Rumor: Haswell Refresh platform to arrive in April

Well, lookie there. DigiTimes is back with more Intel CPU rumors. After predicting the delayed debut of Intel’s Broadwell processors yesterday, the Taiwanese site now reports that Intel’s Haswell Refresh processors will be out in April, a month early.

Last we heard, Haswell Refresh was supposed to introduce new, higher-clocked Haswell-based processors as well as a 9-series chipset family. Word has it the 9-series Haswell Refresh motherboard might be upgradeable to Broadwell. There was some talk about 9-series chipsets supporting the Serial ATA Express standard, too, but there’s been some disagreement on that front, so I wouldn’t get my hopes up.

DigiTimes says its was tipped off to the change in schedule for Haswell Refresh by "Taiwan-based DIY motherboard makers." Oddly, those sources seem to suggest that Intel still plans to launch its 9-series chipsets in May. Since the site says Haswell Refresh will be "compatible with Haswell," I suppose the new chips might initially have to be paired with current-gen motherboards. Hmm.

In any event, the change of plans seems to fit with yesterday’s story about Broadwell delays. According to that story, Intel postponed the Broadwell launch in order to allow more time for Haswell inventory to clear.

Comments closed
    • melk
    • 6 years ago

    So 4770/4771 will no longer be the top end?

    And I can drop these into my existing 1150 board?

    I’d love to have a 128MB L4 cache version…

      • HisDivineOrder
      • 6 years ago

      [quote<]I'd love to have a 128MB L4 cache version...[/quote<] The only thing I've love more is a hexacore Haswell-E without hyperthreading for $300.

    • the
    • 6 years ago

    This refresh would be interesting if they released desktop parts with the 128 MB of L4 cache, unlocked and complete extension support (VT-d, TSX, etc.). That’d provide a moderate IPC benefit even though it is the same core design. This could merit being sold under the flagship ‘extreme edition’ badge, though it’d probably carry the typical $1000 USD price if they did so.

    • aceuk
    • 6 years ago

    Will the 16GB UDIMM bug be fixed in these new Haswell CPUs?

    [url=http://www.anandtech.com/show/7742/im-intelligent-memory-to-release-16gb-unregistered-ddr3-modules<]http://www.anandtech.com/show/7742/im-intelligent-memory-to-release-16gb-unregistered-ddr3-modules[/url<]

    • stmok
    • 6 years ago

    [quote<]There was some talk about 9-series chipsets supporting the Serial ATA Express standard, too, but there's been some disagreement on that front, so I wouldn't get my hopes up.[/quote<] I can explain that. The upcoming Intel 9-series chipsets won't NATIVELY support Serial ATA Express. Mobo companies (like ASUS) will implement third-party chips (like ASMedia ASM106SE bridge chip), to provide Serial ATA Express support. Under third-party scenario, Serial ATA Express can also be implemented in today's Intel 8-series chipset. We won't see native Serial ATA Express support until Skylake (2015).

    • TwoEars
    • 6 years ago

    Yes, yes. Very exciting.

    Where is Haswell-E???

      • HisDivineOrder
      • 6 years ago

      At least Intel has somehow managed to let the Enthusiast line catch up in technology to the mainstream line after a period there where it was what? Two years behind?

      • itachi
      • 6 years ago

      I’d be interested to know about that, I guess thats the famous 8 cores intel that was rumored to pop up by the end of the year or something

    • UnfriendlyFire
    • 6 years ago

    I wonder if the mobile Haswell refresh supports Intel’s XTU? I’ve been hearing interesting things about OCing the i7-4700qm CPU.

    On a side note, Intel doesn’t really need to refresh Haswell given their CPU performance position in the desktop and high-mid end laptop market.

    Or are they doing it just to say, “Look consumers, new stuff!”?

      • smilingcrow
      • 6 years ago

      The only potential significance of this refresh on the desktop seems to be a new chipset but even that may be a non event. Adding an extra SKU at the top end with a 100MHz speed bump used to be the norm before the clock started ticking and tocking.

    • ronch
    • 6 years ago

    So after Haswell there’s Broadwell, then Skylake then Skymont then …… ??

