$100 Obsidian 350D is Corsair’s first microATX case

Corsair is known for its large, roomy enthusiast cases, but it hasn’t dabbled in smaller form factors. That’s changing today with the new Obsidian Series 350D, which is Corsair’s first enclosure designed to fit microATX and Mini-ITX motherboards exclusively.

Despite its compact 17.7" x 8.3" x 17.3" dimensions and lack of support for full-size ATX mobos, the Obsidian Series 350D has plenty of room for storage, expansion, and cooling. Users can fit up to two 5.25" optical drives, two 3.5" hard drives, and three 2.5" SSDs. The hard drives slide in at the bottom on removable trays, while the SSDs go in a separate cage near the top. That SSD cage is fed from the right side of the enclosure to simplify cable management.

The gap between the 2.5" and 3.5" bays leaves room for up to two "full-length" graphics cards. To keep those cards (and the rest of the system) cool, Corsair lets you install two 140-mm intake fans under the front panel. The company also leaves room for three exhaust fans: two 140-mm ones at the top and a 120-mm spinner at the rear. Users with more exotic cooling needs can even forgo the top exhausts and install a 280-mm radiator in their place.

Out of the box, though, the Obsidian Series 350D keeps things simple. It comes with only two fans: a 140-mm front intake and a 120-mm rear exhaust.

This enclosure has some of the same conveniences as its bigger siblings. There are USB 3.0 front-panel connectors, rubber-grommeted cable routing holes, tool-less drive mounts and thumb screws, removable dust filters behind the front intakes and under the PSU, a big cut-out in the motherboard tray behind the processor, and so on.

The 350D will be available next month in two flavors. A windowed model will sell for $109.99, and Corsair will offer a plain variant priced at just $99.99. That will make the 350D not just Corsair’s smallest enclosure, but also one of its most affordable models.

Comments closed
    • Wildchild
    • 6 years ago

    That case is sexy as hell.

    • Synchromesh
    • 6 years ago

    I like this case. Just wish Lian Li would make something similar – straight and to the point. SLI in a smaller case has been my dream for a while too and this would work out great!

    • shank15217
    • 6 years ago

    Whats the point of two optical drives? This isn’t 2006..

    • Bensam123
    • 6 years ago

    it definitely looks pretty, but there is quite a bit of dead space in that case in the front. It wouldn’t have hurt them to compact things a little bit. That’s only a inch shorter then my Lian-Li ATX case.

    For instance they could’ve put the PSU on the top and butted the 51/2s right next to it (leaving room for cables)or moved them to the bottom, then flipped the hard drive enclosures sideways. They could’ve knocked off maybe 2-4 inches.

    Taking a second look at this, this is actually pretty bloated for a micro-atx case, putting those measurements into context. But I guess my expectations for space management grows (shrinks? XD) the smaller the form factor they go with.

    • albundy
    • 6 years ago

    great looking case. and very well designed for ventilation. they could have shrunk the case down a bit more, but the h100i fans would probably be too close to the cpu. it has a very sleek and clean look. not sure how dual gpu cards would work in this with heat dissipation in such a small enclosure.

    • smilingcrow
    • 6 years ago

    I have a mATX case; Antec P180 Mini.
    I wanted a high quality case that was a bit smaller and cheaper than the equivalent ATX case. With hindsight I wish I’d gone ATX for a number of reasons:

    Installation is fiddly in the Mini but that’s partly due to its dual chamber design.
    There are still more limited choices of mATX boards especially if you want more than the basic features.
    From a price perspective you might even need to pay more to get the features in a mATX board which would negate any savings made on the case.

    I recently purchased an Asus P8Z77-M PRO because it has 4 fan headers all of which can be controlled via software; amongst other reasons.
    It’s in my Mini which is a bit of a dinosaur now (No USB 3 or mobo tray cut-out) so I’m looking to replace it and ATX seems the way to go.
    So I do think these large mATX cases are rather niche not that this takes away from them if they suit you.

      • Bensam123
      • 6 years ago

      The mini P180 is hardly a micro-atx case. I’ve had it and worked with it before, there is enough space in that case that they could’ve put a full sized ATX motherboard in it.

