Win8.1 update promises tweaks for desktop users

Slowly but surely, Microsoft is making Windows 8 behave more like, well, Windows. Win8.1 brought back the Start button and the ability to boot directly to the desktop. The next major version of the OS, dubbed Threshold, is expected to resurrect the Start menu and allow Metro apps to be run in their own windows.

Threshold isn’t due until 2015, but Microsoft appears to have a couple of Metro tweaks planned for the interim. According to SuperSite for Windows’ Paul Thurrott, a Windows 8.1 update is coming in April. That release will reportedly add a "close" icon to Metro apps that shuts down those programs completely. Right now, closing Metro apps with the mouse involves a lot of awkward clicking and dragging. A dedicated icon should make things much easier for desktop users who can’t easily swipe the screen with their fingers.

Leaked screenshots also suggest that the Win8.1 update will allow users to pin Metro apps to the taskbar. That would be convenient, but it doesn’t address the fact that those applications monopolize the entire screen. We’ll have to wait for Windows Threshold to address that issue, it seems.

Windows Threshold may do little more than adding windowed Metro apps and resurrecting the Start menu. Thurrott says the 2015 update will be "similar to Windows 8.1 in scope." Since Microsoft is backpedaling from some of the major changes it introduced with Windows 8, perhaps it’s better for the firm to take baby steps with future OS updates.

Comments closed
    • marraco
    • 6 years ago

    Will it make possible to close metro apps?

    By the way, I hate the MS cloud. Out of my cloud, MS!

    • swaaye
    • 6 years ago

    Don’t Metro apps work like Android apps in that the OS closes background apps when RAM is needed? Background Metro apps are essentially inactive too. It seems to work fine from what I’ve experienced…

    • k2x4b524p
    • 6 years ago

    I have read ALL of the comments. ALL OF THEM and NOT ONE, NOBODY, mentions the good ole ALT-F4. Closes windows, apps, and Windows itself. Alt+F4 WILL actually close the windows 8 apps. Use it all the time, quicker than mouse to this, hold this key and mouse over that. 2 simple keys ALT+F4… Been closing programs and windows since 1990 something…

      • Diplomacy42
      • 6 years ago

      false. setzer mentioned it 2 days ago, not that it matters.

      #rantfail

      • ermo
      • 6 years ago

      If there is any other way to close Metro fullscreen Apps, I certainly haven’t discovered it.

      Which tells you all you need to know about either Windows 8/8.1 or my Metro UI prowess. Up to you.

      • trackerben
      • 6 years ago

      YES

    • squeeb
    • 6 years ago

    What a concept…a close icon.

    • someuid
    • 6 years ago

    Just a few more point releases and interim updates and Win8 can move from alpha to beta status!

      • CeeGee
      • 6 years ago

      Is Windows 8 the most successful Kickstarter / Early Access software ever? 😀

    • alientorni
    • 6 years ago

    windows 8.1 is a ram whore it suspends all metro apps to keep on background wasting memory. i can’t complain too much i have 8gb, but what happens to more entry level/ old pcs?
    the first w8 was a good ram manager, it even run better than w7 on some netbooks and old 1gb pcs that i’ve configured.
    i haven’t tried win 8.1 on those yet but from what i’ve seen i’m not likely to get any good results.

      • alientorni
      • 6 years ago

      other think about this os, is about installing software and the stupid way to manage the access to them, it makes no sense. at least give some time to the interface, don’t just puke the metro interface completely useless and unpolished to us. 8.1 did improved metro by cleaning the shortcuts to apps, but it went the oppisite way, completely eliminating them from it. having to go to another hidden page to find them and then pin them to start page. i can’t install this os on most peoples pc’s mostly because of this and the lack of metro shortcuts blocking.

      • sweatshopking
      • 6 years ago

      Its only suspends if ram is available. Its ram usage isn’t high.

    • hasseb64
    • 6 years ago

    Who cares? Windows is as interesting as the asphalt in the street.
    WIN7 is good enough. MS trying to get paid for any version after Win7 is a complete fail, (even worse people paying for version after win7….xxx……)

    • smilingcrow
    • 6 years ago

    Why is the 8.1 Update so freakin’ large and take so long to install?
    I figure it’s a Service Pack really at least in terms of functionality.

