GeForce GTX 770 serves up GK104 in Titan-style package for $399

The first member of the GeForce GTX 700 series is barely a week old, and already, Nvidia has added a second offering to the lineup. Say hello to the GeForce GTX 770, which is coming out today at a more affordable $399.

This card is based on the same GK104 graphics processor as the GeForce GTX 680. It shares many of the GTX 680’s key specs, but the reference core and boost clocks have been cranked up to 1046MHz and 1085MHz, respectively, and the memory speed has been raised to 7 GT/s. As you’d expect, these increases have taken their toll on the card’s power envelope, which has fattened up to 230W (compared to 195W for the GTX 680). Here’s how the specs compare at a glance:

  GPU

base

clock

(MHz)

GPU

boost

clock

(MHz)

Shader

ALUs

Textures

filtered/

clock

ROP

pixels/

clock

Memory

transfer

rate

Memory

interface

width

(bits)

Peak

power

draw

GeForce GTX 580 772 512 64 48 4 GT/s 384 244W
GeForce GTX 680 1006 1058 1536 128 32 6 GT/s 256 195W
GeForce GTX 770 1046 1085 1536 128 32 7 GT/s 256 230W
GeForce GTX 780 863 900 2304 192 48 6 GT/s 384 250W
GeForce GTX Titan 836 876 2688 224 48 6 GT/s 384 250W
GeForce GTX 690 915 1019 3072 256 64 6 GT/s 2 x 256 300W

And here’s how the numbers above translate into peak theoretical rates, for both the GTX 770 and its peers:

  Peak pixel

fill rate

(Gpixels/s)

Peak

bilinear

filtering

(Gtexels/s)

Peak

bilinear

fp16

filtering

(Gtexels/s)

Peak

shader

arithmetic

rate

(tflops)

Peak

rasterization

rate

(Gtris/s)

Memory

bandwidth

(GB/s)

GeForce GTX 580 37 49 49 1.6 3.1 192
GeForce GTX 680 34 135 135 3.3 4.2 192
GeForce GTX 770 35 139 139 3.3 4.3 224
GeForce GTX 780 43 173 173 4.2 4.5 288
GeForce GTX Titan 42 196 196 4.7 4.4 288
GeForce GTX 690 65 261 261 6.5 8.2 385
Radeon HD 7970 GHz 34 134 67 4.3 2.1 288
Radeon HD 7990 64 256 128 8.2 4.0 576

The higher clock rates give the GTX 770 a small but substantial advantage over the GTX 680, especially in the memory bandwidth department. Considering this card will cost $399, while the cheapest GTX 680 at Newegg is priced at $419.99, that’s not a bad proposition. We’d expect the GTX 770 perform very similarly to AMD’s Radeon HD 7970 GHz.

There’s much more to the GTX 770 than higher reference clocks, though. This card includes the same premium, Titan-style cooler as the GTX 780, which is one of the quietest cards we’ve ever tested. Considering the GTX 770 has a tighter thermal envelope than the GTX 780, chances are it will be just as quiet, if not quieter. Also, the GTX 770 features a refined boost algorithm that accounts for temperatures as well as power utilization. There should be plenty of extra headroom in this bad boy on top of the higher reference speeds.

In fact, Nvidia’s partners have a gaggle of superclocked GTX 770 variants ready to go, all with clock speeds well above those of the reference card. Take a look:

  Base clock

(MHz)

Boost clock

(MHz)

Memory transfer

rate (MT/s)

Asus GTX770-DC2OC-2GD5 1058 1110 7010
EVGA GTX 770 SC 1085 1137 7010
EVGA GTX 770 SC ACX 1111 1163 7010
Gigabyte N770OC-2GD 1137 1189 7010
MSI GeForce GTX 770 Gaming 1098 1150 7010
MSI GeForce GTX 770 Lightning 1150 1202 7010
Zotac GeForce GTX 770 1059 1111 7010
Zotac GeForce GTX 770 AMP! Edition 1150 1202 7200

You’ll find pictures of some of these cards in the image gallery below.

We don’t yet have pricing for all of the cards above, but Asus and Gigabyte tell us their superclocked GTX 770 variants will be priced at $409.99 and $409, respectively. Also, while all the models listed above have 2GB of GDDR5 memory, Nvidia is allowing partners to double up. We know Zotac has a 4GB card with 1059/1111MHz base and boost speeds on the way, and there are probably others.

The only downside is that the GTX 770, like the GTX 780, doesn’t come bundled with a free copy of Metro: Last Light. Nvidia started including that game with GeForce GTX 660 and better graphics cards last month, but for some reason, the offer doesn’t extend to the GTX 700 series. Strange.

In any case, we expect to have a review of the GTX 770 for your perusal some time in the hopefully not-too-distant future. We’ve been too swamped with other upcoming products (*cough* Haswell *cough*) to do the GTX 770 justice in time for today’s launch, but we’ll do our best to get this thing benchmarked as soon as we’re able.

Comments closed
    • NeelyCam
    • 6 years ago

    What I want to know is when will we start getting some 20nm GPU stuff.

    [url<]http://www.tomshardware.com/news/Volcanic-Islands-GPU-Sea-Island,22443.html[/url<] 2013? Wikipedia seems to think the Radeon HD 9000 series is 20nm.

    • csxcsx
    • 6 years ago

    Can’t see the current batch of 770s selling that well, considering all the reviews and stuff we see has the Titan cooler, but we can only buy ones with crappier coolers online for the moment.

    • anotherengineer
    • 6 years ago

    Can it drive this?

    [url<]http://www.techpowerup.com/184696/asus-launches-pq321-monitor-with-3840-x-2160-igzo-display.html[/url<]

      • Farting Bob
      • 6 years ago

      Yes.

      [url<]http://www.geforce.co.uk/hardware/desktop-gpus/geforce-gtx-770/specifications[/url<] Max res is 4096x2160.

      • danny e.
      • 6 years ago

      Edit. 16:9. ugh.

      Still nice to see move to higher res but 16:10 is perfection.

      • danny e.
      • 6 years ago

      If they priced that thing right, it’ll be on my buy list even though it is 16:9. .. since NO ONE ELSE seems to be moving to high res at decent price point.

      I really want a 3840×2400 30″ monitor. That’s be perfect.