        • smilingcrow
        • 6 years ago

        It’s a case that supports up to mATX so in what way is it not a mATX case? Maybe you are confusing it with the P180 (non Mini)!

        Here’s a photo showing that there’s no extra room once you install a mATX mobo:

        [url<]http://www.silentpcreview.com/files/images/antec-minip180/mp180-20.jpg[/url<]

          • JustAnEngineer
          • 6 years ago

          I’ve had the P160, P180 Mini and currently a P182. The P180 Mini is un-Tardis-like. It’s bigger on the outside than it is on the inside.

            • smilingcrow
            • 6 years ago

            “It’s bigger on the outside than it is on the inside.”

            Ain’t Physics a bitch; outside of kids fantasy TV shows.

            • JustAnEngineer
            • 6 years ago

            The point is that there’s about as much room for stuff inside this new Corsair Obsidian micro-ATX case as there are in micro-ATX cases from other manufacturers that have half to two-thirds of the outside dimensions.

            It’s a wasteful and inefficient design.

          • Bensam123
          • 6 years ago

          The size of the case. There is like 1-2 inches above the motherboard by the fan, below it between the PSU and the motherboard (with the metal between it). The case is overall ginormous and heavy.

            • smilingcrow
            • 6 years ago

            You need some free space otherwise it’s impossible to install the mobo.
            I find it a bit cramped for my tastes.
            Yes, it’s a big case for mATX but that goes with the dual chamber design and the built for silence philosophy.
            Pro rata compared to a regular ATX P180 I’m not so sure that it’s disproportionate.

            • Bensam123
            • 6 years ago

            It’s as big as my Lian-Li ATX case. You don’t need excess room to install things. Once they’re installed, they’re installed. You don’t open up your case and fiddle with stuff all the time (well I don’t). That could be a personal taste thing though. The top 1-2 inches in the case are covered by the fan and inaccessible as well.

            The dual chamber is for airflow, not silence and it’s removed in newer models, such as the p280.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 6 years ago

      I like the Asus P8Z77-M Pro. It’s in an Antec NSK2480 in my living room PC.

      • Decelerate
      • 6 years ago

      Also have a P180 mini, and wish the 350D was out when I needed it. My brother has the 600T/650D (the one that looks like the 350D but bigger) and it was a [b<]joy[/b<] to work with compared to the mini P180. The dual-chamber is a nice idea, but in practice it's a pain.

    • Sargent Duck
    • 6 years ago

    I like the aesthetics of the case. At least with the non-window version, it’s clean, no frills and not crying out “Look at me!!” It wouldn’t look out of place at all.

    That being said, given that it only fits matx boards, do we really need a 2nd optical drive? Really? Or a second video card? People who have those items will most likely be wanting a bigger case anyways. Get rid of those useless space wasters and shrink this down. Also, not a fan of the top vents. A lot of paper and crap end up on top. But it does look like a worthy successor to My Antec Sonata III.

      • auxy
      • 6 years ago

      I have a 5.25″ SATA RAMdrive already. To be fair, I don’t HAVE any of these things, but if I did… without the second 5.25″ bay, I couldn’t also have a fan controller, audio bay, or an optical drive, if I were so inclined.

      I’m personally glad some vendors are making MicroATX cases that will accomodate lots of drives, dual GPU, 240mm radiators, and so on. I don’t need a larger motherboard, so why should I have to have a larger case than necessary?

        • slowriot
        • 6 years ago

        If you had even one of those things you’d be in a very small niche.

        This case is larger than necessary. It is the size of a smaller ATX case.

          • auxy
          • 6 years ago

          See my reply to your other post. Optical drives are a “very small niche”?

      • Pez
      • 6 years ago

      Dual bay res/pump for w/c

      • Chrispy_
      • 6 years ago

      This! The ‘m’ in mATX is about space-saving, and I hardly think space-saving is a priority for a dual-optical, dual-GPU, triple-radiator watercooled behemoth. These people will buy full-towers for better cooling.

