EVGA’s SuperNOVA PSU pumps 1600W, guaranteed for 10 years

EVGA's new SuperNOVA 1600 G2 power supply is a monster. This thing has 1600W of total output power, which should be enough to fuel a small apartment, let alone a high-end rig with multiple graphics cards.

Almost all the power—1599.6W, to be exact—can be pushed through the PSU's single 12V rail. Loads of connectors branch off from that rail: dual auxiliary CPU power leads, nine eight-pin PCIe connectors, and five six-pin PCIe plugs. You get 16 SATA connectors on top of that, plus a handful of Molex and floppy plugs. All the cables are modular, including the main 24-pin line for the motherboard.

Inside, the SuperNOVA is lined with high-end capacitors from Japanese manufacturer Nippon Chemi-Con. It has 80 Plus Gold certification, which denotes an efficiency of 87-90% with 115V input. Cooling is provided by a "quiet and intelligent" 140-mm fan with dual ball bearings. The fan should spin down at idle, but I wonder just how quiet it is when the PSU is fully utilized. This thing surely generates loads of heat when pumping 1600W.

The SuperNOVA 1600 G2 will be available soon for $349.99. You didn't expect a 1600W PSU to be cheap, did you? At least EVGA offsets the sticker shock with an impressive 10-year warranty. I'm not sure I've ever seen a decade-long warranty for a PC component.

Comments closed
    • PerfectCr
    • 6 years ago

    I just picked up the EVGA SuperNova 750W G2. Really nice and well built. I also got the sleeved cables from EVGA made for the G2 series. I am really impressed with EVGA overall. Always loved their video cards too.

    • ronch
    • 6 years ago

    I’d like to see someone use one of these in an Athlon 5350 setup.

    • ronch
    • 6 years ago

    I want a PSU rated for 1.6 gigawatts.

      • Pbryanw
      • 6 years ago

      Or A Back to The Future edition rated for 1.21 gigawatts – preferably fuelled by a Mr. Fusion Home Energy Reactor…

    • Wildchild
    • 6 years ago

    Any idea if this is built by super flower as well? I have the 750 watt version and it is an absolute beast. Great PSU’s for the money IMO.

    • SCR250
    • 6 years ago

    1600 watts over 10 years:

    38.4 KWh per day

    14.0256 MWh per year

    140.256 MWh over the 10 years

    at 10 cents per Kwh that equals $14,025.60 of electric costs

    —-

    Edit: On the AC side the power is 1778 watts (90% with 115V input) so that ups the total cost to $15,584.

      • albundy
      • 6 years ago

      or in NYC where it’s 20 cents or more, just double that. then again, you have to factor in the price increases during the 10 years, so quadruple that.

        • SCR250
        • 6 years ago

        Why is electricity so expensive in NYC?

        Here in Dallas I am on a fixed price 24 month contract with “Source Power and Gas” for 9.6 cents per KWh and that is the total price including all fees and taxes.

          • willmore
          • 6 years ago

          Because monopoly and other corruption? It’s NYC, after all.

    • deruberhanyok
    • 6 years ago

    Okay, thought exercise. Put together a PC that would legitimately need a PSU capable of pumping out 1.6kW of power.

    I’m thinking… dual socket 2011 Xeon, four video cards, a dozen hard drives? Would that start to come close?

      • BoilerGamer
      • 6 years ago

      4 Titan/780Ti/290X with unlocked voltage(by a modded bios) + a SB-E/IV-E above 1.35V will get you pretty close(or even past) to the max output of this PSU, if you don’t believe me just look at this thread on Overclock.net discussing the Titanium rated version of this PSU(the one shown here is only Gold rated):

      [url<]http://www.overclock.net/t/1493504/twitter-evga-evga-1600w-titanium-psu/20#post_22361880[/url<]

    • internetsandman
    • 6 years ago

    First of all, why do you need something with that much wattage? Even dual socket, quad GPU systems with loads of drives wont draw more than half that load IIRC, and second of all, Corsair recently released a 1500W PSU with digital monitoring and 80 Plus Titanium, so this product is essentially moot anyway

      • cynan
      • 6 years ago

      First of all, the quad GPUs in a quad GPU system can exceed 800W at load on their own (eg, GTX 780 and above for the green team and R9 280x and above for the red), particularly if overclocking.

      Second, just because one company has had a similar product first, this means additional companies can’t offer competing products? And Corsair wasn’t the first to offer PSU with output in this range. Does that mean their PSU was moot upon introduction too?

    • ludi
    • 6 years ago

    Huh…it actually does have the 16A-rated IEC inlet connector in place of the conventional 10A connector. The power output claim might actually Not Be Lying for a change, although to deliver full power at the rated 90% efficiency, it would have to pull 15A on a 120V North American circuit, meaning that for code conformance it should technically be plugged into a 20A branch circuit.

    I wonder if it ships with a free electrician.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 6 years ago

    Just in time for the dogecoin mining rage to tank. Nicely done, evga.

