Enermax to offer all-white CPU cooler

Some people laughed when enclosure makers first started offering stark white cases. The trend toward arctic-themed PCs hasn’t shown any signs of slowing, though. White cases are everywhere these days, and component makers are churning out more and more parts that are colored to match. We’ve already seen white fans, headphones, drive docks, keyboards, and mice. Now, Enermax is poised to roll out a white version of its ETS-T40 CPU cooler.

As you can see, the cooler’s fan and heatsink have both been given the white-out treatment. The 120-mm fan even has matching white LEDs. Don’t assume Enermax has sacrificed function in the name of form, though. The company says the white coating is thermally conductive and just as efficient at transferring heat as the bare metal. With a dissipation rating of 200W, the ETS-T40 should be able to cool even overclocked CPUs with ease.

And, yes, that’s a black version blending into the background on the left. The stealthy variant is likely to be more popular than the white version, and I’m curious to see if colored heatsinks catch on. As much as I like the look of bare metal fins, they don’t really match the colors seen inside most modern systems.

The ETS-T40 is a little on the large size, as towers with 120-mm fans tend to be. If you’re looking for something a little more compact, Enermax has a smaller tower with a 92-mm fan. This model is due in March and should be reasonably affordable. You’ll have to make do with the bare metal aesthetic, though; the smaller design hasn’t been given the same color treatment as its 120-mm sibling.

Comments closed
    • Meadows
    • 7 years ago

    I love white stuff. I have a wardrobe full of crystal white clothes.

    If the selection grows enough, I might replace my case and fans, but not at this time.

      • Krogoth
      • 7 years ago

      Meth and crack user detected.

        • Meadows
        • 7 years ago

        What the cock are you talking about.

    • LoneWolf15
    • 7 years ago

    “I’m curious to see if colored heatsinks catch on.”

    I have a Thermalright TRUE Black for a reason, although I like their black-anodized method better than the painted look these have.

    • flip-mode
    • 7 years ago

    Hey, just noticed the fan clips. Those things look like a joy compared to most if not all other fan mounting methods I’ve seen. Speaking to the clips on the white and black one; the clips on the fan in the bottom picture look like the more typical pain in the arse.

    • Bensam123
    • 7 years ago

    Definitely neat… Usually you just have a choice between aluminum and copper. Thinking on this, I’m surprised we haven’t seen any gold or silver plated heatsinks, which would be really flipping cool and trendy (even if more expensive).

      • Farting Bob
      • 7 years ago

      Gold or silver plated heatsinks would be a lot more expensive for no real benefit. They might sell a few though, just do a limited edition run of a popular high end heatsink. Folks over at [url<]http://www.million-dollar-pc.com/[/url<] will find a good aesthetic setup for them im sure, although most use WC in their builds.

        • ronch
        • 7 years ago

        If you ask me, I don’t really care all that much how an HSF looks as long as it does a great job at cooling my CPU and is silent. All those gold and silver just jack the price up.

          • willmore
          • 7 years ago

          If you were really concerned with cooling, you’d go water and stop caring about the HSF of the day scene. 🙂

          Edited to add:

          Then again, that would make you start being concerned with different colors of tubing, cooling fluid, and radiators, etc.. So, I guess there’s no winning that one.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            Water coolers with 240mm radiators put two fans right at the edge of the case. If you’re not overclocking, a tower with a 120mm or 140mm fan (for those creative fan mounts that put a 140mm fan in a 120mm space) is about as quiet as it gets.

          • Bensam123
          • 7 years ago

          No one is forcing you to buy one. They also change how the item looks. That’s why these are painted in the first place.

        • Bensam123
        • 7 years ago

        I don’t think the paint provides any real benefit either… Somethings are about aesthetics. Gold or silver plating doesn’t cost that much, we aren’t talking about making the item out of gold. Gold and silver also conduct heat quite well.

    • puppetworx
    • 7 years ago

    [Insert racist comment about ‘whitey’ here]

    • flip-mode
    • 7 years ago

    Dunno, I like the white one. I’d buy it. Put that thing in one of those white cases and the curtains match the carpet.

      • LoneWolf15
      • 7 years ago

      [url<]http://xkcd.com/508/[/url<]

    • eitje
    • 7 years ago

    I was hoping this meant they were making a ceramic HSF.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 7 years ago

    edit: beaten to it

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]The company says the white coating is thermally conductive and just as efficient at transferring heat as the bare metal.[/quote<] I'm sorry, but no; The laws of physics says otherwise.

      • just brew it!
      • 7 years ago

      Not necessarily. If the coating’s surface is rougher than the bare metal (thereby increasing the total surface area exposed to the air stream) it could still be a wash… or even a small net win.

