How do you prefer to read books?

It’s way past time for a new poll, and I have an honest question about how folks like to consume books. Have you made the change to an e-reader or tablet, or do you prefer paper copies? Or something else, like audiobooks or just reading on a smartphone?

I have no good sense of how this vote will turn out. Make your pick below, and we’ll see!

Oh, and don’t forget that Cyril wrote a book you can use to test out the electronic reader options.

Comments closed
    • gmskking
    • 6 years ago

    Still on this poll almost 3 months later. Wow.

    • gmskking
    • 7 years ago

    OK, I think we have plenty of data now to go by. Time for another poll.

    • jimhsu
    • 7 years ago

    Paper, no other choice. As far as e-books… I can get over the fact that they have limited battery life, or that the text hasn’t reached 300 dpi, or that contrast isn’t up to par, or even that they’re still way more expensive.

    What I can’t get over is the pricing for e-books, AND the fact that there’s no used market to speak of. When I can get 3 or MORE used hardcovers of a book for LESS than the e-book price for a single book … well, there’s a pricing problem there. When brand-new books + the shipping cost less than the same e-book, there’s a problem. Not to mention that not every e-book is formatted properly, simply due to the limitations of the display.

    My personal target for reasonableness is 50% of the paperback price. Right now, for most books (i.e. not new releases), it’s the other way around (hardcopy 50% of e-book price). Before then, my Kindle is simply going to gather dust while I buy superior products for less money.

    Basically, until we get a functional used e-book market with open standards, I really don’t see paper becoming obsolete.

    • jstern
    • 7 years ago

    Audio books for the win. I already read way too much throughout the day. With the audio book you can do other things as you listen.

    • gmskking
    • 7 years ago

    If I read a lot. I would have to go with traditional books as to not destroy my eyes.

    • Khali
    • 7 years ago

    I am reading constantly. I can go through your average size paperback in less than a day. At that pace you can imagine the huge stacks of books I had, still do to some extent. My sister was the first in the family to get a E-reader. I had looked into it but had not done anything up to that point. One hour playing around with her Kindle convinced me and it has been the best tech buy I have made in recent years.

    Whats not to like? I can carry 2500 plus books on one device that weighs very little. The E Ink display on the kindle is not harsh to the eyes and can be used even in the brightest of sun light with no problems. Battery life is pretty good with a charge lasting me about a week. Your typical user might get two to three weeks before needing a charge. This is where devices like the Kindle Fire fall down in my opinion. A charge on that type of device only last 8 hours or less. Plus reading off a LCD display can be hard for some peoples eyes. For a all in one device the Fire is great but for just reading stick with the lower cost dedicated readers. In this age of all in one devices the dedicated reader is still King if all you want to be able to read.

      • shaq_mobile
      • 7 years ago

      Well, most people don’t read 2500 books at a time. When I goto the bar, I take my backpack with me anyways. I usually throw one of two books in it and off I go. If I can’t decide between two books, then I probably need to choose better books.

      More importantly, people think I’m way smarter when they see my book collection.

        • Khali
        • 7 years ago

        Yes, but I can carry my whole library with me. If I find a book to be boring or not worth reading I can always pick one of my other titles since I have them all in one handy portable place. If I don’t have what I want on hand I can simply open up the internet connection and buy something with out having to go to the book store.

        I too have a huge book collection. Its one more reason I went with a E-reader. I have simply ran out of room for yet more books. I too love the feel of a book in my hands and was afraid the whole experience wouldn’t be the same with a E-reader. After the first week I don’t even notice the difference any more. I can still lose myself into a good story to the point I don’t notice when I turn a page, or lose track of time for hours on end.

    • Growler
    • 7 years ago

    I like the idea of e-books, and have read a few, but their cost is the main reason I stick to paper books. New e-book prices are ridiculous, considering the lack of physical media, and the relatively insignificant cost of getting the book to the customer. An e-book shouldn’t cost more than a paperback.

    • Kaleid
    • 7 years ago

    Paperback. Small size is preferable.

    • Malphas
    • 7 years ago

    Paper still has it’s benefits but all this hokey sentimentalism about it “just feels right” or “feel, and the smell of a hard cover” is so lame and cliche. Get over yourselves, you pretentious drones.