    I installed it on a Latitude Ultrabook and Latitude Tablet and it broke both installs so they needed to be reset or refreshed or whatever they call it. The whole process per machine took many hours.
    Don’t recall a Service Pack ever doing that on the many systems I installed one on.
    I’m getting nostalgic for Windows 2000; the most stable version I ever ran not that NT4 was bad.

    • DarkUltra
    • 6 years ago

    I wonder if the have fixed the USB polling issue. My 1000hz logitech G400 got nerfed in 8.1 but can be [url=http://www.blurbusters.com/systemwide-fix-win81-mouse-fludiity/<]fixed[/url<].

    • ssidbroadcast
    • 6 years ago

    Anyone here see this article originally posted by The Verge on a proposed “Windows 8.2” ui redesign? It’s pretty in depth and, at a glance, looks much better.

    [url<]http://jay-machalani.squarespace.com/blog/2013/12/12/fixing-windows-8[/url<]

      • ssidbroadcast
      • 6 years ago

      Nobody else is impressed, huh?

        • LostCat
        • 6 years ago

        I’ve seen enough proposed redesigns. Sorreh.

          • ssidbroadcast
          • 6 years ago

          Thanks Krogoth :/

      • Wirko
      • 6 years ago

      I’ve seen several proposed redesigns and am impressed at them, including this one. This guy seems to understand that it’s not enough to just bring back the old Start menu. A start menu for 2014 should combine all the best ingredients of 8’s [url=http://badmenu.com/<]"menu"[/url<] and 7's menu. And XP's cascading menu for all programs, too.

      • Diplomacy42
      • 6 years ago

      it looks like it fixes all the major problems of the OS except one:

      it still looks ugly. transitions were invented for a reason.

    • jdaven
    • 6 years ago

    Well that’s a curious business strategy. Strip out important features that everyone wants (8.0), give some back for free (8.1) and then charge for the rest (Threshold).

    Will the next version of Windows have the number 8 minus 1 (Windows 7)?

    • internetsandman
    • 6 years ago

    I’ve steered clear of W8, but reading this article was the first time I learned that programs don’t have a simple close button. Seriously? In what way does removing the little X in the corner increase productivity at all?

    Planned obselescense is one thing…this though, this is premature-self-obsolescence

      • NeoForever
      • 6 years ago

      The regular desktop windows have the close button in Win8 (Everything looks pretty much like Win7).
      It’s the Metro apps that don’t have a close button.

        • internetsandman
        • 6 years ago

        Is there anything about the desktop environment that’s a legitimate improvement over W7? I ask out of curiosity, not spite, I’m not as informed as I should be in this regard haha

          • Waco
          • 6 years ago

          The task manager is a lot nicer.

          That’s about it in terms of the “desktop experience” IMO.

            • l33t-g4m3r
            • 6 years ago

            and it’s a copy of process explorer, which you can download and run on 7 for free. Not a legitimate reason to switch.

          • DarkUltra
          • 6 years ago

          Let see:

          1. Customizable toolbar, or a ribbon toolbar if you fancy.
          2. Progress bar with graph on file move/copy operations.
          3. Automatic drifting from a wifi to a faster ethernet connection if both PCs have Windows 8 during file transfer.
          4. Much improved Task Manager
          5. Smoother window animations (if you have a 120hz monitor)

          But there are the well known drawbacks
          1. Star screen takes up entire screen so no more drag-and-drop to open folders or programs
          2. Can’t search for multiple items at once (somewhat improved in 8.1 but still poor and slower)
          3. Flat, square look windows skin without any shadows (can be improved with custom skin/style)

            • internetsandman
            • 6 years ago

            Nothing really notable then to pull a desktop user from 7 to 8 then (two of the five things are only cosmetic)

            • Ryu Connor
            • 6 years ago

            There are some under the hood improvements as well.

            Better disk management option for WinSXS to keep Windows small.
            Better automatic management of the pagefile to shrink it to small sizes with larger RAM or keep it large if your usage demands it.
            Better DirectX performance. Not sure if that’s from the DX update or the WDM update. If the latter then OpenGL might benefit as well.
            Smaller overall memory footprint (smaller than Windows 7 even).

            Those are a few off the top of my head, there are more.

            • Voldenuit
            • 6 years ago

            And some negatives:

            Broken mouse acceleration.
            Broken USB polling.
            Removed media center/dvd playback.

            Not discounting the technical advances, but it’s not a win in every category, even discounting the UI changes.