      I think your average build could use 0-1 optical drives, 2 hard drives at most, a single GPU and a small air cooler (92mm is ample for some quite sizeable and quiet overclocks, assuming that you even have a z68/z77 board in the first place….)

        • phez
        • 6 years ago

        Then get an ITX board.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 6 years ago

    great looking case.

    • mcnabney
    • 6 years ago

    Not sure what all the down-votes are about complaining about size. This is a really big case for one that can’t hold ATX

    Compare:
    Corsair Obsidian 350D 17.5 x 8.3 x 17.7 / 2×5.25, 2×3.5, 3×2.5
    Silverstone SG09 11.6 x 8.6 x 13.9 / 0x5.25, 2×3.5, 1×2.5

    The Silverstone is 1357 cubic inches compared to 2571 with the Corsair.

    The storage arrangement of the Silverstone makes more sense too – two 3.5s and an SSD.

    Oh, and same price.

      • phez
      • 6 years ago

      Obviously the SG09 is smaller if there is no 5.25 bay.

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 6 years ago

        SG09 accommodates a slim optical drive. They’re not much more expensive than the standard half-height 5¼” drives are.

        P.S.: When was the last time that you saw a full-height device of any kind?

          • HisDivineOrder
          • 6 years ago

          A slim SLOT optical drive. You need to be sure to add that in there.

          When was the last time that you saw a slot blu-ray optical drive that wasn’t outrageously more than its non-slot equivalent? And if all you want is a DVD drive, why wouldn’t most people go buy themselves a USB DVD drive for the rare moments they need one instead?

        • mcnabney
        • 6 years ago

        A 5.25″ bay doesn’t add 1200 cubic inches. The bottom half of the Corsair case in the front is total dead space. That’s a quarter of the case’s volume that is completely useless.

    • south side sammy
    • 6 years ago

    the world’s been getting smaller and some people are still dragging their feet………

    not a very well thought out case design as far as ventilation goes.

    • hubick
    • 6 years ago

    Does it fit a standard size ATX power supply then?

    That interchangeability is what’s kept me with my Ultra “Microfly” microATX cases.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 6 years ago

      Most mATX cases do, and based on the photo that shows a standard ATX Corsair PSU I’d have to say this one does too.

    • flip-mode
    • 6 years ago

    It’s a very nice looking case.

    It probably could have been 2-1/2″ shorter without the feet on the bottom and the fan space up top, but those are important cooling features.

    The SSD drive accomodation is great to see.

    I’ll have to give a harder look at this thing next time I do a build.

    • bjm
    • 6 years ago

    Wow, this case looks awesome and the features make it even better. I can understand some folks wanting it to be smaller given the MicroATX label, but sometimes those cases sacrifice too much to get that small. Standard ATX cases with similar features are too big. This fits the bill perfectly.

    • Chrispy_
    • 6 years ago

    Disappointing start; the whole point of mATX is the ‘m’.
    I have four Full-ATX Silencio 550 cases next to me right now, and they’re almost exactly the same dimensions (slightly lower total volume, in fact). Each of those 550’s takes an EATX motherboard with room for 7 full-length cards, 8x 3.5″ bays and 2x optical bays, so what Corsair have [i<]actually[/i<] released is a larger-than-ATX case that is incompatible with your average ATX motherboard. mATX is only worth considering if you are looking to save space, otherwise you'd be better served with a full-ATX board and case anyway </facepalm> I hope Corsair will make smaller cases to fit more common builds. I don't think a dual-140mm watercooling radiator or a pair of full-length graphics cards represent your typical user, and it would be sad if this large case was Corsair's only foray into smaller form factors. Their Aesthetic and design choices really are top-notch.

      • superjawes
      • 6 years ago

      [quote<]I have four Full-ATX Silencio 550 cases next to me right now, and they're almost exactly the same dimensions (slightly lower total volume, in fact).[/quote<]? 350D: 17.7" x 8.3" x 17.3" = 2541.543 in^3 S 550: 8.3" x 17.8" x 19.9" = 2940.026 in^3 Unless I got the wrong model, the 550 is more than two inches taller and has 15% more volume than the 350D. Not to mention that most users do not use the volume of a mid-ATX case (or the expansion slots on a full ATX motherboard). mATX alternatives might not seem that much smaller, but the volume is better utilized.