    • ronch
    • 7 years ago

    Nothing beats good old (paper) books. They never run out of batteries, you can just toss them around, you can smell the fragrant scent of paper. I’m glad it got the majority vote by a mile (as of this post, anyway).

    Edit – And yeah, I had to cast the 666th vote!

    • wtburnette67
    • 7 years ago

    I used to be a diehard paper book only type, but that ended when I bought the original Kindle Fire. Since then, I’ve bought very few actual books and have purchased tons of ebooks. I recently upgraded to a Fire HD 8.9 which is even more enjoyable for reading, except for when I’m in bed, in which case I still prefer the 7″ version. The only time I still prefer an actual book is if I want to soak in a tub with a good book and a glass of wine (or a beer).

    • sjl
    • 7 years ago

    “With my eyes.”

    Nw that I’ve got the silly, obvious answer out of the way … I’m an avid reader. I honestly don’t know how many books I have in my collection, but it’s a lot – probably several hundred, easily. But the past few years, I’ve travelled around a fair bit – two international moves (Australia to New Zealand and back again), plus an interstate move (NSW to Vic). The bulk of it, and hence the biggest expense, was definitely the books.

    So I bought myself a Kindle. Then I looked – hard – at the outrageous prices certain publishers (hello, Hachette) want to charge Australians (typically, it’s a 50% markup compared with the US price, for the exact same content), and decided to say hello to Baen (formerly Webscriptions).

    I intend to move as much of my old collection over to electronic form as I can afford to (and justify it to myself), but it’s slow going. Meanwhile, there are only two authors – Pratchett, and Charlie Stross – that I buy in dead tree format now. Anything new from anybody else will be electronic; I just can’t justify the shelf space, unfortunately.

    • albundy
    • 7 years ago

    i prefer someone else to read books to me. better than any tablet out there!

      • sunner
      • 7 years ago

      “I prefer someone else to read books to me….”

      Thats how we were taught when little kids to love books&reading (“Class, you’ve been good today so I’m going to read you a couple more chapters of ‘Call of the Wild’). I never forgot that great teacher.

      IMO this is why the potential of CD AudioBooks is great; they can lead to the same thing (Mum, with car fulla noisy kids, quietly sticks Vol-1 of ‘Hobbit’ in car’s cd-player and they quiet down as Bilbo’s magic adventures draw them in).
      It can lead to instilling a love of books & reading into our little Bandits, at an early age.

      • ronch
      • 7 years ago

      Well, if your book is available on PDF format you can use Adobe Reader’s ‘read’ function to make your PC read it for you in a cold, metallic voice.

      • Kurotetsu
      • 7 years ago

      I prefer audiobooks in that I have an easier time associating a particular voice with a character than I do with just a name (assuming it uses voice actors for the different characters). That and a good narrator makes the story much more immersive to me than just text (or even cinema).

    • ET3D
    • 7 years ago

    The last book I read (Dinocalypse Now) was on my PC/laptop. Just more accessible. Before that I read a book or two on my Cybook Office, but I dislike the sluggishness of e-ink. I bought a Nexus 7 and expect to read on it, but I don’t read that much, so haven’t gotten around to it (I’m playing Broken Sword mostly).

      • sunner
      • 7 years ago

      “….I dislike the sluggishness of e-ink….”

      Haven’t heard that complaint. Do you mean e-ink pages open noticeably-slowly? Or e-ink text changes slowly compared to lcd text?

    • MadManOriginal
    • 7 years ago

    Dead trees forever.

    • rwburnham
    • 7 years ago

    I like having a tablet because it gives me the most variety in terms of reading apps. I love having my reading collection with me in an easy-to-carry tablet than having to carry around a selection of books, magazines and comic books.

    • tootercomputer
    • 7 years ago

    I have macular degeneration and printed text other than headlines are simply too small for me to read. The ipad was a godsend, got mine in October 2010. I have a 2009 Kindle as well and I still use that for magazines on occasion. In any case, all my books are electronic now, for pleasure as well as professionally.