            • Ryu Connor
            • 6 years ago

            While true it is important to note that the first two of those have a fix and the third still exists as an add-on from Microsoft.

            • Diplomacy42
            • 6 years ago

            yes, for only 9.99 your pc will once again be compatible with 1995 technologies like the DVD.

            In a future update you will be able to pay for VGA compatibility as well as 3.5mm headphones.

            Microsoft, moving forward without you.

            • jihadjoe
            • 6 years ago

            The broken USB polling actually messed up a few external DACs.

            • njsutorius
            • 6 years ago

            his post is correct. in summary not much.. i never use metro for anything. always desktop mode. Its a tiny bit nicer than 7.

            • Diplomacy42
            • 6 years ago

            you forgot can’t play DVDs, no DVR capability, not compatible with widgets, bad driver experience, unstable.

    • chrissodey
    • 6 years ago

    To easily close metro apps with a mouse and keyboard hold the windows key + press and release tab. While still holding the windows key use your mouse to right click on the open app and choose close.

      • tay
      • 6 years ago

      No.

        • flip-mode
        • 6 years ago

        LOL. Well said.

          • torquer
          • 6 years ago

          Yeah, he’s really sticking it to the man by refusing to use a keyboard shortcut.

      • jcamel24
      • 6 years ago

      Yea, that sounds much easier than “Click on the X”.

      • Thorburn
      • 6 years ago

      When your new graphical UI design requires users to remember CONSIDERABLY more keyboard shortcuts than the previous one, you’ve screwed up your UI design.

      • torquer
      • 6 years ago

      Hey lets all dump on a guy for giving a keyboard shortcut for what is an obvious current need that won’t be resolved/made easier by Microsoft for another year!

      DEATH TO THE HELPFUL FEW!

      • cynan
      • 6 years ago

      +1 for the sarcasm vote. (There’s no way he’s actually suggesting this is an easy or sensible way to close an application/program in a modern desktop OS GUI 30 years in the making)

    • CaptTomato
    • 6 years ago

    I’m a desktop user, wake me up when a more advanced version of W7 pops up.

      • HisDivineOrder
      • 6 years ago

      A few years ago, I remember someone like you saying, “I’m a PC. Wake me up when a more advanced version of XP pops up” in advance of Windows 7 after the Vista debacle.

      Now the very same people are using Windows 7 and have already forgotten how diehard XP fans they were after the horror story that was Vista ravaged enthusiasts for years.

      Truth is, Microsoft hasn’t made a truly stunningly new Windows release in a long time, not since XP. Vista was XP with a lot of bloat and security measures. 7 was a service pack to Vista with a new taskbar and trimmed services. 8 was a service pack to 7, which was itself a service pack to Vista. 9 will be a service pack to 8, too.

      This is why Windows cannot keep up with newer, more modern tablet OS’s. Microsoft refuses to stop and build something brand new from the ground up for modern systems that excises all the fat and crud that has gathered for years.

      If you want to see how that is, go look up one of those videos where someone upgrades from DOS to Windows, then through every version of Windows to Windows 8. That’ll show you how much crud has collected in Windows. Much of it is unnecessary to modern systems even to support the 32-bit applications we run 99% of the time.

        • lilbuddhaman
        • 6 years ago

        Tablet OS’s suck. Tablet UI’s suck. Google-esque UI’s suck. Even when you know all the different swipes, long-presses, gestures, and the 100 various non-standard menus; the chances of the UI recognizing some other swipe/gesture/press are way too high.

        God forbid that a button function as a button, a menu always be a menu, a function always…function. That’s why that old, antiquated windows OS is still #1. That’s why so many people hated the ribbon, metro, the changes to youtube.

        Change that removes functionality is not good change. Just because it looks stylish and makes a good commercial or very-specific-single-purpose, doesn’t make it good. Every, EVERY “new” OS out there is too lean, their functionality too limited, too closed to be taken seriously.

        They are toys, not tools.

        • Wirko
        • 6 years ago

        Long story short, 9 = NT 3.5 SP30 but doesn’t come on floppies.

        • CaptTomato
        • 6 years ago

        I wanted W7 for a proper 64 OS to utilize my now 16gigs of ram, anyway, coming from XP, W7 64 is an excellent OS…..however, I see no compelling reason to even consider any variant of W8.

