Entire Radeon R9 lineup finally available at list prices

It’s a little crazy that this is newsworthy, but AMD’s full lineup of Radeon R9 graphics cards is finally available online at suggested e-tail prices. Various members of the family have been in short supply and selling at inflated prices since last year. Supply constraints and increased demand from cryptocurrency miners were apparently to blame, but the situation seems to have been resolved. AMD says the "madness" is over—and that the current, intended prices will remain stable moving forward.

At least right now, Newegg has plenty of Radeons selling at AMD’s official launch prices, plus a handful that are even cheaper. Let’s go with a bulleted list:

  • Loads of Radeon R9 280 cards are in stock, but only one has the prescribed $249.99 sticker. You’re better off with this Sapphire version, which is $209.29 with a 9%-off promo code. A mail-in rebate shaves another $10 off that card, too.
  • The last member of the Radeon R9 family, the 295 X2, is available in several flavors for $1,499.99. All the cards are basically the same, and I’m fairly certain this relatively recent offering hasn’t suffered the higher prices that afflicted AMD’s other Hawaii-based cards.

So, there you have it. The Radeon R9 family is finally whole and available to gamers as AMD intended. Let’s hope this sort of development isn’t newsworthy with future generations.

Comments closed
    • yuhong
    • 9 years ago

    Except the GTX 750 and even then the spike for that was probably less than for the AMD cards.

    • marvelous
    • 9 years ago

    Miners dumping video cards.

    • NeelyCam
    • 9 years ago

    You need to improve the insulation of your house. Attic insulation pays good dividends.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 9 years ago

    I hope it works out for your, seriously. It’s quite a deal, and I like the idea of people giving miners pennies on the dollar and getting a good shake out of it. I’m just not likely to go that road myself.

    • superjawes
    • 9 years ago

    [quote<]You can count on HIS cards to game** hard for 24/7/365 for years*! [i<]*Only the first year is guaranteed. **HIS cards are designed for gaming. We do not recommend HIS cards for cryptocurrency mining.[/i<] "What liability?"[/quote<] You can claim false advertising, but someone will find an out. Also, you're still missing the point. I have the same stance on CPUs and motherboards. I'm not against anyone buying used, but I think that anyone buying used should know the operating conditions and adjust what he/she is willing to pay accordingly. There's no double standard here.

    • alloyD
    • 9 years ago

    No, not really. I ended up buying a GTX 760, which seems to do just fine at my price point. The Watch Dogs offer was a big plus for me. In my experience, any computer hardware you buy will drop or be replaced with something better as soon as you buy it. Better just to be happy with what you get.

    • l33t-g4m3r
    • 9 years ago

    “CPUs” Yes, but not GPUs. You’ve just taken this beyond FUD, and into TROLLING territory.

    a. 24/7 for how long? These R- cards just came out, and the mining fad is over.
    b. Video card coolers are fairly robust. Plus clock throttling.
    c. Hurr Durr, and GPU testing isn’t? lol.
    d. google your card. It’s easy enough to find out what card has what.

    P1
    Yes. Yes you are, and no I’m not. The anecdotal reports are fud. Nobody is actually reporting on real world failed mining cards, it’s all fud. Not to mention miners would RMA failed cards, and not resell them. This fud logic is so stupid it’s not funny. I won’t believe it until I see some actual reports of failed mining cards.

    Question:
    What might be the real motive to spread FUD on mining cards?
    Cheaper prices. People who want a second card for crossfire at rock bottom prices are spreading FUD to lower the resale value. Price manipulation via anecdotal stories. Kind of like a pump and dump scam.

    If I was looking to buy an AMD card, now would be the perfect time. For used or new.

    • Voldenuit
    • 9 years ago

    You were the one that brought up “used overclocked CPUs”.

    I’m saying people were comfortable buying them because

    a. they were probably not running at 100% load for 24/7.
    b. the cooling systems are easily replacable
    c. It’s easy to test the quality of the CPU you buy with readily available testing tools
    d. the power delivery components, [i<]if[/i<] stressed by overclocking and/or continual use, are on the motherboard I'm not claiming that a used miner GPU is automatically dead, but you're arguing by false analogy. I know I've seen enough anecdotal reports of faulty or dead used miner GPUs that I would not be comfortable buying unless the savings were considerable, and even then, price/performance of mainstream GPUs is so good right now I would probably still opt for a fresh card, which would at least have a warranty. EDIT: I will concede that the probability of getting a bad used card is probably lower now than it was during the height of the mining craze. Used cards on the market back then were much more likely to be defective units that the miner was replacing with new units. Now that the mining craze is over, they're much more likely to be just excess hardware that ppl are getting rid of because they no longer need them.