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    My biggest gripe with paper is not actually the sheer bulk of the things, but the fact that you can’t read them with one hand in a lot of cases; This is why 6″ e-readers are epic.

    I like to use my other hand for a variety of things whilst reading (awaiting innuendo-laden misquotes) but my three of favourite spare-hand activities are:
    [list<][*<]sipping beer/wine.[/*<][*<]eatings snacks without fooding-up the book.[/*<][*<]resting my chin on my hand.[/*<][/list<] ...though those last two conflict slightly, it's much easier to mast[i<]ic[/i<]ate with [b<]no[/b<] hands.

      • dpaus
      • 7 years ago

      So, with a 6-incher, one hand is enough? Huh, who knew…? I have a 10-incher, and it always requires two hands to control that beast.

      I did +1 you for not having to go back and edit anything (you’re better than I am)

        • Chrispy_
        • 7 years ago

        I tend to find the the 6-inchers easier to slip into your jeans, wheras a 10-incher is awkward to carry around all day.

        Having a 6-incher makes it easier to whip out in public – say if you want to crack off a quick chapter whilst waiting for a bus or something.

        It doesn’t happen so much now but people still sometimes ask if they can have a closer look – they usually want to get a feel for the weight of it in their hand, and of course how fast it goes forwards and backwards.

          • yogibbear
          • 7 years ago

          You guys are disgusting!

    • Pettytheft
    • 7 years ago

    Greatly prefer books but after years of book piles and diminishing book stores I’ve switched to the Nook. Can’t stand reading on a tablet or phone.

    • cygnus1
    • 7 years ago

    I chose smartphone, but only because that’s what I end up reading with but not what I really really prefer. The device that’s available is what ends up being used. My honest preference is definitely the dedicated e-reader. I just never have time to read, recreationally at least, when I have my Nook available.

    • jabro
    • 7 years ago

    After I bought Cyril’s book, I read it using my phone. I liked the book, but I’m not too crazy about using my smart phone as a reader. I definitely prefer paper, especially since my wife does not like it when I borrow her tablet. Maybe if I had an e-reader like a kindle I would change my mind.

    • Novuake
    • 7 years ago

    Hope in humanity restored. Poll still is mostly paper…

      • Shoki
      • 7 years ago

      Mostly = Less than half…

      • rwburnham
      • 7 years ago

      Why does that restore hope?

    • no51
    • 7 years ago

    e-reader… so no one can know my secret.

    • SnowboardingTobi
    • 7 years ago

    paper… on the toilet. True story, bro.

      • gmskking
      • 7 years ago

      cool story, bro.

    • cheerful hamster
    • 7 years ago

    I still prefer dead trees, but after 30 years of collecting them, clutter is a huge concern. A lot of my favorite authors wrote in the 19th and early 20th centuries, so there are tons of public domain books available on the Kindle that interest me. That was ultimately the deciding factor in purchasing the cheapest model two months ago. Now I’ve read more in that time than I have in years, and the eInk display is easy on my eyes. But if Amazon thinks they’re going to make much $ off of me…I’ve read maybe 30 books in two months, and purchased exactly one. Maybe I’ll come to an end of the public domain books, or suddenly develop an interest in contemporary authors…but I wouldn’t bet on it. 🙂

    • cynan
    • 7 years ago

    I like the dedicated e-ink devices. Once in a while, an old-fashioned paper book is a nice change, but for regular everyday reading, the e-readers are just too convenient, especially if away from home.

    I don’t much like reading off of backlit devices for more than short spurts here and there. It doesn’t matter if it has a “Retina” display or not. I spend much of my day staring at a backlit screen for work/entertainment and anything that offers a break from this (ie, e-ink or paper) is welcome.

    Audiobooks are great. Nothing better for a long solo car trip, or sometimes when exercising or commuting or doing mindless household chores. Too bad most are rather expensive (compared to most ebooks/paperbacks). Paying $40 or more for a digital download is a bit steep. I understand that they are more work to produce, and that the narrator and production team needs a cut, but I don’t see why most should be more than double the price of the ebook (I suppose it’s because they do less volume…)..

