AMD reveals base clock, power rating for 5GHz CPU

On Tuesday, AMD introduced its new FX-9000-series processors. The company quoted their peak Turbo speeds (5GHz for the FX-9590, 4.7GHz for the FX-9370) and a rough time frame for availability ("this summer"), but it revealed little else. We were left wondering about base clocks, power envelopes, and potential retail availability.

Well, today, AMD has finally answered our questions. The company told us the base clocks for the FX-9590 and FX-9370 are 4.7GHz and 4.4GHz, respectively. Also, as rumored, thermal envelopes for both offerings are "~220W." That’s a substantial increase over the 125W TDP of AMD’s current FX-series flagship, the FX-8350.

AMD’s original announcement said the FX-9590 and FX-9370 would become "available from system integrators globally beginning this summer." We asked whether these processors will also be available at retail. The company’s response: "AMD is considering all options, but their initial plan is [system integrators]." In other words, you may not find these chips outside of pre-built PCs.

As Scott pointed out on Tuesday, keeping a 220W processor from overheating likely requires some exotic liquid cooling. System integrators will presumably offer machines tailor-built to accommodate the FX-9590 and FX-9370, but sticking the same CPUs into any old enthusiast PC could be fraught with danger—or, most likely, loud fan noise and thermal throttling. AMD’s decision to target system integrators exclusively may be sensible given the cooling requirements involved here.

To get a sense of how these chips are likely to perform, have a look at this section of our FX-8350 review, where we overclocked the same "Vishera" silicon to a 4.5GHz base clock with a 4.8GHz Turbo peak, very similar to the FX-9370’s 4.4/4.7GHz base/peak frequencies.

Comments closed
    • RachelGat7
    • 6 years ago
    • Yeats
    • 6 years ago

    “As Scott pointed out on Tuesday, keeping a 220W processor from overheating likely requires some exotic liquid cooling. ”

    Actually, AMD is recommending an ordinary Corsair H80i. From my own use, a Noctua D14 is easily sufficient. So is the rebadged Asetek cooler AMD bundled with the FX-8150. Nothing “exotic” here.

    C’mon, TR, no need to FUD.

      • Airmantharp
      • 6 years ago

      If a stock HSF is normal, a $30 tower is extra, and a $50-$60 H60/equivalent is high-end, then couldn’t the H80i+ be exotic?

      I mean, that’s the minimum you’d want, right? I think they hit it on the head.

        • Yeats
        • 6 years ago

        From dictionary.com:

        Exotic

        1. of foreign origin or character; not native; introduced from abroad, but not fully naturalized or acclimatized: exotic foods; exotic plants.

        2. strikingly unusual or strange in effect or appearance: an exotic hairstyle.

        3. of a uniquely new or experimental nature: exotic weapons.

        IMO, commonplace, entry-level watercooling kits – which are really comparable to top-end air cooling – does not qualify as “exotic”. The best air-coolers beat the likes of the H60.

        Edit: also, Cyril mentions “exotic liquid cooling”, implying that run-of-the-mill liquid cooling (like a Corsair H80) would be insufficient.

          • Airmantharp
          • 6 years ago

          I’m still trying to figure out how you believe that an H80i is somehow not ‘exotic’ fitting of the word’s description in point one above.

          They ship standard CPUs with the dinkiest of coolers. Any liquid cooling is ‘exotic’ in comparison.

          An H80i is itself exotic among ‘liquid coolers’; it’s 120mm cooling taken to the extreme, and that’s the minimum you’re suggesting.

            • Yeats
            • 6 years ago

            For several years there have been CPU’s shipped with heatpipe coolers, which are not “dinky”. AMD has already shipped stock CPU’s with water cooling.

            You can buy a Corsair H80i at Best Buy.

            The description that Cyril provided is “exotic liquid cooling”; that is, not just liquid (water) cooling, but liquid (water) cooling which is exotic in nature relative to other water cooling solutions. The H80i is as common as can be.

            And, I’ll reiterate, watercooling isn’t even necessary. I know from personal experience with several FX-8350’s that a high-end air cooler is adequate to reach 4.7ghz base clock.

            • Airmantharp
            • 6 years ago

            +1 because I’m not really trying to argue with you, rather, I mostly agree;

            Just understand that those ‘heatpipe’ OEM HSF’s were themselves shipped with ‘exotic’ CPUs.

            And no, water-cooling isn’t necessary, but it’s much more space efficient and easier to work with in the inexpensive iterations, and it’s better at controlling airflow inside the enclosure than any ‘air’ cooler could be. Since high-end air coolers and integrated water-coolers are in the same price bracket, the IWC’s start to make a lot of sense.

            Now, about ‘exotic’ water-cooling; I’ve argued that the H80i is just about the ‘lower limit’ of what might pass as exotic and agree that whether it is or isn’t is definitely a matter of opinion, so my example of a solidly ‘exotic’ water-cooler would be one with a 280mm or 360mm radiator sandwiched with 38mm-thick fans, for just the CPU. I cannot, however, think of a use case where going to that much effort will yield any useful real-world gains comparable to what an IWC like the H80i (or equivalent) yields over a standard Intel LGA115x HSF.