        When I’m convinced that W9 is somehow better than W7{and not gimped, ie, WMC} I might bother, but atm, I’m happy with W7 and my PC overall.

          • ermo
          • 6 years ago

          That’s … interesting.

          I use Windows 8.1 with [url=http://www.classicshell.net/<]Classic Shell[/url<] (Open Source software) and find that it works like a better Windows 7 in this specific configuration. I also found that if you do not like the tacked on Windows 8 Metro UI stuff, it is pretty easy to opt out of it with 8.1.

        • Zizy
        • 6 years ago

        MS hasnt made a truly stunningly new Windows release since 95. Windows 8 (especially server 2013) is the largest single jump since 95, both in terms of UI changes and background stuff.

        Build something brand new? Windows is the closest thing to “new”, as its NT kernel is only moderately obsolete, unlike everything else. Plus W8 UI is the most radically brand new thing and the source of most hatred. Then you propose something new, modern? WTH? There is nothing more modern than Windows 8. Dont demand modern, when you want same thing as everything before.

    • sweatshopking
    • 6 years ago

    they’re not backpedaling on really anything. they’re combining the 2 operating methods as they’ve said they wanted to do since the beginning. they’ve always talked about One windows and one operating system. there aren’t really any major surprises here.
    I highly doubt we’ll see a dedicated X icon as we have on the desktop brought over to the metro stuff. that would be a mistake.
    The fault of win 8 whining is with the OEM’s not moving towards touch screens in time, despite the writing being on the wall.

      • HisDivineOrder
      • 6 years ago

      They’re backpedaling because they said Windows apps would NEVER be treated like regular applications. Now every indication that that is no longer the prevailing wisdom. Moreover, they said they would NEVER add the Start Button back. Now they have. They were NEVER going to add back the Start Menu. They are.

      I expect them to also add back manual installations of programs (no requirement to go through the app store) at this rate. In this, they’d only be backtracking to equality with Android anyway.

      But Microsoft is very clearly backtracking. To deny that is to deny the obvious. They said they would not do certain things and now they say they are doing them. That’s the definition of the term.

        • sweatshopking
        • 6 years ago

        They always had a start button, it just only showed when you moved the mouse there. I don’t remember anyone beside Sinofsky saying much about the start menu, and he’s no longer there. We will see if a start menu like win 7s comes back. I’d doubt it.
        you can still manually add programs. I don’t know what that even means.
        they’re doing the same things they always said they would. Wanna see backtracking, look at xbone.

      • maxxcool
      • 6 years ago

      80% of the business world is NOT going to touch there monitor to do work.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 6 years ago

        100% of my own personal world is not going to use a touch monitor for a PC, either. Phones get finger-printy enough, TYVM.

          • sweatshopking
          • 6 years ago

          Convertible pcs are the future. You’ll be touching your laptop/tablet/undocked machine soon enough. Keyboards, mice, external monitors, etc will continue, but touch will take over many of the tasks.

            • ermo
            • 6 years ago

            I would qualify this and say ‘small, convertible PC form factors with a touch screen will be a nice complement to larger non-touchscreen laptops and desktop workstations’.

            All-in-one kiosk PCs with a touch screen are nice though. It’s not like touch screens are going away or anything. But crucially, neither is the keyboard, the mouse or even the trackpad.

            How will the computing landscape look five years from now? We’ll just have to wait and see, I guess…

        • sweatshopking
        • 6 years ago

        Only if they have a desk job. Anyone mobile will be soon enough. Are you serious? Corporations and enterprise are buying MILLIONS OF IPADS. Its not so they can hook up a Bluetooth mouse and keyboard. Sometimes I wonder if you nerds follow the market at all.

          • maxxcool
          • 6 years ago

          80% of my 100,000 device environment is fixed desktops. The rest is sales. the sales folks do not use ”ipads” because they do work for a living and need access to windows apps. as for those who like win8. good for them.

          But coding, dev, beta testers, managers and 80% of my environment never moves their pcs.. so a touch screen is just stupid.

          and for those that do touch their screens all day i feel bad for them as the Ergonomics of sitting at a desk and reaching 2 feet to touch a screen is terrible… and GROSS.

        • ssidbroadcast
        • 6 years ago

        [s<]80%[/s<] 98% fixed.

