New Thermaltake Urban cases are primed for microATX, Mini-ITX

Thermaltake has just announced a pair of cases aimed at (relatively) small-form-factor builds. Both units are part of the Urban series, and they both carry the series’ trademark aesthetic, with rounded edges and brushed-metal front doors that cover up the external drive bays. Both cases support microATX and Mini-ITX motherboards.

The Urban SD1 is the pudgier-looking of the two. It measures 9.4″ x 11″ x 17.9″ and lays the motherboard flat on its back with the power supply hanging over the CPU socket. As a side-effect of that layout, clearance for a conventional CPU cooler is a little low—only 3.5″. Thermaltake says there’s room for a 140-mm radiator, however. To make the installation process less cramped, the company has made the motherboard tray removable.

The SD1 ships with a front 90-mm fan and two 60-mm spinners at the rear, and it can accommodate a nice collection of storage devices. There are dual 5.25″ and single 3.5″ bays at the front, two 3.5″ internal bays fitted inside an anti-vibration cage, and two 2.5″ bays side by side just under the top panel. In spite of all those drive bays, Thermaltake has left plenty of clearance for extra-long graphics cards. Anything up to 13.7″ will fit, the company says.

Pictured above is the Urban S1, the more conventional-looking of the two models. It has a tower-style design with a top-mounted power supply emplacement and overall dimensions of 9.4″ x 11″ x 17.9″. Like the SD1, it includes dual 5.25″ and single 3.5″ drive bays at the front—but unlike its pudgy sibling, the S1 can accommodate five 3.5″ hard drives in its belly. There’s also a “hidden” 2.5″ bay at the bottom of the chassis.

As far as cooling goes, the S1 ships with a 80-mm rear exhaust fan, and it has room for a 120-mm front intake. Thermaltake makes no mention of liquid-cooling radiator support, though mercifully, there’s plenty of clearance for a regular CPU heatsink (5.8″). The S1 will only take graphics cards as long as 10.2″, however, a few inches shorter than the SD1. 10.2″ should be enough for most sub-$200 cards, but you’ll have to double-check dimensions carefully if you spring for a higher-end GPU.

We’ve asked Thermaltake to fill us in on pricing and availability details for these two cases. Stay tuned.

Comments closed
    • Chrispy_
    • 6 years ago

    Do I even have to comment on the design-language malfunction going on here with the S1?

    1) Put door on front to mask intake noise and create indirect air chanelling from the bottom.
    2) Have giant hole in the side panel right above the two noisiest components.

    Good job Tt for designing the noisiest ‘quiet case’ ever.

    • f0d
    • 6 years ago

    that urban TT-SD1 matx case is exactly the same internally as my TT-A30 i have had for years and its a fairly horrible case – you cant put any watercooling in it and there isnt even any room for a big heatsink

    i modded mine by removing the 5.25 drive bay section (which you can see in picture 6) and i made a mount for a tiny TT water 2.0 pro where the 5.25 bays are (i was going to put full custom water cooling in it but it was going to be too much of a hassle for a case i dont want to keep)

    it does have plenty of room for large video cards though so at least thats a bonus – i have 2x 6970’s in mine

    my next htpc case will be a coolermaster HAF XB i think – they seem to have plenty of room in them and support 240mm rads in the front as standard

    • Chrispy_
    • 6 years ago

    I’m waiting on CM to file a suit against Tt for the mITX offering. It reeks of the past and present Elite 120/130 but I think it’s the mesh venting style, location and the exact way the plastic fascia goes from rectangular edges to a rounded front.

    • Laykun
    • 6 years ago

    Come one, I think it’s about time we can lose the 5.25″ bays from these smaller cases now. If people really want to use an Optical drive they can just buy a USB one. We’re talking valuable space for cooling here!

      • Chrispy_
      • 6 years ago

      Q: What’s worse than a hulking great drive in an small form factor PC that occupies 16X more volume than an SSD or 2.5″ HDD?

      A: An obsolete hulking great drive.

      DVD’s are [i<]so[/i<] pre-broadband....

      • slowriot
      • 6 years ago

      These are micro-ATX cases, they’re not exactly tiny. Given the nature of how mandatory components fit in a case there’s often plenty of available space for a 5.25″ bay. Removing that bay likely nets you nothing besides arguably aesthetics (and there’s multiple ways to solve that issue).

      Providing a 5.25″ bay gives the builder more than just the option of optical media. 5.25″ bay devices come in a huge range of functionality. For instance, in my mini-ITX case I use a 5.25″ bay device that fits 2×2.5″ drives, provides two additional USB 3.0 ports and a multi-card reader. It also allowed me to remove the cumbersome internal drive cage (I have a Lian Li TU200). There’s many other devices too focused on storage, input/output, cooling, etc.

      Ultimately removing 5.25″ drives needs to provide a strong benefit. Otherwise you’re wasting internal space. As is these designs are not at all hurt by the inclusion of 5.25″ bays. There’s plenty of room inside and the only likely replacement (3.5″ or 2.5″ bays) can be fit into the 5.25″ bays as well. Aesthetics are maintained with the use of a door.

        • Laykun
        • 6 years ago

        Given that this case is capable of taking some pretty high TDP components you’d want as much room as possible for cooling. That 5.25″ space can be used for fans or even radiators. Perhaps you could even make the case smaller. I believe using this space for 5.25″ bays actually does hurt the design by compromising on what is more important, size and cooling.

