Report: Unlocked Broadwell won’t hit the desktop until late 2014

Last week, Intel announced that, due to a "defect density" problem, production of next-gen Broadwell processors would be postponed until next quarter. The first Broadwell-powered PCs will presumably roll out in the spring or summer of 2014. However, we may have to wait much longer for a desktop version of the chip with an unlocked upper multiplier.

The guys at VR-Zone got their hands on a leaked roadmap, and they claim that Broadwell-K isn’t due out until the fourth quarter of 2014. The chip will fit inside an LGA1150 package, they say, although it "may not be compatible with older 1150 motherboards because of a change to Intel’s power specifications." The K suffix, of course, means there should be no restrictions on multiplier-based overclocking.

Interestingly, VR-Zone’s desktop roadmap shows no other Broadwell processors scheduled for 2014—or even early 2015. A Haswell refresh platform will apparently show up some time before Broadwell-K next year, but that’s about it.

Perhaps this is because mainstream Broadwell chips won’t be introduced to the desktop in the conventional sense. Back in January, a trusted source in the motherboard industry told us that select Broadwell CPUs would come pre-soldered onto desktop motherboards. In fact, the source suggested that lower-end desktop Broadwell variants would only be offered in that form.

Comments closed
    • yammerpickle2
    • 7 years ago

    Intel does not care about power desktop users anymore. Broadwell has very little to offer us, primarily a die shrink of Haswell. Good for low power applications, but nothing big for desktops. My P-2600K overclocks like a dream and is only about 1.3 % slower than a Haswell 4770K when using higher graphic settings with an overclock. Also at overclocked speeds the P-2600K is actually more energy efficient than Haswell! So what is Broadwell going to get me, more difficulty cooling the chip without significant speed increase? When Intel gets unlocked Skylake-E than maybe I’ll care.
    Link to P-2600K to 4770K summary follows:
    [url<]http://www.ocaholic.ch/modules/smartsection/item.php?itemid=1123&page=14[/url<]

      • Krogoth
      • 7 years ago

      They still do care about power user crowd. Intel wants you to invest into their workstation tier stuff which failed the Xeon-grade QA testing. The silicon’s TDP is too high for clockspeed x, it needs too many volts to be stable at clockspeed x, silicon is not accurate/robust enough to get the Xeon badge. Otherwise, these chips still work fine. Intel just re-branded them as the i7-39xx-49xx family.

    • Stickmansam
    • 7 years ago

    I have a feeling unless something drastic changes, the 14nm and below chips are going to suck at overclocking due to reduced die size.

    • UnfriendlyFire
    • 7 years ago

    Intel: “Alright, we kicked AMD out of the high end CPU market. Let’s snuff out ARM-based manufacturers AND AMD in the lower end CPU market…”

    (Check Steam’s hardware survey. About 73% of Steam users use Intel CPUs.)

      • HisDivineOrder
      • 7 years ago

      Wouldn’t AMD have to actually have some substantive presence in the low-power, ARM-esque area to be kicked out of it? Right now, they’re still trying to get a solid tablet win…

        • jimbo75
        • 7 years ago
          • MadManOriginal
          • 7 years ago

          It’s still more than AMD. Where is a Kabini tablet, even an announcement?

            • UnfriendlyFire
            • 7 years ago

            There was a few demonstrative tablets, and AMD’s reference designs were interesting.

            The issue is that they’re still not in the market yet. I haven’t heard much about Kaveri lately though.

            • jimbo75
            • 7 years ago
            • UnfriendlyFire
            • 7 years ago

            Intel’s finance: Excellent

            Intel’s desktop/laptop position: Excellent

            Intel’s progress in the phone/tablet market: Enough to get ARM’s attention and to actually launch products.

            AMD’s finance: …

            AMD’s desktop/laptop position: Poor

            AMD’s progress in the phone/tablet market: *cricket chirps*

            I do like AMD’s APU and tablet designs. But they have nothing to really show for when it comes to phones and tablets manufacturing.

