Report: AMD Hawaii graphics cards to ‘mass ship’ in October

In about a month’s time, AMD will gather journalists for a press conference in Hawaii and show us… something. The latest echoes from the rumor mill suggest this something will be a new high-end GPU code-named, oddly enough, Hawaii.

Now, a story by DigiTimes has addressed the question of when Hawaii GPUs could ship. Quoting “sources from the upstream supply chain,” the site claims that Asus, MSI, and PowerColor are all “expected to start mass shipping related products in October.”

DigiTimes specifically refers to Hawaii as a next-gen high-end GPU, so there’s little room for misinterpretation on that front.

Kicking off shipments in early October, a week or so after the press event, wouldn’t be unusual. AMD and Nvidia tend to give reviewers some time to test products ahead of hard launches. Of course, the DigiTimes story doesn’t mention when in October mass shipments will begin. It could be October 1, or it could be October 31. That means it’s also possible that cards will be scarce until November.

I suppose time will tell. In any event, it sounds like AMD will have some next-gen graphics hardware in stores in time for Christmas.

Comments closed
    • AMPinoy
    • 9 years ago

    They are putting all their hands up on how to build the CPU leader and they are doing just fine. offering Real time performance and not defeat those benchmarks… honestly? i don’t know what in the world does benchmarks do in our every day gaming and living. for me, if it can deliver the same performance for a fraction of a cost, then is that bad?? 🙂

    • Diplomacy42
    • 9 years ago

    Intel is doing a lot keeping ghz stable and reducing power waste at the microscopic level. they are clearly ignoring the desktop and focused on mobile, but they are reaping huge efficiencies because of it in all classes processor. When skylake comes out, I think we will see a return to the process gains that we are used to seeing.

    • Diplomacy42
    • 9 years ago

    Meh. Billion dollar company, 20,000 dollar party… Probably pays for itself in “free” advertizing a dozen times over.

    • clone
    • 9 years ago

    given what is believed to be AMD’s precarious financial position, write off or not I find the whole “let’s fly everyone to Hawaii” for the launch to be an example of what is/was always wrong with AMD…. a return to the Gerry Sanders era where he refused to have an electric pencil sharpener while at the same time driving a Bentley.

    it won’t change anything, if good, the reviews will reflect it, if more of the same or an incremental improvement the reviews will reflect that as well and given the buyers won’t be the ones in Hawaii it all just seems like a waste.

    • Sahrin
    • 9 years ago

    I think you maybe referring to the 9500 flashed-to-9700-Pro.

    • SCR250
    • 9 years ago

    Does your wife game?

    • SCR250
    • 9 years ago

    [quote<]It's not the percent improvement over the previous generation that justifies price, it's supply and demand.[/quote<] Two points: #1 The buyers most complaining about the price being too high when the 7970 was released were AMD potential (or real) buyers. Go back and check the forums when the 7970 was first released. Post after post about the price being too high based on performance comparisons. #2 If Nvidia used your Supply-and Demand logic they would have priced the GTX680 at $599 but instead priced it at the old GTX580 price of $499.

    • southrncomfortjm
    • 9 years ago

    Newegg has (had?) a crazy deal on a 3GB 7950 – Should be about $178 after rebates. Sounds like what you want.

    • Chrispy_
    • 9 years ago

    I’m looking for a 7850 replacement with more grunt – Neither the 7870 I have nor the 7950 fit in my GD04 HTPC and for OpenCL reasons I’m avoiding Nvidia.

    • jokinin
    • 9 years ago

    Ok nice, but will we 7xxx users have decent drivers by then?
    They’re still really immature. AMD has great hardware, but not so good drivers.

    • anubis44
    • 9 years ago

    With Jim Keller now Head of CPU design at AMD, you’ll almost certainly get your wish. He’s the only AMD engineer who ever built a big iron x86 core that defeated Intel’s best (Athlon 64 vs. Pentium IV). He’s done it before and he’ll do it again.