    Edit: Correct me if I’m wrong, but I think Cyril’s book is only available in Kindle format. So if you own a non-Amazon ereader and want to read on that, you’re out of luck. Yes, you can download the kindle format and convert it, BUT, I don’t think Amazon lets you download the actual file unless you actually own a Kindle device (the option to download to device under “manage digital purchases” didn’t exist for me when I tried it.

      • Washer
      • 7 years ago

      There’s the Kindle cloud application that lets you read books in a browser. There’s also software for Windows, OSX and I think Linux too.

      • bthylafh
      • 7 years ago

      You can install the Kindle app on your computer, download the book, and optionally use Calibre to convert it into another format (plugins exist for Calibre that can strip DRM, but I’ll say no more) and copy it to your e-reader.

        • cynan
        • 7 years ago

        Ah, so you need to install the App. With the Kindle Cloud reader only, Amazon wasn’t giving me the option to download.

    • FuturePastNow
    • 7 years ago

    I still do most of my reading on paper. What ebooks I read, I just use the desktop/laptop. If I had a Kindle or other tablet, I would use it, but I can’t justify a dedicated e-reader right now.

    • oldDummy
    • 7 years ago

    Using an “old” kindle still amazes me, how do all those books fit in there. 😉

    Now if only i could stay awake while reading.

    • Helmore
    • 7 years ago

    I don’t have a real preference. I sometimes read on my smartphone, sometimes a book, sometimes directly from my PC, but usually from my iPad. Do I prefer my iPad over a book? No, not really. Do I use my iPad the most for reading? Yes.

    I still remember the exact smell of the first Dune book I read. It was an old book that my dad bought before I was even born, but I’ll always associate that book’s smell with the planet Dune for some reason. I imagine that that’s what Dune smells like :P. It’s not an experience I’d ever get on an e-reader or an iPad.

    • bthylafh
    • 7 years ago

    I’m a Kindle/eInk convert. Here’s why:

    1) Instant gratification. I don’t have to drive to the next town to find a bookstore.
    2) Better ergonomics. I don’t have to use both hands to hold the book open and keep my place. Also since I’ve got an illuminated cover I don’t have to deal with off-angle light from a bedside lamp.
    3) A good selection of free books, not always pre-192x public domain.
    4) In a pinch I can get on my work’s Zimbra email server from anywhere that’s got a 3G cell signal.
    5) An entire room’s worth of books will fit into one paperback-sized device.

    Which is not to say it’s perfect, of course. Batteries wear out, buttons eventually break, and you’re pushed into getting books from one source unless you use a computer. It’s also no good for color pictures or large-format books.

      • Shinare
      • 7 years ago

      Well put. I agree with you %100. And, I hate to admit it, but sometimes I run across a word I don’t know, and its always nice to just cursor over to it and have it pop up the definition instantly.

        • willmore
        • 7 years ago

        ^^^this^^^

    • zgirl
    • 7 years ago

    I still love paper books and magazines. I also have very sensitive eyes to reading for long periods of time on an LCD or tablet is hard for me. That being said while I still collect paper books, mostly from used book stores, I love my kindle e-reader. I get the best of both worlds. Convenience of being able to carry lots of books in one small format and I can read on it for hours and not get eye strain.

    Right now the e-reader is the best way to go, and I love it. I never thought I would switch from actual books.

      • sunner
      • 7 years ago

      I’m a bookworm, too.
      So, you really like your new Reader? Which Kindle is it? (year, model, screensize, etc).
      After years of printed Books, I’ve found they get old & cruddy & lose pages—and I’m tired of lugging’em in&out of Coffee shops.
      So, I’m looking at ‘Readers’ selling in my local Chain stores.

      Best Buy stores & Staples Office stores, are now selling Amazon’s new hi-rez screen, “KindleFire-HD 8.9″ (a 9” combo tablet/reader).
      The Text-on-white background (adjustable) looked real good, and a Batman(?) Movie on one of them had brilliant colors & strong clear audio.

      But, this Kindle will be my first Reader. And since you have a Kindle—I’d appreciate hearing your opinion, good or bad. Thanks! 🙂

        • rechicero
        • 7 years ago

        If you really like reading, forget about LCD screens (no Kindle Fire for reading!!). That’s not what you want. A kindle for $69 will be muuuch better for you (or a Sony, or a…. whatever).