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 6 years ago

        4K TVs are available, if you don’t mind paying.
        [url<]http://store.sony.com/c/S_4KTV/en/c/S_4KTV[/url<] [url<]http://www.us-appliance.com/xbr55x900a.html[/url<]

    • kilkennycat
    • 6 years ago

    SUGGEST CHANGING THE TITLE OF THIS ARTICLE VERY QUICKLY….

    NONE of the release offerings (May 30)of the GTX770 on Newegg have the Titan cooler !!!! Regardless of the pictures in this article and on the GTX7xx main page on Newegg. And no bundled software to “ease the pain” and perhaps help mentally deaden the fan noise….. this product takes more power than the GTX680. Early buyers beware… !!

    Corrected and updated 2:15pm Pacific Time, May 30….

    Seems as if the nV partner manufacturers may have done a quick hack with updated GK104 silicon on some of their blower-style excess 680 circuit-boards, labeled them GTX770 and called it a day…..

    Checked the eVGA website. The only GTX700 coolers available from eVGA across the GTX770 offerings are similar to GTX680 offerings. The dual open-fan version is proprietary eVGA and carries a fancy new name called ACX, but looks somewhat identical to one of their current GTX680 offerings and is likely to share the same nois(y) characteristics when under load.

    To accommodate the genuine nV Titan cooler, the GK104 blower-style CIRCUIT BOARD layout design would have to change, most likely in the area of the Titan blower-fan. The Titan blower shell is the same length as the Titan circuit board – 10.5 inches on GTX780 and GTX Titan. However, the current eVGA GTX770 blower offerings all seem to be only 10 inches long, same as their GTX680 blower version… the open-fan ACX variety GTX770 is 10.5 inches and is likely to be an eVGA-specfic update of their GTX680 dual open-fan design, also 10.5 inches long.

    I do expect that GTX770 boards with Titan coolers will eventually emerge, but whether they will be at the same price as the current offerings is unknown. Personally, I expect them to carry some sort of premium to pay for the metalwork and excellent fan.

      • Farting Bob
      • 6 years ago

      It’s not like they’ve done nothing. They’ve had to change the whole sticker AND slightly change the numbers on the box.

        • HisDivineOrder
        • 6 years ago

        They probably had to make a couple of additions to the BIOS, too. You know, toss in temperature as part of the GPU Boost calculation.

        And change the ID to match the 770 branding.

        Could they add that in for all our 670’s and 680’s so we could all have GPU Boost 2.0? Yes. But then they wouldn’t sell as many 770’s. Sooooo…

        No GPU Boost 2.0 for anyone UNLESS they want to go buy 7xx series OR Titan. Because it’s just that elite.

      • cynan
      • 6 years ago

      I love that most seem to be jumping on the bandwagon decrying the travesty of justice that is forgoing the Titan-style cooler. Without much or any evidence about whether or not the OEM replacements are actually inferior no less.

      Sure, the Titan cooler [i<]feels[/i<] and [i<]looks[/i<] nice due to the materials of the shroud (which actually has little if any bearing on performance). And in previous implementations, it has been quiet. But. As I posted elsewhere here, the only evidence I've come across comparing the stock GTX 770 cooler to an OEM version is from [url=http://www.hardocp.com/article/2013/05/30/msi_geforce_gtx_770_lightning_video_card_review/9#.Uafm8LW08ut<]HARDOCP[/url<], where the MSI cooler destroyed the stock cooler where (in my opinion) it matters most. Heat dissipation. Maybe the Titan style cooler is quieter than most OEM versions, and maybe it feels nicer to the touch during those long intimate evenings comprised of just you and your favorite gaming rig... but if it can't do the job as well and you end up with lower stock clocks and overclocking headroom, then...

        • kilkennycat
        • 6 years ago

        The reference GTX770 design from nVidia has the Titan-style heatsink – see the nV website.

        This is the first time I have ever witnessed NONE of the partners offering the nV reference design to US customers, maybe at a higher price to compensate for the material costs. Particularly, I am looking at you -eVGA, who is not only the primary partner, but also the source of nVidia prototype and beta builds. Must be a whole lot of excess GTX680 component material, particularly the circuit-boards, on hand that the partners wish to move out in the early shipments of GTX770.

        BTW, Cynan your comparison is somewhat flawed. The HARDOCP reference describes the MSI GTX770 Lightning, a 3-slot thick, 11.81-inch long GIANT. Not a candidate for SLI. And with the excess length (1.31 inches longer than Titan/GTX780), it will probably have a terrible time fitting most towers (except the server variety) without interfering badly with cable runs and/or crashing into a hard-disk or other front-panel peripheral.

        Comparing chalk and cheese?

        For the physical details on the MSI GTX770 Lightning see:-

        [url<]http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/geforce-gtx-770-gk104-review,3519-29.html[/url<]

          • cynan
          • 6 years ago

          OK, How about [url=http://www.guru3d.com/articles_pages/gigabyte_geforce_gtx_770_windforce_review,6.html<]this stock overclocked version from Gigabyte[/url<]. 67 deg c at load. Similar to the MSI temps (and similar clocks too). Oh. And the Gigabyte is a 2-slot cooler. Edit: This is clocked about 10% higher than the reference GTX 770, yet at load, is 12 deg (15%) cooler. Yes, the Titan-style might be a good compromise when having to cram the thing in a tight space (eg, SLI), and as I said above, it sure may look and feel purdy, but otherwise, there are some other very good performing aftermarket coolers, that at least performance wise, blow the Titan-style cooler away. Is that cheesy (or chaulky, depending on which is the referent I guess) enough for you?

            • kilkennycat
            • 6 years ago

            If you would really like a 230watt case warmer, then go for it. Or 460watt in SLI. With this open-frame design and normal case ventilation, I doubt if more than 10% of the heat emerges through the rear-panel card-slots. Of course, if you install a powerful extractor fan right over the card(s) and corresponding input air pushers at the front of the case at least it would help divert the hot exit airflow from the open-fan design away from the CPU and power-regulators…. Pity that some of the idiots than review graphics cards use open frame test-systems … no doubt for lazy card-exchange convenience. In an open-frame, no wonder an open-fan cooler will almost always beat the blower version… Do any of us have open-frame PCs?

