Nvidia releases GeForce Experience, Shield software updates

Looks like Nvidia was busy over the holiday weekend. On Monday, the company rolled out two software updates: one for its GeForce Experience utility and another for its Shield handheld gaming device.

The GeForce Experience 1.8 update includes a new feature called Adjustable Optimal Playable Settings. Previous versions of the GeForce Experience software let you click a button to apply optimal graphical settings for a given game. Now, it’s now possible to customize the tradeoff between performance and image quality by moving a slider, like so:

Nvidia says the Adjustable Optimal Playable Settings feature supports resolutions up to 3840×2160 and display modes including full-screen, windowed, and borderless windowed.

On top of that, GeForce Experience 1.8 polishes up Nvidia’s ShadowPlay video recording feature. The company has added multi-source audio recording and support for video capture at “native resolution and aspect ratios up to 1920×1080.” Stuttering during video playback has been reduced, and some of the limits imposed on Windows 7 users have been lifted. Folks running Windows 7 can now save “up to 20 minutes” of video in shadow mode, and footage is no longer restricted to one 3.8GB file in manual mode.

Nvidia rolled out its December Software Update for the Shield today, as well.

Most notably, the update increases the resolution limit for Console Mode, the feature that lets you hook up the Shield to your TV and control it with a Bluetooth gamepad. Console Mode was previously restricted to 720p, but Nvidia says 1080p gaming at 60 FPS is now supported in 22 games. You’ll find the full list of compatible titles here. Nvidia expects this list to grow “on a weekly basis.”

The new Shield software also improves Gamepad Mapper, which lets users bind touch controls in Android games to the Shield’s gamepad. Gamepad Mapper can now map “gyroscope, motion-based movements,” and it includes better support for first-person and cursor-based games. In the former, Nvidia says you can use the standard dual-analog-stick scheme to move and look around. In the latter, a new feature called accelerated cursor “keeps the cursor at the point where it was left, rather than having it return to the center of the screen.”

Today’s Shield update features an option to hide the Android task bar automatically, too, and it adds “exclusive access” to Nvidia’s GRID cloud gaming beta for folks in Northern California. Check Nvidia’s blog post about the update for more details.

The new GeForce Experience software can be downloaded here. The new Shield software should be available as an over-the-air update directly on the device.

(Thanks to SH SOTN for the heads up on these releases.)

Comments closed
    • DPete27
    • 6 years ago

    [quote<]Most notably, the update increases the resolution limit for Console Mode, the feature that lets you hook up the Shield to your TV and control it with a Bluetooth gamepad[/quote<] Isn't the Shield a gamepad in itself? So you're using a gamepad to control a gamepad???? I think Shield needs some way to wirelessly stream the image to a TV. (something like a Chromecast)

      • derFunkenstein
      • 6 years ago

      If we’re talking about Chromecast, I’d rather find a way to take the Shield out of the equation entirely, and just stream from the PC to the Chromecast and use like a wireless Xbox 360 controller for Windows to control it. NVidia won’t do that, so probably the best case scenario is that they either help Ouya get game streaming from the PC or release a similar set-top box of their own. Even if it was $150 instead of the Ouya’s $100 price, I’d dig in if it had something faster than a Tegra 3.

        • DPete27
        • 6 years ago

        I completely agree with your statements. While I was focusing on the fact that Shield doesn’t have wireless display tech, I see where you’re coming from. Not sure about the viability of current controllers having the range to reliably connect back to the host PC in all setups though.

        I suppose you could always go back to the days of wired controllers and get a long Redmere HDMI cable….

        (Disclaimer) I know only general information about Shield. Mostly because I don’t care. I’ll never buy one.

    • Bensam123
    • 6 years ago

    Stuff like this is still right up Valves alley. Video capture and streaming in general should definitely be added to Steam. Adding support for features like the nvidia experience for the entire repository of Steam games wouldn’t be that hard either, considering they could gather data points off their gajillion user database. Sadly they’re too busy trying to spit out the SteamOS.

    Shadowplay from what I heard is still worthless for streaming. There is no way for you to specify bitrates or quality settings.

      • willmore
      • 6 years ago

      Too bad there’s no way to edit or recompress H.264 video.

      Edit: Okay, there are at least five idiots who don’t understand very blantant sarcasm. Of course you can edit video, it’s trivial,

        • Deanjo
        • 6 years ago

        That makes absolutely no sense. Of course you can do both easily.

          • willmore
          • 6 years ago

          Sarcasm is wasted on you, it seems.

          • Bensam123
          • 6 years ago

          I think that was his point, but it still doesn’t matter because you can’t rencode a livestream.

            • Deanjo
            • 6 years ago

            *cough* BS *cough*

            Do it all the time via VLC.