    • sschaem
    • 9 years ago

    No need to go to Hawaii to get the scoop,
    If we take the 7790 vs 7770 as a blueprint of whats to come:

    ~30% bigger, ~30% faster.. same TDP

    • jensend
    • 9 years ago

    It’s not the percent improvement over the previous generation that justifies price, it’s [b<]supply and demand[/b<]. As others have already tried to tell you. It's not a "hair cut" or a "hit to your image" when increasing supply (because time since launch has allowed you to build up some inventory, and because yields are improving) and/or decreasing demand (because the early adopters who must have the latest and greatest at almost any cost have been exhausted, and because more competition has entered the market) lead you to drop prices. The alternative to having high prices at launch and dropping them later is to have shortages at launch. That arbitrarily and unfairly allocates some of the value of the cards produced, arbitrarily awards some of the value to arbitrageurs ("ZOMG I caught a 7970 before it went out of stock, time to ebay it for $200 more than I paid for it"), and destroys much of the rest of the value. When the launch price is high enough that supply and demand are balanced, the people who are most willing to pay for their card get their card, the company gets the revenue which will incentivize them to produce more and which will give them the ability to improve their process and reduce costs, and on the balance society is much better off. Maybe try taking ec 101 from your local community college before figuring you're smarter than every businessman out there?

    • SCR250
    • 9 years ago

    The problem wasn’t no competition but that the 7970 wasn’t much of an improvement from the previous generation to justify the sky high pricing.

    • ronch
    • 9 years ago

    If they do that, we’ll have a scenario not much different from the Xbox One. Suddenly, we had to clarify whether we’re referring to Xbox 1 or Xbox One in a conversation.

    • ronch
    • 9 years ago

    AMD is doing all a plucky little company can do against a huge competitor. AMD has done what no other company has ever managed to pull off: get this far in the game against Intel. Intel, on the other hand, is deliberately pulling a lot of levers to turn features on and off to segment their product lines. AMD is giving us everything they possibly can at every price point.

    • Waco
    • 9 years ago

    I’d buy a 9800 Pro just because…especially if I can flash the XT BIOS. 🙂

    • Blink
    • 9 years ago

    Good thing Intel doesn’t offer minor speed bumps using increased power consumption to do so. If they did that would be terrible…

    • Bensam123
    • 9 years ago

    It’s like wearing hand me downs. They’re all Kepler, and the GK110 has been around for quite some time. You don’t wear hand me downs and say they’re ‘exotic’. Maybe they originally were, but they aren’t anymore.

    • Jigar
    • 9 years ago

    You have no idea

    • jihadjoe
    • 9 years ago

    $700 for a Titan beater and I’m on board AMD’s ship.

    • jihadjoe
    • 9 years ago

    9800pro or bust!

    • Jigar
    • 9 years ago

    Hi Fighterpilot,

    HD 5850 is a legendary card, it can still play a lot of latest games at high details on Full HD. Don’t forget to sell that card, so that it can still do its duty when you replace it.

    • Fighterpilot
    • 9 years ago

    Hiya Jigar 🙂
    I’m up for a 9950 myself…must be high time to retire my faithful 5850.

    • Jigar
    • 9 years ago

    Looks like my wife’s PC will get a great upgrade very soon – My HD7970 GHZ edition.

    • Aveon
    • 9 years ago

    A business model that does not consider every segment of the consumer base. That’s a little to harsh considering not everyone can upgrade their system every 2 years or everyone doest not have the time and patience to go through shipping a faulty product or someone who spent a little less on mid high end product can’t tweak the system a little bit to get some extra performance gain .

    • DarkMikaru
    • 9 years ago

    So that is why my Sapphire Radeon HD7790 dropped so much on the egg recently. I finished building my FX system and paid 139 for the card. Now its 129.99 with a 15 dollar rebate! Grrr. Well, I am not much of a PC gamer, I just wanted enough oomph in my system so when I did decide to play for a bit I wouldn’t have to turn everything down just to get 18 fps 🙂

    [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814202029[/url<] I recently re-installed Steam and logged in. Says I had all of 20 min of Half Life 2 logged for play time lol If that doesn't prove my point, I don't know what else will. Now that I have this card I'll try to spend more quality time with my PC.

