Unannounced GeForce GTX 760 Ti OEM appears on Nvidia’s site

A new card has joined the GeForce GTX 700 series, and it’s done so on the down-low. Nvidia’s GeForce.com website now includes a listing for the GeForce GTX 760 Ti, an "OEM" product apparently targeted at pre-built PCs.

The listing includes a run-down of key specs, and as far as I can see, the newcomer is essentially a re-badged GeForce GTX 670. Both cards have 1344 stream processors, a 915MHz base clock, a 980MHz Boost clock, 2GB of GDDR5 memory clocked at 6 GT/s, and a 256-bit path to memory.

The board lengths and cooler reference designs appear identical, too. So do the 170W thermal envelopes.

There’s no indication of whether this product will show up outside of pre-built PCs or not. We’ve asked Nvidia for more details and are awaiting a response. (Thanks to TR reader SH SOTN for the tip.)

Comments closed
    • lilbuddhaman
    • 9 years ago

    Possibly, or their yields have gotten better and you might get one of the outside/bad chips off the wafer and have even less overclocking potential.

    • Krogoth
    • 9 years ago

    Its probably based on the newer stepping of GK104 silicon (found in 760 and 770). So it has a better overclocking ceiling than its 670 “predecessor”. Outside of that, not much else.

    • James296
    • 9 years ago

    Woohoo, now I can call my 670 a 760ti /sarcasm. really starting to hate the re-branding this gen -.-

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 9 years ago

    There’s no guarantee you understand syntax so I’m assuming you aren’t a native English speaker and in that case you can ignore this sentence. If you are a native English speaker, may some god – whomever he/she may be – have mercy on your soul.

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 9 years ago

    It’s at idle. It requires a 1000W PSU at load. Also, TDP is not actual power consumption. I wish you would change your name to buck bundy.

    • PopcornMachine
    • 9 years ago

    Another rebadge. Oh, the excitement. I don’t know if I can take it.

    • chuckula
    • 9 years ago

    Actually… that 170 watt number was taken when the card was completely disconnected from a computer, as you saw in the photo. It’s well known that Nvidia is run by a bunch of criminals, and now they have decided to break even more laws… OF THERMODYNAMICS!

    • derFunkenstein
    • 9 years ago

    err…duh?

    • albundy
    • 9 years ago

    that 170w better be at load, or else, yikes!

    • Great_Big_Abyss
    • 9 years ago

    How many people tried flashing their 680’s to 770’s and ended up bricking their cards?

    • oldDummy
    • 9 years ago

    Something had to be done with the 760.
    I was thinking about upgrading to a 7x series card from a GTX670.
    Turns out it would have been a downgrade going to a gtx760.
    Not good for a “new” generation card.

    • Chrispy_
    • 9 years ago

    Yep, my beef with Nvidia is not the rebadging, that’s inevitable. it’s stuff like the the 630M, the 635M and the 640M LE:

    There are multiple silicon options attached to each model. Take the 640M LE. Is it Fermi or Kepler? Is it 96-cu or 384cu? Is it 20W or 32W? There are major performance/power differences between them, and yet they all get the same “badge”

    • BlondIndian
    • 9 years ago

    Nvidia requires you to jump a few hoops while amd works out-of-box . This is an advantage for AMD .
    I don’t really mind such rebrands too much as I look at spec sheets .

    The real bad thing was Nvidia GT640 on laptops . The manufacturers often don’t specify wether it was kepler or fermi , ddr3 or gddr5 , variable number of shaders,clocks , etc. That was very shady .

    • HisDivineOrder
    • 9 years ago

    The 7970 was launched in December of 2011. We’re in late October of 2013 and the R9 series in its refresh incarnations are just getting out there.

    Dec 2011 to Oct 2013 is dangerously close to 24 months for a new refresh and these cards are likely to stay the “law of the land” for another 6-12 months.

    What I’d say instead is, “I guess that’s what you get when GPU companies decide to work together to avoid introducing new products as much as possible because their interests are not in the markets they dominate.”

    That is, nVidia is focused on Tegra and AMD is focused on staying solvent long enough to find a niche that ain’t already occupied. It’s like some sick game of musical chairs and all the chairs seem to be filled.

    Qualcomm, nVidia, hell even Intel have their chairs. Where’s AMD’s? That console chair they’re trying right now seems awfully wobbly…

    • HisDivineOrder
    • 9 years ago

    Sometimes. If I were you, I don’t think I’d be bringing up Crossfire support as a historically strong point for AMD, though.

    • HisDivineOrder
    • 9 years ago

    I guess you missed the part where AMD rebadged the entire 7xxx series without even updating the speeds on the cards to make the 8xxx series in the mobile GPU space, right? 😉

    nVidia and AMD are equally guilty of refreshing the hell out of products with new names. AMD did (also) just rename the 7xxx series a whole new naming scheme, too, just to complicate matters even more.

    • Kurotetsu
    • 9 years ago

    This is why you research something before spending money on it. I thought that was common sense for people who give enough of a crap about desktops to buy a discrete graphics card?

    • LukeCWM
    • 9 years ago

    I guess that’s what you get when gamers expect new generations every twelve months, but it takes 18-30 months between actual generations.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 9 years ago

    AMD’s entire 8000 series was OEM rebadge. They both do it.

    • superjawes
    • 9 years ago

    That and I don’t think there’s any reason to. Anyone who does a straight (meaing in place, like 660 > 760) upgrade every year on electronics is doing it wrong and deserves to be overcharged.

    • Deanjo
    • 9 years ago

    It would be a hard thing to do especially since the practice is carried out in many areas of consumer electronics. It would have to cover, CPUs, GPUs, chipsets, optical drives and players, tv’s, microwaves, laundry machines, etc etc.

    • Deanjo
    • 9 years ago

    A bios flash usually takes care of that.

    • Great_Big_Abyss
    • 9 years ago

    At least the AMD rebrands are compatible with the previous gen’s models. I.e. you can crossfire them.

    Nvidia does NOT let you do that with rebrands.

    • Bubster
    • 9 years ago

    They (AMD and Nvidia) are both pretty bad. Lets not forget that the R series with the exception of Hawaii are complete rebrands. Or the turks rebrands on mobile (similar to low level 600m series rebrands).

    • Musafir_86
    • 9 years ago

    -Can’t we put up a legislation to prohibit rebadging without clarification? Under Consumer Protection Acts, perhaps?

    Regards.

    • Chrispy_
    • 9 years ago

    If you look at Wikipedia’s comparison of Nvidia GPUs you’ll see that the number of Nvidia rebadges and barrel-scrapes is borderline obscene.

    From what I can tell, sticking the word OEM on the end makes a complete mockery of the model number and Nvidia change the specs of the OEM parts as they see fit, to use whatever unsellable, harvested dies they have lying around.

    There’s no guarantee that it’ll even be a GK104.
    There’s no guarantee how many GPCs or SMXs will be active
    There’s no guarantee how much RAM or how many bits the memory path will have
    There’s no guarantee what clocks it will ship with.

    The worst example was with the 600-series mobile options; That was genuinely a case of Nvidia [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_Nvidia_graphics_processing_units#GeForce_600M_.286xxM.29_Series<]taking the mickey[/url<]....

    • DeadOfKnight
    • 9 years ago

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