Nvidia Shield Tablet is packed with ports, possibilities

Just under a year since the release of the Shield Portable, Nvidia has announced a second member of the Shield family. As expected, it's the Shield Tablet, an Android slate with an emphasis on gaming. Like the Shield Portable before it, the Shield Tablet will sell direct from Nvidia, not from a partner company. The Shield Tablet extends Nvidia's Android gaming focus to a new form factor, making it one of the first tablets anywhere with a fairly pure gaming mission.

In keeping with the Shield theme, the tablet can run Android games locally on its Tegra K1 SoC, and it can also stream games from a host system, such as a GeForce-equipped home PC or a Nvidia GRID server in the cloud.

As the details in the cutaway diagram above suggest, the Shield Tablet is a premium Android slate with an 8" IPS display that sports a 1920×1200 resolution and a rich feature set. The Tegra K1 SoC that drives it features quad ARM Cortex-A15 CPU cores. (Sadly, it's not the "Denver" version with support for 64-bit software.) The K1's graphics processor is based on a single Kepler-derived SMX unit with 192 shader processors. An angel loses its wings every time Nvidia says the K1 has "192 cores," but still, that single SMX should grant the new Tegra with some of the most capable mobile graphics anywhere, compliant with every API that the GeForce Titan can support, plus the latest mobile variants.

The Shield Tablet has front- and rear-facing five-megapixel cameras. As rumored, it can accept microSD cards up to 128GB in capacity, which is a trend we can get behind. Connectivity includes 2.4/5GHz Wi-Fi with a 2×2 MIMO antenna config and optional LTE. The other ports and slots include a 3.5-mm headphone/mic jack, a micro-USB 2.0 port, and a Mini HDMI 1.4 output.

The device weighs in at 13.7 ounces, or 390 grams, and its chassis is 9.2 millimeters thick. Lurking beneath its skin is a 19.75-watt-hour battery that Nvidia estimates will sustain 10 hours of HD video playback and 4-6 hours of 3D gaming, with substantially longer run times for simple fare like Angry Birds.

Also included is a stylus, stylishly named DirectStylus 2, that Nvidia claims is "twice as accurate" as its prior attempts, presumably in the Tegra Note. The image above was created in a new Nvidia painting studio app called Dabbler, which supports the stylus. The Shield slate will do handwriting recognition, as well, and it ships with Evernote installed.

Like the Shield Portable, the Tablet will have an Nvidia-supported version of Android with fairly minimal skinning. Nvidia has been quick to provide OTA updates when new Android versions have dropped, so I'd say this arrangement adds to the product's premium credentials, provided Nvidia keeps it up.

Here are some arbitrary benchmarks from Nvidia that compare the Shield Tablet's graphical prowess to some popular competitors. Make of them what you will.

Sounds good so far, yes? Happily, the price of entry is quite reasonable. The base Shield Tablet with 16GB of internal flash storage and Wi-Fi networking lists for $299 and will be available in the U.S. and Canada starting one week from now, on July 29. A couple of weeks later, in mid-August, it will arrive in Europe.

The 32GB version of the tablet adds LTE support and is expected to arrive in North America about a month and a half after the base model for $399. Nvidia tells us the Shield Tablet will go on sale in other parts of the world this fall.

All of the above may sound like a pretty decent deal on a premium 8" tablet, but we haven't yet talked about gaming on the thing. The possibilities there go well beyond Kingdom Rush. On the back of the tablet is a three-position kickstand that props it up into an upright position, as seen above. Add in the $59 companion Shield game controller, and you have a portable, console-like gaming arrangement.

The Shield external controller looks very much inspired by the excellent gamepad built into the Shield Portable, which in turn maps directly to the Xbox 360 controllers' button layout. Interestingly, although the tablet supports Bluetooth, this controller connects via Wi-Fi Direct instead. In fact, the Shield Tablet can sustain up to four connected controllers at once, and those connections are bi-directional, since the gamepad has an audio jack that supports headsets with integrated mics for in-game chat.

