haven’t tried out Windows 2012’s backup service yet, but I currently use Win2008R2 as my file server and its backup service to back up nightly in increment. It works beautifully. You can also set your PCs to back up their images to a share folder on the file server, although I have not tried that. I will check that out and update this post.. Or perhaps somone has already done that?

    • Xenolith
    • 7 years ago

    I am using a WD mybook live for home network storage. Occasionally mirror that to my Drobo. I have another external drive that I mirror to, that I keep off site.

    • Prototyped
    • 7 years ago

    I’ve been using FreeFileSync ([url<]http://freefilesync.sourceforge.net/[/url<]) for my file-for-file backups. It needs a bit of configuration, and isn't as scriptable as I wish it was, but it has a few features I consider a must: * Keeps older versions of files (if so configured). * Detects and correctly handles file moves and renames. * Makes use of the Volume Shadow Copy Service to back up files that are locked by the OS. * Doesn't get stuck in an infinite loop, thwarted by reparse points or junctions or symbolic links placed by Windows (I'm looking at you, robocopy). It isn't hugely polished, but it does the job better than any other tool I've used. I tend not to bother with system images. If I did, I'd probably end up using something like Macrium Reflect.

    • Prospero424
    • 7 years ago

    I have a related dilemma:

    I recently put together a 4-bay RAID enclosure for use as a backup for my media. I’m looking for Windows software that does scheduled incremental backups of specified folders, but stores them in the clear. That is, I want to have the ability to shut down the RAID enclosure, take it to a friend’s or family member’s house, plug it in and they can immediately see and copy data to and from it rather than having to restore it from a container and/or fire up a third-party program first that they may or may not have.

    Any suggestions? Will Arec Backup do this? Thanks!

      • Prototyped
      • 7 years ago

      FreeFileSync ([url<]http://freefilesync.sourceforge.net/[/url<]) will do incremental file-for-file backups in the clear to a folder of your choice. It doesn't however build in scheduling capability -- but it's pretty easy to use the Windows built-in Task Scheduler to schedule backup jobs ([url<]http://www.trustyetc.com/trustyblog/2012/10/07/automatic-backup-with-freefilesync/[/url<]).

        • Prospero424
        • 7 years ago

        Thanks! FreeFileSync looks like that’s going to do the trick. Only thing left to do is test the scheduled task.

      • satchmobob
      • 7 years ago

      Give this a try: [url<]http://www.2brightsparks.com/syncback/[/url<] The free version may be enough for you needs.

      • sonofsanta
      • 7 years ago

      Write a batch file to robocopy the relevant files over? Built in, robust, multithreaded (with /MT) and just… copies your files.

    • Dirge
    • 7 years ago

    Damage if you can find some bullet proof software for incremental backups please let us know.

    It seems as though most people are posting about full disc imaging. I am having a hell of a time finding good software to make file backups with incremental updates that run on a schedule.

    I make things hard for myself as I would ideally like it to be compatible with Linux/Windows

      • Prototyped
      • 7 years ago

      For Linux at least, I’ve used storeBackup ([url<]http://storebackup.org/[/url<]) in the past (back when I actually used Linux on physical computers). It uses hard links to produce timed backup sets with unchanged files hardlinked into place. It'll also compress files as it backs them up. It also deals very elegantly with renamed or moved files (it checksums them before compression and stores the checksums; when backing up another set, if a file isn't found by its name in the previous backup set, it'll look up its checksum and size, and if this corresponds to another file, it'll hardlink to that). Combined with LVM ([url<]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logical_Volume_Manager_(Linux)[/url<]) snapshotting and cron, one can set up scheduled backups, producing internally consistent, versioned backup sets. I haven't had great luck with storeBackup on Cygwin as one might expect. I've had backup sets terminate for random reasons, so I had to give up storeBackup when I switched to using Windows on my computers for good. If I get the free time, I might write an equivalent someday (potentially not using MD5 though -- that bit went pretty slowly -- maybe a Rabin Fingerprint -- [url]http://www.infineta.com/blog/rabin-algorithm-–-mother-deduplication-technologies[/url] -- instead).

    • Goofus Maximus
    • 7 years ago

    Isn’t there a disk imaging backup utility already (albiet hidden away) built into Windows 8?