            • Deanjo
            • 6 years ago

            I wouldn’t consider the H80i (or any other closed loop sealed OOB system) anymore “exotic” then say a discreet video card (and not even a high end one at that). Enthusiast perhaps but no where close to exotic.

    • slaimus
    • 6 years ago

    They finally found a use for those old surplus P4 BTX coolers!

    [url<]http://www.intel.com/pressroom/kits/p4/btx/[/url<] [url<]http://www.behardware.com/news/7170/p4-with-btx-thermal-module.html[/url<]

    • hasseb64
    • 6 years ago

    At LAST there is a market for all those +500Ws PSUs
    (not counting SLI-hobbyists)

    • ronch
    • 6 years ago

    Ok guys, no need to shoot flak at this CPU anymore. [url=http://www.techspot.com/news/52862-amd-first-to-reach-5ghz-with-fx-9590-processor.html#comments<]TechSpot[/url<] says these chips will be available only through system integrators. These OEMs cater only to insane people who are willing to spend on similarly insane machines without a care to efficiency as long as they can boost their epeens with their hardware (hence, a [url=http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_l8wol7O09f1qc7o59o1_500.png<][u<]MAN[/u<][/url<]). Damn, even I am not man enough to even thinking about owning one of these INSANE CPUs!

    • ronch
    • 6 years ago

    AMD would’ve garnered more excitement with these 220w models if they released it in the run up to the winter season.

    • Silus
    • 6 years ago

    So the outrageous rumor and AMD’s complete lack of sense are confirmed…
    A useless product that the only thing that has going for it (marketing purposes only of course) is that it’s clocked at 5 Ghz. Of course anyone that knows that @ those 5 Ghz, power consumption goes off the roof, won’t be deceived by this marketing ploy…but they’ll still make money out of the faithful fanboys.

    Some of those are commenting on this thread, stating that “there’s no problem, this a niche product” or “if you don’t like it, don’t buy it”, which is true, but “oddly” other companies never got or get such slack when they produce power hogs…

      • Mombasa69
      • 6 years ago

      It takes a fanboy to know a fanboy eh m8? I take it you’re n Intel Fanboy, well good luck on your stuttering next gen console ports, as Intel Haswell wont be supported, or should I say Hasbeen, same goes for the current gen Intel too.

      AMD make the console hardware now Radeon and AMD respectively, so if you haven’t got a similar PC based hardware it’s going to run like s***e.

      Most PC games are console ports, so good luck. =)

        • Klimax
        • 6 years ago

        Wrong.
        First Jaguar is very weak compared to Sandy Bridge cores. (Quite likely two to one)
        Second. Ports won’t use such fine tuned instruction streams, because many assumptions possible with consoles go out of window when dealing with general purpose OS.

        Such ports are generally done by taking high level code, changing API calls and recompile. (Most likely using Visual Studio or Intel C compiler – at best vendor neutral code)
        99% of optimization for Jaguar are eliminated.
        First “advantage” destroyed. AMD won’t gain anything. Intel’s solution will be still and once again superior to AMD’s.

        Second would be GPU and at that point code will go through API like DirectX with its own compiler for shader languages (vendor neutral or by vendor itself) and drivers themselves will be doing HW specific optimization. GPGPUE is last thing, but then that’ll be likely DirectCompute or OpenCL and for games drivers will have again specific optimizations and game creators won’t be single vendor only. Games are too expansive to afford that…

        Second and last “advantage” for AMD destroyed.

          • Airmantharp
          • 6 years ago

          I think you’re right (+1), but I’ll expound a little-

          The AMD ‘advantage’ here is not architecture or instruction based but rather centers on basic engine design conventions needed for these console CPUs.

          Since you have eight real cores, that are all equal and all have OoO pipelines with real FPU and assorted SIMD support, engine developers will be compelled to break up core engine processes into more pieces than was possible on the previous generation console’s CPUs. This is good for everyone on the desktop side, and will help to emphasize core count over clockspeed again.

          What’s specifically good for AMD, and more so than for Intel, is that these engines will be expecting to have six or seven real cores at their disposal, something AMD has in their FX-8000 series but Intel lacks altogether outside of Xeons.

          And then there’s the weakness of AMDs Jaguar cores- this pushes engine designers to deal with slower maximum IPC per thread, which means that the lower IPC of AMDs desktop CPUs will be far less of a hindrance with these ports than it is now.

          As for the GPU stuff, you’re right on. By the time the code runs in a desktop environment, there won’t be any real affinity toward AMD or Nvidia left if it’s not specifically added during the porting process.