In addition to on-the-go gaming, the Shield Tablet looks to be a very capable living-room hub. It can connect to a television via HDMI and switch into game console mode, where native Android or streamed PC games appear on the big screen. That's where the ability to talk to four controllers probably makes the most sense. I've used the Shield Portable for in-home game streaming from a desktop PC to my living room, and it's fast enough to provide a compelling experience even in action games like Arkham Origins and Tomb Raider.

Thanks to its Tegra K1, the Shield Tablet can drive 4K display resolutions and decode 4K video on the fly, and it can stream 1080p video from Netflix, as well. One can control Android apps via any connected gamepad simply by using an analog stick to direct an on-screen mouse pointer. This arrangement works well enough on the Shield Portable that I'd say the Shield Tablet could be a viable alternative to the Apple TV and the Amazon Fire TV, simply for media playback duties.

The possibilities don't stop there, though.

The Shield Portable recently gained the ability to stream games from a home PC to anywhere outside of the home via the Internet. The Shield Tablet builds on that foundation by adding support for streaming over LTE, as well. Provided you have enough upstream bandwidth on your home Internet connection, it can work. I was able to use the Shield Portable with my phone's Wi-Fi hotspot feature to achieve reasonably good streaming quality, believe it or not, over our 5Mbps upstream connection. The 32GB Shield Tablet will have its own integrated LTE reception, which should be even lower latency.

For an entirely different brand of streaming, Nvidia has added real-time Twitch.tv support to the Shield Tablet, so folks can stream video from their gaming sessions at 720p straight from the device to the world. The front-facing camera can even show the user's mug in the live stream as a picture-in-picture overlay. Twitch streaming works with headsets attached to the controller to enable audio narration from the player, too.

Nvidia is working to nudge Android game developers in a direction that's friendly to hard-core gaming systems like its Shield lineup. In some cases, that means adding gamepad support, and in others, it goes beyond that, to full-on ports of Half-Life 2 and Portal to the Shield Portable, for instance. The firm expects to see 11 games specifically optimized for the Tegra K1 soon, some of which will be available when the Shield Tablet arrives next week. One of those games, the excellent co-op puzzle platformer Trine 2, will ship installed on the device and act as a showcase for its graphical and multiplayer prowess. Along the same lines, the TegraZone app from the Shield Portable is getting a new name, Shield Hub, that pulls it closer under the umbrella of Nvidia's own consumer brand.

The Shield Portable has had something of a checkered existence so far, with persistent rumors of slow sales fed by a series of price cuts. I like playing with mine, but the screen feels too small for extended gaming. The Shield Tablet, though, could find a much larger market for itself, whether it's simply acting as a step up from a Nexus 7 or taking over the role of a streaming "Steam box" type device in the living room. Could this Shield finally be the hit Nvidia was hoping for?

Comments closed
    • snook
    • 5 years ago

    It’s overpriced at best. As a gaming appliance, it will fail. As a tablet, I don’t know. I just never really needed the one I had so I gave it away. I wont need this one either.

    • unclesharkey
    • 5 years ago

    I can see Amazon jumping on this with their Kindle Fire and doing it cheaper.

    • ronch
    • 5 years ago

    Just an aside: what happened to Denver? Wasn’t it supposed to go into tablets and such? Or is it now relegated to server duty? If so, where are the servers? How’s the performance and energy efficiency of those cores?

    Edit – Oh, so Denver is no longer targeted at servers and Nvidia is now focusing on the mobile market. [url=http://www.pcworld.com/article/2366480/nvidia-abandons-64bit-denver-chip-for-servers.html<]Here.[/url<] So where are the mobile gear using Denver? Even Nvidia's own Shield tablet uses A15. Something's not right.

    • vargis14
    • 5 years ago

    1. Nvidia should have made it with a 10-11″ 1080p screen. I do not know what happen when you stream a 1080p game to a 1200p panel…stretching maybe?