    Ah! Here’s where I read about it, on Ars Technica:
    [url<]http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2012/12/using-windows-8s-hidden-backup-to-clone-and-recover-your-whole-pc/[/url<]

    • dmjifn
    • 7 years ago

    I know your question is “what do you recommend” not “blast me with some random crap I’m clearly not interested in” but I’m going to do the latter anyway. 🙂

    I started off with Acronis a few years ago and was really happy with it. Mounting your system image as a virtual disk and pulling down lost files is AWESOME. But I also started having restore trouble, and having to babysit it. I looked at some others, like Paragon and Clonezilla. They seemed just OK.

    Ultimately, I just quit doing system images. I got tired of spending energy on fussing with scheduling, issues like gpt vs mbr and partition alignment and whether I included the hidden system partitions, testing the image to see if it’d restore, worrying about whether it’d be corrupt later, Windows needing to do a repair install /anyway/, etc. and put it toward making it easier to just reinstall. The answer for me is Ninite, Steam, a few local exes, and a couple script files for settings.

    And a good incremental file backup. I use Crashplan at home and Arcea at work.

    As a plus, all this prep makes putting together a minty fresh new build a snap. I mean, who wants to tote along a 4 year old Windows image on their new build? Blah.

      • axeman
      • 7 years ago

      this, a million times this.

      – I save or backup all my data files to a “server” of sort -> it’s a Linux rig with mdraid, but you could use anything, in fact I also have SWMBO trained to save her stuff there too.

      – save copies of some of the most commonly used programs to said server (like my version of NiNite, since with a 5mbps pipe, it still can be quite tedious to download stuff)

      – the only time I’ve done a full system image is for a laptop, since all the requisite vendor utilities to make things like the hotkeys work properly is a pain to setup. I ended up never using it though.

      • setbit
      • 7 years ago

      Agreed that Ninite is a huge time saver when doing reinstalls. A Ninite configuration for critical apps, plus incremental backup of documents and settings, gives you easily 95% of the benefits of a full backup image with less hassle.

      • Prototyped
      • 7 years ago

      Better than this, Sysprep ([url<]http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh824938.aspx[/url<]) can be used to build an install image that includes the applications and settings you want out of the box. Basically you set up a machine, use Sysprep to generalize the installed system, then capture the image and make a Windows + apps installation DVD-ROM or USB flash drive out of it. Fresh install with your apps out of the box.

        • dmjifn
        • 7 years ago

        Thanks. It’s on the to-investigate list.

    • Igor_Kavinski
    • 7 years ago

    [url<]http://www.macrium.com/reflectfree.aspx[/url<] Have only good things to say about it. Do give it a try and see if you can resist it 🙂

    • ClickClick5
    • 7 years ago

    A perfect full disk (bit-by-bit) backup program is G4U. It offers storing the image on an FTP server and you can set a level of compression for the program to use (Gzip). I use this a lot for servers at work. Quite nifty, and it is free.

    As for incremental backups… I don’t have any worthwhile suggestions.

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    I’m just going to add yet another nod to Clonezilla for the imaging side of things – It’s free, easy to use, and pretty versatile. If you hit one of it’s limitations then there are other suggestions here, but it’s handy for me because on powerful hardware (i7 and SSD’s) it’ll create/restore an image insanely fast.

    I can’t offer much help for file-backup utilities. I normally use robocopy scripts but if it’s too much hassle I’ll just use BackupExec running a local system agent over the domain, which doesn’t sound anything like what you’re after.

    • Kougar
    • 7 years ago

    Nice timing on this post. Been running into many issues trying a simple clone disk option from one SSD to another using Acronis. Random sector read and write errors, access errors, even drive detection errors regardless of SSDs and HDDs used. Had one SSD clone process take 20 minutes to complete just to find out the resulting system partition was “unallocated” space even though the initial 100mb boot partition was intact and the SSD was very warm from the 20 minutes of “unallocated” writes. Given the finite write lifespan of SSDs I was not appreciative of the result.

    Acronis 2013 was even worse than 2012, because if there is an error during the cloning or backup restoration process there is not a way to cancel the operation. Clicking cancel doesn’t abort the operation, instead it will continue regardless of the read/write errors. Right-clicking the systray icon and selecting cancel will also not halt the disk operations that was in progress, either it does nothing or in rare cases it will outright crash the program.