            See page 5 of the Gigabyte review for a telling picture:-

            [url<]http://www.guru3d.com/articles_pages/gigabyte_geforce_gtx_770_windforce_review,5.html[/url<]

            • cynan
            • 6 years ago

            That’s a valid point. To some degree. But in reality, with the possible exception of tiny micro ITX enclosures, any case with proper attention to air flow will not end up being significantly warmer over room temperature around the PCI slot region. A couple of degrees, give or take. But that’s about it. Whether or not the card is tested in or outside a case really won’t affect GPU temps to any significant degree. And even if you do have sub par airflow, a good direct-flow cooler like the one on the Gigabyte seems to be will be more efficient than a blower style like the Titan cooler. You’ll just end up with other components in your case being a bit warmer as a result. The whole issue about video card coolers that vent outside of the case vs not is really overblown. Or at least it is if your case is properly ventilated.

            The fact of the matter is that a properly designed direct flow cooler like on the Gigabyte will always outperform a blower style due to the increased air volume, velocity and turbulence it is able to generate. The larger heat sinks/pipes that direct flow coolers tend to have don’t hurt either.

        • beck2448
        • 6 years ago

        Also this generation of 104 is several manufacturing generations of refinement down the road from the original, which helps the performance headroom.

    • ColeLT1
    • 6 years ago

    In the clockspeed chart, the Asus GTX770-DC2OC-2GD5 has the base and boost clock listed backwards:
    base: 1110 boost: 1058

      • Cyril
      • 6 years ago

      Fixed. Thanks for pointing it out!

    • Ryhadar
    • 6 years ago

    [quote=”Article”<]There's much more to the GTX 770 than higher reference clocks, though. This card includes the same premium, Titan-style cooler as the GTX 780, which is one of the quietest cards we've ever tested.[/quote<] I hate to be [i<]that guy[/i<] but I just read that none of the North American cards (at least) from the AIB partners will equip the GTX 770 with the Titan cooler for release. Kind of a drag.

      • cynan
      • 6 years ago

      Might not be all bad. According to [url=http://www.hardocp.com/article/2013/05/30/msi_geforce_gtx_770_lightning_video_card_review/9#.Uaepe7W08us<]HARDOCP[/url<], the aftermarket cooler on the MSI Lightening version vastly outperformed the reference cooler.

    • chuckula
    • 6 years ago

    UPDATE: Newegg has them in stock right now. This was not a paper launch although the reviews were posted a few hours before the retailers listed the parts.

    [Edit: Amazon has them too.]

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 6 years ago

    Still struggling to have the raw value of a AMD card with its 4 games.

    • Goty
    • 6 years ago

    I’m surprised there’s no wailing and gnashing of teeth because NVIDIA didn’t start their graphs from “0%” in their press slides.

    (Ok, actually I’m not.)

    • Krogoth
    • 6 years ago

    770 = rebranded 680 with slightly more aggressive clockspeed on a new stepping of GK104 silicon = boring

    Factory overclocked 680s have here for months at the same price point. I would rather get the 7970 at the same point which has a higher overclocking ceiling and can outperform the 680 and 770 at non-TWIMTBP titles.

    If Nvidia wanted to kill AMD at high-end. They would place 780 at $499 and 770 at $299-349. They would destroy 7970 and 7950 at those price points.

      • Waco
      • 6 years ago

      The cheapest 680 on Newegg is $419.99…and most are far above that.

      A faster 680, with a quiet cooler, for $399.99 is an absolute steal.

        • slowriot
        • 6 years ago

        It’s a decent deal. It’s by no means a steal.

      • flip-mode
      • 6 years ago

      I’d like to get through a new product release without seeing you use the formula (new product = old product). Often you follow up by “enough said”. Thanks for leaving that out this time, at least.

        • Krogoth
        • 6 years ago

        Blame Nvidia and AMD for re-branding and re-spining existing product into a new “product”. The game has been played for over a decade through various generations.

        It is more commonplace now, because it is no longer as easy for architects and engineers to design silicon that yield significant performance gains and new feature sets as it was back a decade ago. Shrinking silicon into a smaller process node doesn’t yield the same returns.

          • flip-mode
          • 6 years ago

          Exactly. We’re all very familiar, so no point in saying: (new = better old; enough said).

      • deruberhanyok
      • 6 years ago

      So overall, you’d say you’re… not impressed?

    • phez
    • 6 years ago

    Over at Anandtech, they have the 770 about 10~ fps faster than the older stock 670. The OC 670s were about 5-10fps faster than the stock 670, so older 670 owners don’t really need to worry.

    If anything the older OC 670s should be a good deal now.

    • southrncomfortjm
    • 6 years ago

    I really like the way these new Nvidia reference cards look. They definitely have the style angle down.

    However, I think Nvidia is really missing a chance to pull even farther ahead of AMD by not including a game or two, especially with these higher end cards. For the same or slightly lower price, you can get a Radeon HD 7970 and get 4 AAA games included. Even if the 7970 offers a bit lower performance, the value is probably way better.

    All that said, its probably a good thing Nvidia isn’t increasing the value angle since we all really need AMD to do better. More competition will help all GPU consumers.

    • ultima_trev
    • 6 years ago

    So now AMD has to contend with the fact that their best single-GPU SKU is slower than three of nVidia’s top single-GPU SKUs. Even though the GTX 770 only seems to be 2-5% faster on average (depending what review you read), that doesn’t change the fact that the GTX 770 is $50 cheaper and many people probably care less about AMD’s bundles as their drivers are so abysmal.

    To add insult to injury, we’re 6+ months away from Volcanic Islands, which probably is only a few months out from Maxwell, which will probably be an even bigger gap versus Volcanic Islands than Big Kepler was versus Tahiti.

    AMD, as one of your fans, I’m begging you to get your s*** together!

      • DeadOfKnight
      • 6 years ago

      It’s only better on SOME games, and the included bundle is still a factor for many people.

      However, the 770 is still clearly a winner here for those looking to do an SLI configuration.

      • Bensam123
      • 6 years ago

      You mean three of Nvidias NEW gen cards (two of which are insanely high priced) are faster then AMDs top last gen card?

      The performance they’re getting out of these cards is no where representative of their price points either. This is supposed to be the next gen, but it’s only marginally faster then their 680… or the 7970. Six months doesn’t mean a whole lot when most people are waiting because they know new gen is right around the corner. This is simply the transition period where all viewpoints get out of wack till the market settles again.

      This is more of a let down to Nvidia customers that were waiting for something super to come out this time around. Quite a big disappointment.