    2. Nvidia shoulkd have incorporated the controls on the sides of the panel like the Razer Edge Pro. Then it would be perfect since that controller is big and ugly and like previously stated it really removes the portability gaming feature it was designed for. Geez the controller is so big it pretty much blots out the whole screen in the picture.

    3. support for wireless mouse and keyboard I think is a must. It is designed to stream from your gaming rig so I do not think you would want to use a game pad for a FPS.

      • Xenolith
      • 5 years ago

      Android has support for mouse/keyboard. Buy a USB adapter to plug into this tablet, and you should be off and running.

      The better question, do you want to play an FPS on such a small screen.

      • l33t-g4m3r
      • 5 years ago

      1: Ever use a 1200 screen? You normally get very tiny black bars. 1920×1200 is the perfect resolution for gaming, simply because it can natively do 4:3 and 16:9 resolutions. It’s not really an issue, because shield certified games will support the 1200p resolution.

      2: Maybe, but that also adds weight. I wouldn’t want to be holding that for an extended period of time. Regardless, it might be a nice option for people who don’t care about holding the tablet.

      3. Non-issue. It’s an android tablet, so just get an android compatible wireless kb/m. Nobody’s forcing you to use the nv controller. It’s optional for pete’s sake, and you could also use a 360 controller. As for using a game pad for FPS, tell that to all the console people. Doesn’t stop them. I actually don’t mind using the touchscreen for FPS, as it gives you similar control to a mouse.

    • Deanjo
    • 5 years ago

    Might pick one up just to wipe out Android and install linux with KDE Plasma Active since Nvidia has full linux support available.

    • Grimmy
    • 5 years ago

    Tablet ok. But that BULKY controller?
    I know it’s “optional” but I would want a controller to that set up. But not that one.
    I cannot understand why ANYONE can say that the controller looks nice.
    And the first Shield was even worse.
    It’s supposed to be portable. yeah in a bag.

      • l33t-g4m3r
      • 5 years ago

      Really? It’s the same size as an xbox controller. The original shield’s controller wasn’t just a controller either. It was the entire device. SOC, cooling, battery, screen, etc. Yeah it is a little heavier than a console controller, but that’s because it was the entire device. If you think this new controller is the same, you must be smoking something, because the tablet is the device. It hasn’t even been released to the public yet, so how would you know it’s “BULKY”? Troll.

    • BabelHuber
    • 5 years ago

    The tablet itself looks quite well, I also like the pure Android experience.

    I hope that the controller behaves like a regular Android controller, most 3D games support this nowadays.

    But for Android gaming, the downside is the Nvidia SoC:

    I had an Asus TF201 and TF700 (Tegra 3). 3 Months ago I replaced it with a Sony Z2 tablet, because this one has a Snapdragon 801.

    The Nvidia Tegra store with Tegra-optimized games is drying out, I have rarely seen new games there in the last year.

    In 2012, many new games where released, but this changed dramatically with the low Tegra 4 market share last year – most new games are optimized for Snapdragon-chips and hence look worse on Nvidia hardware, even when the Nvidia SoC is faster (I noticed this e.g. for MC4, Asphalt 7 and Blitz Brigade).

    I hope Nvidia succeeds, because I like competition and I hate monopolies. But I think the chances are low…

    • NeelyCam
    • 5 years ago

    [url=http://blogs.marketwatch.com/thetell/2014/07/22/apple-gets-patent-for-wearable-watch-dubbed-the-itime/<]iTime[/url<]

      • chuckula
      • 5 years ago

      Rule #1: If a patent is going to issue before your product is ready, put in a fake name to throw everybody off.

      Rule #2: Steve Jobs is dead, so Rule #1 might not be in effect anymore since Apple’s product control ain’t what it used to be.

        • HisDivineOrder
        • 5 years ago

        See, I think Jobs being dead has thrown Apple into fake leaks overdrive. In fact, I think Jobs threw out that fakery that was his, “I cracked it” on Apple doing actual TV as his LAST fake leak. He threw that out there to drive Google and potentially Microsoft insane, which seems to have worked.