    Judging by others comments I will give Macrium a try. It can’t be that hard to write disk cloning software that just works, even inside Windows.

    • satchmobob
    • 7 years ago

    I’ve been using Syncback SE from 2BrightSparks for file backup purposes for years. Really simple to use but loads of options if needed.
    As for disk imaging, I don’t bother on my home machines any more but we use clonezilla at work to a windows network share. Works great in most cases. The only caveat I have come across so far is restoring to a smaller drive. Not sure if there’s a way round this but I’ve never managed to get it to work.

    • Calum
    • 7 years ago

    For the incremental file backup stuff, I can recommend CrashPlan. I know it’s known for its “cloud” backup facility, but I find it works very well for backing up to a USB3 drive in a dock. Don’t have any imaging recs though, sorry.

    • oldDummy
    • 7 years ago

    REM Become a script monkey
    REM just an idea.

    [code<] @ECHO OFF REM BackupScript REM Version 1.01, Updated: 2008-05-21 REM By Jason Faulkner (articles[-at-]132solutions.com) REM Performs full or incremental backups of folders and files configured by the user. REM Usage--- REM > BackupScript SETLOCAL ENABLEEXTENSIONS ENABLEDELAYEDEXPANSION REM ---Configuration Options--- REM Folder location where you want to store the resulting backup archive. REM This folder must exist. Do not put a '\' on the end, this will be added automatically. REM You can enter a local path, an external drive letter (ex. F:) or a network location (ex. \\server\backups) SET BackupStorage=C:\Backup REM Which day of the week do you want to perform a full backup on? REM Enter one of the following: Sun, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri, Sat, * REM Any day of the week other than the one specified below will run an incremental backup. REM If you enter '*', a full backup will be run every time. SET FullBackupDay=* REM Location where 7-Zip is installed on your computer. REM The default is in a folder, '7-Zip' in your Program Files directory. SET InstallLocationOf7Zip=%ProgramFiles%\7-Zip REM +-----------------------------------------------------------------------+ REM | Do not change anything below here unless you know what you are doing. | REM +-----------------------------------------------------------------------+ REM Usage variables. SET exe7Zip=%InstallLocationOf7Zip%\7z.exe SET dirTempBackup=%TEMP%\backup SET filBackupConfig=BackupConfig.txt REM Validation. IF NOT EXIST %filBackupConfig% ( ECHO No configuration file found, missing: %filBackupConfig% GOTO End ) IF NOT EXIST "%exe7Zip%" ( ECHO 7-Zip is not installed in the location: %dir7Zip% ECHO Please update the directory where 7-Zip is installed. GOTO End ) REM Backup variables. FOR /f "tokens=1,2,3,4 delims=/ " %%a IN ('date /t') DO ( SET DayOfWeek=%%a SET NowDate=%%d-%%b-%%c SET FileDate=%%b-%%c-%%d ) IF {%FullBackupDay%}=={*} SET FullBackupDay=%DayOfWeek% IF /i {%FullBackupDay%}=={%DayOfWeek%} ( SET txtBackup=Full SET swXCopy=/e ) ELSE ( SET txtBackup=Incremental SET swXCopy=/s /d:%FileDate% ) ECHO Starting to copy files. IF NOT EXIST "%dirTempBackup%" MKDIR "%dirTempBackup%" FOR /f "skip=1 tokens=*" %%A IN (%filBackupConfig%) DO ( SET Current=%%~A IF NOT EXIST "!Current!" ( ECHO ERROR! Not found: !Current! ) ELSE ( ECHO Copying: !Current! SET Destination=%dirTempBackup%\!Current:~0,1!%%~pnxA REM Determine if the entry is a file or directory. IF "%%~xA"=="" ( REM Directory. XCOPY "!Current!" "!Destination!" /v /c /i /g /h /q /r /y %swXCopy% ) ELSE ( REM File. COPY /v /y "!Current!" "!Destination!" ) ) ) ECHO Done copying files. ECHO. SET BackupFileDestination=%BackupStorage%\Backup_%FileDate%_%txtBackup%.zip REM If the backup file exists, remove it in favor of the new file. IF EXIST "%BackupFileDestination%" DEL /f /q "%BackupFileDestination%" ECHO Compressing backed up files. (New window) REM Compress files using 7-Zip in a lower priority process. START "Compressing Backup. DO NOT CLOSE" /belownormal /wait "%exe7Zip%" a -tzip -r -mx5 "%BackupFileDestination%" "%dirTempBackup%\" ECHO Done compressing backed up files. ECHO. ECHO Cleaning up. IF EXIST "%dirTempBackup%" RMDIR /s /q "%dirTempBackup%" ECHO. :End ECHO Finished. ECHO. ENDLOCAL [/code<]

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      TL;DR

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      Use the “[ code][ /code]” tags on your post to keep proper indentation otherwise posts with code are just an eyesore to look at.