        • Chrispy_
        • 6 years ago

        I just measured it with a tape measure very roughly, hence the word ‘almost’. HxWxD 17.5″x 8″ x 18″ = ~2500 in^3

        Regardless of my measuring accuracy or regional variations, “about 18 by about 8 by about 18” is Full-ATX to me The 550’s are by no means the most compact ATX cases, they just happened to be the closest ones to me when I read the article.

        More importantly these 550’s I have aren’t as wide and aren’t as tall. Who cares about the depth as long as it’s reasonable? – it’s just a mess of cables in a dark corner under your desk.

        I’m not going to split hairs. This is big for a mATX just like the Bitfenix Prodigy is big for an mITX.
        I’m still waiting for a more “micro” sized micro-ATX case in the vein of [url=http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811129035<]this[/url<] or [url=http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811163058<]this[/url<].

          • DancinJack
          • 6 years ago

          I’m curious as to why and how people would be better served with a full atx mobo and case? Only real thing you lose is PCI slots.

            • mcnabney
            • 6 years ago

            More fan headers on full ATX boards. Usually more SATA ports too. There aren’t too many mATX boards that support SLI/X-fire. Room for bigger coolers.

            • auxy
            • 6 years ago

            Sorry, but all of this is conjecture, assumption, and disingenuous — or even dishonest — rhetoric. Virtually all MicroATX boards have the full assortment of SATA ports, and there are MANY MicroATX boards that support dual-GPU. Space for coolers is dependent almost entirely upon your enclosure, and has very little to do with your motherboard.

            There is no justification for full ATX beyond expansion slots, and frankly, Thin-ITX is enough for most people, with Mini-DTX for the gamers. Your “enthusiasts”, with dual-GPU and accessory soundcards and so on, will be on LGA2011 anyway.

            • slowriot
            • 6 years ago

            Motherboards can be a significant factor in the size of heatsinks you can use or the fan configurations. Many motherboards have the DIMM slots placed too close to the CPU socket to allow for certain designs (such as dual fans). As well other heatsinks, such as on power circuitry, can cause space issues. This specific quality (the ability to accommodate larger heatsinks) is a regular part of motherboard reviews.

            As well, as the motherboard shrinks it becomes even more of an issue. You can run into issues like the nearest PCIe slot being unusable with certain heatsinks. The memory slots are almost certainly closer. Things like the 8/4-pin motherboard power connector can be in really bad spots which cause issues.

            There’s no justification in making a case the size of many ATX cases that can only fit mATX motherboards, which is what Corsair did with this case.

            • auxy
            • 6 years ago

            [quote=”slowriot”<]There's no justification in making a case the size of many ATX cases that can only fit mATX motherboards, which is what Corsair did with this case.[/quote<]Really? No justification? How about making a smaller case that still supports full-featured systems? I think you just went full retard. You should do the rest of us a favor and sterilize yourself. "slow" riot indeed.

            • slowriot
            • 6 years ago

            You can get a case this small that supports ATX motherboards. Which would be a true full featured system at this size. Or you can get a smaller case than this Corsair model that supports mATX and can accommodate a similar range of accessories like bay devices, multi-GPU, and appropriate cooling for that hardware.

            The Corsair Obsidian 350D is to mATX what the BitFenix Prodigy is to mITX.

            I thought your hyper insecurity was pretty funny too.

            EDIT: To just spell it out with numbers:

            SilverStone SG09 8.66″ x 11.61″ x 13.94″ = 1401.56
            LIAN LI PC-V355 11.14″ x 10.35″ x 15.2″ = 1752.54
            SilverStone TJ08-E 15.16″ x 8.27″ x 14.72″ = 1845.49
            SilverStone FT03 11.18″ x 9.25″ x 19.17″ = 1982.47
            LIAN LI PC-V354 9.65″ x 12.60″ x 16.54″ = 2011.1
            LIAN LI PC-A04 18.11″ x 7.4″ x 15.20″ = 2047.73
            Fractal Design Define Mini 19.29″ x 8.27″ x 15.55″ = 2480.67
            Fractal Design Arc Mini 19.06″ x 8.27″ x 15.84″ = 2496.8
            Corsair Obsidian 350D 17.7″ x 8.3″ x 17.3″ = 2541.54

            • auxy
            • 6 years ago

            No, sorry, you’re still retarded.