    • 0g1
    • 9 years ago

    Yeah, I sure won’t be buying any graphics card till October, when we see what happens with price/performance.

    • Airmantharp
    • 9 years ago

    Uh, those aren’t ‘dirty tricks’. Those are business as usual for the CPU industry. Intel has focused on efficiency lately in order to push their full-fat Core technology into ever more limited thermal envelopes, and that’s a very good thing; that AMD has shot themselves in the foot repeatedly in the CPU market has allowed Intel to pursue their interests unabated.

    • shank15217
    • 9 years ago

    greenland is an island

    • Airmantharp
    • 9 years ago

    Titan is only exotic in that it’s the follow-up to the GPU that went into the GTX480/GTX580. The 600-series completely lacked a a large-die compute-oriented SKU.

    But no, the 600-series and 700-series were not based directly off of a cut-down ‘Titan’; only the GTX780 shares that distinction. The GTX680/770 were the same size as the GTX460/560 GPUs, and were set up similarly with a very limited set of compute capabilities and a focus on efficiency for gaming.

    Now, yes, the 600- and 700-series ‘Small Kepler’ GPUs were based on the same core technology as the Titan and GTX780, but they are very different GPUs.

    • Aveon
    • 9 years ago

    Slow movement is not the biggest of the concerns… Intel has been playing all sorts of dirty tricks lately.
    The TIM issue, the USB 3 sleep state issue , no-overclocking in non K series CPU……

    • Bensam123
    • 9 years ago

    I’m not sure, with these new price drops and AMDs game bundles, we may be looking at AMD aggressively trying to pursue Nvidias card share, which means marking these at a price that even Nvidia fanbois can’t deny. They’re almost there already. Normally of course they’d just mark them high and keep them there till Nvidia releases something new that makes them drop their prices (like Nvidia did with the 7xx series).

    Not that they have to set a precedent, but if you give gamers a good deal and they see it’s a reasonable experience, they may be inclined to stay on board.

    • Bensam123
    • 9 years ago

    Aye, stable release can mean available, but not the only option. It probably means they’ll still fill in the mid and low end tiers of their lineup, while the new 8xxx cards fill in the high end. If they’re fast enough we may even see the 7970 and 7950 filling in the mid range cards (which could be indicative of why their price dropped so much).

    • 0g1
    • 9 years ago

    AMD will probably try to keep the price as high as possible and milk these new cards, relative to nVidia.

    • 0g1
    • 9 years ago

    Your prediction skills are better than mine! Wasn’t it you who said the price drops to the 7xxx series were indicative of imminent new cards? And I was quoting AMD saying 7xxx series “to be stable througout 2013” to mean they will just keep reducing the price and release 8xxx series 2014 lol. Seems like I was wrong!

    • NeelyCam
    • 9 years ago

    Well, my “3 years since 28nm” was clearly wrong, so downthumbs are much deserved

    • NeelyCam
    • 9 years ago

    I guess Maxwell is likely to be 28nm then. NVidia hasn’t been doing runs on bleeding edge processes… they wait until yields are better.

    • NeelyCam
    • 9 years ago

    Yes.. but although he delivers the rumors at an elevated trolling level (and without a help of an editor), he’s batting pretty much 0.500. I think it’s very possible that Maxwell is 28nm

    • NeelyCam
    • 9 years ago

    Ah that’s right. It was 40nm chips that came out in Q3/2009, and 28nm chips in Q1/2012. Extrapolating forward, can we assume that it’ll be Q3/2014 for 20nm then?

    You know, that also means TSMC is running at 2.5-year cycle, while Intel is running at 2-year cycle between process nodes. So much for TSMC catching up…

    • willmore
    • 9 years ago

    You mean *both* of you?

    • Bensam123
    • 9 years ago

    And there they are. I’m sure the 7xx cards are looking like even better value propositions now. Poor fellows, you got about five months out of your marginally better top end hardware for a premium price. Nvidia got you good.