        I don’t believe that the 5.25″ bays on cases add much convenience in the way of USB and card readers. Sure you can add them but then that mean you have to reach to the case to use them, meaning the case has to be fully accessible at all times to be convenient. Whereas a lot of modern monitors easily replicate the same functionality in a much more convenient way (monitor integrated USB hubs and card readers). Or even a desktop mounted card reader/USB hub. Peripherals have no real place in the computer case any more in my opinion and I also believe the 5.25″ bay should go the way of the floppy drive.

        Personally that’s a deal breaker for me, I find the 5.25″ bays wasteful, I don’t go for smaller cases just so I can waste space, I want to get the most out of the smallest size possible. Currently I’m sitting on a Define R3, and although this works perfectly fine, it’s hardly efficient for i7 + SLi GPUs and a couple of HDDs. I have plenty of 3.5 and 5.25 bays simply sitting empty, and they always will be empty. Nit-picky sure, but I like the look of this case and although it’s internal configuration isn’t marketed towards me, I feel the look is, I like the clean design.

          • slowriot
          • 6 years ago

          Is this a joke?

          Even 5.25″ bays couldn’t accommodate anything more than a couple of more 80mm/90mm sized fans. No one is going to want those up front. They’re barely tolerated in a design like the SD1.

          Radiator? Where or how in the world would you mount it? To the top of the case above the 5.25″ bays? It certainly couldn’t lay flush with the front, not close enough room.

          Your monitor/input/output comment is entirely personal preference. I’ll also point out that the amount monitors with card readers is extremely small and the amount of monitors with USB 3.0 is also incredibly small. USB hubs inclusion has been steadily going down for ages now. Regardless, this is only a small section of the 5.25″ bay devices you can buy.

          You failed to address why removing the 5.25″ is a benefit at all. I guess your personal preference is enough reason in your mind to remove things from products sold to thousands.

            • Laykun
            • 6 years ago

            Simmer down. it’s my personal opinion, not a joke.

            Putting in radiators is just an example. It’s not that fans would only fit in just the space occupied by the drive bays, but rather the 5.25″ bays consume a large area and are an obstacle for the the use of the SURROUNDING area. If you took out the drive bays you could use the surrounding space AS WELL.

            Lets examine the case. One of it’s short comings is the fact that the PSU goes above the CPU, making the case taller. if you were to remove the 2 5.25″ bays you could probably fit the PSU in the front of the case and have the ability to either have a much larger CPU cooler, free up the top of the case for 240mm radiator or even just make the case short/smaller. With the freed up areas you would most likely be able to fit a 120mm fan. It’s not up to me to tell you EXACTLY how removing the 5.25″ bays is beneficially as I expect you to be able to use common sense to figure it out yourself.

            Even if monitor USB and card readers are minority you’ve conveniently forgotten that I also mentioned desk mount USB/Card readers, infinitely more convenient than trying to access the case to plug things in.

            I think you’ll also find that the use of the 5.25″ bay for anything other than a DVD/Bluray drive is in the absolutely minority. And those who do have a DVD/Bluray drive use it about 0.01% of their computing time IF AT ALL. (maybe install Windows). I build computers on a regular basis and administrate a small research lab of about 50 computers (used for research projects, not a computer lab) and the DVD drives in these machines goe virtually untouched, I don’t even use them to install Windows any more since I do it all off a USB key.

        • XTF
        • 6 years ago

        Without 5.25″ bays cases could be less deep (perhaps 30cm for mATX) and less wide.

          • slowriot
          • 6 years ago

          Less deep? And force you to use an even smaller video card? Less wide? And limit your heatsink choices? Such incredibly small “gains” for losing many useful features.

            • XTF
            • 6 years ago

            Even smaller than what? Not every case is required to support a 7990 and not every case is required to support a tall tower HSF. You’re basically saying people looking for compact cases should be ignored and that just because you’re not looking for a compact case?

    • Godel
    • 6 years ago

    Where are the (washable) air filters?

      • jdaven
      • 6 years ago

      Where are the washable PCs? Mine keeps shorting out when I try to wash off the spilled jam.

        • Haserath
        • 6 years ago

        You should stop using a hose.

        • mnecaise
        • 6 years ago

        You should wash it with something non-conductive, like anhydrous iso-propanol.

    • Imperor
    • 6 years ago

    Urban S1 dimensions are 15.4 x 7.1 x 18.4. 😉

    Looks good! Compact cases usually lack HDD space. Normally not a huge problem, with todays densities, but for a RAID more than 1 3,5 and 1 2,5, like most have, is required!

    • indeego
    • 6 years ago

    They said it couldn’t be done…They took the annoying blue/blinking LEDs and one-upped their annoyance.

      • Neutronbeam
      • 6 years ago

      Yeah, but be thankful they shot down the idea for the multicolored pulsating disco ball status light after they realized it could trigger seizures.

    • Neutronbeam
    • 6 years ago

    The S1 is sleek, but really prefer a top that lets air out–mesh/grill/louvers, something.

    • internetsandman
    • 6 years ago

    I’ve forgotten the last time I was genuinely intruiged by a TT case, must have been about five years ago at this point, they had an MATX in the exact same style and configuration as the S1 (right down to the drive bays and PSU placement) except both side panels were windowed. So basically, the S1 is that case with a slightly cleaner aesthetic

    Innovation, thy name is not Thermaltake

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