        A tablet is OK if you don’t read so much. But if you do, a dedicated e-ink will be your best friend. With a tablet, forget about reading outdoors in a bright day. Of course, there is the eye straing because of the light emitting screen. And don’t forget battery: Weeks vs Hours.

        The kindle fire is not a reader, it’s a tablet.

          • hiro_pro
          • 7 years ago

          +1 to rechicero and zgirl.

          get a 6″ dedicated ereader. i have the second gen kindle and wouldnt trade it for the world. i just got a friend the paperwhite. that is pretty awesome though i turned the backlight off for day reading.

          get calibre too. it’s a free program so you can convert txt, lit and html books to mobi/epub.

          • sunner
          • 7 years ago

          Thanks much, Rechicero, for the detailed feedback. I’ll act on it.

          Cuz its time to dump my old, heavy, Hardbound books. Some now smell moldy & my Paperbacks shed pages. The ‘Bookbinding’ trade is dying out, so books cant be easily or economically repaired.

          Later today I’ll check out Staples Office Superstore and see if they sell Kindle Readers in various sizes. I’d like 8″screen (+ xtra-cost options if any are available). I’ll post here if I buy.

          Damage, this is a real good Thread you started—Thank you.

        • zgirl
        • 7 years ago

        I have the last one they made with a keyboard. Fourth Gen Kindle? Can’t remember, but that one. Plus I am obnoxious about keeping the screen clean so I definitely like the keyboard to type with rather than a touch screen.

          • sunner
          • 7 years ago

          ….”I have the last one they made with a keyboard. 4th Gen Kindle? cant remember.”

          Thanks for the info. I like your idea of k/b so I went to BestBuy, Staples Office & Barnes&Noble stores (day before Christmas). According to salesmen some models offer optional plug-in k/b if you have Bluetooth. Wow, all those stores were really pushing tablets & readers.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            Amazon still sells a Kindle with keyboard (and 3G). I actually checked when I first read zgirl’s post because the post implied that Amazon no longer sells a keyboard Kindle, but they do.

            • sunner
            • 7 years ago

            “….Amazon still sells a Kindle with keyboard (and 3G)….”

            Big thanks MMO, I’ll check that out. (Its tough having so little free time to do these things). Stupid question: what’s ‘3G’?

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            3G wireless for buying books, accessing your library, etc.

    • bjm
    • 7 years ago

    I prefer stone tablets.

    They have awesome battery life and longevity, but the backlight sucks. Another drawback is the authors tend to be of the know-it-all type. You will fear the day that stone tablet manufacturers assert their patents of these puny electricity based tablets.

    • Stickem
    • 7 years ago

    As a voracious lifetime reader I have now converted to reading everything on a 24 inch monitor. Adjustable fonts and sizes, the scroll wheel, and old eyes convinced me.

    Mind you, that monitor sure is heavy for reading in bed. (it’s hard to breathe)

    • Shouefref
    • 7 years ago

    Sometimes I prefer them on paper, sometimes as e-books.

    • paulWTAMU
    • 7 years ago

    I prefer on paper but the kindle’s so damn convenient that I’ve bought more new books for it than physical books in the last year.

      • BIF
      • 7 years ago

      Me too with my Nook!

    • stdRaichu
    • 7 years ago

    Depends on the type of material; for novels, it has to be paper for me, either soft or hardback – I just don’t really feel like I’m reading a story unless it’s printed on paper, probably because I spend every waking hour looking at a screen of some sort so I guess paper gives a bit of escapism 🙂

    Which leads me on to technical manuals; give me PDF and a nice, fat, hi-res, high-DPI screen and a search button or give me death. A nice nippy reader like SumatraPDF helps as well.

    I know they’re probably not seen very often, but “coffee table” books that are printed on good high-quality paper, such as this [url=http://www.amazon.co.uk/Panoramas-Lost-London-Philip-Davies/dp/1907176721/<]baby[/url<] which I've bought for my dad as a pressie, or any other book full of good pictures IMHO, just doesn't have the same impact when shown on a screen (even a very good one).