        Apple released nothing. Google threw GoogleTV under the bus and completely changed it into AndroidTV, alienating everyone they worked with on the original. Amazon’s ears perked up and they created FireTV in a mad rush to get something out there, buying a few game developers in the process. And Microsoft released a console at $500 just to toss in Roku-like features along with HDMI-in and a TV guide, pulling their own take on the PS3 launch with a high price and a featureset no one asked for or wanted, followed by a feature cut and a price drop within a year.

        Meanwhile, Apple spent no money at all on new releases and quietly continued to sell ancient AppleTV’s at a faster clip than just about all of the above, except Google’s $39 (often on sale) Chromecast.

        Even close to death, Jobs fake leaked the competition into overreaction.

        Perhaps Apple releases a watch. Perhaps Apple’s just continuing the long, storied tradition of fake leaks to trick their competition into throwing money and manpower into red herrings.

          • NeelyCam
          • 5 years ago

          Haha, Jobs totally punked Google on that one. No wonder they picked Kutcher to play him

      • windwalker
      • 5 years ago

      Is it “obvious” yet or will it only become so once Samsung releases the rip-off?

        • Liron
        • 5 years ago

        I thought Samsung released the rip-off last year.

          • chuckula
          • 5 years ago

          SAMSUNG ALSO RIPPED OFF APPLE’S TIME MACHINE… IN THE FUTURE!!

    • Voldenuit
    • 5 years ago

    Seems like Scott and Geoff have slightly differing views of the MSRP’s value proposition.

    [url=https://techreport.com/news/26803/report-shield-tablet-coming-july-29-for-299<]Geoff, TR 07/21/14:[/url<] [quote<]Although the stickers are a little steep, the tablets seem pretty loaded.[/quote<] [url=https://techreport.com/news/26810/nvidia-shield-tablet-is-packed-with-ports-possibilities<]Scott, TR 07/22/14:[/url<] [quote<]Happily, the price of entry is quite reasonable.[/quote<] Personally, I think $299 is a bit steep for a 16 GB tablet, no matter the ability to add additional storage via MicroSD. (It doesn't help that Google has been making microSD storage progressively less versatile in recent versions of Android - applications now only have write access to files that are in a subdirectory with the same name as the parent app. While this is understandable from a security point of view, it can become cumbersome when a user uses more than one program to open a single type of file, or for programs that use or create metadata when opening files - ebook readers and some media playback utilities, for example). Digitizer pen is nice, though. Commentators on the internet also seem a bit unenthused about the streaming/gaming utility of the Shield Tablet. Points raised include having to prop up a tablet to play games on it. If you're going to have to find a place to put down the tablet to game, why not play it directly on the desktop in the first place? I'm sure nvidia will find buyers for whom the Shield Tablet fulfills a niche. I'm just not one of them.

      • NeelyCam
      • 5 years ago

      I guess Scott is the loaded one.

        • Voldenuit
        • 5 years ago

        Scott! The internet has spoken… you need to pay your staffers more :p.

      • HisDivineOrder
      • 5 years ago

      I can imagine propping up your tablet on the patio, in the bathroom, in the den with the family, the wife wanting to play a game while she’s busy faking for you, when Tom Cruise refuses to leave the closet, or what not being possible uses for such a streaming system. Plus, propping up an 8″ tablet doesn’t really take up THAT much space. Certainly less than a full-on gaming laptop does or even a 10+” laptop does.

      That said, what really gets me about that price point is that it doesn’t include ANY of the following:

      1) Controller $59 (useless with anything except SHIELD devices, so no PC use case and no other tablet use case)
      2) Case $39 (custom, which means high priced and gonna stay high priced. My Poetic case for my Nexus 7 2nd gen cost me $10 by comparison).
      3) Spend $100 more to get LTE (useless to most people) and 32GB (the bare minimum any tablet should come with nowadays).

      nVidia is deliberately fleecing us at that price. I get why. It’s got Tegra K1 and that’s probably expensive to produce at this point, but it’s an 8″ tablet and it’s hitting iPad Mini price points at the viable configuration (32GB+case+controller = 399+39+59=497).