    • l33t-g4m3r
    • 9 years ago

    Again perpetuating my last point. Why are you insinuating that all these video cards are overclocked? Do you have proof? Do you understand that AMD’s cards have thermal clock limits and can’t actually be abused like you’re claiming?

    This is why I’m calling FUD.

    Also, any ebayer knows you have around 30 days to file a claim for a defective item, or even mislabeling. Regular sellers won’t risk their reputation by upselling junk. It just doesn’t happen. Not on a regular basis, and definitely not with regular sellers. You’ll get an accurate description of the item, and people will bid according to what it’s actually worth.

    People sell cracked cell phones on ebay. Guess how they’re described. Protip: not as brand new.

    My guess is that most of the FUD spreaders don’t actually use ebay on a regular basis, or understand that AMD has thermal clock limits. Yes, mining could be a small problem, but they haven’t been used for years non-stop, as mining was a brief fad, and the components should be durable enough to handle it. The sky isn’t falling just because you see a few clouds.

    • Voldenuit
    • 9 years ago

    [quote<]People buy used CPU's all the time and think nothing of it, even heavily overclocked ones. [/quote<] How many of those overclocked CPUs were running 24/7 on computational tasks?

    • l33t-g4m3r
    • 9 years ago

    Regardless, that’s exactly what they claim it to do, and they can’t make those claims without being liable.
    [quote<]You can count on HIS cards to game hard for 24/7/365 for years![/quote<] Not to mention, CPU's / motherboards are made with the same components and none of you are holding them to the same standards as videocards. People buy used CPU's all the time and think nothing of it, even heavily overclocked ones. Most people will tell you that they've never had a CPU die from normal overclocking, and still have old overclocked celerons that work. This business with videocards is less about the actual videocard, and more about unproven personal prejudice. Perhaps a small portion of this stems from some brands making cards with cheap components, and manufacturing problems like bumpgate, but anyone avoiding cheap brands should be fine today. Another questionable thing is, why are the FUD spreaders claiming all mining cards were overclocked in unventilated boxes? There are thermal clock limits and clock throttling. This fear mongering is nothing but pathetic nonsense, once you start applying some basic rational thought to it.

    • Voldenuit
    • 9 years ago

    Would you be any happier buying a new Radeon only to have the price drop (back to MSRP, mind you) just a couple weeks later?

    The cryptocoin fad was bad for everyone except the miners.

    PS, tigerdirect has the [url=http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=8911158<]Sapphire R9 270 for $159 after rebate[/url<]. Now [i<]that's[/i<] a deal!

    • ronch
    • 9 years ago

    I’m more worried about the power delivery circuits. I used to have an HD 5670. Two years in, I began to notice that it performed worse. A complete OS and driver reinstall didn’t fix things and even an older HD 4670 played games a lot more smoothly. I suspected the chip not throttling all the way up from its ‘Cool & Quiet’ speed to its full clock specs. I suspected the VRMs or some lousy , [u<]solid[/u<] capacitors just stopped doing a good job. Also had an MSI "Military Grade" ("10-Year Lifespan!") 990FXA-GD65 board die after just 13 months (right after the warranty period has passed) of use with no overclocking whatsoever. Funny how manufacturers always scream "Solid Caps!", "Ultra Durable!" and all sorts of things touting durability these days when boards are still dying all over the place.

    • ronch
    • 9 years ago

    Ironic. Just when AMD came out with a graphics architecture that blows Nvidia out of the water in cryptography and general compute, it comes back to bite them. Guess AMD just can’t ever catch a break.

    • l33t-g4m3r
    • 9 years ago

    Yeah, the perf optimizations are great, but the biggest positive is that all games work great day1 out of the box. AMD takes months to optimize and bug-fix, so AMD’s driver really sucks unless you’re buying all your games on steam sales, not to mention indie games rarely get optimized for.

    Anyone who bought AMD right around Rage’s release had horribly broken drivers. Crossfire didn’t work. Horrible stuttering in many games, because of frame latency issues. AA performance was broken in several games, and probably still is if you force it via the control panel, unlike nvidia. Rage didn’t work at all. Hotfixes were everywhere, and you didn’t know what updates were trustworthy enough to install. Vista support was unofficially dropped, even though AMD promised all whql’s would support it. (lol whql’s) Also, AMD doesn’t directly support stereo 3d. This is what it’s like to have an AMD card, in general, and IMO it’s not worth it anymore. ATI’s drivers were much better before the AMD buyout.