            • Klimax
            • 6 years ago

            I’d say that multithreading in games is not easy, because of various interactions, which can at times kill parallelism. Best case for eight concurrent threads is 2-4 threads for AI/simulation/graphics/sound with rest being used for physics. (Otherwise locking can kill performance fast or programmers spend ungodly amount of time doing lockless algos, which are anything but easy while easy to get bugs)

            Bulldozer architecture however needs not to apply, because it doesn’t have six/eight real cores – those are modules and critical for games are FP units, of those only four are present in BD arch. (And hyperthreading on Haswell takes care of those more demanding cases, because structures required for it got expanded – visible in benches)

            IPC:
            AMD won’t gain anything on PCs. Studios will use general compiler (VS/Intel/GCC) at which point any code written with low IPC expectations will be lost, because assembler code won’t be adapted and compilers are emitting general code stream usable on major archs. (Some functions might have arch specific optimizations like memcpy, which has number of code paths) And in case of Intel compiler you can get Intel specific code paths with some fallback general one. And I severely doubt anybody is going to do low level optimization in assembler, because it is not needed for majority of CPUs(Intel) and such experts are very expensive so they will be working only where necessary like on code for consoles.

            Also note, there is no AMD compiler for Windows to use…

            • Jason181
            • 6 years ago

            Yeah, that’s why Haswell has instructions to alleviate some of the headaches associated with locks.

            I agree that the fpu is a problem for BD and the reason its performance is all over the board. But, you state that 2-4 threads plus physics is all we can hope for. I disagree; there are games out right now that use four threads, and the low ipc combined with the low clockspeeds of the Jaguar in the consoles will more or less demand that they utilize the cores to get good performance.

            Since the processors are x86 compatible, any assembly generated for the cpu would also be applicable to PCs. But, I don’t see much in the way of handwritten assembly because it’s very time intensive.

        • Airmantharp
        • 6 years ago

        Please, please keep posting. The more you get noticed, the sooner you’ll be gone. Thanks!

      • RickyTick
      • 6 years ago

      [quote<]power consumption goes off the roof[/quote<] I love mixed metaphors. 🙂

      • clone
      • 6 years ago

      AMD has to have a buyer for these chips, given they are destined for OEM’s who are anathema to enthusiasts and fanboys alike their must be an organization / organizations that have an app that can take advantage of these chips in a way that offsets the lack of versatility, the high price, high heat and high power requirements.

      “we” who read TR are not the only group that can read a benchmark and while “we” don’t know who the buyers are common sense dictates they must exist.

      OEM’s would not place an order for a limited run of specialized chips to be installed on custom motherboards without reason and AMD wouldn’t offer them given the exotic nature of the platform required.

      these chips are going somewhere and I’m certain have already been bought by someone.

    • allreadydead
    • 6 years ago

    Wonderful ! Now AMD, make a mobile version of this ! So, we can use this as heater or boil water/make dinner when we go camping.

    • Mat3
    • 6 years ago

    Why AMD!? If someone really wanted to, they could take a 8350, overclock it, and get similar results both in performance and power draw. Not to mention they’ve gone ahead and butchered their numbering scheme.

    I’m an AMD fan but this is just embarrassing, silly and pointless.

      • M3gatron
      • 6 years ago

      I will explain this as most of the intel fans are complaining like someone is forcing them to buy this CPU.
      The 5ghz AMD CPU is an Enthusiast Overclocker CPU.
      AMD guarantees that this CPU will run stable at 5ghz which means that it can be taken even higher. These are binned cpus.
      Also AMD did not confirm the TDP but in this case the 220W is the wost case scenario as it’s an oveclockers cpu.
      A 5ghz 8350 would easily run hotter and be less efficient than these cpus. So you could take an 8350 and OC it but you wont have the guarantee of 5ghz, good voltages, temps and most of all stability.

    • tbone8ty
    • 6 years ago

    why couldn’t they of focused on a 28nm FX-8350 same arch better process (tick)

    i bet we would of seen some nice efficiency gains like we saw going from bobcat to jaguar

    • madmilk
    • 6 years ago

    With a 220W TDP, AMD should just have made a 16 core/8 module CPU at about 3.8GHz, with a turbo of 4.5GHz. It would actually be the best at something: desktop multithreaded performance. Make it fit in a desktop socket. Memory bandwidth shouldn’t be a big problem, but strongly recommend DDR3-1866 or even bin for DDR3-2133. Sell at $600, and suddenly the 3930K has some very strong competition.

    The main concern would be cannibalizing the Opteron market, but I think with no registered memory/ECC, no quad-channel memory, no multiprocessor, and a 200W+ TDP, no one will buy this chip for servers.

      • Spunjji
      • 6 years ago

      At this stage they don’t have much of a market to cannibalise. A chip like that with ECC could conceivably be targeted directly at workstations.

      But no! Five of your finest gigglehurts, please.

      • maroon1
      • 6 years ago

      Do you know how big die size of AMD 16 core ? Do you think they can sell something like at low price for desktop users and a make profit ?

        • Airmantharp
        • 6 years ago

        Why does it have to be a low price? Die size only matters if it doesn’t fit in the socket packaging (assuming that it can be manufactured at all).

