Corsair adds all-mechanical keyboard, new mice

Corsair’s Vengeance keyboards are pretty sweet. They combine gorgeous industrial designs with Cherry MX Red mechanical switches, and they’re pretty reasonably priced. There’s just one problem: while the majority of the keys use mechanical switches, the macro, function, and paging keys sit on top of rubber dome switches that feel dull and lifeless in comparison. Fortunately, Corsair has unveiled a new keyboard that uses mechanical switches throughout. Say hello to the Vengeance K95.

 

As you can see, this latest model trades the silver base of its siblings for a black anodized finish. Each and every key is backed by a Cherry MX Red mechanical switch. The keys are individually backlit, too, and users have the option of disabling the backlighting for specific keys. The underlying white LEDs offer four levels of intensity, although it looks like the backlight brightness is a universal setting that isn’t adjustable on a per-key basis.

Users can save different backlight profiles to the keyboard’s onboard memory, which also houses profiles for the 18 macro keys. Corsair says the K95 has a 1-ms report rate, 20-key rollover, and anti-ghosting tech. The keyboard is slated to hit the market early this spring with a $150 asking price.

Before the keyboard arrives, you’ll be able to get your hands on updated versions of Corsair’s Vengeance M60 and M90 mice. Dubbed the M65 and M95, these fresh models track motion with a new 8,200-DPI sensor that offers a much higher resolution than the old 5,700-DPI one.

The new mice use more rugged switches than their predecessors, but they’re otherwise similar. The M65 still targets the FPS crowd, while the M95 has extra buttons for MMO players. That said, Corsair has added new colors this time. The MMO model will be available in white and black motifs, while the M65 will echo those colors and add military green to the mix. These mice are due this month with price tags of $70 for the M65 and $80 for the M95.

Comments closed
    • NovusBogus
    • 7 years ago

    Interesting. Remains to be seen how the quality pans out long term but I like that more OEMs are putting out gaming hardware.

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    Still waiting for an ergonomic, split-design keyboard from someone like this.

    You can wail/flame/bitch all you like about whether you think split keyboards are actually ergonomic or not, but it doesn’t stop the fact that there are more than just a handful of people out there who like them and want to buy one with Cherry microswitches in them instead of rubber domes.

    • Bensam123
    • 7 years ago

    Love the Corsair keyboard (I own one). But they definitely need to make one with browns, lighting, that comes with a wrist rest, and is missing those gawd awful G keys on the side. Just chop those off… I’d say the majority of people buy them thinking they’ll use them and just never do.

    • Rectal Prolapse
    • 7 years ago

    I hope the surface of the keys don’t wear off! It seems a lot of the (cheaper?) backlit keyboards have the keycaps worn off after moderate use. For example, my Belkin n52te keypad is just clear plastic on the WASD arranged keys after only a few months. 🙁

    • moog
    • 7 years ago

    What’s good about these mechanical keyboards? I thought all keyboards were mechanical?

      • JohnC
      • 7 years ago

      [url<]http://www.overclock.net/t/491752/mechanical-keyboard-guide[/url<]

      • just brew it!
      • 7 years ago

      “Mechanical” keyboards use old-school individual pushbutton switches under each key instead of the rubber dome/membrane arrangement typical of most PC keyboards. Many people (myself included) vastly prefer the way they feel compared to rubber dome ‘boards.

      Mechanical keyboards on the market today typically use switches made by Cherry Corp. Cherry switches come in several versions (indicated by the color of the stem to which the keycap attaches), and can either have a “linear” feel (where the key depresses smoothly until it bottoms out), or a tactile “bump” (possibly accompanied by an audible “click”) at the activation point, when the key is depressed about halfway. The most common types of Cherry switches are Black (linear switch preferred by many gamers), Red (less stiff version of the Black, also popular with gamers), Blue (tactile with a pronounced audible click, preferred by many people who do a lot of typing), and Brown (tactile without the loud click, essentially a compromise between the Blue and Red types).

      Many Cherry-based keyboards also have anti-ghosting (or full n-key rollover in models having a PS/2 interface), which prevents key lockout when many keys are pressed at the same time. This feature is popular with gamers (obviously), and fast touch typists.

      There are also mechanical keyboards based on the classic “IBM Model M” PC keyboard. The only manufacturer of this type of keyboard is Unicomp (who acquired the rights to the design from Lexmark, who acquired them from IBM). These are essentially a hybrid design where the electrical contacts are made via a membrane sheet (as with rubber dome keyboards), but instead of rubber domes each key incorporates a “buckling spring” mechanism which results in very pronounced tactile and audible feedback, with longer key travel than Cherry-based ‘boards.