        • oldDummy
        • 7 years ago

        oops

      • Prototyped
      • 7 years ago

      This’ll break if you’re running any applications that open files exclusively (which I think is the default behavior of the file APIs on Windows, so this means most applications). Also if your filesystem has junctions or symlinks (which in some cases Windows puts on there as part of its install — [url<]http://www.vistax64.com/vista-general/58035-nested-application-data-directory.html[/url<]). For the former issue I would suggest starting the script using something like vshadow, vscsc or VSS BackupHelper, to back up off a snapshot whose files are [i<]not[/i<] locked: [url<]http://vscsc.sourceforge.net/[/url<] [url<]http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/113812-vss-backuphelper/[/url<] For the latter, while it's not perfect by any means, robocopy has a number of options that can make it skip these junctions and the like (/XJ and friends).

    • LostCat
    • 7 years ago

    I have a friend who swears by DriveImage XML, personally I can’t be arsed to deal with it so I turn on my WHS box every so often and let it take care of it.

      • bthylafh
      • 7 years ago

      It’s a decent program, but it suffers from being unable to restore an image to a smaller drive than it was created on, even if there’s enough space.

        • satchmobob
        • 7 years ago

        Doesn’t Clonezilla suffer from this problem also? At least I’ve never been able to clone to a smaller drive with it.

    • Flatland_Spider
    • 7 years ago

    Redo Backup (http://redobackup.org/) is what I use for baremetal restores and backups. Like Clonezilla, it’s a live Linux CD that makes an image of a machine. It can backup over a network or locally, and it can be installed to a USB drive. It’s based on partclone, and it’s only downside is I haven’t been able to find a way to mount the image like I can with dd.

    Cobian Backup is what I use for file backups on Windows. It’s free, it can take backups of locked files using VSS, and it stores the files in zip files, which makes it easy to pull files out with out the software.

    Disk2VHD is the Windows version of dd, sort of. It makes an image of the hard drives in the machine, like dd, which can be mounted in Win 7, and as long as you have Ultimate and similar hardware, you can boot from the VHD. Since this is Windows, the image would need to be sysprepped, and what not, to move move it between machines. Then to actually install the image requires a bunch more steps. Overall, it’s best if you just want a static image to mount and pull files from.

    • RickyTick
    • 7 years ago

    coming soon…

    How To Back Up A PC: The Tech Report Guide
    Step-by-step instructions for the best back-up strategy

    Your last “How To” was so well received, why not continue with this topic.

    • thanatos355
    • 7 years ago

    Macrium Reflect.

    I use the free version for my at-home needs which is basically just full on backups and restorations.

    I use the professional version for a few friends/clients of mine for full and incremental updates (that run on daily schedule).

    It (both versions) even allows you to mount backups as virtual hard drives for exploration and manipulation.

      • setbit
      • 7 years ago

      The free version of Macrium Reflect saved my bacon several times in quick succession. I haven’t experienced any problems with any of the restores or file recoveries I have performed.

      It’s also useful for porting images between machines and performing upgrades. I was able to perform a motherboard upgrade on an XP installation without reinstalling, which is not supported, but can be done if you manage it carefully. It took me about four tries to get it right, but it was no big deal, since I could always start fresh from the backup I had created.

    • Warp9
    • 7 years ago

    Without a doubt, the best backup solution I’ve ever used is Windows Home Server 2011 (or Windows Server 2012 Essentials, for the slightly more adventurous). Fully automated image-based backups that are block-based (so multiple machine backups don’t consume tons of space for redundant files like the OS). Just set it and forget it. Restore just works (both file-based restore and full image restore).

    For cloud-based backup, I use CrashPlan. Unlimited storage for a reasonable yearly fee.

      • Ryhadar
      • 7 years ago

      Not to mention, the whole OS only costs like $50.00 on newegg.