    • gerbilspy
    • 7 years ago

    I really like my Nook tablet because of the adjustable font size and brightness. It has a great screen! Although I love a good paper book, my eyes aren’t what they used to be, and that’s why I never read them anymore. The convenience of eBooks is hard to beat too.

    • Peldor
    • 7 years ago

    Print is dead.

    I collect spores, molds, and fungus.

      • RedAdmiral
      • 7 years ago

      Who you gonna call?

    • Walkintarget
    • 7 years ago

    I would prefer a book but my eyesight is getting bad enough that unless it is in very good light, it causes headaches and eyestrain. I’ve moved on to reading on my tablet with its wonderful backlight (HP Touchpad, WooT !)

      • not@home
      • 7 years ago

      I have just the opposite problem. If I read for an hour on my tablet, my eyes get very strained. OTOH I can read a well lit book for very extended periods of time. This is unfortunate because my tablet is way convenient.

    • Firestarter
    • 7 years ago

    E-reader, it’s more convenient than books for novels and such, and more relaxing to read than on a phone/tablet. Plus, how would you read a book on a beach using a tablet?

    • DeadOfKnight
    • 7 years ago

    Audiobooks FTW!

    • Symmetry
    • 7 years ago

    For a mixture of convenience and the experience I think my kindle is best. Books are slightly better, but bulkier to carry around. My phone is the most convinient since I always have it, but it’s not a great experience.

    I also have an audiobook for when I need my eyes free, but that’s not a primary thing.

      • willmore
      • 7 years ago

      I always have podcasts for the audio-only thing. Remote BT speaker bar makes that really convenient.

      But, you’re right on WRT reading.

    • Dazrin
    • 7 years ago

    I use an e-reader for all my pleasure reading – much more convenient than paper books and the screen is MUCH nicer to use than a phone/tablet. I would love to get one of the illuminated e-readers but for now I am plenty happy with my K3.

    I prefer paper for reference books though. Much easier to search and flip back and forth in.

      • Alexko
      • 7 years ago

      It’s pretty much exactly the same for me.

      Novels, essays, etc., are great on my Kindle 3 (from which I feel no need to upgrade whatsoever), but for technical stuff, or even books that include large maps and pictures, I still prefer paper.

      I find reading on back-lit displays tiring, so no tablets or phones for me, thank you.

    • brute
    • 7 years ago

    reading is for nerds

      • just brew it!
      • 7 years ago

      Erm… you do realize what sort of people tend to hang out on this site, yes?

      • 5150
      • 7 years ago

      Just by reading my reply I’m proving you are a nerd.

      WINNING!

        • BIF
        • 7 years ago

        -1 for “Winning”. I hate that saying. Yes, I guess I’m a hater. 😀

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      i’ve been saying this forever. i’d rather the nerds read than reproduce or making music and videos about video games.

      • stmok
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]reading is for nerds[/quote<] Then I shall stand proud of being a nerd. ...A nerd who continues to pursue his knowledge long after any formal schooling; to expand my mind about the world; and to further develop skills/competence from the knowledge acquired, in order to secure better promotion and pay. (One needs to be constantly improving in this globally competitive world).

    • axeman
    • 7 years ago

    i don’t read good

    • kvndoom
    • 7 years ago

    Still paper for me. Same for magazines, but I don’t read print newspapers anymore.

    I used some ebooks for school in some of my online classes, and I never found them as easy to search as my hard cover books.

      • just brew it!
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]Still paper for me. Same for magazines, but I don't read print newspapers anymore.[/quote<] This. I'll probably switch to a tablet or eReader at some point, but that point has not arrived yet. Which reminds me, I really need to go and renew my "dead tree" magazine subscriptions (Discover, Nat Geo, Sci Am).

    • DancinJack
    • 7 years ago

    And again, no cheese?

    • DancinJack
    • 7 years ago

    Hard back and paper if at all possible.

      • khands
      • 7 years ago

      Ditto, something about the feel, and the smell of a hard cover.

        • DancinJack
        • 7 years ago

        Got that right. I love the smell of good hardbacks.