    It’s hard to imagine this being slower then AMDs current offerings and they’re on par with Nvidias (only a decent bit cheaper and with games to boot). Can’t wait to see what’s happening. Who knows, maybe Nvidia will introduce, another, new series of graphics cards in a couple months too.

    • Bensam123
    • 9 years ago

    Till something better comes along…

    • Bensam123
    • 9 years ago

    I don’t think you’ll need to worry about performance in BF4. I haven’t seen any numbers on it, but judging by the graphics I’m going to assume the requirements are the same as BF3.

    • Bensam123
    • 9 years ago

    Titan wasn’t exotic by any means dude, especially considering like the entire 6xx and 7xx series were based off the same cut down chip.

    • Farting Bob
    • 9 years ago

    I hate what AMD is doing which is offering minor speed bumps but increasing power consumption to do so. Don’t blame Intel for slow movement in the CPU world, blame it’s rivals who have stagnated or in a few cases, gone backwards.

    • Farting Bob
    • 9 years ago

    It does not take long to install a new GPU and drivers. Then in game just slide all the settings up a notch.

    • dragontamer5788
    • 9 years ago

    If you include iGPUs, AMD has a larger marketshare than NVidia according to Jon Peddie. (21% vs 16%). NVidia is winning on dGPUs, although AMD has caught up.

    [url<]http://jonpeddie.com/press-releases/details/amd-winner-in-q2-intel-up-nvidia-down/[/url<] Edit: misspelled Jon Peddie's name the first time.

    • dragontamer5788
    • 9 years ago

    I know people find him abrasive, so take it or leave it. I have in fact *posted* my references so that you can criticize them. BTW: you’re welcome.

    Or would you rather me hide my references like everyone else on the internet does (or even, just make up crap without any references at all??) Nope, I’ll be honest, and post my references. Its the better way to do these discussions.

    • ColdMist
    • 9 years ago

    If possible, they need to be available before BF4 comes out. Not fun to get BF4, want to play, and have to switch all the graphics again two weeks into the game. At that point, I want to be playing, not tinkering.

    • dragontamer5788
    • 9 years ago

    AMD is also offering “cloud” GPU features and GPGPU virtualization features on their workstation models. If you want to have thin clients with GPGPU capabilities, its important to buy a FirePro instead of a Radeon.

    Official driver support also makes a difference. Some CAD programs will only run on certain workstation cards.

    • Aveon
    • 9 years ago

    I wish they could catch up with the CPU market as well,, I hate what INTEL has been doing lately with the recent CPU.. I mean somebody needs to give me some serious competition.

    • ptsant
    • 9 years ago

    Should be a great product. They said that noise/thermals are improved. On the other hand, I’m so happy with my stock 7950 that I bought for $290 a long time ago… Can’t really find an excuse for upgrading.

    • Wildchild
    • 9 years ago

    Asking $550 for a graphics card when there is no competition is just simply supply and demand. If you don’t want to buy it, then don’t. Intel, AMD, and Nvidia have all been guilty of charging a premium for the most bleeding edge tech.

    I wouldn’t call Kepler “cutting AMD at the knees.” At least not for anything except Titan and the 7xx series, but at the time the 7970 was still very competitive when the 680 was released. And if you want to talk about a high cost, then Nvidia would be a better example. The 4xx series was notorious for having poor yields and for being extremely inefficient (the 500 series didn’t fair much better). One of the biggest reasons Kepler was such a huge jump from Fermi is because they butchered the compute capabilities in order to lower power consumption.

    • NAG3LT
    • 9 years ago

    Reputation of that site is mostly tarnished by its creator – Charlie Demerjian. Short version how he approaches the news is – AMD rocks, Nvidia and Intel suck. To do that he doesn’t care about accuracy at all. The correct news from him are the same as the non-running clock showing time right twice a day.

    • Disco
    • 9 years ago

    I’m looking forward to a pretty significant jump in performance. It has been a very long time since they released their current gen, and I would hope that they have put this extra time into developing a real winner that will be the undeniable best performance for any given value category. NVidia has only recently (relatively) put out their top cards, and they would be hard pressed to get something new on the table to compete in the short to mid-term.