        Give people a double-wide Piledriver that drops into an AM3 socket and supports faster (2.4GHz DDR3) memory, what’s not to like?

        • madmilk
        • 6 years ago

        Of course this would be done with multiple dies, much as how 16 core Opterons are made. Since a FX-8350 costs only $200, it seems like $600 would be a reasonable price.

      • Bensam123
      • 6 years ago

      Yeah, I suggested they do this back when BD came out. I still think they should bring some of their server models down to the desktop and find some good bins of those to crank up the juice on.

      They really don’t have much of a server market to cannibalize though, Intel controls most of that… and if they offered cheaper server parts, people would buy them (just for less money) for servers.

      The whole segmentation doesn’t prevent desktop users from buying server parts or vice versa, it happens all the time (especially servers using desktop parts). Perhaps not in data centers or anything like that, but for small and medium businesses it’s not unheard of at all.

    • Bensam123
    • 6 years ago

    Is TR planning on testing it?

      • chuckula
      • 6 years ago

      If TR can have AMD send over a sample I’d love to see benchmarks. I’ve already volunteered my OC’d Haswell (4.7Ghz, which matches the base clock of the FX-9590) for comparison testing if there are any linux-based benchmarks that they can run.

      [Edit: Whenever an offer to do benchmarking gets downthumbed, I take it as a no-confidence vote by people who just want to look at GHz numbers and don’t want real analysis of some new product…]

      • GrimDanfango
      • 6 years ago

      Either that or planning to cook dinner on it.

        • Bensam123
        • 6 years ago

        I believe it’d have to put out more heat then 220w or you’d end up with some pretty raw dinner (or you’d have to cook it a really long time). So maybe if they made a slow cooker for a heatsink that’d work…

        Maybe Steamroller will put out 1000 plus watts of juice…

    • HisDivineOrder
    • 6 years ago

    The only thing positive about this release imo is that at least AMD is taking performance CPU’s without integrated GPU’s somewhat seriously (if you can call this a “serious” effort that is).

    For the longest time, I figured they’d just given up on the segment altogether. As it is, they seem to have nothing to put there. Hence, why when they are desperate to get there, they release… this.

    Better to release nothing and only SEEM like they’re unable to compete in this segment than release a product of desperation and remove all doubt.

    • BloodSoul
    • 6 years ago

    2in1 CPU and heater deal? What a bargain!

    • chuckula
    • 6 years ago

    I just posted more details in the forums too, but: I got that Coollaboratory Ultra TIM for my delidded 4770K and I just finished a 2+ hour successful run with the mprime torture test with a 4.7GHz overclock, which will be my new daily OC (up from 4.6Ghz and with substantially lower temps than I was getting with AS5).

    Highest core temp briefly hit 82C during the worst of the short-length tests in a 23C ambient temperature environment. When the new FX chips comes out, I’ll be happy to run Linux benchmarks on this rig to compare against them to see how things stack up.

      • Airmantharp
      • 6 years ago

      Glad that worked out for you man!

    • tbone8ty
    • 6 years ago

    i think its a neat little product and if it was available at a reasonable price it would be pretty “cool” to have a 5ghz AMD FX chip in my system.

    as a desktop user I really could care less about TDP

    I cant wait to see what extreme overclockers will do with this chip.

    after all thats what this chip was released for.

    9ghz LN2!?

    • soryuuha
    • 6 years ago

    now, onto 240V !

    • Geonerd
    • 6 years ago

    I don’t understand the bashing. If the chip/system fills a niche market and makes AMD some money, why not?

    That said, the peak thermals are impressive; I doubt many Arizona residents will want this in their house. But if you live in the northern tier of the country, a little incidental heat is rarely unwelcome.

      • FuturePastNow
      • 6 years ago

      There’s niche products, and then there’s niche products.

      This thing doesn’t update or replace any of AMD’s existing processor line. It just adds an outlier for boutique system builders. I’m a guy on a budget, who values that budget a bit more than raw performance, so the position of AMD’s processors on the performance-per-dollar chart appeals to me. But I’m not interested in speed records and I’m certainly not going to fiddle with liquid cooling, so I see nothing of interest here.

    • Krogoth
    • 6 years ago

    AMD, stop smoking the crack and drinking the grain alcohol.

    This chip isn’t a good idea, no matter how you slice it. The performance race is no longer about the “MEGAHURTZ”, it is about having more threads. Intel has most of the cards in that deck.

      • Xylker
      • 6 years ago

      AMD knows this. They have know it ever since Athlon XP. Remember the “Exposing the speed trap” marketing?

      I still have a T-shirt and Athlon XP 1800+ that I won at one of those events.

      [url<]http://web.archive.org/web/20021001151010/http://www.xppcentral.com/xpp/avoidthespeedtrap.asp?p=6[/url<]

      • flip-mode
      • 6 years ago

      Maybe it’s not right for you, but if enough people buy it then it’s arguably right for AMD.

