Fractal Design’s new liquid coolers are expandable, refillable

Excited to hear about another round of closed-loop liquid coolers from Computex? No? Well, too bad, because the news is still flowing—and Fractal Design’s Kelvin coolers are actually kinda neat.

The company has announced three of them: the 120-mm Kelvin T12, 240-mm Kelvin S24, and 360-mm Kelvin S36. All three feature a high-pressure ceramic pump design that, according to Fractal Design, is "strong enough to support considerable expansion." The coolers come with just a multi-socket CPU block, but you should be able to add GPU blocks and extra radiators if you so choose.

Also, the fluid in these coolers can be topped up via a special refilling port. According to Fractal Design, one of the most common issues with closed-loop coolers is the loss of coolant over time, which degrades cooling performance.

Along with the expansion and refilling features, the Kelvin coolers feature all-copper CPU blocks and radiators. They’re compatible with "all modern CPU sockets," and Fractal Design says all parts have G 1/4" thread fittings compatible with "the vast majority of enthusiast water cooling products." Pricing will be $99.99 for the Kelvin T12, $119.99 for the S24, and $139.99 for the S36.

Comments closed
    • LoneWolf15
    • 5 years ago

    With no disrespect to Fractal Design –I’ll say the same thing I said when I saw the new Cooler Master AIO liquid cooler.

    When someone finally reviews one of these rigs, and finds that it not only cools significantly better, but is less noisy at that temperature than a quality air cooler (e.g., Thermalright, Noctua, etc.) then I’ll consider it.

    Every closed loop liquid cooler I’ve read about costs considerably more, and is within a couple of degrees of air coolers unless the fans are raised to a noise level higher than air coolers. It’ll be great if that changes someday.

      • UberGerbil
      • 5 years ago

      My question is always what the combined T and db level is for a water system including a GPU block, vs a complete system with air-cooled CPU and GPU. I’ve never bothered with water cooling (right now my main machine is happy with IGP, for that matter) but if I was going to go H20 I’d only do it if I could use the radiator to cool everything.

      • Spotpuff
      • 5 years ago

      I like that they give extra room around the socket but you’re correct that the best air coolers are pretty close to these.

      • Airmantharp
      • 5 years ago

      Uh, that’s all of the above, AND they support a positive-pressure (more intake than exhaust) setup that allows you to keep the system free of dust inside by filtering all of the intakes and not sucking in random stuff through all of the cracks.

    • Generic
    • 5 years ago

    “strong enough to support considerable expansion.”

    WTH does that even mean? Thermal Expansion? What?

      • UberGerbil
      • 5 years ago

      Additional waterblocks for more a(nother) GPU, etc., I imagine.

        • Generic
        • 5 years ago

        Thank you!

        It is now incredibly obvious what it means, but for some reason I couldn’t escape the context of the pump itself rather than the system as a whole.

    • Ryhadar
    • 5 years ago

    Have AIO water coolers been around long enough to determine how long their pumps will last (on average)?

    They seem cool and all, but I don’t want to buy an expensive kit only to have the pump fail on me after the warranty goes. It’s probably the one thing holding me back from buying one.

      • Prestige Worldwide
      • 5 years ago

      Well in this case, you can just add a new pump to the loop that you based around this kit if this one were to fail.

      • Airmantharp
      • 5 years ago

      Yes. Buy one with a long warranty, like anything else with moving parts.

      • ColeLT1
      • 5 years ago

      I can’t speak for AIO, but I figure they use the same tech as my pump, maybe not.

      I have had a Laing DDC-3.2 (18W) pump w/ Petra’sTech DDCT-01s top setup since March 2008 and no sings of it going out.

        • cynan
        • 5 years ago

        I wouldn’t be so certain (though I don’t actually know). The Laing DDC and D5 (and the various Swiftech, etc, aftermarket pumps based on them) are highly regarded. Some cheaper pumps, as, for example, the one included in the cheaper custom XSPC kits (the rest of the XSPC stuff is great), are known to have higher failure rates.

        But as Prestige points out, you can always add another pump in series should the need arise, whether for a backup, or after pump failure.

    • Airmantharp
    • 5 years ago

    So we’re getting a Define R5 specifically designed to be compatible with these?

    I’m all-in if I can get a pair of next-gen GPUs to drive a 4k panel along with Devil’s Canyon or Haswell-E cooled at top overclock [i<][b<]silently.[/b<][/i<]

    • Prestige Worldwide
    • 5 years ago

    2013 marked my FIRST rig built with a Fractal case. Phenomenal quality and customization options.

    This looks like a very good alternative to the gabage AIO systems out there. Use this as a starter kit and add to it as life goes on and you improve your rig. I’ll take a loop with high quality compression fittings over whatever the hell they use on the AIO systems any day.

    I think the option to be able to expand the loop and be able to perform maintenance in changing your fluid is well worth the premium over an AIO system and is still cheaper than buying a waterblock / pump / reservoir / radiator separately.

      • rpjkw11
      • 5 years ago

      Swiftech has had such a system for several years. Were I ever to try watercolling, an expandable system would be my choice.

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