OCZ readies PCIe Vector solid-state drive

No question about it, OCZ’s Vector solid-state drive is fast—the drive performed extremely well in our benchmarks. Now, for its next trick, OCZ is going to turn the Vector into an even quicker solution with a PCI Express interface.

Pictured above is the Vector prototype being displayed by OCZ at the Consumer Electronics Show this week. This puppy features dual Indilinx controller linked together by a Marvell RAID chip, and it hooks up to your PC via a PCI Express 2.0 x4 interface. OCZ’s Virtualized Controller Architecture allows the PCIe Vector to appear to the host system as a single drive, despite the dual controllers. TRIM is supported in Windows 8, as well, so rewrite speeds ought to be nice and quick—just like on a Serial ATA drive.

OCZ plans to offer the PCIe Vector in 240GB, 480GB, and 960GB variants. These won’t be cheap, obviously; OCZ says it’s shooting for pricing in the $1.40-1.70 per gigabyte range. That means the 240GB model may set you back at least $336 and at most $408. The high price of entry may be worth it, however, since OCZ claims this is the fastest SSD around.

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    • BIF
    • 7 years ago

    Even in my new PC, I’m not enthusiastic about using up a PCIe slot for just a single drive. Not at these prices.

    But then again, PCIe expansion cards with internal and external ports really only give you permission to spend money on drives for the back-end anyway. So maybe it’s a wash.

    • The Dark One
    • 7 years ago

    Thunderbolt also offers up four lanes of PCIe 2.0 connectivity- I wonder if an external version of this drive would be capable of the same performance.

    • albundy
    • 7 years ago

    wouldnt it be cheaper and faster to buy 3 crucial 960GB m500’s for the same (or less) price as one PCZ 960GB and raid them?

      • internetsandman
      • 7 years ago

      Haha I just realized the hilarious truth behind that. 3 $600 drives RAID together for approximately 2.7 TB to give more performance than a potentially $1800 storage device with 900 (usable, probably) gigs of storage. That M500 looks to be a pretty awesome deal with those prices

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 7 years ago

    I remember when the Raptor drives first came out and I put them in a RAID 0. People were asking me why would I spend so much money on something like that. As far as data transfer goes in your computer, the HDD is the slowest. I loaded levels, booted faster, etc. than any one, dispite I had an “anverage” CPU at the time.

    As far as the fastest? Well, we’ll have to see. Bored one day, I did some quick math in my head, and a 4 SATA controller with 4 SSDs ~500MB/sec will max out a PCI-E 2.0 4X slot. It’s possible they will hit that with a native solution. But that’s like each pill company saying they have the strongest you can get without a prescription because they all have the same ammount of medication.

      • BIF
      • 7 years ago

      “But that’s like each pill company saying they have the strongest you can get without a prescription because they all have the same ammount of medication.”

      So funny and so true.

    • 5150
    • 7 years ago

    Or you can get two drives at a lower cost, RAID 0 them yourself and get something just as fast (if not faster) and offers a lot more flexibility.

      • DragonDaddyBear
      • 7 years ago

      But you can’t use TRIM unless you have Intel’s RAID controller. This, according to the article, supports TRIM.

      Though this would cause delete operations to take longer, couldn’t you use a secure erase as you delete files and have it 0 the cells? I know there are issues with SSD’s relocating the data but it would be better than nothing in a RAID 0, right? Perhaps others have tried this?

        • 5150
        • 7 years ago

        Are people RAIDing SSD’s with motherboard controllers other than Intel’s?

      • Stickmansam
      • 7 years ago

      I wouldn’t trust RAID 0, more like 1+0

        • DragonDaddyBear
        • 7 years ago

        I wouldn’t trust any RAID level. Backup, backup often, and keep it off site if possible.

        But SSD’s are proving reliable if you don’t write much to them and they are not buggy releases. I still have two 1st gen Vertex drives (old firmware, no less) going strong that were at one point in a RAID 0. But at no point did I have “valuable” data on them and only them.

        • 5150
        • 7 years ago

        I’m not arguing the merits of RAID, I’m arguing the merits of a PCI Express SSD in a consumer desktop computer.

          • DragonDaddyBear
          • 7 years ago

          What do I think this will really be used for? Well, like people lifting their trucks and never getting muddy, it’s likely going to be used to compensate someone’s e-peen and never be used for the intended audience… I see your point in that. But there is a small sub-set of users who would actually use it. And, c’mon, who doesn’t want a 2GB/sec max throughput almost 1TB drive?

    • jdaven
    • 7 years ago

    What intriques me about this is the prospect of building a cable-free, fan-free, no moving part, silent desktop.

    I’m obssessed with modular passive PSU’s, no external power GPU’s, passively cooled CPU’s (large heat sink on 35w or less) and PCIe SSD’s. The idea is to build the most powerful configuration along these lines. Oh and there is no wires on the case because you would use the open test bed like the one TR uses. With wireless technologies, the only cables would be motherboard power and wall plugs.

    • Bensam123
    • 7 years ago

    “OCZ claims this is the fastest SSD around.”

    I’m sorry OCZ, I’m all for your drives… But when you start claiming things like that you have to start competing with real PCIE SSD solutions, not two consumer flash drives duct taped together.

    [url<]http://www.fusionio.com/products[/url<]

      • DPete27
      • 7 years ago

      They’re probably referring to “fastest” in certain select performance metrics. Just like car companies claim their vehicle has “best in class fuel economy.”

        • willmore
        • 7 years ago

        where the class is defined as ‘vehicles we make with exactly 4 cup holders and a rounded center section in the dash.’

          • Grigory
          • 7 years ago

          Nice. 🙂

      • BIF
      • 7 years ago

      The 10 TB PCIe version only costs about $126,000. A mere bag of shells.

      Man, we’re all in the wrong business!

        • Bensam123
        • 7 years ago

        Where’d you even find pricing info? I couldn’t find any without calling a representative. XD

    • Firestarter
    • 7 years ago

    I hope this drive makes a big splash so all the produkt managers and such at the big companies get embarrassed into making more great products 🙂

    • Krogoth
    • 7 years ago

    Overkill for the vast majority of desktop users. It doesn’t have enough features and OCZ’s reputation is too shaky to satisfy enterprise market. You cannot boot directly off it either.

    It would make a great scratch disk though for the cost though.

      • drfish
      • 7 years ago

      Where does it say you can’t boot from it?

        • Byte Storm
        • 7 years ago

        Not only that, but had he clicked on the link and ran a quick search for “boot”:
        [quote<]What is the SuperScale Storage Controller and its benefits? ... In the enterprise PCIe implementation of VCA 2.0, users have the option of treating each SuperScale™ accelerator as one more Virtual Logical Drive (LUNs). Storage management software such as file systems, volume managers, and applications are able to access a number of LUNs allowing unprecedented flexibility in storage, while maintaining the hardware assisted features of VCA 2.0 [b<]and enabling the host to boot from the PCIe device[/b<]. [/quote<]

    • drfish
    • 7 years ago

    TRIM support, PCIe, and a 240GB version at a semi affordable price? Nice!

    • yogibbear
    • 7 years ago

    $1632 for 960GB……… That there is some nice price/capacity…

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