    • NeelyCam
    • 5 years ago

    192 cores!!! So much better than the Samsung octacores.
    NVIDIA FTW!!

    • windwalker
    • 5 years ago

    From a hardware standpoint this seems like a good idea.
    The big question is the games catalog.

    Something like this from Sony with support for PS3 games would be very appealing but may be too difficult to do.

      • JohnC
      • 5 years ago

      It is easy to do, it’s called “Playstation Now” and is already in beta testing phase. Unfortunately Sony does not want to support any tablets yet (even though it is technically possible to do that).

        • Voldenuit
        • 5 years ago

        Aren’t all PS4 games supposed to be able to stream to a Vita?

        Playstation Now prices at the moment look completely out of whack (some game rentals cost as much or more than buying the game outright), and I still have serious doubts about the bandwidth and lag issues of streamed gameplay. Heck, even Steam streaming is getting mixed results for in-home wifi streaming.

          • JohnC
          • 5 years ago

          Prices do look high, but they should be more sane when service goes live. And yea, Wi-Fi streaming does add noticeable delay especially when streaming over internet but the games are still perfectly “playable” if you have good router. At least they were with OnLive service 😉

          • HisDivineOrder
          • 5 years ago

          Prices are out of whack, but Sony is promising some kind of ongoing subscription model aka OnLive-esque availability.

          I suspect this is Steve Jobs 101. Leak/fake a high price, then arrive at a somewhat lower price and be called “reasonable.” He did this with the iPad (third gen) as you’ll recall when he introduced the Retina display on an iPad at the same price as the iPad 1 and 2, defying all the rumors that it was going to be $100 more in cost to pay for the retina display. Instead, Apple dropped the price of the iPad 2 to hit $100 lower. So in reality, the rumors were true about the $100 difference, but the rumors had missed the MSRP of the iPad third gen completely. Probably because Jobs told his bosom leak buddy over at WSJ or wherever the wrong number on purpose. Nobody cared, though, because it was lower than anyone expected.

          And suddenly it was a “great deal.” The entire industry has learned from moments like that. Jobs was a pioneer. A marketing pioneer.

        • windwalker
        • 5 years ago

        That’s streaming.
        I meant running PS3 games on a tablet.

          • JohnC
          • 5 years ago

          That will never happen, Sony is not interested in allowing non-Cloud emulation like this.

    • sschaem
    • 5 years ago

    The LTE model price is not extravagant, if you use the option on a regular basis,
    but I cant see myself spending 400$ for an 8″ tablet.

    And 300$ for the 16GB model is a pretty big premium over their existing Tegra note ($180.)

    But if this model use the same IPS type display as their previous model,
    but just higher res, I wouldn’t get one even at $200…

    • albundy
    • 5 years ago

    awesome marketing stunt and I love the nonsense graph. That was a nice touch. good luck convincing someone. not sure how well it will sell though. just picked up a Hisense Sero 7 Pro tablet for $35 last week.

      • willmore
      • 5 years ago

      That’s a nice tablet for that price. It’s basicaly everything the 2012 N7 should have been. Camera, uSD slot, HDMI out, same pretty screen, etc.

    • Chrispy_
    • 5 years ago

    Looks like a decent tablet for media, and possibly remote streaming of games via a BT controller.
    Nvidia’s focus on gaming is wrong though; There just aren’t (m)any native Android games that justify above-average graphics capabilities, and touchscreen gaming is considered bottom-feeding in mobile gaming world.

    There’s still a shortage of decent high-end titles because you can’t get a decent control feel from gryos or touchscreens and the most popular games are low-fidelity, simple affairs with one-finger tap or swipe controls that fit people who game during all the ‘three minute breaks’ in their lives (or who have three minute attention spans!)