      • davidbowser
      • 7 years ago

      I tried the WHS backup stuff a while back and had enough issues that I gave up on image based backups altogether. I was also stymied by having to backup Linux and MacOS. I pretty much only use file based backups with CrashPlan, and then my work stuff is all on VMs, so snapshots are a no-brainer.

    • LoneWolf15
    • 7 years ago

    Build a basic box with windows home server 2011 or windows server 2012 essentials, which will baremetal back up your desktop clients. Flawless backup and restore for multiple systems, and it’s set-and-forget.

    • chucko
    • 7 years ago

    I use HDClone Professional. It’s not really a backup program but a HD or partition cloning product. I’ve never had it fail me. I’ve been using it for the last couple of years. It makes mountable images so you can add to or extract files from the image after it is made. It’s really a feature rich product, and I’m constantly amazed at all of the stuff it can do.

    Give it look see. You might find it suitable for what you need.

    [url<]http://www.miray.de/products/sat.hdclone.html[/url<]

    • nerdrage
    • 7 years ago

    Scott, just out of curiosity, which method of backup/restore did you use with Acronis? The “on-line” version that runs inside Windows, or the “off-line” version that runs from a bootable Linux CD?

    I’ve personally had much better results using the off-line version for both backup and restore operations. (Though I realize that’s no excuse for the on-line version being unreliable).

    • holophrastic
    • 7 years ago

    I’m a big fan of imagex. I built a product around “the usb key of death” that, when inserted, would boot the computer and restore a disk image. Of course it had a cousin usb key to capture the image.

    I’m used to running it from a WinPE boot, but it’s my understanding that you can run it from windows proper, and there are various gui front-ends around.

    Ultimately, it produces a .wim file, which is a file-based windows disk image. The image can be mounted, and you can add/remove files from it.

    Best of all, you can restore the image, and the full windows experience, across a hardware abstraction, and it does a pretty good job of retaining most user profile customizations.

    I’ve always found it to be super-stable. Although I haven’t done anything silly with it.

      • lonleyppl
      • 7 years ago

      ImageX is fantastic. It’s a little barebones in it’s look, but I’ve found it to be much more powerful than Acronis. The ability to image one machine, and deploy to something completely different is nice. The fact that it does a file based copy, as opposed to a sector based copy, is fantastic when I need to transition from a large drive to a smaller drive. The fact that it’s free is what completely sells me on it.

        • Ryu Connor
        • 7 years ago

        This is my recommendation as well.

        The Windows 7 AIK will give you ImageX.

        The Windows 8 will give you DISM.

        DISM is an old tool (it debuted with Vista), but with Windows 8 DISM has assumed all the functionality of ImageX while retaining its original functionality (the ability to manage offline images). ImageX, which still works fine, is technically deprecated by the new DISM.

        Simply open up a Administrative command prompt in Windows 8 and type dism /?

        DISM uses a file based backup instead of a sector based clone. When used along side other Windows tools (like Sysprep), this can allow for captured system images to be deployed to any machine regardless of hardware.

        It also removes difficulties like restoring to RAID arrays or restoring from a larger drive to a smaller drive. DISM is even smart enough to not do things like back up the pagefile or hiberfil reducing the size of the overall image.

        I’d note that the Windows 7 File Recovery (inside the Windows 8 control panel) also allows for backups (and a scheduled structure). The Recovery Disc (Bare Metal Recovery) stores the collected files into a VHD and deploys easily from the Windows Recovery Environment from your Windows based DVD or USB stick.

        The backup being in a VHD makes the backup very accessible in a number of different scenarios including within a VM or even mounted like a HD in Windows.

        [url=http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2012/12/using-windows-8s-hidden-backup-to-clone-and-recover-your-whole-pc/<]Link[/url<]

          • Prototyped
          • 7 years ago

          dism + sysprep /generalize ftw. Also useful for installing to entirely different hardware . . .

          Windows 8’s dism tool is also part of the “Deployment Tools” that come with the Assessment and Deployment Kit. (And it will install and run on Windows 7 and Vista and against a Windows 7 or Vista system to image.)

    • Usacomp2k3
    • 7 years ago

    I’m currently using Crashplan to backup to my WHS (I’ve given up on the built-in backup) which is also mirrored to the cloud. Soon going to convert the WHS box to AMAHI once I buy the 3TB drive to backup the server to during the conversion.