      I mean compare the differences between the release of the 6970/7970 and 570/680

      Then compare it to the Titan and the 680… These cards are in no way worth the material they’re printed on and don’t even represent the next gen, unless Nvidia is going to release something like the 880 in six months.

      [url<]https://techreport.com/review/24832/nvidia-geforce-gtx-780-graphics-card-reviewed/9[/url<] [url<]https://techreport.com/review/23150/amd-radeon-hd-7970-ghz-edition/11[/url<]

        • chuckula
        • 6 years ago

        1. The 770 is not a “new gen” card and everybody knows it. You can legitimately attack Nvidia for the rebadge, but acting like this is some new architecture that Nvidia has royally screwed up is totally inaccurate.

        2. The 7970 GHz edition is a last gen card. BUT… where are the 8 series cards? Launching in 6 months? That’s wonderful, and in 6 months you can gloat about how much faster they are. But that’s the future, and a good bit into the future too considering the product cycles of these cards. An Nvidia fanboy could just as easily say that Maxwell will be faster than those 8-series cards, and it would be just as irrelevant.

        3. You complain about price/performance: Looks like the 770 has roughly the same performance as the 7970Ghz while being cheaper. Oh, and as a Linux user, Nvidia actually wants to support their products on my platform. So where is this massive price/performance advantage for AMD again?

          • Bensam123
          • 6 years ago

          They’re presenting it as their newest architecture, holding the crown suffix. It is both a 7xx series card and a x80. 7xx denotes it’s a new gen, x80 denotes it’s a high end model (or in the case x70 which would be mid-high grade). Nvidia has not stated otherwise and everything they’ve released to this point definitely makes it seem like these are the next gen.

          If they aren’t they’re going to piss off a lot of people obsoleting their $1000 and $750 video card in less then six months.

          So I don’t understand, I thought you were making it seem as if Nvidia has something big and bad planned in six months to compete with AMD, so I wont obviously be gloating… But at the same time there are going to be a lot of screwed over Nvidia fans when that comes to pass (you can’t play this both ways).

          3. Still in AMDs court. You can get almost all the 7970s for $400, some as cheap as $360 with MIR… oh and a gaggle of free games.

          [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&N=100007709+600286767+600286740&QksAutoSuggestion=&ShowDeactivatedMark=False&Configurator=&IsNodeId=1&Subcategory=48&description=&hisInDesc=&Ntk=&CFG=&SpeTabStoreType=&AdvancedSearch=1&srchInDesc=[/url<] AMDs latest open source drivers have also been quite noteworthy as of late... [url<]http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=amd_nvidia_15way&num=1[/url<] But when you start digging for the Nix drivers argument it's pretty easy to tell you're out of good points.

            • Yeats
            • 6 years ago

            You consider the “gaggle” of games included as adding value, others will consider the significantly quieter cooler of the GTX 770 as added value, and that will continue to be of benefit after the games’ completion dates.

            • Bensam123
            • 6 years ago

            That was in addition to the value that’s already present (which is cheaper then the 770). You know, icing on the cake.

            • PixelArmy
            • 6 years ago

            I will risk the inane conversation…

            You are using generation and architecture interchangeably. This is confusing people… Architecture means a very specific thing and this is clearly not presented as a new architecture (upfront we know it’s still Kepler, nvidia is not hiding that), though it is presented as a new series.

            Think of it as nvidia’s “tick”, where as Maxwell will be the “tock”. (Though this is not totally analogous to intel’s tick and tock, as intel’s tick involves process changes and more arch tweaks).

            4-series = Fermi
            5-series = Fermi Refresh
            6-series = Kepler
            7-series = Kepler Refresh

            People are generally fine with this if the new series’ x70 models matches the previous series’ x80 and so forth down the chain.

            For those with $1000 cards, a) they aren’t obsolete, b) those people are not shopping on some value curve.

            On average, the 770 is 10% faster than the standard 7970 and 2% faster than the 7970GE, which is why it is compared to the later. I’d argue the game bundle is the [i<]only[/i<] thing keeping both the 7970s in play. Without it, one would say the 770 is 10% faster than the standard 7970 for just 5% more cost or the same as the 7970GE for 10% cheaper.

            • Bensam123
            • 6 years ago

            When this has happened in previous generations, they didn’t mark up the new ‘tocks’ extensively in price (the 780 should be replacing the 680). There were improvements at all price points and definitely more notable then this.

            They also traditionally actually ‘refined’ the chips. They aren’t refining anything here, they’re simply crapping out the same silicon only bigger… This silicon is also nothing new, it’s been around since the creation of the 6XX series, they’re just rebranding. Which definitely doesn’t represent a tock of any sort.

            I’m not sure why you’d say they aren’t going to be obsolete if Nvidia introduces say a 880 in six months that supplants them. Something extremely high end instantly becomes second class. And as far as people who spend a pretty penny on something like a 1000 video card, that most definitely feels like it’s now obsolete.

            The 7970 and the 7970 GE are one in the same. AMD even has firmware to turn the 7970s into 7970GEs. Go back and read TRs article. It’s just branding and doesn’t mean anything. The 7970 is cheaper and runs marginally slower (not taking into account the intial price hike when these hit the market, which always happens). You can read Cynans post one down from here if you want further elaboration on this point.

            BTW I always start my conversations out with a insult too. ‘Ur a towel’

            Did that make me look classy and superior… or simply like a bigot?

          • cynan
          • 6 years ago

          I agree with your first two points.

          However, for the last one, there are plenty of HD 7970s that you can buy for $400 or less (yes, even ones that come clocked at 1GHz) – so I’d say the price/performance between the two is pretty much on par. The fact that most of these are not labelled “GHz edition”, to me is about as irrelevant as you can get. It was purely a marketing move by AMD to get people to notice that they had a product that was as fast/faster than the GTX 680. There is absolutely no evidence that I’ve seen that show that GHz and vanilla HD 7970 editions are different or that either can’t be overclocked to the same speeds, on average, etc.Paying extra for a card that only differs by a bios that offers a boost clock vs one that does not (and in some cases, even non GHz editions come with such a bios) and has “GHz edition” on the box is about as uninformed a computer enthusiast purchase as you can make.

          The main point here is that there are AMD cards that routinely sell for $400 (ie, [url=http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814127732<]this one[/url<]) that perform pretty much on par with the GTX 770. Regardless of what they are labelled. And the GTX 770 is, so far, a paper launch. It may very well sell for more than $400 at first. Just like the GTX 680 sold for over MSRP at launch...