            • the
            • 7 years ago

            I wouldn’t say that Intel is the laughing stock, they’re either not hitting the ultra low power targets and/or priced themselves out of the ultramobile market. Intel hasn’t realized that being x86 in a market that doesn’t care about legacy x86 code shouldn’t carry a price premium like it does on the desktop/server. I think the bigger of these two issues has been price which Intel has been very reluctant sacrifice margins for volume.

            x86 matters for users who want to run older applictions (ie full x86 Windows desktop) but thus far the only device to really attempt that in the mobile arena has been Microsoft’s Surface. Every other popular tablet and phone is running either Android or iOS where developers are going to be rewriting their code to support the new operating system, the different CPU architecture (which in reality could be a JVM), and for touch input.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            It took Intel a while to get solid x86 support into Android. Windows tablets were also in their infancy (and I guess still are), while Intel had no business in the iOS ecosystem.

            Now, x86 support is there for Android, and Windows 8.1 is here. Moreover, Intel’s ARM killer, Bay Trail, is out. The only remaining question in the tablet space is price/margins, and looking at some of those Bay Trail Win8 tablets, it seems clear that Intel is very willing to compete on price.

            Now, phones are a slightly different market… Intel won’t have a (semi-)competitive cellular solution out until early next year. But when that happens, Intel can start gaining market share on phones as well.

            • Thorburn
            • 7 years ago

            “Intel hasn’t realized that being x86 in a market that doesn’t care about legacy x86 code shouldn’t carry a price premium like it does on the desktop/server.”

            Bang on. They are trying to maintain high margins and simply pricing themselves out the market.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      Competition – it’s a thing

    • End User
    • 7 years ago

    Broadwell-K: Now I know when I will upgrade my 3770K rig.

      • chuckula
      • 7 years ago

      You might be disappointed with the performance delta unless you really want to use an IGP or you are banking on benefits from the new solid-state storage interface.

      Power consumption, assuming you don’t OC the thing through the roof, should be impressive though, and it will be faster than a 3770K… just not by a massive margin.

        • NeelyCam
        • 7 years ago

        Maybe he meant he now knows he’s gonna upgrade when Skylake comes out…?

        I have a Sandy Bridge, and I don’t see a reason to upgrade until Skylake… if even then.

          • the
          • 7 years ago

          With desktop Broadwell being late 2014, that could put desktop Skylake in late 2015, possibly 2016. Then again, Intel has been rather indecisive about Broadwell on the desktop: at first they were going to keep broadwell a mobile part and have a Haswell refresh for the desktop market in 2014. Due to the 14 nm production delay, consumers may get both a Haswell refresh (ie. minor speed bump, perhaps L4 cache models in socket 1150?) before Broadwell arrives on the desktop. This may play out well for the socket 1150 early adopters as that was supposed to last for only a single generation.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]With desktop Broadwell being late 2014, that could put desktop Skylake in late 2015, possibly 2016.[/quote<] If I remember the conference call correctly, they were saying that this won't affect Skylake schedule at all. Now, what is the Skylake 'schedule' is anybody's guess, but I doubt they'll wait until 2016.

            • chuckula
            • 7 years ago

            Skylake is 2015 at the earliest…. maybe late 2015.

    • PrincipalSkinner
    • 7 years ago

    Things like this and the VAT of 20% on IT equipment in my country make me want to pet my 2500K before bed.

      • bfar
      • 7 years ago

      I’m normally the unlucky guy who buys hardware at the wrong time (I’m looking at you, Lynnfield!), but my 2500k is a wonderful exception. 2yrs old and at least another year of high-end service left.

        • HisDivineOrder
        • 7 years ago

        The people who bought a 2500K and a 7970 got a great lifespan near the top of the heap in performance.

          • Farting Bob
          • 7 years ago

          Have a 2500k from lqaunch, its still awesome. Have my 7850 (which replaced a 4850) which also shows signs of a long, illutrious career in my PC. Storage is the only thing i will probably change or add to in the next 2 years.

          • Krogoth
          • 7 years ago

          The same thing happened to people who jump onto the Bloomfield bandwagon. Aside from power consumption, Bloomfield is just about as fast as Ivy Bridge and Sandy Bridge assuming the clockspeed is the same. They just had to update their GPU to something newer/faster.

        • brucethemoose
        • 7 years ago

        Unless you really care about power consumption, I don’t think broadwell would even be a significant upgrade over a 2500k.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 7 years ago

      I’d take it to bed with me! <3

      • NeelyCam
      • 7 years ago

      Taxes are good. They pay for the high quality of life in your country.

    • ronch
    • 7 years ago

    Watching the x86 industry is like watching a horse race where all the horses except for two have dropped out of the race and the one leading the race is a mile ahead of the second horse.