      • chuckula
      • 6 years ago

      Engadget isn’t the best website for CPU-type news, but they did have a brilliant headline about these chips: [url=http://www.engadget.com/2013/06/11/amd-5gz-fx-chips/<]AMD wins race to 5GHz CPU clock speed, in which it was the sole participant[/url<]

      • Airmantharp
      • 6 years ago

      Damnit Krogoth, if you’re gonna troll, go all the way and declare this CPU as AMD’s admission of what a failure Piledriver is!

      Or something to that effect. We know you can do better!

      • Krogoth
      • 6 years ago

      Silly AMD fanboys.

      FX-9xxx is AMD’s version of P4-based Extreme Edition CPUs. Hot, fails to beat the competition at regular at stock, overpriced and has little or no headroom.

        • Yeats
        • 6 years ago

        AMD fanboiism has nothin’ to do with you being down-voted, it’s your lack of comprehension.

        • USAFTW
        • 6 years ago

        So you’re not impressed either. I thought that was just me.

    • willg
    • 6 years ago

    Quite a contrast with the previous news article about a 4.5w Haswell. You could run 40 in the same 220w power envelope as one of these chips.

    An 8350 will likely clock to similar levels (with similar TDP). Botique providers are not afraid to provide pre-overclocked systems, so I guess these just guarantee the minimum clock speed and save them sorting through 8350s. I doubt AMD is charging much of a premium given the additional costs OEMs will incur powering and cooling these.

    This must be a marketing driven release, they figured they’d get some press, draw attention to the FX range and maybe get some halo-product benefits in exchange for some binning.

    For any sane person these make almost no sense and I doubt AMD expects to sell many.

    • swaaye
    • 6 years ago

    Maybe it’s OEM only because of the need for a capable motherboard. I can’t see most boards running this CPU. There would be a lot of torched mobos methinks.

    • axeman
    • 6 years ago

    AMD’s new slogan:

    We’re on CRACK!

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 6 years ago

    So basically its a bad product so they can’t sell it to consumers. Ok makes sense.

      • someuid
      • 6 years ago

      It’s the other way around. Bad products get dumped on unsuspecting consumers. System integrators do their homework more than impulse purchase consumers and wouldn’t pick it up if it was a bad product.

    • Thrashdog
    • 6 years ago

    So that’s kinda ridiculous, but I think they should just own it. The systems with this chip in them need to rumble-pak motors, so they can rumble and wobble ominously at load. Maybe they can add a backlit acrylic panel that starts to glow like molten steel as the chip ramps up to maximum turbo frequency, or even a smoke machine!

    • Chrispy_
    • 6 years ago

    I wonder what the difference between an FX-9590 and an FX-8350 is when you consider that the FX-8350 usually OCs to at least 4.7Ghz anyway.

    TR’s FX-8350 review sample hit 4.5GHz at 68W more power draw than stock
    Anand’s FX-8350 review hit 4.8GHz at 99W more power draw than stock
    Scott reckoned he got a dud sample and I’ve heard enough to know that 5GHz (base clock) isn’t unreasonable, and that 4.7GHz is all but guaranteed now that yields have improved a bit.

      • BaronMatrix
      • 6 years ago

      I’d say the warranty… OEMs can give a warranty for that level…

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 6 years ago

    Remember when the 8170 was supposed to go 4.5 GHz at 125w? Maybe that was bogus, but the Richland A10 goes 4.4 GHz at 100w.

    So…what is the FX-9370’s excuse?!?

    • flip-mode
    • 6 years ago

    All of the benches on the page Cyril linked to look to be multi-threaded benchmarks (correct me if that is not the case). So the FX 9370 looks great in highly threaded scenarios. But if you’re looking for good single threaded or low-thread-count performance, the chip may be significantly less appealing (if appealing is even a word that can be applied to a 220 watt chip).

    • ronch
    • 6 years ago

    Engineering probably didn’t approve releasing these crazy SKUs, but you know AMD… the marketing guys always have it their way.

    Expect more culling in the marketing dept.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 6 years ago

      If by ‘culling’ you mean ‘give all the marketing guys systems with these CPUs and run a distributed computing project on them in rooms without air conditioning until they die of dehydration’ then yeah.

    • DPete27
    • 6 years ago

    I wouldn’t expect to see these in builds from OEMs like Dell and HP. Probably more limited to the likes of iBuyPower, CyberPower, Falcon NW, and all the other botiques. There won’t be many sold because of it (and because of the likely insane price tag) but then again these are likely top-binned FX-8350s of which there are limited supply.

    What’s wrong with selling them retail with an included 240mm radiator?

    • ronch
    • 6 years ago

    I hope there will be mobile versions of these SKUs. Can’t wait to have a laptop that bursts into flames in 5 seconds!

      • kvndoom
      • 6 years ago

      No fires (yet) but my girlfriend’s Turion laptop will sterilize you in minutes.

    • ronch
    • 6 years ago

    On the positive side, AMD could’ve done a lot worse by labeling this as an Energy Efficient model.

    • jessterman21
    • 6 years ago

    Reminds me of a Veyron Super Sport.