    • ptsant
    • 5 years ago

    I never saw the importance of portable gaming. Then again, I’m either at work, where I’m not supposed to game, either at home where I can game on my comfortable desktop. I suppose it could be interesting for people on the move, with long commutes or long waiting times. Otherwise, why bother?

      • NeelyCam
      • 5 years ago

      Because tablets are the sh*t, and PCs are dead. I mean, c’mon grandpa, join the 21st century.

        • pandemonium
        • 5 years ago

        When will PCs die off, because I’m tired of hearing that they will be dying soon, over and over. Make it happen already! /s

          • l33t-g4m3r
          • 5 years ago

          That’s just internet marketing from the people who have a stake in the alternatives. For the most part, we should just ignore it. At this point the numbers prove otherwise, and the liars have been crying wolf way too many times to be even remotely credible.

    • ssidbroadcast
    • 5 years ago

    That bird doesn’t look angry at all.

      • chuckula
      • 5 years ago

      I think so Brain, but if they called it “Mildly Confused Birds” then the kids wouldn’t buy it!

      • NeelyCam
      • 5 years ago

      It’s [i<]before[/i<] the eggs incident. Random fact of the day: Angry Birds and the pigs speak Finnish in the cartoons.

    • JohnC
    • 5 years ago

    Android + front-facing stereo speakers? Sold. Unless HTC will come up with better offering, but I doubt it.

    • jdaven
    • 5 years ago

    Nvidia is working hard to make up for the fact that they lost out on all three current gen consoles. Between Shield, Shield tablet, initial Steam Box/Steam OS driver support and the great potential behind Maxwell, I think Nvidia is doing quite nicely for the gaming community.

      • ptsant
      • 5 years ago

      Steam drivers are a nice deal because they benefit the Linux community as a whole. Shield has been really marginal, at best. We’ll see how the tablet will do.

    • Duct Tape Dude
    • 5 years ago

    Does anyone actually find this form factor usable? I don’t get it.

    A tablet is nice, and a controller is nice, but how are you supposed to feasibly use both if they don’t fit together? I imagine you have to put it down on a desk, lay it flat on your lap, or dangle it with duct tape over your head in bed. And by that point, why not just play on a laptop or console? I don’t want to duct tape the tablet to the controller.

    Awkward.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 5 years ago

      edit: i misunderstood the question and gave a nonsensical answer. My apologies.

      • JohnC
      • 5 years ago

      You connect it to TV. But personally I’m not interested in “controller” part at all.

    • Bensam123
    • 5 years ago

    Wow, I guess Nvidia is getting serious about making a dent in the tablet market. It’s really a shame this is still a ‘tablet’ rather then running a full blown OS like Windows, it would open up more possibilities and uses for the things as a laptop. Then again the streaming mode partially does that already.

    The hardware does seem excellent, they just need the software end of things to back it up, gunning for Android probably isn’t a good place to start if you’re trying to appeal to hardcore gamers. They mentioned at one point of having other projects in the works when AMD was winning MS/Sony and this may be what they were talking about. This is practically a console… android isn’t a console OS though… at least not yet. Hard to imagine there is more room for another console though considering they’re sure to die out with this gen, except for Nintendo of course.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 5 years ago

      One of two things have to happen before you see nVidia jump on a tablet running Windows:

      1.) They are somehow granted a freebie x86 license
      2.) Windows gains some sort of penalty-free x86 to ARM translation layer.

      Until then your complaint is pretty much invalid.

        • NeelyCam
        • 5 years ago

        Yes. A more likely scenario is that AMD makes a viable Windows tablet. I.e., a 0.1% chance.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 5 years ago

          It’s at least possible, as in, AMD has the requisite IP.