        • HisDivineOrder
        • 6 years ago

        I think you’re overstating it.

        The 770 is nVidia essentially overclocking the 680, sticking faster memory on it, upping the voltage to let the thing stay at higher speeds longer, and adding temperature into the GPU Boost calculation.

        Then they knocked $100 off the price. If you compare the 770 to the 670, it’s a solid gain in performance. If you compare the 770 to the 680, it’s a big drop in price and still some gain in performance. Neither case is as compelling as, say, the guy who upgrades every other release of new cards who is sitting on a 570, but these cards might be with us a good long while if there are delays on Maxwell like there were with Fermi.

        So really, what’s to complain about? That nVidia didn’t put a GK110 card down to the $400 level? I don’t think anyone thought that would happen.

        There are two disappointing things imo about this release and neither fully dispels the better deal that this represents when compared to what nVidia options we had yesterday at this time before its release.

        1) Titan cooler is going to be exceedingly rare on this card and hard to find in the wild.
        2) nVidia didn’t take the opportunity to make 4 GB mandatory for all cards at this price point.

        The last one is likely to be important when made-for-next-gen games start getting ports to PC. This is not a new problem, though. Look at those poor 570/580 users with their sub-2GB memory and those were games mostly ports from consoles with a scant 512 MB’s of memory total for the entire system. The next gen consoles are going to have 8 GB total, which will likely divide up into 2 GB for the system + processor and 6-ish GB for the GPU and textures, etc.

        I think that’s when having a 2 GB card is going to hurt. By then, perhaps nVidia will have a 870 at $400 with greater than Titan performance. And more memory.

        Even at $450, a 770 with 4GB is a great deal if you’re coming from any generation not 6xx-based. It’s just a shame they didn’t default it to the higher memory in light of the importance memory will have soon and a shame that they didn’t compel the card makers to use Titan coolers.

      • Krogoth
      • 6 years ago

      What are you talking about?

      Only 780 and Titan are only SKUs that are faster than 7970. 770 and 680 trade blows with the 7970. The 7970 has more overclocking headroom which can allow it to catch up to the 780.

      780 and 770 are both overpriced disappointments that do not change anything in the high-end GPU landscape.

      • Yeats
      • 6 years ago

      The 770 is not $50 cheaper than the 7970…

      …and the drivers are OK.

      • cynan
      • 6 years ago

      If you’re an AMD “fan”, I’d hate to see your reactions to things you root against…

      AMD is still in solid contention on the value/performance metric. Yes, the GTX 770 has put a significant dent in their clear lead in this area held as of yesterday, but they are in no way not still in contention. Especially when factoring in the game bundles. Even if you detest all the games, you can still sell them for at least 10-15% of the cards price, adding to the value proposition. And what do the state of AMD’s drivers (which have improved immensely recently if you’ve been paying attention insofar as latency – which has really been the only pressing issue for most people of late) have to do with whether or not game bundles are enticing or adds value?

      • heinsj24
      • 6 years ago

      AMD has nearly doubled the performance of the Tahiti since it first appeared and another major driver tweak is due next month. Even the lowly Cape Verde has had its performance increased 50% since launch.

      I’m more than happy with my AMD purchases – they keep getting better with age (and as AMD learns to program for the architecture).

    • indeego
    • 6 years ago

    [quote<]Nvidia started including that game with GeForce GTX 660 and better graphics cards last month, but for some reason, the offer doesn't extend to the GTX 700 series. Strange.[/quote<] Testing the market. If it doesn't sell (like the Radeon's weren't without the bundles at that pricepoint,) the bundle gets put in. This is probably going to be par from here on out. Bundles are artificially keeping card prices high. I guess it's great if you absolutely want all the games, but do most people want every game, or are they talking themselves into it?

      • peartart
      • 6 years ago

      It would be interesting to know how much the game bundles cost AMD/Nvidia, but I doubt they are inflating prices that much.

      • Ryhadar
      • 6 years ago

      Eh, I wanted all 3 of the games that came with my 7870. I originally figured I would do what I always do: wait until they go on sale months later. I wasn’t really planning on upgrading from my 6870 either.

      I almost never play games close to release but it was a nice treat for myself to be able to get them that soon. Plus if I subtract the retail value of the games from the price of the card I only spent $80 on a significant upgrade. Hard to beat that.

        • indeego
        • 6 years ago

        Cool.

        For years now I just wait until $5-$10 sales, usually the July/December variety. No hassles with driver issues and particular games, no hotfixing/patches, I get a full suite of mods [b<]and[/b<] DLC already tested and rated by the community. The only real thing I miss out on is multiplayer gaming, which I don't miss at all, since the last few experiences were screaming kids in my headphones. I can get ~12 games for the price of 1-2 AAA list titles. Makes it much more palatable when the games aren't anything much to write home about. I'd say 1/5 games I play these days are worth more than $10. Not trying to be Krogoth, but a lot have forgotten what "fun" is all about, and more seem achievement/grind oriented. Not so much fun.

          • willmore
          • 6 years ago

          ^^^a billion times this!

          • jessterman21
          • 6 years ago

          Yep. It’s been three years and counting since I spent more than 5 of my own dollars on a game. And I would hate to spend full price on a game, just to have it not fully finished, then patched and repatched for the first 3 months, then have $10-20 DLC trickled out for a year after that… I’ll wait for the Steam sales.

          Best buy by far to date: PoP Forgotten Sands for $2.50 this Xmas. Iterative, but just like one of my all-time-faves: Sands of Time with nice visuals and Arkham-ish combat.

          • indeego
          • 6 years ago

          Oh and lookie there: Alan Wake + all add-ons is $4 on Steam today. Thank you!

            • rxc6
            • 6 years ago

            It was on sale at the humble weekly sale. The average was a little over $2. Even better deal.

      • brute
      • 6 years ago

      artificially? they’re providing added value for what you were paying before

      that isn’t artificially high, bro

      • HisDivineOrder
      • 6 years ago

      It’s rare to see a card maker do a bundle right out the gate at a product launch. You do bundles after all the people who were going to buy your new card because its new and just released have bought. You do the bundle when those initial volley of cards of people who have more money than sense have gone and now sales are dropping.