    Except not.

      • Voldenuit
      • 6 years ago

      Maybe one of those Lamborghinis that spontaneously [url=http://www.gtspirit.com/2013/06/04/lamborghini-gallardo-goes-up-in-flames-at-gas-station/<]burst into flames?[/url<] Although there have been a few Ferraris that've done that in recent years, too. PS Since when did CPU makers start advertising boost clocks instead of base clocks?

        • MadManOriginal
        • 6 years ago

        Ever since they started advertising each integer unit as a ‘core’.

          • Action_Parsnip
          • 6 years ago

          They ARE cores. They comply with ALL the definitions of a core.

          A core needs to fetch an instruction, decode that instruction, execute the instruction and store the result in memory. That is a core.

          Shared fetch & decode stages, shared L1 instruction cache and floating point unit do not stop it being a ‘core’.

      • JohnC
      • 6 years ago

      Reminds me of old American V8’s (like Cadillac’s V8’s in 1970’s) – huge volume, huge gasoline consumption, not much hp/torque output 😉

        • Duck
        • 6 years ago

        lol

        How can AMD extract such a small amount of CPU horsepower out of such a large and high revving core?

          • USAFTW
          • 6 years ago

          I’m sure I’ve heard that somewhere… Oh yeah, TopGear.
          “How did they get so few HPs out of a 5.0 litre engine?”

    • sschaem
    • 6 years ago

    I was so wrong on this one… yet, this is so out there that I still cant believe it.

    I wonder how much money AMD is going to get from this.
    I cant image a few million being worth hurting their image even more and being the source of ridicule ?

    AMD just went “full retard” on this one 🙁

    • ronch
    • 6 years ago

    AMD would have gotten away with something like this 15 years ago when overclocking was a mysterious technological endeavor and power consumption didn’t get much attention, but these days, what they’re gonna get is… ridiculed. Oh well.

    • jjj
    • 6 years ago

    Not much of a point in going retail. can’t really have any room to OC and the perf is nothing to brag about especially at that TDP. It’s good for folks that don’t know what they are buying,other than that who cares.

    PS: wouldn’t mind the 220W , if it was 16 cores on 20nm (very doable)

      • faramir
      • 6 years ago

      “PS: wouldn’t mind the 220W , if it was 16 cores on 20nm (very doable)”

      Not at 4.7/5 GHz. Overclocked Haswell can barely get to 4.7 GHz, 5 GHz appears to be no-go, and power consumption at 4.7 GHz is about twice that at stock (rated at 84W TDP). 8 cores would amount to twice that much, well above 220W mark so no-go for Intel (at 22 nm) and their next target is 14 nm.

      As for AMD, this is what they just brought out at 220W (at 32 nm), so, umm, no, not very doable, at least not in the foreseeable future – they are a year away from 28 nm, a couple of years from 20 nm (and even then it’s going to be TSMC producing their GPUs running at significantly lower speed, not 5 GHz CPUs).

        • OneArmedScissor
        • 6 years ago

        Define “cores.” AMD would tell you they’re already up to 3.5 GHz with 16 “core” Opterons. :p

        • BaronMatrix
        • 6 years ago

        Actually Kaveri is 28nm and is due in Q3… They demoed it at Computex and E3…

          • chuckula
          • 6 years ago

          According to AMD’s own roadmaps Kaveri is a late Q4 product. It will likely ship to OEMs in Q3, but that doesn’t mean you’ll be buying one in Q3.

    • Plazmodeus
    • 6 years ago

    I wonder how one of these FX’s at 4.7 will fare against a i2600k at the same speed?

      • Klimax
      • 6 years ago

      Same clock? Still nuked.

      • Beelzebubba9
      • 6 years ago

      It’ll get destroyed by an overclocked Intel CPU from the Sandy Bridge and newer models, but at stock speeds it should be faster in a lot of applications.

      • jihadjoe
      • 6 years ago

      Bit-tech has this interesting chart:
      [url<]http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/2013/06/01/intel-core-i7-4770k-cpu-review/6[/url<]

    • albundy
    • 6 years ago

    jeebuz H., they’re CRAZY!

      • Tristan
      • 6 years ago

      Rather desperate, to continue ‘fight’ with Intel

      • BaronMatrix
      • 6 years ago

      They want some of that exotic system money… If they can sell a chip that will run at 5GHz Turbo with water, it will kick ass with a 7990…

      • ssidbroadcast
      • 6 years ago

      Yeah that’s what I was thinking.

    • Meadows
    • 6 years ago

    Swell binning, but no cigar from me.

    Now all you have to do is provide this performance at the old TDP via some sort of improved stepping, AMD. Get on it, I got tired of contemplating an FX-8350 purchase already a while ago.

    • ronch
    • 6 years ago

    220 watts? You sure it’s not 220 [b<]volts[/b<]?

      • Cyril
      • 6 years ago

      I think cooling would be the least of your worries if you fed 220V AC current directly to a CPU. 😉

      • windwalker
      • 6 years ago

      Maybe it’s 220 Amps.