    AMD has a real opportunity here. I hope that can take advantage of it. Especially if it comes with fancy new drivers that fully optimize their rendering potential (frame pacing etc…).

    • JosiahBradley
    • 9 years ago

    If they don’t release a HD 9700 Pro, they are missing a huge marketing dream.

    • Goty
    • 9 years ago

    The 7970 is faster than or competitive with the 780 and Titan in many compute workloads, so AMD doesn’t really need to change anything in order to compete with these cards in GPGPU markets.

    As for AMD changing their strategy, I can’t imagine they really feel the need to; they gained market share at the expense of NVIDIA over the past year (of course, I don’t recall if that was in discrete GPUs only), so they seem to being doing fairly well.

    • SCR250
    • 9 years ago

    So why would you buy an expensive workstation-class card if the consumer-class cards are similar enough?

    • dragontamer5788
    • 9 years ago

    [quote<]Seems counter to their business model over the past few years.[/quote<] Not necessarily. Workstation GPUs are a growing sector of computing. Unlike NVidia, AMD's workstation-class chips are near identical to their consumer chips. If AMD wishes to grow in server-class GPGPU compute, they'll have to release Titan-class competitors. And AMD is nice enough to keep their workstation-class and consumer-class cards similar enough that everyone benefits from the research. (none of the GK104 vs GK110 stuff from NVidia)

    • Star Brood
    • 9 years ago

    Now if only we could get a new batch of CPU’s that actually improve performance shipping around that time.

    • cynan
    • 9 years ago

    I guess the obvious question is whether it will be an incremental upgrade/rebranding as in the GTX 680 -> GTX 770 – which is probably what I’m betting – or something more exotic like the 780/Titan? Would AMD really take a chance with such large chips? Seems counter to their business model over the past few years.

    On the other hand, there is a [url=http://wccftech.com/amd-hawaii-gpu-performance-exposed-3dmark-faster-gtx-titan/<]leaked benchmark[/url<] indicating comparable performance with the Titan. But obviously take with large helping of salt..

    • ronch
    • 9 years ago

    A lot of kids will have AMD silicon under their Christmas trees this year, nicely wrapped and waiting, and most of them probably wouldn’t even know about AMD.

    • anotherengineer
    • 9 years ago

    I think I am going to wait for the HD 9800 Pro (probably HD 9850) to upgrade the HD6850.

    It’s a nostalgia thing I guess.

    • ronch
    • 9 years ago

    The name Volcanic Islands just gave me an idea. Volcano = hot, islands = small. So will AMD’s next-gen chips be… Hot and small?

    • SCR250
    • 9 years ago

    Semi-accurate. Name says it all.

    • SCR250
    • 9 years ago

    [quote<]AMD has a recent history of doing this successfully.[/quote<] And the cost to AMD and the buyers were very high. As for "successfully" that is debatable. All AMD had was a 3 month lead and when Kepler was released Nvidia cut AMD off at the knees in that the 7970 that AMD was asking for $550+ had to take an immediate $100 hair-cut followed by a redo of it in the form of the 7970GE. Both of those cost AMD dollars and a hit on their image. With AMD having cash flow problems they no longer will be the first-in-line for low yielding parts on a new process.

    • dragontamer5788
    • 9 years ago

    Nice Downvotes Neely: you always manage to get downvotes by asking such controversial questions like “What are the facts” ??

    Semiaccurate is reporting 28nm for Hawaii: [url<]http://semiaccurate.com/2013/08/07/amd-to-launch-hawaii-in-hawaii/[/url<]. And is also reporting 28nm for Maxwell. [url<]http://semiaccurate.com/2012/12/06/nvidias-maxwell-process-choice/[/url<] Semiaccurate is also reporting that Apple is getting first dibs on 20nm in 2014. 20nm is available, but first dibs go to the richest companies. Qualcomm / AMD / NVidia will have to fight for the scraps, so its unlikely either of them will get to 20nm soon. Charlie argues that AMD will have the best shot, because Apple has the highest chance of being nice to AMD. So the first 20nm GPU will be Apple based, for some iPhones or iPad.