    • Arvald
    • 7 years ago

    If you are willing to spend a bit more I use Windows Home Server 2011. You’d have to build a system to run as the server.
    I’m very happy with it.
    Not sure why SSD and TRIM awareness would need to be in a backup/restore solution as that is running O/S requirements, would you not start by secure erasing the SDD then putting the O/S back on it.

    • barich
    • 7 years ago

    I use WHS. It performs daily, automatic, deduplicated backups of all of my computers. You can restore files/folders or the entire system by booting to the restore disc. I’ve had to restore backups twice and it has performed flawlessly. It is the end of the line for it, but it’s supported until 2016 and I have yet to find a suitable replacement that can do all of the above, never mind all of the other things it can do.

    It has relatively low system requirements, so I’m running it on parts that, aside from the hard drives, I had lying around (1.8 GHz Sempron 64, 2 GB of DDR), and it can transfer data over gigabit as fast as the hard drives will allow.

    • Noigel
    • 7 years ago

    I feel your pain. I was a fan of Acronis for a long time but that’s waned over the years through issues and BS upgrades… also tried a WHS backup route and was burned by it not restoring to the exact same system that it was happy to take images from… it failed to load up network and hdd drivers below the Windows OS.

    If you find a reasonable replacement shout it from the rooftops, would appreciate seeing the light at the end of this tunnel. 🙂

    • bthylafh
    • 7 years ago

    Areca Backup doesn’t do imaging, but it’s pretty good for file backups. Written in Java so it’s cross-platform and can target Windows or SSH/SFTP shares over a network in addition to external drives or local folders.

    Its killer feature for me is support for delta backups, which saves a /ton/ of space in my Steam folder.

    • joselillo_25
    • 7 years ago

    I use this

    [url<]http://www.fssdev.com/products/casper/[/url<]

    • axeman
    • 7 years ago

    I’d give Paragon a try. One enterprise I worked for used it for workstation imaging, seemed decent enough.

    • dpmeersman
    • 7 years ago

    I’ve used Acronis for several years. Have succesfully restored several times from full disk images created with their software.

      • ChronoReverse
      • 7 years ago

      Did you read the article? He used to use Acronis until the latest version failed to restore.

    • hbarnwheeler
    • 7 years ago

    Easeus ToDo Backup

      • kilkennycat
      • 7 years ago

      I wondered whether anybody would mention Easeus [url<]http://www.easeus.com[/url<] who now produce a huge range of backup and recovery products. Easeus 'Partition Master' and 'ToDo Backup' are the ONLY legitimate and thoroughly modern and powerful successors to the original PowerQuest Partition Magic and Drive Image....After the PowerQuest acquisition by Symantec, Partition Magic was abandoned and Drive Image was absorbed into useless bloatware (er, Ghost...) by Symantec. ( One of Symantec's latest acquisitions, PC Tools [Spyware Doctor etc] may be heading in the same direction.) Have been using both of these products from Easeus for several years, including participation in some early beta testing. These very smart Chinese engineers took note of the huge market opportunity offered by the abandonment of the PowerQuest products. For Scott:- I have a machine that I use both for software evaluation and hosting older programs which has a Windows multiboot setup (XP32, Vista32, Win7-32, Win7-64) with all the OS partitions on a single disk. ToDo Backup Workstation V4.x does perfect image-backups of that disk, with the added ability to mount the image and selectively extract any folder or file from any partition. And this is just a very small sliver of this product's overall capability.... Product is now up to V5.3 and Win8 compatible. $39.99. Visit the web page here.. [url<]http://www.todo-backup.com/business/workstation-backup.htm[/url<]

    • Ryhadar
    • 7 years ago

    It’s not simply software in the strictest sense but I backup all my windows machines using a centrally managed Windows Home Server 2011 server.

    It works on macs too and should have support for windows 8. It’s nice because if the computer is on, I can log in to my server’s dashboard from my phone or from another computer and start a backup. If you want to restore the whole machine, you use a key that can be built by WHS 2011 to a USB drive. With the USB drive you boot in a Windows PE-esque environment complete with a GUI to do a full restore.

    It does file-based incremental backups but I have not had to work with images. I image if the server goes down I won’t be able to perform a restore so that might not work well for you. Still, never had a problem restoring from a backup on my home server. Sometimes I get a “there was an error loading… blah blah blah” when booting from the USB key but usually a restart fixes that. Not once have a seen “can’t restore machine”.