      That’s when you drop a bundle and get your card talked about again, improving the value argument. AMD dropped a new bundle when they decided not to release new cards. nVidia dropped a new bundle (Metro:LL) when the cards they still had on the market were suffering against AMD’s mid-range and they knew they were three-ish months away from updating mostly the high end (ie., 780, 770, then 760 Ti).

      I’d expect a bundle of some PhysX-based title (if there are any left) in September right when AMD’s Volcanic Islands begin to show signs of a soon-ish eruption.

      When was the Borderlands 2 bundle? September. That they took almost a year to release their full product stack was probably not what they planned to do when they started, which is why the bundle hit around the time of the 660/660 Ti launch. That late start also suggests (to me) they won’t update the mid-range parts (660, especially 650) for a while yet.

      I think the 760 Ti at its rumored $300 price point with its 670+ performance is already going to lay the smackdown on anything AMD’s got anywhere near that price point. That’s the card that has to keep AMD in “emergency response” meetings. $400-1k cards are great, high margin products.

      But $300 or less cards are where the bulk of your sales are. If you told someone a month ago they could buy a 670 for $300, they’d tell you that’s a great deal. Now imagine it’s regular price.

    • jdaven
    • 6 years ago

    7 Ghz+! That’s the highest GDDR5 memory rate I’ve seen.

    • drfish
    • 6 years ago

    After spending the weekend getting to know my GTX 780 I have no regrets (I’ve wanted a GK110 since it was announced) but this guy [i<]is[/i<] impressive and I'm really glad to see the Titan style cooler on it and for only $400 it seems really nice if you want to lean green.

      • kilkennycat
      • 6 years ago

      Your investment is still great. NONE of the current US-released GTX770 has a Titan cooler. Probably moving on excess GTX680 material with an updated GK104..

        • Krogoth
        • 6 years ago

        770 are using newer stepping of GK104.

        I expect an upcoming price cut on 670/680 inventory ($399/$299), so Nvidia can clear them out for 760/770 stuff like they did with 560/570 and 460/470.

      • beck2448
      • 6 years ago

      780 is a great card, period. All the whining from bile spewing nitwits is irrelevant.

    • Bensam123
    • 6 years ago

    On the opposite side of the spectrum, it seems like Nvidias offerings are rather lacking this time around… If these really are the new generation of cards that are supposed to supplant the old ones, they aren’t even close to AMDs last gen offerings price/performance wise… AMD hasn’t even release their new gen yet…

    I can only imagine they have something new planned, but why would they right away replace the 780 (the X80 suffix has been used to denote their bread and butter high end card for quite a few generations, same with x70), 770, and Titan. Why does the 780 have such a ridiculous price tag too? They have to know this isn’t going to work out in their favor… Unless they’re just trying to get what they can for them before AMD shoves them down in price (or competes at the same price, hopefully they lower the prices).

    Maybe the plan is to bait AMD into competing at the same prices so they make more money?

      • superjawes
      • 6 years ago

      AMD probably won’t have new silicon until late this year/early next year. Nvidia doesn’t have to release new silicon until they have to compete with that series. Rebranding the 6xx at lower price points (Titan > 780, 680 > 770) increases the value of Geforce cards and puts new products (or just SKUs) on the market to sell something.

      Remember that Nvidia can also reduce prices quite a bit more than with the 6xx series considering that it’s the same silicon. No new chips means that they don’t have to retool their process or accelerate tooling to get product on the market. This is basically just a temporary measure to bring in revenue while they work on what will be the “true” competition with the 8xxx series (which will be new silicon from AMD, IIRC).

      But hey, at least the 7xx has more value than the 6xx.

        • Bensam123
        • 6 years ago

        I don’t think there has been an example of a new gen having less value then the old gen as far as $/performance goes. It’s usually, much, much larger then this.

        Yeah, Nvidia is capable of putting new products on the market whenever they want, but they’ll definitely lose face if they simply replace a 780 with a 880 as soon as AMDs new cards arrive and definitely piss off a lot of customers. How would you like your shiny new 780 being obsolete in under six months as well as it’s price tag?

          • chuckula
          • 6 years ago

          Please explain how 1. The 770 is a “new gen” and 2. How charging less money for the 770 compared to the 680 while the 770 clearly has a performance advantage is now a [b<]worse[/b<] price/performance offering. Please further explain why I should pay more money for the 7970Ghz to get about the same performance... assuming the drivers work, which is a big IF under Linux.

            • Bensam123
            • 6 years ago

            The number at the front of it’s model number has increased by +1 as it has with every past generation when they introduced a new one. You’re being really obtuse with this…

            I’m not sure what you’re trying to prove with point two, I can only think you misread what I wrote and you just wrote a knee jerk response to it. I wasn’t comparing the 770 to the 680, I was comparing the 770 to the 7970, most are under $400 and come with a bunch of games.

            The driver argument is retarded, both you and I know it. Look at the other response I gave which includes a phronix article.

            • flip-mode
            • 6 years ago

            I think you are saying things that make sense to you but not to anyone else.

            • chuckula
            • 6 years ago

            The irony is that Bensam123 could easily have aired valid complaints about the 770 that are 100% legitimate. For example: It’s just an overclocked 680 that Nvidia has rebadged with new model numbers.

            However, he thinks that he has some brilliant insight that everyone else is too dumb to see, and we end up with these down-modded rants.

            • Bensam123
            • 6 years ago

            After I responded to you I immediately got hit with 3 downvotes from your alt accounts as per usual and your responses all got 3 up votes. Then you act like I’m in the wrong in order to try and make it snowball, where people don’t even read responses and form their own opinions, they just hop on the bandwagon.

            Claiming that the system is working when you’re manipulating it doesn’t make it a legitimate argument.

            I appreciate your blatant insults and superior attitude when you don’t even address the points in the argument though. Just act superior when you lose and play it off. “You’ll be sorry!” right? All about saving face.

            Lose with a little bit of dignity and stop trying to get under my skin with petty insults and red herrings when you don’t have counter points.