    Sure, the drivers are better now than they were with Rage, but I still don’t think they’re anywhere near competitive. AMD is still stupid slow in DX11, which is why they’re pushing mantle, but mantle would be totally unnecessary if they just optimized like nvidia does.

    Yeah, I might get fanboy downvotes for speaking truth, but I’ve had enough experience with AMD to know they’re not worth buying just yet. Not until dx11 and AA is fixed, and they start optimizing in general instead of game-specific. Mantle’s a band-aid on a broken leg. AMD needs a full body cast, not a band-aid.

    • ronch
    • 9 years ago

    Or bitterness.

    • ronch
    • 9 years ago

    I wonder when AMD’s next-gen GCN architecture is coming out. Except for the top-model 290 and 290X chips, as you may know, the R-series is basically just a rebrand of the HD 7000 series which has been around for more than 2 years. Don’t get me wrong, GCN is an excellent graphics architecture but I think AMD needs to focus more on energy efficiency especially with the imminent release of newer Maxwell-based models.

    • Billstevens
    • 9 years ago

    Owning a first gen dx12 card so that a 2nd gen card can come out along the first dx12 optimized game… But if you have a 6 series or better yeah… why bother.

    • Billstevens
    • 9 years ago

    Wow lots of hate for that. I mean the speed of Nvidias driver optimizations to eek out performance leads of a few frames over AMD is just kind of ridiculous. I wish their driver team sucked a bit more so they would be forced to release faster cards sooner.

    • Billstevens
    • 9 years ago

    Improvements in heat and power… give me performance, I’ll hold out the big bucks for Pascal and a new connection interface assuming Nvidia delivers on their current road map. Though I suppose we could get pleasantly surprised by Maxwell.

    • Billstevens
    • 9 years ago

    That’s fair, I had the same concern initially. If the thing explodes in a month I will likely regret it, but the prices in some cases are just low enough for me to take the risk. Buying any electronic off Ebay holds risk because you don’t typically get a warranty.

    In my short fortunate electronics life I haven’t had many components go bad on me except for a hard drive here and there that wasn’t too painful to replace. But there is wisdom in reminding people of the risk they take by bargain hunting for electronics. There is no way to verify over the web if hardware was mistreated or has damaged components.

    But if you are willing to take a risk there are some great deals right now.

    • Geonerd
    • 9 years ago

    Ya got a point. A possibly OC card churning away at full load for months on end has got to be feeling its age. OTOH, it might have enjoyed comparatively few off/on thermal cycles, leaving the solder joints in better-than-anticipated condition. Hum…. if the price is right, a coin card might not be as terrible a buy as you’d first think. (?)

    • JustAnEngineer
    • 9 years ago

    We’re eight to ten months away from 20nm GPUs. That should be a significant improvement.

    • Chrispy_
    • 9 years ago

    Excatly this. The ad will read
    “FS: R9 280X, used for 9mo, great condition”

    What you should read is
    “FS: R9 280X, overclocked, possibly BIOS modded and run in an un-earthed plastic box for 9 continuous months whilst sandwiched and suffocated between two other equally-tortured, roasting-hot cards. Warranty was voided by BIOS mods.”

    • Chrispy_
    • 9 years ago

    I’m in Europe. By the time I’d even heard of mining (over a year ago) it was already a loss at my current kwh unit price, and that excludes investing in the card.

    My mined bitcoins/litecoins wouldn’t have even paid the electricity bill.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 9 years ago

    I’m not willing to gamble a couple hundred bucks on something that, regardless of what % of them are fine, are not *as* fine as a brand new card. You have that kind of money to potentially throw away, then great. I don’t, so I didn’t. Don’t put words in my mouth. All I said was that I would not (personally) buy one. Loads of people do and a few people on the TR forums have gotten burned. Others I’m sure are doing just fine. I’m not willing to take the risk.

    • superjawes
    • 9 years ago

    The fan is probably going to be the weak link, especially depending on how much dust gets caught in it.

    My main point was/is that you aren’t [i<]extending[/i<] the life of your electronics by using them more. People should capitalize on great Radeon prices if they can. I just think that they should evaluate the used card the same way that you would a used car. Know what you're buying and adjust what you're willing to pay accordingly.

