HP builds Leap motion controller into 17” laptop

I’m not one to gush over jumbo-sized notebooks, but this is kinda neat. HP has rolled Leap’s motion controller into a premium 17" notebook with Haswell guts and optional Nvidia graphics. The system is coming out on October 16, and here’s what it looks like:

Leap’s controller isn’t just good for playing 3D pong. As we noted in our previous coverage, the controller is very accurate; it can track all 10 of your fingers in an area of eight cubic feet, and it detects movements as small 0.01 mm. The Leap Airspace store features a nice collection of apps, which enable everything from Minority Report-style gesture controls to music creation to mid-air painting.

According to HP, pricing for the Envy17 Leap Motion Special Edition will start at $1,049.99 with a Haswell processor, 8GB of RAM, and a 1TB 5,400-RPM mechanical hard drive. You’ll be able to throw in a second hard drive (or, presumably, an SSD) and add discrete Nvidia graphics. The press release also mentions a "17.3-inch diagonal optional full HD display," which likely means the default resolution will be less than 1080p—but you’ll be able to upgrade.

HP may have some competition in the not-too-distant future, as well. Back in January, Asus said it was planning to build Leap technology into some of its high-end systems.

Update 9:29 PM: Leap’s PR folks tell us that Asus won’t integrate a motion controller into a laptop like HP. Rather, Asus will bundle Leap controllers with high-end notebooks and all-in-ones due out later this year.

Comments closed
    • Chrispy_
    • 6 years ago

    It’s a shame the Leap motion controller is awful.
    I read a review of one in PC Pro (printed article ZOMG!!1) that basically confirmed all my expectations of [i<]why[/i<] it would be awful. Maybe in a few generations we'll have useful, lag-free, accurate, non-gimmicky motion controllers....

    • dashbarron
    • 6 years ago

    I really feel like we could evolve to being keyless typers. Once you know the keys, it’s all muscle memory from there. That and consistent finger movements.

    Put your hands in the typing position, have a special flick of the finger to indicate the F and J keys, and go to town.

      • Farting Bob
      • 6 years ago

      Some sort of tactical response makes a hell of a lot of difference when typing. Even a touchscreen you feel when you physically make contact with the screen. With air keyboarding though you will never know if your movement has been registered, and not having a physical key to see or feel will make even the greatest air typists rather slow or inaccurate compared to any keyboard or touchscreen. On the plus side, if there is an air prog rock band looking for a lead keyboardist, you’ll have an advantage.

        • Voldenuit
        • 6 years ago

        Did you mean “tactile”, or do Navy SEALS bust down your door when you’re commenting on a Guardian article? Cause that would be awesome.

        • GrimDanfango
        • 6 years ago

        I certainly can’t argue that a tactical response would make a huge difference when typing. It’s a nightmare trying to type while under fire.

      • Voldenuit
      • 6 years ago

      [quote<]Put your hands in the typing position, have a special flick of the finger to indicate the F and J keys, and go to town.[/quote<] Based on the ars technica video, there's already a special 'flick of the finger' reserved for the Leap Motion. :p

    • internetsandman
    • 6 years ago

    I’m gonna be the guy who says they’re had better be an option to upgrade from 1080p to at least 1440p for those willing to pay for it

    • trackerben
    • 6 years ago

    Like when the iPad arrived, HP now has something people will flock to look at and ask questions, particularly children. It will boost the brand’s marketing unless it makes the user appear clueless and becomes the butt of jokes.

    • Laykun
    • 6 years ago

    Yep. Nope.

      • Unknown-Error
      • 6 years ago

      maybe

    • HisDivineOrder
    • 6 years ago

    Technology like this is not going mainstream until the OS is using it at the most basic level.

    • Generic
    • 6 years ago

    Oh go ahead TechReport; make me feel guilty for returning mine.

    The hardware seemed up to the task, but I had a “poor” experience with the software, and I didn’t want to pay $90 to be a beta tester.

    I do wish them future success even if I’d rather touch a screen.

    • Voldenuit
    • 6 years ago

    [quote<]As we noted in our previous coverage, the controller is very accurate[/quote<] Did you watch the video in the ars review? Good for a laugh. [url<]http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2013/07/hands-on-with-the-leap-motion-controller-cool-but-frustrating-as-hell/[/url<]

      • SomeOtherGeek
      • 6 years ago

      LMAO! Thanks for sharing.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This