      • Ryhadar
      • 7 years ago

      Well, look at that. WHS 2011, normally $50, is on sale at the egg for $35 with promo code: EMCYTZT2685

      [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16832416443&Tpk=32-416-443&nm_mc=EMC-GD121912&cm_mmc=EMC-GD121912-_-index-_-Item-_-32-416-443[/url<] Must be a sign.

      • swiffer
      • 7 years ago

      Windows Server 2012 Essentials (but WHS2011 would work for just a simple backup solution) is our household’s backup solution. The ability to load windows-based drivers for those arcane SAS/RAID/NICs in a bare metal restoration is key for us.

      That it also allows for mounting backups as a network drive, acts as a File History server for Windows 8 clients, comes with a slick remote access web UI, storage spaces support, domain controller with active directory services, streaming web transcoding, and has no silly 8GB memory limit like WHS2011 is just icing on the cake. (A $500 cake, mind you.)

    • Jon
    • 7 years ago

    Since you’ve tried a few solutions, can you consider the remote possibility that there is something wrong with your PC’s which results in any tested or untested backup solution failing?

    Could this be systemic in nature?

    Try Ghost 8. It’s a few versions back and I don’t know if it supports SSD’s but it may be worth a shot.

      • ludi
      • 7 years ago

      Ehrm…

      [quote<]...Acronis...Some googling around confirmed that this problem is fairly widespread and extends to TrueImage 2013, as well. ...build-in Windows backup tool... More googling unearthed way, way too many threads started by people who had the same sort of problems, who tried everything the MS "experts" recommended, and who still couldn't get the backup to finish. ...I looked up the latest version of Norton Ghost, and the reviews on Amazon for it are brutal. TrueImage's restore problems appear to have crept into Ghost, as well, along with various other quirks in too great a measure.[/quote<]

        • CyberKender
        • 7 years ago

        The latest version of Ghost is a very different animal than Ghost 8. I use Ghost 8 at work to do system images, and it works, but there are some issues. It’s not happy with E512 drives and SATA controllers running in RAID/AHCI mode. Been looking for a replacement tool, but most solutions either are not bit-images or they’ve gone like Ghost and Acronis and expect you to go with the enterprise version of the tool to do disk images. The latter being nice, but we don’t have the budget to dedicate a server to host said expensive option.

          • trackerben
          • 7 years ago

          Do you refer to the online or offline executable of Ghost? If it is the offline, how does it compare to the old DOS-based Ghost 11.5 from the 2.5x enterprise solution suite?

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 7 years ago

    My suggestion would be and off-line dd or Clonezilla for a full backup and maybe use the windows backup for files. But this is coming from a Linux guy.

    EDIT: I like Ryhadar’s idea combind with a full disk approach with clonezilla/dd. I heavily advocate them because I have disks sitting in a fire proof box (off-site storage would be best). You can secure erase an SSD and restore it from a backup, too.

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      Yup, my vote would be for clonezilla as well. It even handles multi-os installs and the restores can be done with correct alignment on SSD’s (unlike many commercial backup programs).

        • MadManOriginal
        • 7 years ago

        It must have been a while since you looked at them in detail, every major commercial backup program I’ve looked at has proper SSD alignment.

          • Deanjo
          • 7 years ago

          Acronis and Ghost only align the first partition and if a non windows bootloader is installed (grub2 for example) they don’t align them at all.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            Well, I didn’t look at those because they are generally panned 😉 Plus I don’t care about non-Windows bootloaders.

      • ludi
      • 7 years ago

      That’s what I’ve been using as well on a couple recent system changes but I don’t think it meets the kind of requirements Damage described. An off-line image, or even better an off-line bit-copy, will always be the most reliable but it also takes down the system and requires the most time.

        • DragonDaddyBear
        • 7 years ago

        Agreed, but, speaking from experiance, it’s worth doing every few months or so with rotated media. For referance, ludi, dd is a command used by *nix systems to do a bit-for-bit copy. It’s fairly safe and reliable but does require more time than clonezilla.

        In all of my admin experiance, there has always been a tool like dd or clonezilla utilized for full disk. The file backups, though, have been done using many different tools. But I don’t think I can stress enough the value of an offline backup.