    • superjawes
    • 9 years ago

    Long life components doesn’t necessarily mean that they’re 24/7 designed components.

    And you can call FUD all you want, but I’m not going to put my faith in a chunk of marketing material.

    • flip-mode
    • 9 years ago

    It could run 100% 24/7 for years, too. The only thing I’d worry about is the fan giving out. I’m sure the silicon is fine.

    • superjawes
    • 9 years ago

    You’re completely missing the point…the concerns about “mining cards” are similar to the concerns you should have about buying a 2-year-old car with >100,000 miles on it. It might be in great condition. It might have been well taken care of. But stuff doesn’t last forever. The more you use something, the more it wears. The more it wears, the more likely it is to fail.

    This is about knowing the quality and condition of a used product (or in this case, [i<]not[/i<] knowing). derFunk's comment was actually about potential liars on eBay misrepresenting the wear on cards.

    • DPete27
    • 9 years ago

    [url=https://techreport.com/news/26226/nvidia-pascal-to-use-stacked-memory-proprietary-nvlink-interconnect<]Stacked memory is a couple years out yet.[/url<]

    • f0d
    • 9 years ago

    dont bother
    most people on TR has a personal grudge against mining like it beat up their sister or something
    never mind they think [email protected] is ok on hardware (never seen anyone complain about [email protected] killing hardware)

    i have a 6950 (firmware modded to 6970 shaders and overclocked) that i mined with for much longer than the R9 series has been out for and i dont have a single problem with it – it still runs exactly the same as the day i got it

    nothing wrong with mining its just everyone here hates it

    edit: typos – nothing was changed

    • DPete27
    • 9 years ago

    There’s always improvements looming on the horizon.

    • Bauxite
    • 9 years ago

    Cheap is relative. A good part of the US is a freaking expensive place to live, and unlike many other countries the “median-middle-class-cannot-afford-it” zones are a lot more common than just the upscale urban areas.

    The typical family-o-4 household monthly electric+HVAC (if we are pricing GPU mining, those are all relevant) in the states can be more than it costs to live fairly well in other parts of the world.

    • l33t-g4m3r
    • 9 years ago

    FUD. You people are acting like all used mining cards will be DOA. That’s bunk, and you know it.

    Most cards are now made with long life components*, and the card will likely last fine until it’s obsolete. AMD will stop supporting the card well before it dies. Just look at the dx11 VLIW series, and support for Vista. Non-existent. These cards will only get driver updates through w9, and AMD will instantly depreciate the current gen as soon as the next gen comes out.

    There’s nothing wrong with saving a few bucks, especially when AMD’s support window will be shorter than the lifetime of a used card.

    *[url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814161440[/url<] [quote<]HIS cards are engineered with the highest standard of safety, preventing them any potential damages. Solid State Choke stabilizes the card and Full Solid State Capacitors ensures the best power quality and enhances the card’s stability in critical gaming situations! PCB might easily be warped due to prolonged hanging on the motherboard and casing, potentially causing cracks on BGA solder joints and resulting in malfunctioning of the card. The HIS special metal rib provides extra strength to the PCBs to avoid warpage, making the cards extra stable and durable. You can count on HIS cards to game hard for 24/7/365 for years! [/quote<] Couple others: [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125490[/url<] [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814121803[/url<] You get the point. Mining FUD is FUD.

    • superjawes
    • 9 years ago

    The 290x wasn’t designed to run at high temperatures, it was designed with a feature that throttles the clock speed when it gets hot. Actually, PowerTune measures and changes a lot of things [url=https://techreport.com/review/25509/amd-radeon-r9-290x-graphics-card-reviewed/4<]as explained here[/url<]. The custom cooled cards performed "better" because they never hit the thermal limits, and the clock speed could stay at 1 GHz. Water cooled might be good for the chip, but no silicon will get more usable hours by running at full speed 24/7, just as no car is going to last longer by driving 50,000 miles a year, and just as no light bulb is going to last longer by staying on 24/7.

    • Billstevens
    • 9 years ago

    But if you are dying to play something modern you wouldn’t be at a major disadvantage buying this generation. Personally i upgraded just to have hardware that can handle the Oculus DK2. For that I don’t want to wait until Nvidia feels like releasing their new hardware.

    Now if it were an architectural leap, I would have likely decided to hold out for the 4 or 5 months till their release. In general though waiting will always yield you a better card.