        • Chrispy_
        • 7 years ago

        It’s a nice theory but sadly we both know they’ve just sprayed it with cheap white paint and then got the marketing department to make up some lies about thermally conductive superpaint for the gullible fashion victims 😉

          • just brew it!
          • 7 years ago

          Even so, thermal resistance is a function of both the thermal conductivity and the thickness. While the paint certainly has poor conductivity compared to metal, a layer of paint is extremely thin, and so (assuming comparable surface smoothness) isn’t going to have a big effect regardless.

            • ronch
            • 7 years ago

            I’m gonna be having second thoughts about that white paint unless they used white TIM to paint the heatsink! 🙂

            • Chrispy_
            • 7 years ago

            I was actually thinking about basic laws of thermodynamics; colour doesn’t come into it at all, because as flip-mode pointed out, the amount of radiation will be negligible compared to conductance (via forced convection) between the fins and the air.

            The paint coating between the fins and the air will act as an insulator between the fins and the air unless the conductivity λp of the paint multiplied by the increase in the surface area is greater than λf of the fins. [i<]All paint*[/i<] is polymer-based, which means [b<]even the most conductive paints are orders of magnitude poorer conductors than metals[/b<]. Given that the increase in surface area of even a very rough-drying paint is going to be pretty close to zero, I fail to see how paint of any type, thickness or composition can be better than no paint. Now, I know that overall, the difference between paint and no paint is going to be pretty small, but if we go back to my original quote, the laws of physics say that it cannot be [i<]as efficient[/i<] at transferring heat as the bare metal. I would cut them so slack if they said "almost as efficient", but they won't do that because no marketing department like the word "almost" 😉 [i<]*Oxidative cure coatings. Far less common, and whilst potentially better than polymer paints, still an insulator compared to metal. Metallic bond vs Covalent/Ionic bond. If you don't understand their effects in relation to thermal conductivity, stop downranking me and go and promote ignorance on Youtube comments like the rest of the uneducated masses.[/i<] /rant at people's general ignorance of the world we live in.

            • just brew it!
            • 7 years ago

            I just realized something that probably makes the entire argument moot. The cross section of each fin is very, very tiny compared to its surface area. Orders of magnitude tinier. The heat needs to flow lengthwise down the fin before it can be conducted away by the air flow. So I’d be willing to bet that the performance is almost completely determined by the cross section of the fins and their contact area with the heat pipes, not by the coating (or lack thereof) on the fins’ surface.

            • flip-mode
            • 7 years ago

            It’s a good point. Then again, I wouldn’t be surprised to see it still do fine on the test bench.

      • flip-mode
      • 7 years ago

      You’re speaking of thermal emissivity, and yes, being white doesn’t help that, but emissivity and conductivity are two different things. There’s nothing saying white cannot be conductive. I think the fact that the thing has air blowing over it means convection is going to be the dominant method of heat transfer, so much so that the loss of emissivity probably has a negligible impact.

      The methods of heat loss:
      radiation (emissivity)
      conduction
      convection
      evaporation

      It feels like a save assumption to make that as in regards to the case of CPU cooling, any device that maintains even a relatively low level of convection isn’t going to be shedding much heat through radiation.

      • Waco
      • 7 years ago

      It could easily be as conductive if it’s loaded with ceramic or metal particles…that combined with the rough surface may make it a wash.

      • hasseb64
      • 7 years ago

      +1 Chrispy_

      • ludi
      • 7 years ago

      The laws of physics say it is possible for an appropriately designed coating to appear white by reflecting most of the visible light spectra while still having good emissivity characteristics in the infrared range. Can’t prove that’s what they did here, but it is possible.

        • just brew it!
        • 7 years ago

        I assumed he was just griping about the additional thermal resistance of the paint coating (could be wrong).

        And I still think surface roughness is a much bigger factor, since we’re blowing air across it with a fan. Emissitivity would matter if we were trying to radiate the heat off into a vacuum, as with the cooling systems on a space station; but that’s not what we’re doing here.

          • ludi
          • 7 years ago

          From what I understand, polished aluminum actually has worse performance than anodized for this very reason — or rather, it’s combination of increasing the roughness and reducing the reflectivity. Of course, anodizing is a chemical bonding process, so with paint coatings it’s harder to say…

    • dpaus
    • 7 years ago

    I’m sorry, is the [i<]Tech[/i<] Report or the [i<]Fashion[/i<] Report??

      • James296
      • 7 years ago

      it’s the Fashion Tech Report

        • ronch
        • 7 years ago

        If so, there aren’t enough reviews of Apple products or Ultrabooks here…

          • willmore
          • 7 years ago

          Because they are *so* yesterday.

    • LauRoman
    • 7 years ago

    … so it can turn a greish yellow from the dust and heat.

      • LoneWolf15
      • 7 years ago

      My first thought too.

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