      • HallsMint
      • 6 years ago

      I think he meant 220 Coulombs.

    • ronch
    • 6 years ago

    [url<]http://i44.tinypic.com/flzuaw.jpg[/url<]

    • chuckula
    • 6 years ago

    [quote<]Also, as rumored, thermal envelopes for both offerings are "~220W."[/quote<] In honor of Will.I.Am's completely made up job with Intel, I'd like to pass along this message from Intel to AMD: [code<]You are now now fabbing with Will.I.Am and Physics Biatch![/code<]

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 6 years ago

      Thanks to you, I just lost several minutes of my life flipping through their “collaborations” on youtube. I never saw a laptop mentioned.

      Should have just hired Xzibit. “Yo dawg, I heard you like VRMs, so we put 320 phases in your phaser so you can modulate while you modulate.” I’d buy it sight unseen.

        • NeelyCam
        • 6 years ago

        Lol +1

    • jihadjoe
    • 6 years ago

    Time for Jared Walton to eat crow.

    • Wildchild
    • 6 years ago

    I think excluding these to pre-built manufacturers only is a smart move. Most people who build computers have enough sense to realize that this isn’t worth the money. Even the most die hard AMD fans can see past that (I hope).

    You’re going to most likely see these in “gaming” pre-builts where the buyer probably has less knowledge on computer components. They’ll see “5 ghz” and be sold right then and there.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 6 years ago

      More like the people who don’t realize they aren’t worth it also don’t realize what kind of cooling requirements there are for a CPU that dissipates upwards of 200+W of heat. Lots of system failures there.

      • cynan
      • 6 years ago

      Kind of like the same people those OEM-only “HD 8970s” appeal to…

      Maybe these 8970s are also cherry-picked Tahiti XTs that will all boost to 1.3 GHz on air cooling at TDPs of 300W no less. If that was the case, at least there’d be a semi-legit reason to call them [b<]8[/b<]970s.

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 6 years ago

    Well, they finally raised the L3 clock…to 2.4 GHz.

    Keep it up, AMD, you’re almost caught up to 2008, when the i7 965’s L3 ran 2.66 GHz with an older manufacturing process, an additional memory channel, and half the TDP. Er…wait a minute…

    • SCR250
    • 6 years ago

    [quote<]Also, as rumored, thermal envelopes for both offerings are "~220W[/quote<] Fire in the hole.

    • codedivine
    • 6 years ago

    Well, the 200W barrier has been broken. Now onto 500W!

      • ronch
      • 6 years ago

      Well, someone’s gotta make good use of those 1000w PSUs someday..

      • NeelyCam
      • 6 years ago

      Continuing a long history of innovation, AMD announced today that they were the first to reach a critical CPU power envelope threshold. AMD CEO, Rory Read, was visibly pleased with his company’s progress as he was announcing this new development.

      “Through creative innovation and company-wide alignment, we have now achieved something our competitors can only dream of. We are proud to announce that our new, 8-core flagship FX-9590 has reached and surpassed the previously unattainable goal of 200W TDP. The demand for this new product is strong; the first large-scale server deployment contract in Northern Alaska will be announced early next week.”

      AMD is also planning to continue developing this new product line with annual refreshes. Said Read: “We have a clear roadmap for these products for the next three years. Our 2014 platform, codenamed Sauna and fabricated on a 32nm process, will reach 250W TDP. In 2015, we will release a 20nm refresh, codenamed Nucular, that will increase TDP by up to 30% or more – this will be available for Back-To-School season. Finally, by 2016 Holiday season, we will release a product codenamed Solara – a new architecture that takes TDP to unprecedented levels. More details about Solara will be announced at Computex 2014 – stay tuned!”

      After trailing their main competitor, Intel, for years, it looks like AMD is back in the game. Intel has been slow at improving TDP lately; the new desktop Haswell CPUs were released with a disappointing 84W TDP. The recently announced Ivy Bridge E platform promises to improve TDP, but the new FX 9000-series products from AMD seem to have leapfrogged the competition. Intel representatives declined to comment on this story.

      As always, I would wait for independent benchmarking results, but judging from the heat and excitement in AMD’s demo room, this reporter has a feeling that AMD has finally nailed it – these new CPUs sure look [i<]HOT[/i<]!

        • MadManOriginal
        • 6 years ago

        Epic post: +infinity.

          • ronch
          • 6 years ago

          Wow. That should easily offset all the downvotes Neely has ever received!

          /joke

            • NeelyCam
            • 6 years ago

            Cool; this is my first time in the front page “Top Comments” section! Thanks, guys! <3

            • Musafir_86
            • 6 years ago

            -Wow, I thumbed up your post without even realizing it’s you, Neely!

            -I’d downvoted you if I knew… (just kidding! :-p… or maybe not.)