      • WaltC
      • 6 years ago

      If they wanted to combine the two GUIs, then that’s what they should have done. Instead, they moronically tried to move all those hundreds of millions of desktop-environment users to touch screens, whether they liked it or not. Touchscreens are not going to replace desktops because while some people like and prefer touchscreens, most of Microsoft’s estimated 1.5B-strong traditional desktop customers *like* the desktop and the far more accurate and precise (not to mention hygienic) mouse/keyboard combo. OEMs are very sensitive to customer demand: if customers don’t demand touchscreens there’s no reason not to give them desktops instead, if that is what they prefer.

      I like 8.1×64 fine, at home it is all I use–but I don’t use it with “Metro” (touchscreen gui)–but Microsoft has gone out of its way to hide the fact that the Metro GUI is 99% optional in Win8/8.1–that 8/8.1 runs splendidly with the traditional explorer.exe ui. Interesting, too, is the fact that I find 8.1 to be even more backwards-compatible (with games if nothing else) than 7 was.

      The good thing in all of this relative to Microsoft is that Metro’s chief architects and proponents are gone from the day-to-day operation of Microsoft: Ballmer and Sinofsky are both history. (For those tempted to give Ballmer a break, just imagine the disaster that would have ensued had Yahoo! had enough sense to accept Microsoft’s premium stock buyout offer! That was Ballmer’s baby all the way–he was saved from an even earlier retirement by a very stupid Yahoo! co-founder…;)) Sinofsky was some kind of weird I-want-to-copy-Steve-Jobs-but-look-like-Captain-Picard sort of guy…

    • indeego
    • 6 years ago

    [code<]Get-AppxPackage -AllUsers | Remove-AppxPackage[/code<] is like the first thing I do on any Windows8.x system. Group policy or local policy disables the store. I find the apps incredibly intrusive and of low quality.

      • gmskking
      • 6 years ago

      Why even bother with Windows 8 then?

        • HisDivineOrder
        • 6 years ago

        Windows 8/8.1 has some great things in it that are entirely unrelated to the controversial parts like Metro, no start menu, and the App store.

        As much as MS did to hurt the overall efficiency of the UI in Windows 8, they improved under the surface. Finding ways around those UI niggles gives you a superior version of Windows 7.

        • indeego
        • 6 years ago

        Longer support

        Better multimonitor support

        Bugs fixed that aren’t in Windows 7

        Better shell, taskmgr, tools

        Better base IE (which I rarely use)

        Fewer updates/restarts compared to a bare Windows 7

        Faster starts (when sleep works, which is rare, in my experience, had to disable it on my desktop, meh)

        Applications built now are likely to be tested on 8 primarily, and other OS’s secondarily, so I expect better compatibility longer term

        It’s same cost as 7.

          • jcamel24
          • 6 years ago

          “It’s same cost as 7”

          Unless you need WMC like I did for my HTPC, then it’s an extra $50 for Pro + $10 for WMC!

      • flip-mode
      • 6 years ago

      Awesome. Thanks.

    • Shouefref
    • 6 years ago

    a Windows 8.1 update is coming in April. That release will reportedly add a “close” icon to Metro apps that shuts down those programs completely. Right now, closing Metro apps with the mouse involves a lot of awkward clicking and dragging.
    ————->
    What? You would be running programs (apps are programs) without knowing it?
    But we should all move to Win8 because it’s safer than XP. Yes. Right.

      • TheEmrys
      • 6 years ago

      XP? At least use Win7 in your example. You couldn’t pay me (you could, but you would have to pay a TON) to use XP now. At this point, I would choose Vista-64 over XP.

      • sweatshopking
      • 6 years ago

      no. man, you really don’t understand how windows 8 works, but you QQ like crazy. apps can, with permission, run in the background. JUST LIKE WINDOWS 7. When apps are closed, they’re usually suspended in the ram so they can be brought back quickly. if ram is low, then the OS closes them. JUST LIKE OTHER OPERATING SYSTEMS.

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 6 years ago

        >make an 8th version of popular software
        >long time users don’t understand how it works
        >this is the users’ fault

          • sweatshopking
          • 6 years ago

          He’s willfully obtuse with this subject. His posts are purposefully inaccurate and overblown.

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 6 years ago

    That doesn’t take years. MS needs to rebrand to Bureaucracysoft…BS.

    • Deijya
    • 6 years ago

    I close NetFlix by clicking back into the desktop, moving my cursor to the top left corner, right click the netflix tile, and left click close.