      • Flying Fox
      • 6 years ago

      Skymont is the successor to Airmont, which is the successor of Silvermont, the low power family that powers the latest Bay Trail Atoms and Avoton (and others) processors. Different line.

        • NeelyCam
        • 6 years ago

        I thought Goldmont was after Airmont..?

        [url<]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atom_%28system_on_chip%29[/url<]

          • UberGerbil
          • 6 years ago

          Then Altamont, and then somebody gets stabbed.

          • Flying Fox
          • 6 years ago

          Ooops, you are right. Skymont did appear to be Skylake’s shrink so the OP was right. How did they slip the -mont name when the other chip line is all *mont?

            • NeelyCam
            • 6 years ago

            No; Skymont was the brainchild of Charlie’s that was pulled out of a hat of one of his moles. He later admitted that he was wrong and that Skymont was not the codename of the Skylake followup. (Correction – he said [url=http://semiaccurate.com/2013/09/25/skymont-intel-cpu-line-sky-lake/<]his READERS were wrong[/url<] for thinking it was called Skymont... although [url=http://semiaccurate.com/2011/03/31/after-intels-haswell-comes-broadwell-sk/<]he was the one who told them to think that[/url<]) Anyway, Skylake followup appears to be Cannonlake: [url<]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cannonlake[/url<]

            • Antimatter
            • 6 years ago

            There was a server roadmap from a few years back that included the names Rockwell and Skymont.

            [url<]http://news.softpedia.com/news/Intel-2012-2018-Server-CPU-Roadmap-Reveled-213265.shtml[/url<]

            • NeelyCam
            • 6 years ago

            I don’t see a “roadmap”. All I see is codenames that Charlie invented and that got repeated by somebody else. Look at the timestamps on the article you linked, and the original Charlie article I linked.

            I’m sure I could find the old Charlie “Rockwell” article if I really had to, but I really don’t think that’s necessary anymore

            EDIT: Fine, [url=http://semiaccurate.com/2010/03/15/haswell-has-sucessor/<]I did it anyway[/url<]. I don't know if you've read the S|A forums, but back a while ago Charlie admitted using fake codenames in his crusade against plagiarists. Many websites have repeated these codenames blindly... but once the real chips come out over the years, those intentional fakes have been proven wrong. Nonetheless, the result of all this has been that I don't trust any codename, brandname or anything similar that Charlie mentions.

            • Antimatter
            • 6 years ago

            In the bottom left corner of the article there’s a link to the image. Anyway here it is

            [url<]http://news.softpedia.com/newsImage/Intel-2012-2018-Server-CPU-Roadmap-Reveled-3.png/[/url<]

            • NeelyCam
            • 6 years ago

            That looks like a fake “roadmap” some random website put together based on (Charlie’s) rumors. We already know that “Rockwell” is actually Broadwell (Charlie blamed poor phone sound quality for that one). And Skymont is probably Cannonlake.

      • ClickClick5
      • 6 years ago

      [quote<]So after Haswell there's Broadwell, then Skylake then Skymont then ...... ??[/quote<] ARM

        • NeelyCam
        • 6 years ago

        More like ‘global disARMament’

      • NeelyCam
      • 6 years ago

      Repeat after me:

      “I shall never again blindly trust Charlie.”
      “I shall never again blindly trust Charlie.”

      Repeat that 10 times, mail me some wings, and you shall be saved.

      • itachi
      • 6 years ago

      I don’t know but they should focus on making the 6 more mainstream, so that the developers start taking the multithreading more seriously, and maybe make apps/games that support up to 8 core or more like bf4(8) that is cool but more optimised though uh lol.

    • jdaven
    • 6 years ago

    Was the desktop version of Broadwell cancelled? If so, that means the Haswell refresh would take us to Saltwell which would give enough time to clear inventory.

      • chuckula
      • 6 years ago

      You need to make up your mind: Either stick with your story from last year that desktop Broadwell doesn’t exist or talk about how desktop Broadwell will be “late,” but you can’t claim that a chip that never was supposed to exist has been “cancelled”.

      As for Saltwell… I don’t know what the codename for the 32 nm core used in earlier Atom phone chips has to do with Desktop Broadwell. ( [url<]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atom_(system_on_chip)[/url<] )

        • nanoflower
        • 6 years ago

        Ah, but of Intel had a desktop version of Broadwell but never released it then they could both late with desktop Broadwell and have a product that doesn’t exist..