            Putting a full-sized ATX motherboard into a case this size means you’re sacrificing space for other components.

            For example, you put a full-sized ATX board into a case with a similar design like this; suddenly WHOOPS! No room on top for that nice 280mm radiator.

            Saving space on the motherboard lets you put more components in the same space. There’s no downside, and some people like the case. You don’t like it, fine, whatever; you’re retarded, so nobody cares what you think anyway.

            Don’t imply it’s some fault of the case or the case design. It was made the way it is on purpose.

            • Metonymy
            • 6 years ago

            There are still specialist cards that have remained PCI, such as audiophile-grade audio cards. I have an ESI Audio card that I’m going to hate to part with, but I’m guessing that they just aren’t doing the volume to justify moving.

          • bjm
          • 6 years ago

          This case isn’t intended to be a smaller version of Silencio-like cases, though. It’s intended to be a smaller version of the other Obsidian cases. The standard ATX cases in this series are already 20.5″ and 19.5″, larger those most other standard ATX cases. Similarly, the 350D case carries much of the same features and is naturally going to be larger than other MicroATX cases.

          And if you’re stashing the case under your desk, why do you even care about height?

          • PixelArmy
          • 6 years ago

          mATX vs ATX is [i<]only[/i<] a 2.4" difference (hence the size difference between these cases)... I'm not sure how micro you're going to get...

          • RdVi
          • 6 years ago

          I care a lot about depth. It means the case can fit under my desk without protruding out. I love the Lian-Li PC-X series of cases for this reason – but I don’t love the prices they carry. The other advantage of a shallow case is the front intake fans are closer to the hardware, allowing for direct cooling without an ugly side intake. Front intakes always allow for the best dust filtering also.

          Even on a desk, a shallower case will allow for you to put speakers or your mouse pad in front of the case giving you more overall usable desk room.

          So for me, a shallow case is much more important than the height. I will sacrifice height for something shallower – I wish more manufacturers would put the drive bays on the top/bottom making for a taller but shallower case.

          What corsair have done here is make a case that suits everyone. It allows for 240 rads on the top (making it a little taller than necessary), a 2 slot GPU in the bottom PCI-E slot (again, taller) and it has easy access to the cable routing holes next to the side of the motherboard (deeper). And it’s wide enough to fit any air cooler. They want to cater to everyone but not specialise in any one thing. That means case size had to be sacrificed… I’m looking for a small case, but I do like what they’ve allowed here. It’s most like the Fractal Design Define Mini, but with an extra PCI-E slot. It’s a no sacrifices mATX case, where as something like the Silverstone SG09/10 is a full sacrifice mATX case. I’m leaning towards the SG10, but I’m tempted by the idea of having a 240 rad…

            • RdVi
            • 6 years ago

            Just to be clear, my desk has a divider/support panel running across it which cuts the free space underneath in half. If your desk doesn’t have this, then clearly depth won’t be an issue. On the desk it is still an issue regardless especially if you have a shallow desk like I have at work. Most cases on that have to run sideways behind the monitor as having them in a normal layout puts them right in front of your mouse pad which is a bit restricting and is kind of a bother in your peripheral.

            • Chrispy_
            • 6 years ago

            Heh, a short enough case (which the 350D is not) would probably fit underneath that divider.

            I’ll agree that a shorter case is good if you have the PC on top of your desk, but even here the 350D is a bit of a failure, since it’s still in the same ballpark as most ATX mid-towers. What I find works well for desk PC’s is the Shuttle-cube design that you can plonk your screen on top of, otherwise an FT03 that trades footprint for height.

    • TEAMSWITCHER
    • 6 years ago

    That’s a clean and sweet looking build. I love the RED and BLACK color scheme. And Cross-Fire too. I love it!!