    I’m sure there’s an easier way to do this, but I believe in Windows 8.1!

      • sweatshopking
      • 6 years ago

      you just grab the top of any app with the mouse and pull down. the same gesture you close almost all mobile apps with since webos.

        • Duct Tape Dude
        • 6 years ago

        …Except on my Windows Phone.

        WHY, MICROSOFT??

          • sweatshopking
          • 6 years ago

          coming with 8.1.

            • Duct Tape Dude
            • 6 years ago

            We’re getting an X button with Windows 8.1. Because swiping is too hard. Augh.

            • sweatshopking
            • 6 years ago

            no. it will be a swipe in 8.1. it’s an x with grd3

            • Duct Tape Dude
            • 6 years ago

            I did not know that! It is sad that I find this news exciting.

        • Generic
        • 6 years ago

        That is how I do it too…

        It’s more satisfying in a visceral way than clicking a small ‘X’, but seems silly all the same.

        • indeego
        • 6 years ago

        > the same gesture you close almost all mobile apps with since webos.

        What? This isn’t true for any Android app.

          • sweatshopking
          • 6 years ago

          it is for every other OS.

            • Diplomacy42
            • 6 years ago

            so what, that is 10% of all mobile apps combined?

        • Voldenuit
        • 6 years ago

        [quote<] you just grab the top of any app with the mouse and pull down. the same gesture you close almost all mobile apps with since webos.[/quote<] Except Android. And iOS. And Windows Phone 7/8. And Symbian. And Mozilla Phone. And Blackberry Z10 But sure, [i<]for every other phone OS[/i<], I'll take your word for it.

          • sweatshopking
          • 6 years ago

          You swipe to close ios apps. You swipe to “close” bb10 as well. Firefox os isn’t even a thing. And some versions of android you swipe as well. Swipe gestures aren’t new.

            • Voldenuit
            • 6 years ago

            You swipe “Up” to close iOS apps. And BB10.

            EDIT: It’s also not a full-screen swipe (unlike Windows 8), more of a “flick”.

            • sweatshopking
            • 6 years ago

            i’m aware of the directions. the point is that swiping is normal and not a big deal.

            • Voldenuit
            • 6 years ago

            That’s not what you said, though.

            You said:

            [quote<]]you just grab the top of any app with the mouse and pull down. the same gesture you close almost all mobile apps with since webos.[/quote<] The equivalent gesture on most phone OSes, grabbing the top of the screen and dragging down, will bring up the quick settings menu. Also, the swipe/flick to close gesture on phones usually works when the task switcher (or equivalent) is up, not in the native window of most apps. I'm not saying the win 8 version isn't more intuitive. But it's not discoverable, and that's bad UI design. MS should have had some form of Tooltips popup in the RTM of Windows 8 as some form of tutorial. Their UI is dissimilar enough from what consumers are used to (both on desktop systems as well as smartphones) that it is not reasonable to expect ppl to be familiar with the changes prima facia.

        • Diplomacy42
        • 6 years ago

        didn’t work for me. It just opened up that the start-screen app.

        PS no, drag from top to bottom is not the same gesture used by ‘every mobile app since webOS,’ don’t be silly.

      • setzer
      • 6 years ago

      I just do alt+f4

        • smilingcrow
        • 6 years ago

        Here here. I did a web search for that and it saved me a lot of grief.

        • Musafir_86
        • 6 years ago

        -I discovered that when I first opened a Metro app 2 years ago. 🙂

        Regards.

      • ludi
      • 6 years ago

      [quote<]I'm sure there's an easier way to do this, but I believe in Windows 8.1![/quote<] Windows 8.1 analogized in Harvey Dent? That works. That works quite well.

      • LostCat
      • 6 years ago

      Or you can just not close it and it has the same effect as if it was closed.

        • Diplomacy42
        • 6 years ago

        yup, this is better because now in addition to a cluttered start screen, cluttered taskbar, cluttered start (thing? the unsorted mess with all your apps if you hit the down arrow on the start screen?) you can now experience the joy of a cluttered quick-launch bar.

        • Voldenuit
        • 6 years ago

        [quote<]Or you can just not close it and it has the same effect as if it was closed.[/quote<] I believe there is a NSA advisory recommending this procedure with Skype.

          • ermo
          • 6 years ago

          Touché.

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