        • jdaven
        • 6 years ago

        I’m genuinely curious as I have not followed the latest on Intel’s desktop plans. If they never planned a desktop version of Broadwell, I accept that. But my statement is true about clearing inventory either way.

          • NeelyCam
          • 6 years ago

          Don’t mind chuckula – his ahole mode is on.

          Broadwell plans were not exactly clear in terms of the split between mobile and desktop. It seems that Intel is prioritizing mobile (and by that I mean mostly laptops and ultraportables, but also tablets). ┬ĘDesktops” would be mostly served by soldered-on-board chips, but at some point rumors about socketed Broadwells hit the ‘web… I think those were supposed to come out in early 2015 (i.e., much later than the on-board chips).

          Chuckula is right about Saltwell, though – that’s an old Atom core. Not sure why you brought it up here…

          [s<]EDIT: OAS has a link down there to an article about a roadmap with a socketed Broadwell in it; check it out[/s<] Nevermind. It was pointed out that this was an ages old roadmap. Don't mind me. I don't know what I'm talking about

            • jdaven
            • 6 years ago

            Whoops sorry I meant Skylake not Saltwell.

            I guess I don’t know what I’m talking about either. ­čÖé

    • chuckula
    • 6 years ago

    And so it came to pass that in the fourth month of the year 2K+14 that The Krogoth didst slumber passing deep.

    Stirreth didst he not for the bumping of the clocks and the releasing of the neutered chipsets, such was his mighty Meh.

    Neither didst he stirreth with the hopping of the Easter Bunny for The Krogoth knoweth of the Cadbury Egg conspiracy and finds it unimpressive.

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 6 years ago

      [url<]http://youtu.be/_FiA57ir5QM[/url<]

    • Melvar
    • 6 years ago

    FFS, Intel could probably make their release schedule more complicated, but they’d have to work at it.

    Any idea what “higher-clocked” means? Anything less than half a GHz wouldn’t make much difference, but that seems like a lot to ask considering how little they’ve bumped up the clocks the last few generations.

      • internetsandman
      • 6 years ago

      Intel has no competition on this front, so they’ve decided to take a page from AMD’s book and just re-release products with 100Mhz boosts. It is technically higher frequency, and they might get away with a price premium depending on the marketing, but nobody will notice or care

        • jihadjoe
        • 6 years ago

        This has been going on for far longer than you might think.

        x6800 to x6850
        Q9650 to Q9770
        965x to 975x
        2600k to 2700k

        Well that, or AMD has been uncompetitive for far longer than you think…

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 6 years ago

      Looks like 100 MHz. Just the typical new stepping that shows up after a half a year or so.

      [url<]http://www.cpu-world.com/news_2013/2013121201_Specifications_of_Haswell_Refresh_CPUs.html[/url<] I wouldn't expect much of clock speeds, even in the future. Intel has been slowly but surely driving up the base clock and leaving the same turbo cap. The Ivy Bridge E quad-core doesn't even have turbo for anything but 1 core! And those have much more wiggle room with the TDP. AMD threw in the towel on the fairy tale that Bulldozer had a higher clock potential. It's not a good trade off. Most computers have both a heat limit and a space limit. Better to integrate more features. Desktops can still overclock.

    • spuppy
    • 6 years ago

    I thought that there wasn’t going to be a socketed Broadwell at all (which is why they’re doing a Haswell refresh in the first place)… Meaning if 9 series is compatible, it only matters to integrated systems anyway

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 6 years ago

      [url<]http://vr-zone.com/articles/intels-broadwell-k-launching-end-2014-according-new-roadmap/60966.html[/url<] There's never been any mention of dual-cores, but as of just recently, there may be a plan for socket 1150 quad-cores. And then they were allegedly delayed to 2015. Intel has cancelled entire lines of CPUs before. I'm not holding my breath.

        • spuppy
        • 6 years ago

        That’s really old. I’m pretty sure the latest rumors indicate that there won’t be a socketed Broadwell at least at launch, if not forever

          • OneArmedScissor
          • 6 years ago

          Sorry, I thought it said 2013 lol. I fixed the link.

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