      Downsides of mechanical keyboards are cost (especially the Cherry-based models), noise level (especially Cherry Blue and buckling spring), and reduced resistance to spills.

      • albundy
      • 7 years ago

      they are as old school as old school gets. i you are looking for a slim wireless keyboard with a small footprint that looks great, you wont find one in the mechanical keyboard world.

        • just brew it!
        • 7 years ago

        The mechanical switches make “slim” physically impossible; you pretty much need to go with a laptop style keyboard design if you want to keep the thickness down. For the other three features you listed you can probably choose any two. 😉

        “Looks great” is really in the eye of the beholder though. Other than the too-bright Caps/Num/Scroll Lock LEDs I really like the minimalist black and white design of my Rosewill RK-9000. Eventually I’ll get around to opening it up and modding it to reduce the LED brightness.

    • just brew it!
    • 7 years ago

    I like the fact that Corsair mounts the Cherry switches directly to the outer metal casing of their keyboards. Should make it fairly easy to keep things free of ‘board chow! 😀

    Now if only they made them with Cherry Blues I’d consider buying one! (And yes, I know the Corsairs are aimed at gamers, and that’s why they use Reds…)

      • superjawes
      • 7 years ago

      I’d like to see how that feels, but that does seem like a great idea. My Dell keyboard at work looks like it’s about ten years old and never been cleaned (it’s bad).

      I’d like to give all the Cherry switches a whirl, but I am definitely a fan of the blues. They work for gaming and make typing a joy.

      Also, ib4 someone mentions a Model M.

        • just brew it!
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]Also, ib4 someone mentions a Model M.[/quote<] Too late, already mentioned it near the end of #16! 😉

          • superjawes
          • 7 years ago

          That you did and I missed it.

          Although I was still expecting someone to come in an tag a post with a mention.

    • The Dark One
    • 7 years ago

    I’m one of those shameful lefties who probably couldn’t even use a left-handed mouse if I was given the option. On the plus side, I can always blame my bad aim in FPS games on my handedness.

      • Thatguy
      • 7 years ago

      Same here. I might hurt myself trying to use a left handed mouse, that’s how bad i would be at it.

    • JohnC
    • 7 years ago

    Nice for Corsair to finally stop deceiving their customers and release the real mechanical keyboard 😉 The price is kinda high, though – Logitech’s model is being sold for less right now (although it does have less macro keys)… Also, not sure how durable the black anodizing will be – it may wear out very quickly and even minor scratches may be very noticeable on its surface… But I guess you can always use black Sharpie to cover them up 😉

    • MadManOriginal
    • 7 years ago

    I rather liked the silver brushed aluminum backplate on the K60 and K90 but I am prone to brushed silver aluminum looks. Too bad they went to black with these, they don’t look nearly as unique any more. (Although having a separate black plastic background for the add-on macro keys for the K90 was pretty bad looking. I get it from a manufacturing viewpoint but lookswise :/)

    • Meadows
    • 7 years ago

    Judging from the numbers, the mouse should have Avago’s new ADNS-9800 sensor, which would make it pretty precise and comfy indeed. I’m planning to upgrade to an ADNS-9800 endowed mouse myself, in the near future. Not one from Corsair, though. Oh god no.

    • allreadydead
    • 7 years ago

    8 mouses, none is fitting for a leftie not even ambidexterious…
    Meh.

    • tanker27
    • 7 years ago

    I like the Back-lit LEDs. However, i’ll be hard-pressed to replace my Filco.

    • ChronoReverse
    • 7 years ago

    I wonder which sensor the M65 uses. The M60 uses a decent sensor but it has some built-in acceleration that can’t be turned off.

    • R2P2
    • 7 years ago

    Neither of the mice is ambidextrous, right? I hate how mouse pictures usually only show the left side and not the right, so you can’t figure out the handedness on your own.

      • superjawes
      • 7 years ago

      I think unless the mouse is advertised as ambidextrous or left-handed, it’s safe to assume that it is right-handed.

      Also, assume that any gaming mouse is right handed. Mice makers clearly hate left-handed people.

        • dmjifn
        • 7 years ago

        And well they should. We’re a subversive lot, bent on destroying the right-handed world!
        For the horde!

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