        • ludi
        • 7 years ago

        Ditto on “feel”. A proper sown binding with a cloth backing has an enduring quality that just “feels” right.

        • lilbuddhaman
        • 7 years ago

        But that outrageous price….

      • Geistbar
      • 7 years ago

      I used to not see the appeal in hardcover, then I started reading some rather long books (~800-1000 pages). When I got a sequel in hardcover it was amazing how much physically easier it was to read. Ever since then I’ve preferred it when possible/appropriate.

    • lilbuddhaman
    • 7 years ago

    I prefer audiobooks, but the narrator needs to have a voice that not only fits the book but also has the right balance of speed, tone, and correct pronunciation of names/words specific to the book. ( Was listening to one of the latter Dune books and it had a different narrator than the previous, who pronounced *everything* differently).

    Otherwise printed.

    • Deanjo
    • 7 years ago

    Paper hands down. I also still prefer reading the newspaper on paper as well.

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      ME TOO! WE’RE THE SAME!

      • BIF
      • 7 years ago

      My newspaper also comes on my iPad. I read it whichever way is most convenient that day.

      It appears that after toilet paper and paper towels, you and I are the sole cause of trees being cut down in the world today!

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        I find reading via electronic means, I wind up skipping most of the newspaper just picking out a headline or two where as a newspaper (or printed magazine) I will not only read it front to back but also in less time then I would if I attempted to do it by other means.

        Even even it comes to debugging code I find myself able to pick out trouble spots on paper (wide carriage) then staring at the screen.

      • James296
      • 7 years ago

      Paper FTW

      • stmok
      • 7 years ago

      Agreed.

      I often prefer hardback books.

    • NeelyCam
    • 7 years ago

    I don’t read. Movies are easier.

      • dpaus
      • 7 years ago

      Oh, so [i<]you're[/i<] Yahoo! New's target market....

        • NeelyCam
        • 7 years ago

        Time is a luxury I don’t have. I know that I miss out on some aspects of storytelling when I choose to watch a movie, but reading just takes so much time..

        I enjoyed reading Lord Of The Rings a long time ago, but I enjoyed the movies just as much (in a different way, of course), and it took a lot less time – even the extended editions.

          • Chrispy_
          • 7 years ago

          That’s Tolkein’s fault for having an excruciatingly slow, rambling, waffly writing style.

          I enjoyed the books but [u<]damn[/u<], he could have condensed his books to half the size and lost almost nothing.

      • ronch
      • 7 years ago

      That explains everything.

        • NeelyCam
        • 7 years ago

        You mean my unparalleled efficiency…?

          • travbrad
          • 7 years ago

          Netburst?

    • Washer
    • 7 years ago

    Someone’s preferred method is on a smartphone? Crazy. How would that not induce extreme eye strain, neck pain, and gorilla arms?

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 7 years ago

      What do you have against gorillas?

      • Damage
      • 7 years ago

      That’s me. The iPhone 5 is an excellent reader. I prefer it to my Kindle Fire and iPad 3. I do a lot of reading in bed, and it’s ideal for that, where the iPad is too large. The Fire is OK but the screen kinda stinks compared to the iPhone.

      Not sure what you mean about gorilla arms. The phone is very light!

      I sometimes read on the iPad when I’m sitting in a chair or such, but I don’t find that it’s much of an upgrade, in practical terms, for just reading text.

        • Washer
        • 7 years ago

        So… either the text is very small or you’re constantly scrolling/flipping pages, right?. Your hands don’t cramp from holding the phone for extended periods? The gorilla arms in my mind would be caused more by the positioning a phone would require, you’re either (again) going to need it closer to your face (and that positioning causing the arm strain) or constantly flipping/scrolling if using larger text.

        Also, I find using strongly backlit screens like on a tablet or smartphone very straining on my eyes. I keep my phone at the lowest brightness level (I momentarily shield the screen if I’m outside and it’s very bright) because of how extremely bright most phones seem to auto adjust to. I imagine that would be worse when reading in bed (where I assume room lighting is at a minimum).

        I don’t know… I guess I just don’t get it. The little extended reading I’ve done on my smartphone has not been enjoyable.