    • DPete27
    • 6 years ago

    Doing battle against the [url=http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811352008<]Fractal Design Arc Mini[/url<] and the [url=http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811163182<]Silverstone Tremjin TJ08-e[/url<]. Review comparisons should be interesting. [edit] Nevermind, [url=http://www.anandtech.com/show/6917/corsair-obsidian-350d-case-review<]Anandtech has it covered[/url<]

      • Zenphic
      • 6 years ago

      Thanks for the review. The Fractal Design Define Mini would be my personal favorite because I put a lot more points in the noise department. It’s also flexible if you want more cooling performance.

        • slowriot
        • 6 years ago

        Just buy a smaller ATX case. The Define Mini is just as ridiculously over sized as this Corsair case. It is also ridiculously heavy. All for that you get poor placement of cable holes, minimal sound dampening improvement and a terrible front design.

        The Define Mini front: Case door with only vents on the side. Behind that is a set of smaller swinging doors in front of the fans which significantly block air and cause air turbulence noise and behind those are fan filters that screw into the fans. The result is an increased level of noise, decreased air flow, and a fan filter cleaning process that is highly annoying.

        It looks cool though… (Yes, I’m a bitter former Define Mini owner.)

    • cynan
    • 6 years ago

    It looks interesting for people wanting to attempt custom water cooling in as small a space as possible. But otherwise, kind of big for an micro ATX.

    • Dposcorp
    • 6 years ago

    Gotta love the fact its already on newegg.

    [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811139020[/url<] here is the funniest stuff though 🙂 '00-19-BB-D8-F1-85Corsair Obsidian Series 350D CC-9011028-WW Black Aluminum / Steel MicroATX Case NEW, High Performance Micro ATX Obsidian Series Be the first to review this product... OUT OF STOCK. Aluminum / Steel MicroATX Mid Tower ADD SELECTED TO CART ► DISCONTINUED This item is currently out of stock and it may or may not be restocked.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 6 years ago

      And “IMAGE COMING SOON” in the product photos. lol

    • NeelyCam
    • 6 years ago

    [quote<]$100 Obsidian 350D is Corsair's first microATX case[/quote<] Too big. It's called a [b<]micro[/b<]ATX case - make it look like one

      • tay
      • 6 years ago

      Err this is what 10% smaller than an ATX case? I’m waiting for the Silverstone SG10 or something of that size. [url<]https://techreport.com/news/24179/silverstone-sg10-case-accepts-microatx-mobos-full-sized-components[/url<]

      • crystall
      • 6 years ago

      Other good-quality microATX cases have been this size like the Antec P180 Mini. There’s also smaller ones around but those tend to be real cramped and they’re usually good enough only for builds without a dedicated graphics card or significant storage. That and the fact that they usually have worse cooling performance.

        • superjawes
        • 6 years ago

        You can get shorter cases, but since the size is limited to mATX boards, that typically results in rotating the motherboard and a larger footprint. It might be shorter than a tower like this, but you will always be contrained by the size of the components.

        • NeelyCam
        • 6 years ago

        If you want great everything, go with a big case and a large board.

        But I want small. Is it really [i<]necessary[/i<] to have space for two optical drives and two [b<]huge[/b<] graphics cards in a [b<]micro[/b<]ATX case...? There is so much wasted space in this case. Yes - cooling is better, and you can add a massive amount of HDDs here. But I rather have something compact.

      • Flying Fox
      • 6 years ago

      +1

      17″ height really can’t be called “micro” anymore.

      • superjawes
      • 6 years ago

      The “micro” comes from the ATX motherboard, not the actual size. If you really want small, you need to be looking at miniITX.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 6 years ago

      Agreed. The Corsair Obsidian 350D is 46½ liters.
      [url<]http://www.corsair.com/us/pc-cases/obsidian-series-pc-case/obsidian-series-350d-micro-atx-pc-case.html[/url<] The Silverstone Temjin TJ08-e is 29 liters. [url<]http://www.silverstonetek.com/product.php?pid=303&area=en[/url<] The Rosewill Line-M is 27 liters. [url<]http://www.rosewill.com/products/2383/ProductDetail_Overview.htm[/url<]

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This