    • Prestige Worldwide
    • 9 years ago

    Recent rumours have been saying ~10-15% faster than 780ti, with driver improvements I would expect that to increase.

    Kepler is old and overpriced (so has Volcanic Islands), I wouldn’t recommend buying a gk110 chip to anybody this late into this generation unless they need the best RIGHT NOW.

    EDIT: Forgot % sign.

    • Prestige Worldwide
    • 9 years ago

    Process shrink from 28nm to 20nm, DX12, new architecture (Maxwell for green team, Pirate Islands for red), stacked memory. I definitely forgot to list a lot of things.

    Basically, MORE BETTERNESS!

    • jstern
    • 9 years ago

    I tend to think more like you, but I’ve heard website saying things like, “You have to leave your new GPU running on full speed for 24 hours to make sure it’s ok.” I only heard it once though. And the 290x was designed to run at a really high temperature, so maybe a water cooled 290x might not be a bad thing. If we go by the theory that these cards are designed to run at full speed non stop.

    • UnfriendlyFire
    • 9 years ago

    You would be surprised. My parents didn’t understand why their laptop with the defective mobile Geforce 8000s series GPUs was causing it to report errors and eventually fail.

    I tried explaining to them that the solder underneath the GPU was going bad, but that flew over their head.

    Though even if they knew, Dell and Nividia were being jerks about replacing the defective laptops.

    • Billstevens
    • 9 years ago

    He’s gonna have to wait a long time. 880 gtx specs look nothing but an increment of 780. If you have that class of card you are good for another generation.

    • stabgotham
    • 9 years ago

    What improvements are looming that would make our fancy?

    • Billstevens
    • 9 years ago

    R9 290 for $270 bucks… shrug, mine runs great. If it breaks it was under $300 bucks

    • csxcsx
    • 9 years ago

    Maybe it’s just me, but the appearance of the card is somewhat important to me, and that Titan shroud, oh the things I would let it do to me…

    • l33t-g4m3r
    • 9 years ago

    At least you don’t have to worry about drivers.

    • Corion
    • 9 years ago

    If you’re looking to spend that much, I’d suggest doing what I did – get a cheap card around $130-150 (like the GTX 750 Ti) and wait for the next generation of cards to surface. There’s a lot of improvements looming on the horizon, and I don’t think you’re going to want a $500 card at the tail end of this generation when the next set of cards pop up.

    Well … unless you’re doing multi-monitor/huge resolutions or have money to burn.

    • just brew it!
    • 9 years ago

    Well, you do take a double hit in the summer. In addition to the power used by the card itself, you have the additional load on the air conditioning system.

    Back when I was active on TR’s [email protected] team I used to shut most of the systems down over the summer for this reason. In the winter the cost of electricity was partially offset by the fact that it was helping to heat the house; but in the summer the electric bills were just too much.

    • Ratchet
    • 9 years ago

    Has anyone done a recent review of the graphics scene lately, using the newest drivers and with a reasonable eye toward what the average person might be looking to buy (by “reasonable eye) I mean around the $300-$500ish range)? I mean, all the cards with fancy coolers and factory overclocks and whatnot, it’s kind of hard to decide. The launch review are kind of outdated now.

    • swaaye
    • 9 years ago

    Who’s to say that a few months of stress testing isn’t a benefit? It’s far more QA testing than you get from the manufacturer. As long as you test it well before the ebay warranty runs out, you might be getting a very dependable card for very cheap.

    • DPete27
    • 9 years ago

    [quote<] better off with this Sapphire [R9-280], which is $209.29 with a 9%-off promo code. A mail-in rebate shaves another $10 off that card, too.[/quote<] Yeah, I'd say. That's $50 cheaper.

    • steelcity_ballin
    • 9 years ago

    Well Nvidia also didn’t have a giant spike in demand from crypto-mining like AMD did, many popular models were out of stock just about everywhere for a time.

    • steelcity_ballin
    • 9 years ago

    I don’t know if the cost of electricity is the argument so much as the draw from the card itself. More draw is more heat in most cases, and depending on your PSU and system stability, that could be a factor itself.

    Cheap is also a highly subjective metric; My monthly electric bill in PIttsburgh is about $120 a month. More in the summer since I have 2 large portable AC units I use (no central air). I keep my computer and my gf’s computer on full time as well. I would estimate this month’s bill to be closer to $200 since it was 90 degrees outside yesterday, blech.