    It’s a boring race where the second horse’s only hope of winning is if the leading horse suddenly drops dead.

      • UnfriendlyFire
      • 7 years ago

      Or if the second horse calls it quits. Then there wouldn’t be a need for the lead horse to keep running.

        • Klimax
        • 7 years ago

        Actually, not correct. There are still shadow horses of its own past wins threating it. (Which racing game had you competing against your past performance?)

    • DeadOfKnight
    • 7 years ago

    I was under the impression that Broadwell was not coming to desktops at all, and would be reserved for things like NUC and laptops. Anyway, if it does come to desktop then I see very little reason to get it over a Haswell refresh which will probably have similar performance. After overclocking them both, Haswell might even outperform it.

    • chuckula
    • 7 years ago

    These slides… assuming they are real.. are very very weird not because of the time table, but because the desktop Broadwell-K chips even exist in the first place*. The whole point of Broadwell is to target the mobile market from notebooks all the way down to larger tablets.

    If you remember the whole kerfluffle about how Intel was “abandoning” socketed CPUs, we eventually found out that the “Haswell Refresh” was going to handle the desktop sockets with a rather uninteresting 2014 platform update while Broadwell was supposed to be mobile-only. Now we are seeing purported slides with socketed desktop Broadwell parts launching only about 6 months after the Haswell refresh… it’s just weird and I’m pretty sure we aren’t seeing the whole picture here.

    * Oh, and anybody who thinks that the very first 14nm parts on the market from Intel are going to be desktop socketed Broadwell parts wants to buy me beer & wings.

      • HisDivineOrder
      • 7 years ago

      Despite the kerfuffle over the desktop user being skipped over by Broadwell, I actually thought it made sense if the truth about what Broadwell is going to offer the end user is true. It looks like it’s going to be a worse performance improvement over Haswell than Haswell over IVB and IVB over SB.

      If true, then I don’t blame Intel for just overclocking Haswell to offer higher performance parts since Broadwell won’t offer much for the desktop user that Haswell doesn’t? Desktop user meaning user-installed CPU’s, of course. NUC’s and other pre-soldered CPU’s would be updated, which is where the power savings and heat production improvements might matter.

      Truth to tell, I’m beginning to think the only CPU based on haswell I might be interested in is Haswell-E simply because the platform looks remarkably resilient in this new era of dwindling CPU performance gains AND in the face of an octa-core variant.

    • jimbo75
    • 7 years ago
      • Krogoth
      • 7 years ago

      Time bomb…..

      Not sure how it applies here. Broadwell is going to do well in its intended markets.

      • trackerben
      • 7 years ago

      The tock of the town that’s ticking off chuckula.

      Broadwell’s tick is refusing to tock with Haswell.

        • chuckula
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]The tock of the town that's ticking off chuckula.[/quote<] Why would I be ticked off that Intel is purportedly bringing Broadwell to a socketed desktop form factor that was never supposed to exist in the original roadmaps? P.S. --> Nice ninja edit to completely rewrite your post.

          • trackerben
          • 7 years ago

          Just trying to be witty 🙂

          I actually think the same

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 7 years ago

      [url<]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OjlSAEgeTo4&t=00m11s[/url<]

      • HisDivineOrder
      • 7 years ago

      A crocodile?

        • trackerben
        • 7 years ago

        His meet & greet is usually by Cinderella’s castle.

    • Krogoth
    • 7 years ago

    Intel has little reason to push out Broadwell. It is from a combination of yielding issues and lack of market pressure. Broadwell is going to offer little over Haswell, besides lower TDP and improved power management (for its intended market, ultra-portables and all-in-one systems).

      • Thorburn
      • 7 years ago

      Ultimately for high-end desktop users there has been little of REAL interest since Sandy Bridge.

      The majority of the market demands power efficiency and low cost over outright performance, so if you have a single micro-architecture scaling between 6.5W and 150W you can guess which end of that scale it’s optimised for. Short of a fourth micro-architecture (and matching variant of the manufacturing process) optimised towards the 100W+ power envelopes I can’t see that really changing much, but is there the volume of sales and gains to be found, to make it worth while?

      Broadwell will come late to the desktop because it’ll give very little benefit to desktop users. Once other markets have had their fill and yields improve it’ll simply be carried over for (manufacturing) cost reduction purposes.

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