            • ronch
            • 6 years ago

            Congrats, Neely! Well done! I always knew you could do it! <sniff!>

            • NeelyCam
            • 6 years ago

            +85 now… crazy! I don’t think I’ve had -85 even with my best trolls

            • willmore
            • 6 years ago

            Same here and mine was a reply to you. 🙂

            • jihadjoe
            • 6 years ago

            They should put up a “Worst Comments” section.

            • indeego
            • 6 years ago

            Yes, as a troll, my day will come.

            • NeelyCam
            • 6 years ago

            I’ve been asking for that for years.

          • Fighterpilot
          • 6 years ago

          If you think that’s an “epic” post from Shilltard NeelyCam you need to get out more…

            • Yeats
            • 6 years ago

            Do you actually understand what it is that NeelyCam wrote?

        • Wirko
        • 6 years ago

        There’s a future for fusion but not cold fusion!

        • JohnC
        • 6 years ago

        Well done, sir!

        • sschaem
        • 6 years ago

        Sure, easy to make fun of AMD.

        But do you realize that this open AMD to a whole new segment of retail products ?
        How about a FX-9370 capucino machine with a built in version of Prime95 to get instant hot water?
        How about a multi socket based hair dryer that can fold ?

        AMD is on to something, diversification.

        BTW, I would love to have a personal heater that can fold. Those thing use 1000w and do nothing but produce heat. At least AMD heating element can run x86 code!

          • Spunjji
          • 6 years ago

          “At least AMD heating element can run x86 code!”

          I actually lol’d

          • Wirko
          • 6 years ago

          It [i<]smells[/i<] like AMD is going to introduce a new performance metric, HOPD, heat output per dollar.

            • heinsj24
            • 6 years ago

            220W is about 750 BTU.

            Make mine a dualie for winter.

        • Unknown-Error
        • 6 years ago

        Epic post indeed! Looks like you might make it to +50….. 😀

        • chuckula
        • 6 years ago

        Congratulations! You win the Internet today!

        • kvndoom
        • 6 years ago

        The Onion should pay you money to publish that as an article.

        • Action_Parsnip
        • 6 years ago

        Time surplus detected.

          • smilingcrow
          • 6 years ago

          Humour shortfall detected!

        • Goofus Maximus
        • 6 years ago

        Actually, you really CAN be proud of this stupidity. For all that it is useless, it is nonetheless a major technical triumph, to pull this much power without melting down or burning up or exploding. How they managed to keep the temperatures tame at this power level is actually something of a feat of useless technical prowess. (^_^)

        • jessterman21
        • 6 years ago

        Most up-voted comment ever. Good job NC.

          • NeelyCam
          • 6 years ago

          I think I might also have the more down-voted comment ever..

      • cynan
      • 6 years ago

      Dell Alienware products development exec on the phone to Asetek in 2015: “Uhmm, do you guys have any plans on bringing out any quad-fan radiator closed-loop water coolers any time soon? With 180mm fans?”

      Asetek: “Uhh, why?”

      Dell exec: “AMD just released their new 7.5 GHz flagship excavator-based desktop CPU”

      • BaronMatrix
      • 6 years ago

      Not really… All FX chips and A-Series APUs are made at GF and they are going from 28nm to 14nm for High Power… Thee was just a story that they are pushing forward both 20nm LP and 14nm HP..

      That means in my mind that Excavator APUs will be 14nm by Q314 – at least sampling… So we shoudl see 14nm Opteron in Q215…

      If they can get 20nm running quickly for Jaguar, they will be ready for phones (not that they will use Jaguar when they are making ARM chips with probably Radeon graphics (RADEON is ADRENO scrambled)…

      The same quad Temash at 20nm SHOULD go below 2.5W… It’s under 5W now…

        • NeelyCam
        • 6 years ago

        [quote<]That means in my mind that Excavator APUs will be 14nm by Q314 [/quote<] Hi-hi-hi! You're so cute and funny! *wink* Are you free tomorrow night?

        • Spunjji
        • 6 years ago

        “RADEON is ADRENO scrambled”

        This is an excellent summary of your post’s coherency.

      • crabjokeman
      • 6 years ago

      Someone wake me when we reach 1.21 gigawatts.

        • ronch
        • 6 years ago

        I’ll wake you up when it’s 1955 already..

    • Star Brood
    • 6 years ago

    If it’s OEM-only and not available for consumer purchase, then I bet they will make a lot more profit out of these. Enthusiasts who are building their own PC’s will just overclock a lower-priced CPU, but people buying pre-built machines are usually people too scared to do overclocking on their own.

      • indeego
      • 6 years ago

      And apparently just look at higher numbers as “better.”

      This just may work.

        • Firestarter
        • 6 years ago

        Some people with just buy the machine with the highest number. That was true in the Pentium 4 days and it’s true now.

    • chuckula
    • 6 years ago

    220 Watts Confirmed!

    What I’d be curious to see is how well the turbos actually work in the real world. Getting one “coar” in a design like Vishera up to 5GHz while guzzling power isn’t really that much of an achievement. If two or more modules can get up to 5GHz for extended operation, it could be more interesting though.

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