    • deruberhanyok
    • 6 years ago

    I don’t suppose they’d be interested in doing something that puts out, say, a quarter of the power (400W), at a quarter of the size (SFX), at a quarter of the price?

    It’d be good to see a little more competition for the mini-ITX setups that are becoming more popular these days. Right now your PSU options are: silverstone, silverstone and silverstone. (Which isn’t a bad thing, but having another company to choose from would at least be nice).

    • gmskking
    • 6 years ago

    If u need this PSU, u need to get out of the house more often.

      • willmore
      • 6 years ago

      I disagree. If you need this PSU, you are already too far gone. Stay in your house! Avoid the big blue room!

        • gmskking
        • 6 years ago

        I will also accept that.

      • shank15217
      • 6 years ago

      Why couldn’t you just run 2 or 3 computers with one of these?

    • Captain Ned
    • 6 years ago

    Hmm, the possibility of a single 12-gauge wire asked to carry 133 amperes. In the real NEC world, that would require 1-aught (1/0). Good luck bending that back behind a motherboard tray.

      • ch┬Áck
      • 6 years ago

      It shouldn’t be too difficult as long as it’s not solid core.

      • Zedcat
      • 6 years ago

      Surely that’s just 13 amps and not 133?

        • ludi
        • 6 years ago

        1600W at 12V = 133A.

        Naturally, no single wire would be asked to carry that much load in a computer, but it illustrates what a ridiculous amount of power is being processed through this thing. You could jump-start a car with it.

          • Zedcat
          • 6 years ago

          Ahh, sorry my bad. Was thinking of the 115v going into the psu, not the 12v rail coming out of it

        • SomeOtherGeek
        • 6 years ago

        Like ludi says. But image at 120V, you better have a 20A wall outlet.

          • Klimax
          • 6 years ago

          10A here.

          • Lans
          • 6 years ago

          I had joked to friends about needing a dedicated wall outlet for your PC just like your AC and looks like we are here… At 1.6kW rated DC output, you might want a dedicated 15A outlet because you’ll be drawing 1777W to 1839w (14.8A to 15.3A at 120v) [EDIT: AC input at 87% to 90% efficient]. Of course that is you really push the PSU above 95% load constantly. If you are say 80% or so load, you probably still try and get away with regular/non-dedicated 15A wall outlet (if nothing else draws more than 120w or so).

          I also did a quick search and you can get TWO >= 850w 80+ platinum PSUs for a little over $349.99 and a little less for 80+ gold ones. A little easier on the wall outlets but still a pain to find two 15A wall outlets that are on different loops. Just a thought but seems feasible since nothing draws that much power from a single 12V connector (150w on a 8-pin PCIe connector?).

          Maybe they expect people using these monster power supplies all have 20A or more wall outlets?

    • wingless
    • 6 years ago

    If your computer needs this PSU, I implore you to invest in lower power components…

    • BoilerGamer
    • 6 years ago

    “I’m not sure I’ve ever seen a decade-long warranty for a PC component.”

    RAM have life time warranty AFAIK, and GPU OEMs used to have Life time warranty(EVGA stopped doing that a few year ago, not sure if XFX is still doing it).

      • BiffStroganoffsky
      • 6 years ago

      For some people, a decade may seem like a lifetime…

    • Jon1984
    • 6 years ago

    10 years? They sure have confidence in their product. This thing could fuel my gaming PC 4 times!

      • BoilerGamer
      • 6 years ago

      It is for people running Quad 290X or Titan Black/780Ti with unlocked Voltage Bios + a SB-E/IV-E on 1.3-4V.

        • ish718
        • 6 years ago

        lol It was made for a solution that doesn’t really work.
        Quad SLI or xFire scaling sucks…

          • Khali
          • 6 years ago

          Actually its more aimed at the Distributed Computing users. Those who run Boinc, Folding@Home, and yes coin miners. You can get a lot more work done using GPU’s than you can with a CPU. For those people SLI/Crossfire doesn’t even come into play since its all about doing computations and nothing to do with video output.

          For example I am running a GTX 780 Ti and a GTX 680 in the same system. The 780 Ti is my video out card but gets used for Boinc as well when I am not running a game. The 680 does nothing but Boinc work. I am running a Seasonic 860 watt platinum PSU. If I had a different motherboard with more PCI-E slots I would be running more GPU’s and would probably need a bigger PSU.

            • bthylafh
            • 6 years ago

            Realistically, it’s only the miners and competitive overclockers that will pay for such a ridiculous power supply. Folders and SETI@home users won’t bother.

            • Khali
            • 6 years ago

            Your wrong on this. There are plenty of Boinc users with systems using multiple GPU’s. Some are even running two to four GTX 690’s. There is one on my Boinc team with a set up like this.

          • BoilerGamer
          • 6 years ago

          Plenty of people just run the Quad set-up for benching(just look at Overclock.net),and a few of them game on those rigs.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This