    • 00testbug00
    • 9 years ago

    AMD still has a lot of room to make their cards larger.

    They could make a chip 33% larger and still be smaller than Nvidia’s largest chips.

    On power, yeah, that is the real constraint.

    Although, the 7790 was a huge performance increase over the 7770 and used barely any more power, so, who knows 🙂

    • Goty
    • 9 years ago

    Are you implying that you already have a 780? If so, that would be a prudent decision; otherwise, I can’t imagine this would retail for much more than a 780 even if it ends up being much faster (something that I honestly don’t see without a change in architecture), so buying a 780 instead would seem like a poor purchase.

    /speculation

    • 00testbug00
    • 9 years ago

    Split launch more likely, gaming Maxwell on 28nm (ie GM201-209) and compute Maxwell (GM200/210) on 20nm.

    Maxwell refresh (GM211-219) should be on 20nm as well.

    • Prestige Worldwide
    • 9 years ago

    Probably going to pass on this unless it blows the 780 out of the water. I want to buy an AMD card but haven’t felt compelled to do so since the HD 4870’s launch obliterated the GTX 280 from a price / performance standpoint.

    • Concupiscence
    • 9 years ago

    Yes, the entire Hawaiian island chain is fed by a magmatic hot spot, so it’s the very definition of a (shield) volcanic island.

    Here’s hoping AMD’s new GPUs deliver some of that sweet, sweet pep.

    • Game_boy
    • 9 years ago

    It is next gen, but it’s 28nm so performance is bound by heat/area/power still.

    • brucethemoose
    • 9 years ago

    But you can also expect better performance.

    AMD has a recent history of doing this successfully. Even with poor yields, the 4870, 5870, and 7970 all managed to undercut massive Nvidia chips by using bleeding edge process tech. But with the 9000 series, that probably won’t happen at 20nm.

    • ronch
    • 9 years ago

    This must be in the minds of most folks who are following the graphics tech industry. It used to be that they just wait for TSMC’s next process node to be able to cram more ‘cores’ (cough cough!) in their ‘next gen’ chips. Process shrinks have been increasingly becoming difficult and expensive to come buy for the past few years, though, so it would be interesting how AMD and Nvidia will push performance/watt/dollar moving forward. Come to think of it, most leading edge semiconductor firms are facing this sort of problem as we speak.

    • chuckula
    • 9 years ago

    These are absolutely [b<]not[/b<] 20 nm parts. In a semi-related note, the latest rumor about Maxwell is that it may launch in Q1 2014... I'm not saying I buy that rumor, but if it turns out to be true then you can pretty well bet that Maxwell is either 28 nm too, or else Nvidia will "launch" Maxwell at 20 nm before the process is ready and Maxwell will only be sold in very small quantities to the uber-expensive HPC or professional space where the K20 lived for a long time.

    • ronch
    • 9 years ago

    I hope this is really their next generation graphics tech, that is, deserving of the title ‘next gen’, and not just some souped-up 7000-series chips. Isn’t their next gen supposed to be called Volcanic Islands? So Hawaii is a volcanic island, right?

    • lilbuddhaman
    • 9 years ago

    Of course it’ll be the “next gen” of cards; the question is what performance level card they will release initially. Could be their high end model, or their “high end but actually not quite high-end” model like the 7870 and 7970.

    • Aveon
    • 9 years ago

    XBOX ONE, PS4 and now this…..

    Looks like AMD is hitting the Jackpot for this Christmas…..

    • SCR250
    • 9 years ago

    Mass production of 20nm in mid-2013 is not going to happen.

    As to whoever will be first they can expect poor yields.

    • nico1982
    • 9 years ago

    [quote<]Hasn't it been about three years since the first 28nm GPUs game out?[/quote<] Have been 28 nm GPU to market before the 7970? January 2012 according to wikipedia.

    • NeelyCam
    • 9 years ago

    Is this 20nm? If not, I wonder which one – NVidia or AMD – is going to be first to 20nm… and when. Should be a major power consumption advantage.

    Hasn’t it been about three years since the first 28nm GPUs game out?

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