          • Damage
          • 7 years ago

          The iPhone 5 display holds a sufficient amount of text at a reasonable size for me, so it’s not a problem at all. And flipping pages is a simple thumb flick. Really not a problem.

          Heck, I’ve grown to enjoy reading on the iPhone 5 enough that I started wondering why anyone bothers with Kindles and such. I even made a poll about it, to see if I’m all alone here still. 🙂

          You’re right that backlight brightness must be managed, but that’s not hard to do. Just lock/unlock and let the sensor figure out your current ambient conditions. That’s way better than the manual-only slider on the Fire.

          I cannot vouch for the reading experience on your smartphone, of course, unless it’s an iPhone 5. I suspect popular phones like the Galaxy S3 and Lumia 920 would be quite good, too–although I’m not down with the PenTile screen door effect.

            • Voldenuit
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]I suspect popular phones like the Galaxy S3 and Lumia 920 would be quite good, too--although I'm not down with the PenTile screen door effect.[/quote<] Scott, the nokia Lumia 920 uses an LCD display with a RGB matrix and does not have a pentile subpixel arrangement.

            • Damage
            • 7 years ago

            Yes, but I am still not down with the PenTile screen door effect, where it exists. 😉

            • Arag0n
            • 7 years ago

            Basically, the Galaxy S3 and all Google Nexus devices. L920 screen is better than iPhone.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            No it isn’t. There is no apple on the back of it.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            Nothing wrong with that, and I agree being a display snob myself, but you should at least give phone model examples for which the PenTile screen door effect actually exists.

            • Damage
            • 7 years ago

            I find your requirements tiresome.

            If only I controlled a resource that could deliver such examples at the merest request. Oh, wait:

            [url<]https://techreport.com/review/22648/life-with-samsung-galaxy-note[/url<]

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]...phones like the Galaxy S3 and Lumia 920...[/quote<] You linked to a Galaxy Note this time. Thanks for fixing your previous incorrect statement. Nonetheless, PenTile != bad, and not all PenTile screens are the same, and it seems to be very subjective anyway...read a bunch of reviews and see how many mention screendoor effect on the S3 or 920. I guess you can link to TR again and quote Geoff's impression of the S3 😉 but he says it's only visible at <6" and many reviews don't mention it at all. (Screendoor effect can exist on any screen so subpixel layout is a pretty poor way to screen, heh, for it anyway.)

            • Pettytheft
            • 7 years ago

            Just drop the $100 on the nook or kindle with the backlight and you’ll never go back.

          • Voldenuit
          • 7 years ago

          I’m with Damage.

          I use my smartphone (Nokia N8 with 3.5″ screen) for about 50-60% of my reading. It’s always with me and very convenient for small stints of reading when I am waiting on something or before bed. My reading app (FBReader) is configured in night mode with black background and white text.

          The remainder of my reading is on my laptop, where I use Adobe Digital Editions (which sucks majorly) for reading and calibre (which sucks as a reader) for ebook management.

          My wife has similar preferences and reads mostly on her Samsung Galaxy S2. Neither of us have a tablet (well, her laptop is a convertible tablet but she doesn’t use it for reading) or dedicated ebook reader.

          I have not touched a physical book for 2 years.

      • End User
      • 7 years ago

      Text on a current gen smartphone can be as large/clear as a book.

      I prefer holding my smartphone in landscape to holding a book when I am taking transit.

        • Washer
        • 7 years ago

        Do you have small hands?

      • ChronoReverse
      • 7 years ago

      I own a Note you insensitive clod!

      But seriously, the Note is large enough that it’s comfortable to read on it.

      • willmore
      • 7 years ago

      I read over a hundred books on my old palm pilots. I guess it helps to be near sighted.

      • PenGun
      • 7 years ago

      I am quite short sighted and when I take my glasses off my Galaxy S2 is just right for reading. I turn it sideways so it flows a bit better.

      I have not read a book any other way for a long time.

      • dashbarron
      • 7 years ago

      I voted it, but not sure if it is necessarily a preferred choice. I have read several long tomes on an iPod Touch. It was great because 1) It fit in my pocket and 2) the built in and easy-to-use dictionary was great.

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