            • chuckula
            • 6 years ago

            Bensam… you give yourself [b<][i<]far[/i<][/b<] too much credit if you think I have sockpuppet accounts that down-mod your posts. Oh, and if I did, you'd be somewhere in the negative hundreds since I'm very good with automation. As for your "points": 1. When was the 7970 launched? 2011 wasn't it? Since then what has happened? Uh.. AMD sold factory overclocks when the GTX 680 came out. Oh, and recently AMD finally got around to putting out a dual-chip card as a halo product. 2. What has Nvidia done in the same timeframe? Released the GK104 parts for regular consumer use that have been quite competitive with AMD's parts. They continue to be so. Then Nvidia released parts based on the GK110. Are they expensive? Sure. Are they very very powerful? Also sure. 3. What has AMD launched again since 2011? Oh yeah, the overclocked Ghz edition 7970. Did Nvidia launch an overclocked GK104 part today? Sure! Did they [b<][i<]also[/i<][/b<] recently launch other parts using a different architecture that are clearly a step up the performance ladder? Yes, the did that too! 4. So what we have here is: A huge rant from you about how Nvidia's "next generation" parts (where "next generation" is solely based on an arbitrary marketing number) are a complete disaster. You completely ignore the high-performance parts that Nvidia has released because they happen to be expensive*, and then you claim that the 770 is worse than the earlier 680 because it is faster and less expensive. Meanwhile, AMD's "next generation" is nowhere to be seen anywhere. * Where "expensive" is $100 more for the GTX 780 than AMD was charging when the 7970 first came out. Sorry Bensam, that's less than a 20% price premium, not 3x or 4x the price. I ain't saying those chips are cheap and I didn't order one, but it's also typically disingenuous of you to claim that Nvidia is charging some huge multiple of what AMD has charged in the past. 5. BUT BUT BUT BUT BUT!!! RADEON 8XXX!!! Yes, I am aware that AMD hasn't given up on product development. Despite the supposed bias that you think I have, I'm quite confident that those parts will definitely beat out the GTX 770. Good for AMD. But I can't go out and buy those parts now. When they come out, I'm sure AMD will be able to post lots of benchmarks showing any advantage over the GTX 770... nobody is surprised by this or denying this. 5.5: Oh, as part of the whole RADEON 8XXX argument, I would like to point out that AMD appears to have taken after Nvidia's lead since there are a crap-ton of supposed 8000-series IGPs built into chips like Richland that are clearly not using the same GPU architecture as future AMD GPUs. But for some strange reason you didn't post long-winded rants about AMD being a huge "disappointment".. gee I wonder why?

            • Bensam123
            • 6 years ago

            Or I’d be at -3 because you know throwing large amounts of votes at something is very obvious. You’re great at manipulation and I’m not very fond of that. That’s also probably why you go out of your way to insult me whenever you can (sucks when someone can see through your BS huh?).

            I’ve met a handful of people like you online and they always implode on themselves when they run out of fuel and there isn’t anyone to make out as a enemy anymore. You derive popularity from making others look bad, which is pretty common practice for kids in k-12 schooling. It doesn’t work when you get into the real world and people actually start looking into your personal characteristics beyond using others as a convenient soap-box to play a cliche hero.

            I don’t understand how any of your counter points even related to the 7XX being the new generation of cards that will be around for the next 1.5-2 years and being very disappointing. You’re just attempting to misdirect that issue and put down AMDs last launch. That’s not even a counter point.

            Point 4 isn’t even a point, it’s a conclusion, yet you still numbered it. Also part of being manipulative. Bulleted lists make it seem like you have more validity then you really do. You often times list more points then you really have and write other random things into the bulleted lists (because you know people don’t usually read all the way down to the bottom).

            • chuckula
            • 6 years ago

            If you are truly stupid enough to think that Maxell isn’t coming out until 2015 at the earliest (which is exactly what you just said when you said “the 7XX being the new generation of cards that will be around for the next 1.5-2 years and being very disappointing.”), then I have a bridge to sell you. I’m making a bookmark of that idiotic comment and you can start writing up your “that’s an unfair strawman for accurately quoting exactly what I said and using it to show what a dishonest tool I am!” reply right now, because I [b<]will[/b<] use it against you later. If you honestly believe that Nvidia will have no new parts out before 2015, then the only logical explanation is that AMD won't have any new parts either because it means that TSMC... where they both get their GPUs made... has completely failed to get its 20nm process running. I'm sure you probably have convinced yourself that AMD's magical 20nm parts will show up on Monday and that Nvidia is years behind everyone else, but here on planet Earth SemiAccurate's wishes don't magically come true. These cards are placeholders until Maxwell launches next Summer. AMD's next-generation parts will launch earlier in 2014, and Nvidia will follow suit a few months later just like the last several generations of GPUs. Until then, the only thing keeping Nvidia from destroying the 7970 is a high-school dropout with a price gun... come to think of it, a high school dropout with a price gun probably has more common sense and a whole lot less of a narcissistic persecution complex than you do.

            • flip-mode
            • 6 years ago

            chuckula here: Another downvote from my flip-mode account!

            • chuckula
            • 6 years ago

            I’m a very very confused person since I’m Neelycam, flip-mode, Madman Original, and Deanjo*. My therapist is making a *ton* of money.

            * I’m only Deanjo on alternating Tuesdays though.

            • flip-mode
            • 6 years ago

            Hey, she’s my therapist! Just because we share a body doesn’t mean all that is mine is also yours.

            • NeelyCam
            • 6 years ago

            Stop talking to yourself. It just looks silly

            • flip-mode
            • 6 years ago

            Listen, other me, stop talking to me while I’m talking to the other other me. Rude.

            • Bensam123
            • 6 years ago

            The enemy of my enemy is my friend? Can’t see that ever going wrong…

            Oh and something about Sockpuppets.

            • flip-mode
            • 6 years ago

            Benny, can you link me to a post of yours that exemplifies losing with dignity? I want to know if you can walk it like you talk it.

            • Bensam123
            • 6 years ago

            I’m just biding by Chuckulas logic, why would I have to ever prove anything I say? I just wait till I can find a red herring to throw in here so I don’t actually need to address points and then rile people up so they forget what we were even talking about (even though we’re in a ordered posting).

            • derFunkenstein
            • 6 years ago

            Without getting into who I actually am, -1 for being a giant turd.

            • Bensam123
            • 6 years ago

            Dogpiling at it’s finest. So we have three actually accounted for votes. My point still stands about Chucks alternate accounts and tactics at pushing people down so he can deflect. Watch the votes for yourselves next time Chuck has a disagreement with someone (although I’m sure he’ll be more careful for a bit now).

            • NeelyCam
            • 6 years ago

            That -1 was from my NeelyCam account

            • Bensam123
            • 6 years ago

            Thank you for rejecting my point with a sound argument. Contempt isn’t the same as validation.