            • Bensam123
            • 6 years ago

            Yup and you can do it with a RTMP media server too, but that means absolutely nothing for end users (or streamers).

            If you’re doing it on your processor you gain no benefit from doing so. It eats your bandwidth coming in, it eats a lot more processor cycles, it’d make absolutely no sense.

            As far as I know, VLC can’t accept a RTMP stream (let alone then turning the output into a RTMP stream) and if you try streaming with VLC it’s extremely slow, hard on resources, and sucks bandwidth. You’d be better off streaming from the get go with something like OBS or even Xsplit.

        • clone
        • 6 years ago

        +1

      • The Dark One
      • 6 years ago

      Wasn’t the rumour that Valve had licensed the SteamOS streaming tech [i<]from[/i<] Nvidia?

        • Bensam123
        • 6 years ago

        They worked with them on it, I don’t believe they licnesed it.

        That aside, I’m not talking about streaming to your living room, I’m talking about livestreaming to somewhere like Twitch.

    • Prestige Worldwide
    • 6 years ago

    I wasn’t a fan of GeForce experience before and would always exclude it from my driver installs, but Shadowplay is just plain awesome.

    I’ll never use FRAPS or DXtory as long as I have a card from the green team (although I have been tempted to get an R9-290 and waterblock from time to time, but have exercised restraint).

    • juzz86
    • 6 years ago

    I find nVidia’s optimal settings a good starting point, and much less conservative than previous efforts at ‘optimising’ game settings. I usually muck around with them myself afterwards, but this should make it nice and easy for those getting a few hiccups at Optimal, to drop it back a notch on the slider and get the best compromise.

    I’ll happily admit that I used to be able to keep up with every setting in the options menu of my games, but now with all these different AA types, AO types, etc. I find myself falling behind a bit, so seeing a setting like this pop up is good news.

    I’ve also been really happy with how Shield has fared out for me, and am glad to see the res boost for Console mode 🙂

      • jessterman21
      • 6 years ago

      I’m interested to try this out, too. Try all my compatible games with fresh eyes, and see how well the slider does.

      Though GE keeps wanting to enable TXAA, which I can’t stand…

        • juzz86
        • 6 years ago

        ‘Scuse my ignorance, but TXAA is the low-cost option that just fuzzes all the edges up yeah? They turned that on for me in Skyrim initially, and I wondered what was up. I turned a few things off at the same time and never went back to establish which setting actually controlled it.

        I had a play last night, and got a ~7fps jump dropping the slider one notch in Skyrim at 2560×1600. Couldn’t really notice much difference, I think they concentrated on the view distances and shadowing more than anything. Personally, I find compromising shadows an easy way to gain some performance. They’re usually the first thing to go for me if I need to compromise somewhere 🙂

        EDIT: Yep, seems that was the culprit 🙂

          • l33t-g4m3r
          • 6 years ago

          Stuff like this is why I manually configure game settings. If GFE gave you advanced options instead of only an IQ reducing slider, then I might use it. Otherwise it just encourages people to become stupid and ignorant, and then complain up a storm if they ever have to manually fix something. It’s consolification of the PC.

            • juzz86
            • 6 years ago

            Well, it is, but I’d argue that it’s a worthwhile trade-off to have it there. It’s obviously not for everyone, but it’s going to make it easier for more people, who don’t have the level of expertise you do, to get more out of their cards. That’s a win for the owner, as they’re actually using what they buy, and a win for nVidia, as they’re making it easy for people to do so.

            It’s not entirely stupefying. A series of screenshots are provided for every game, with small squares you can highlight that do a pretty good job of explaining what the settings do. So if you want to know, you can.

            This isn’t software for the gaming elite. This is software for people who look at the nVidia Control Panel, and just see gobbledygook. And for people like me, who are in between, it makes a good starting point 🙂

            • l33t-g4m3r
            • 6 years ago

            No it’s not. Because how is GFE configured? Per individual card, or is it tuned for 780 SLI and it picks you an arbitrary value on the slider? If you don’t know what the baseline is, then how can you tell what is the best option to pick? It sounds like an awful lot of trial and error, unless you just let nvidia pick settings for you. Then who’s to say they’re giving you the best choice? The guy above said GFE enabled TXAA, which is a blur fest, and I’m sure higher settings use full Physx, when one should never go “Full Physx”.

    • indeego
    • 6 years ago

    So from $350(Announce) to $300(initial availability) to $250(Black Friday) in ~5 months. Seems legit.

      • kilkennycat
      • 6 years ago

      Small addendum….

      …. actually to $200 (plus 3 games) if you were able to take advantage of the recent video-card promo deal from Oct. 26 to Nov 26 on the GTX770 (and up)….

      • Deanjo
      • 6 years ago

      Still better then MS Surface.

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