        I don’t know enough about WHS, but it sounds to meet all requirments other than the full disk for the Windows backup.

          • ludi
          • 7 years ago

          IIRC Clonezilla executes a dd command when the bit-copy option is selected.

            • DragonDaddyBear
            • 7 years ago

            I don’t think so. DD will copy every bit, including “white space” over. Clonezilla has the ability to copy only the data. The difference being if you have 100G of 500G uses, Clonezilla can only copy and restore the 100G. DD will copy 500G over. There may be ways to tweak the commands or tools, but that’s how I’ve always used them (DD to same-size disk, Clonezilla to a large disk).

            • kc77
            • 7 years ago

            He’s actually correct. Clonezilla can use DD as well and does for certain situations.

            • DragonDaddyBear
            • 7 years ago

            I thought it might. The command is so short to use dd that I’ve never looked into clonezilla doing that for me. But I know it can back up only data in use, which is usually recommended. DD will eat an entire disk and most people don’t have that kind hardware laying around.

            I also came up with another idea, but it would require three of the same drive. You could run a RAID 1 and just swap out disks on the fly once a month (or any time of your choosing). It’s not elegent but it works (depending on if you are using write-back or not and if you have enterprise drives with capasitors to finish their write sequence when you pull it). It’s not the best but I’ve seen it and be functional. Then again, most partitions were mounted read only so it wasn’t a risky process.

      • kc77
      • 7 years ago

      My vote for Clonezilla as well.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 7 years ago

    Funny you should post this, there’s a thread that keeps popping up to the Hot Forum Threads, you can check out opinions there. (I agree that Windows built-in imaging options aren’t robust for power users for another reason.)

    [url<]https://techreport.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=30&t=82667[/url<] Macrium Reflect Standard and R-drive for ~$50 seem to have what you want. CloneZilla is free oss but maybe more work than you want to put into it.

      • Dposcorp
      • 7 years ago

      I posted in that thread as well.

      Along with Damage’s wants, I want a specific ability that I have now in a older version of Acronis TrueImage; Mounting images as virtual drives.

      My version lets me mount images as virtual drives, so I can access them as though they were physical drives, and by default the image is mounted in Read-Only mode. That image then serves all my AV stuff over my network.

      Can Macrium Reflect, Ghost, or any other software that you guys know of do that in Windows 8?

        • thanatos355
        • 7 years ago

        Macrium lets you mount backups as VHD.

        I just used that ability for the first time yesterday.

      • RickyTick
      • 7 years ago

      I posted in that thread too, and after 2 days of monkeying around with Acronis, I went to Macrium and was finished within a couple of hours with ease.

      • flip-mode
      • 7 years ago

      Wow, what a timely question by Mr. Wasson. I’ve been testing the free version of Macrium and it appears to be pretty solid. The huge caveat with that statement is that I have not yet restored an image – LOL – I’ve only been testing for a few hours now.

      I’ve been a big proponent of R-Drive image but if Macrium does well then I’ll switch to it as I think they deserve a lot of credit and a lot of commercial business due the fact that they offer a FREE home use version that includes schedule backups and other crucial feature.

      So, tentatively, I give the tip to Macrium, although I only have tried-and-true experience with R-drive Image.

      I can say that RDI is very simple and straightforward. Macrium has added more bling-bling to the interface. I wish there was a free home version of RDI because if so I’d choose the simpler interface over Macrium’s bling-bling.

      And it needs to be said that the built-in windows imaging for Windows 7 is offers the extreme minimum of functionality, and Windows 8 seems to be even worse – restoring files rather than actual partitions, for shame. So it’s good that MS includes something minimal, but anyone who is actually going to use imaging for anything beyond emergency situations needs something better.

      tl;dr: Macrium or R-Drive Image. As a bonus, R-drive Image is compatible with Windows Server.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 7 years ago

        Because of the thread I’ve been looking at options. I chose Macrium too, there are a few features that the paid edition has which swayed me over R-drive. I figured if I was comparing them I should do paid apples-to-apples.

      • Goty
      • 7 years ago

      +1 for Macrium Reflect.

      • Scolasticus
      • 7 years ago

      Another +1 for Macrium Reflect (I have a paid version). Nice and fast, does incremental. Easy to use. Haven’t had to use it for recovery yet though!

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This