            • flip-mode
            • 6 years ago

            Is that what you mean by losing with dignity?

            • Bensam123
            • 6 years ago

            It’s good to know you think I have a valid point, too bad you didn’t actually understand it.

            You actually have to lose in order to lose with grace. 😉

            This doesn’t necessarily seem even like Chuck loves Intel, rather he simply hates AMD for whatever reason (and anyone who says anything positive about it).

          • superjawes
          • 6 years ago

          They aren’t necessarily going to replace the 7xx series in six months…in fact, the only way the next-gen Nvidia launches with or around the next-gen AMD would be if the AMD launch was delayed that long. Assuming best case scenario for AMD, they launch December/January, [b<]and[/b<] the 8xxx series is significantly better than the 7xx series, Nvidia might accelerate their launch by a few months. But take note, that's assuming a lot of good things for AMD, who hasn't been having the best of luck lately... And besides, even with a December launch, Nvidia is likely to sweeten the 7xx series with bundles, increaseing the value even if there is a major power deficit between similar AMD and Nvidia cards.

            • Bensam123
            • 6 years ago

            Aye, which makes these really poor deals and disappointing, which was one of my original points.

            Best case scenario for AMD would be launching when they said they were going to, which is this fall.

            Adding bundles isn’t the same as currently having bundles. Currently, the price performance of a 7970 is a decent amount better then a 770 and that’s current gen for AMD.

        • Silus
        • 6 years ago

        No company will have 20 nm this year. TSMC already reported that 20 nm mass production is only scheduled for Q2 2014. Since all rumors point to the new AMD architecture to be @ 20 nm, they won’t have anything “real” this year. Maybe a paper launch.
        If it’s 28 nm, either AMD has their own GK110 in the works (doubtful) or there’s no reason to make new silicon @ 28 nm.

      • Yeats
      • 6 years ago

      “On the opposite side of the spectrum, it seems like Nvidias offerings are rather lacking this time around… If these really are the new generation of cards that are supposed to supplant the old ones, they aren’t even close to AMDs last gen offerings price/performance wise… AMD hasn’t even release their new gen yet…”

      The 770 is approximately the same price as the 7970, and performs similarly, so how is it not “even close to AMDs last gen offerings price/performance wise”?

        • Bensam123
        • 6 years ago

        You can buy a 7970 for $360, it’s already on the market, it comes with a bunch of games. The 770 hasn’t hit the market yet and hasn’t suffered the initial (more then likely) price hike that will accompany it.

          • Bensam123
          • 6 years ago

          I feel a need to point out this post specifically, because it’s very concise and logical points that address everything Yeats had said. Essentially -5 for being Bensam right here.

    • jessterman21
    • 6 years ago

    You okay, Cyril? Sounds like you’ve got some silicon in your throat.

    • Star Brood
    • 6 years ago

    I won’t buy it, and I’m in no hurry for the review, but yay for better performance at lower prices!

      • cynan
      • 6 years ago

      [quote<]...but yay for better performance at lower prices [i<]from Nvidia[/i<]![/quote<]

    • flip-mode
    • 6 years ago

    [quote<]The higher clock rates give the GTX 770 a [b<]small but substantial[/b<] advantage over the GTX 680[/quote<] Curious. Anyway: how nice to see all the "partners" toss out Nvidia's fantastic cooler to put on their own crappy plastic ones.

      • cynan
      • 6 years ago

      True. But I’m pretty sure those Nvidia coolers aren’t donated by Nvidia. I imagine the temptation to increase the relatively slim margins OEMs get would be quite high. If your cooler costs $15 less and does the job, then that’s $15 more per card for them.

        • flip-mode
        • 6 years ago

        Ah, that’s a good point I hadn’t thought of.

    • chuckula
    • 6 years ago

    [quote<]In any case, we expect to have a review of the GTX 770 for your perusal some time in the hopefully not-too-distant future. We've been too swamped with other upcoming products (*cough* Haswell *cough*) to do the GTX 770 justice in time for today's launch, but we'll do our best to get this thing benchmarked as soon as we're able.[/quote<] It's OK! GTX 770 == Overclocked GTX 680. Which isn't too bad since 1. It comes with the nice Titan cooler and 2. The price is reasonable for what you are getting.

      • Silus
      • 6 years ago

      According to the “enlightened” crowd @ Beyond3D, if it’s a reference card then it’s not “just an overclocked <insert card here>”.
      At least they used this argument to say that the HD 7970 Ghz Edition isn’t just an overclocked HD 7970…so I’ll assume they’ll use it as well for the GTX 770, although the double standard is possible 🙂

        • chuckula
        • 6 years ago

        They’re both overclocked in my book 🙂 I will bash Nvidia & AMD equally for this practice. I’d bash Intel too except that bashing Intel’s GPUs is like picking on a toddler.

          • Silus
          • 6 years ago

          I won’t bash either for this practice, but I call things by their names and that’s what both cards are, overclocked versions of a previous card. being reference designs means that they are guaranteed to work at those speeds, but they are still overclocked.

    • CampinCarl
    • 6 years ago

    I think I’d rather take the game bundle from the 7970 (which costs $399.99 as well) and sell it and come out ahead.

    Also keep in mind that since this is GK104, this thing will have (relatively) little compute performance vs. the 7970.

      • Firestarter
      • 6 years ago

      *relatively little [i<]dual-precision[/i<] compute performance whether that is relevant or not depends on the application

    • MadManOriginal
    • 6 years ago

    This might be the first ‘rebrand’ that people are almost ok with considering how much it advances the value proposition: faster than the $500 (at launch) GTX 680 for $400 MSRP…street prices will likely creep down too.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 6 years ago

      Anything to shake up the value proposition. I’m holding out hope that the GTX 750 will be more like a vanilla 660 and get closer to the $140-range. That’s a card that I would replace my old old GTX 460 1GB with.

      • flip-mode
      • 6 years ago

      After all the good my 100+ posts complaining of rebrands have done, it’s pointless to continue. It doesn’t matter if it’s a rebrand or not. Let them all rebrand. When the time comes to buy I’ll read the reviews and pick the parts regardless of what they’re named and numbered.

        • nanoflower
        • 6 years ago

        As long as it works for them they will continue no matter how much we complain. Since most people either don’t care about the rebrands or don’t follow sites like this it seems likely this renaming will continue. 🙁

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