            • NeelyCam
            • 5 years ago

            Yes. 1 in a thousand is “possible”

            • derFunkenstein
            • 5 years ago

            Ya i was agreeing

        • Bensam123
        • 5 years ago

        Why would it have to be free?

        It was Nvidias choice to make a ARM processor and it will suffer because of it (due to this being pretty much a laptop/console only running Android).

          • Liron
          • 5 years ago

          How was it their choice? ARM sells licenses, Intel doesn’t…

      • l33t-g4m3r
      • 5 years ago

      Disagree. Android is an acceptable OS for portable devices and gaming. Look at consoles. They don’t need x86 or windows. The “software” end is already there, as all of the shield features work well, plus games are already making their way over to the android ecosystem. Kepler is the key feature here, as this will allow easy ports from pc/console games. Some people might have preferred a controller like Razer’s, but then you’d be stuck holding a tablet for an extended period.

      What I’d like to know is if this is the device that supposed to have a keyboard, or is that another product? I’d be interested in a larger / convertible version of this, but a tablet is fine too. Good upgrade over any current tablet.

      • HisDivineOrder
      • 5 years ago

      I disagree. If you want to game on tablets, you have two choices. Android or iOS. For the “hardcore gamer”, you really have to decide which side of the spectrum you are. There are PC gamers who want mods, who want configurability, who want to do what they want to do with their hardware how they like, and they don’t mind spending a bit more sometimes or missing out on a few games to get all those options as long as they allow you to have higher end configurations. Then there are console gamers who want to get one configuration that just works because it works even if it doesn’t look great, they are perpetual settlers who settle for the games they get because they prefer not to struggle or learn something new about graphical options or options in general, and they don’t care if they wind up paying more over the long run to get what they get because what they get is enough for them. They don’t want to change anything or even THINK about changing anything in a settings menu because settings are hard and they just want to get to their killstreaks and if their console crashes, then well they just need to turn it off and turn it back on and pray.

      Both can be rightly called “hardcore” gamers, depending on your criteria. One of those gamers is going to be wanting an Android tablet. The other is going to be wanting an iOS tablet.

      Neither of those potential “hardcore” gamers will want anything with the word, “Windows” in it on a tablet that doesn’t have a keyboard and a mouse attached atm.

        • l33t-g4m3r
        • 5 years ago

        Also keep in mind, most windows “tablets” use Intel graphics. You couldn’t game on it even if you wanted to, outside of indie games and 360 ports running @ low settings.

    • chuckula
    • 5 years ago

    Interestly… Nvidia has dropped out of the smartphone SoC game, and I think it’s for the best since a part like the K1 really shines on something like a tablet.

    The real trick is whether or not Nvidia can sell enough of its officially branded products to make money on its own, or if they still need big third-party design wins to sell sufficient K1s to make it worthwhile.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 5 years ago

      Yeah, I agree. Not much to differentiate themselves in the small power envelopes required on phones, but you can give an 8″ tablet a much bigger battery, use more engery, and provide something of actual value that a Snapdragon 801 can’t.

      • ptsant
      • 5 years ago

      [quote<] The real trick is whether or not Nvidia can sell enough of its officially branded products to make money on its own, or if they still need big third-party design wins to sell sufficient K1s to make it worthwhile. [/quote<] The real trick is getting software to run on the thing and make full use of it. What's the point of buying a gaming tablet if all you actually get is Angry Birds in HD? Maybe they have deals with game producers or something like that for exclusives or titles taking advantage of it. Hardware looks nice otherwise and the price is decent.

        • HisDivineOrder
        • 5 years ago

        People say the same thing about PC gaming. The problem is games will never be made for higher end hardware if higher end hardware is never developed until the games are there to take advantage.

        The hardware always must come first.

      • ronch
      • 5 years ago

      Seems to me that Nvidia being more Apple-like in the long term isn’t totally out of the question. Make the SoC that goes into your own tablets for a competitive advantage. Now all they need to do is promote their tablets heavily. And I mean heavily. Outside of graphics Nvidia is practically unknown to consumers.

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