    My beef with Radeon and AMD as a whole is that they don’t seem to ever get ahead of Nvidia. I’ll grant you I haven’t been following GPUs closely since I haven’t needed one, but if I were given the money today I’d still get an Nvidia card. Shadowplay is sweet, I lost interest in cryptomining, and Nvidia has never given me a problem. I can’t say the same about, admittedly, old experiences with Ati’s Radeons.

    • mikepers
    • 9 years ago

    I’m running a 6950 with only 1GB GDDR5 so I’ve been contemplating an upgrade. My monitor is 1920×1200. The R9280 rebadge at $199 was tempting. Also was thinking R9280x but that’s a little more than I want to spend.

    Based on the comments I decided to go check ebay and it does look like there are some deals.

    Just found a Sapphire R9 290 for $199 plus shipping. ($212 total) Couldn’t resist. Decided to take a chance. The seller had good reviews. (there were six more left after the one I just got)

    [url=http://www.ebay.com/itm/231231783733?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649<]ebay link[/url<] Glad I upgraded my power supply to a nice Seasonic recently.

    • Concupiscence
    • 9 years ago

    I have seriously not run into a single scenario where my GTX 660 wasn’t up to the job at 1080p. If anything makes me upgrade, it will need to be formidable.

    • Concupiscence
    • 9 years ago

    In fairness everything in New York is hideously expensive…

    • albundy
    • 9 years ago

    thanks, but skipping all these bs cards for the next lineup of dx12 cards.

    • albundy
    • 9 years ago

    maybe its cheap in your middle of nowhere, but in NYC, your looking at a few c-notes a month in an all electric apartment.

    • Prestige Worldwide
    • 9 years ago

    About damn time. The mining whores inflating radeon prices and nvidia’s random price increases to compensate turned me off of this entire generation.

    I’ll be getting an 880 or 870 later this year instead, TYVM.

    • SomeOtherGeek
    • 9 years ago

    Yea, but now the miners are broke and the electric companies are smiling on the profits.

    • alloyD
    • 9 years ago

    Well… I guess you guys can thank me for this one. I just knew that as soon as I bought a new GeForce, the Radeons would drop. sigh. oh well.

    • Chrispy_
    • 9 years ago

    I find the obsession with low power consumption for GPUs almost as amusing as the fact that in the US electricity is so cheap that crypto-mining has survived for 6 months longer than anywhere else.

    • HisDivineOrder
    • 9 years ago

    Seems like this happens to AMD more than it does nVidia. nVidia tends to keep their prices high enough that markups don’t happen, but AMD seems to have absolutely no control of their cards’ pricing. It goes up, it goes down, it varies wildly, but whatever AMD is saying the price will be… often, it’s not.

    Really strange. Does nVidia just have greater control over its OEM’s or do they just fear nVidia more?

    • HisDivineOrder
    • 9 years ago

    Been sayin’ this for a while now. Said it from the start, actually. When people were saying, “What harm is going to come from AMD getting all these sales regardless of if they’re making a huge profit on them or not!” I was saying just this.

    These used cards are going to undercut actual AMD sales at MSRP and they’ve got the potential to be less than long-lived. Then rather than realize the real source of the problem (overworked cards), AMD’ll get the blame for… well, everything. I imagine you can lay SOME of the blame at their feet, but I’d argue not all of it and probably not even most of it.

    • superjawes
    • 9 years ago

    Keep in mind that it was probably on 24/7. Water or not, parts do wear.

    • jstern
    • 9 years ago

    I saw one on eBay with a water block. Must of ran pretty cool if it was used for mining. Do you think that would make a difference in its life span? Because it’s pretty cheap to buy.

    • superjawes
    • 9 years ago

    You know I (and I think most people here) predicted that the market would snap back from the crypto-craze, cutting into new sales for AMD (and Nvidia to an extent), but I hadn’t considered how those used sales might affect long-term sales…

    How many people are going to buy a burnt-out mining card and blame the failure on AMD? That would hurt AMD through no fault of their own…

    • derFunkenstein
    • 9 years ago

    No way I’d buy a used Radeon on eBay right now because even the ones that say they were never used for mining probably were.

    • Neutronbeam
    • 9 years ago

    About time. This was why I held off buying a card…well, that and a lack of funds, but still.

    • 6GTX9
    • 9 years ago

    Too late! They’ve only just begun to sell off their cards on Ebay…..

    • superjawes
    • 9 years ago

    Now AMD is just crossing their fingers hoping that the used market doesn’t get flooded with R9’s from discouraged miners…

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