It’s official: Microsoft will consolidate Windows development

On the heels of its quarterly results announcement yesterday, Microsoft announced a plan to unify the creation of disparate Windows versions for phones, tablets, and consoles.

According to Seeking Alpha's transcript of the quarterly earnings call, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella specifically talked about a plan to "consolidate overlapping efforts"—meaning "one operating system that covers all screen sizes and consolidated dual use productivity services that cross life and work."

Nadella added, "We will streamline the next version of Windows from three operating systems into one single converged operating system for screens of all sizes. We will unify our stores, commerce and developer platforms to drive a more coherent user experience and a broader developer opportunity."

During the Q&A portion of the call, Nadella elaborated further, noting that Microsoft will continue to offer multiple flavors, or SKUs, of Windows while despite unifying things at the "engineering" level:

Yes. My statement Heather was more to do with just even the engineering approach. The reality is that we actually did not have one Windows; we had multiple Windows operating systems inside of Microsoft. We had one for phone, one for tablets and PCs, one for Xbox, one for even embedded. So we had many, many of these efforts. So now we have one team with the layered architecture that enables us to in fact . . . bring that collective opportunity with one store, one commerce system, one discoverability mechanism. It also allows us to scale the UI across all screen sizes; it allows us to create this notion of universal Windows apps and being coherent there.
So that’s what more I was referencing and our SKU strategy will remain by segment, we will have multiple SKUs for enterprises, we will have for OEM, we will have for end-users. And so we will – be disclosing and talking about our SKUs as we get further along, but this my statement was more to do with how we are bringing teams together to approach Windows as one ecosystem very differently than we ourselves have done in the past.

Microsoft had already announced universal Windows apps at its Build conference in April. As the company said at the time, developers will be able to write applications that can run on all of Microsoft's current consumer operating systems—Windows 8.1, Windows Phone 8.1, and the Xbox One—with a different user interface for each one.

In November 2013, Microsoft's Julie Larson-Green also dropped some not-so-subtle hints about Windows consolidation. The Devices and Studios head said, "We have the Windows Phone OS. We have Windows RT and we have full Windows. We're not going to have three." However, her statement seemed to point to a future with two Windows versions—for mobile and desktop—rather than just a single one.

Comments closed
    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 5 years ago

    The re-unificatio of a kernal and the die shrinks of x86 may put MS in an interesting position if they move fast enough and actually execute w/ intel on the potential here it could mean a massive grab of a new market for both companies and a huge moment for MS users in mobile…. that being said i thought they would have handled the last attempt (win 8) better than they did…

    • marraco
    • 5 years ago

    How ridiculous.

    There is not even a single version of windows for desktop. There is pro, ultimate, single language, home basic, etc. Dozens of versions of windows for the same device, and each version works differently.

    If you want to do something simple like disabling Skydrive, you need Policy Editor.

    But lots of versions like “home basic” doesn’t have Policy Editor, so the user needs a completely different path: manually editing the register.

    MS unifies windows the wrong way, like the failed attempt to force Windows Server to use Metro, and then breaks his own objective by splitting Windows in dozens of poorly documented versions, to reach different market niche.

      • Zizy
      • 5 years ago

      Just common code will be the same instead of reinventing the wheel. Nothing more.
      Different SKUs – will remain as said in the article.
      Different functionality – phone will have subset of all features and PC will have another subset. They will be used differently.
      Different UI – MS will keep different UI for different devices. Developers can (hopefully will) offer different UI for different devices.

      Why is this such a big (and mostly misunderstood) news? This is just about internal MS change. Instead of duplicated groups for the same thing, one group will create code for all versions. Users should not notice this change.
      The big one (but not news anymore) is store unification, which is only a positive change for users and developers.

    • Kreshna Aryaguna Nurzaman
    • 5 years ago

    [quote<]"one operating system that covers all screen sizes and consolidated dual use productivity services that cross life and work."[/quote<] Is that the same mindset that has brought us Windows 8? Desktop and smartphone are different tools. For starter, touch screen works well with the latter but not with the former. When working with desktop, mouse is less fatiguing than constantly reaching out your arms to touch your screen. Metro is fine with smartphones, but shove it to the desktop and the rest is history. Why does Microsoft still insist to repeat Windows 8 history instead of creating the best O/S for each different kind of tool?

    • HisDivineOrder
    • 5 years ago

    The thing I get more and more from Nadella is that he likes to say things that ultimately don’t mean anything close to what he actually said if you pick the words apart. That is, he likes to talk, but not to mean much. That explains the letter ahead of the firings, which got people into an uproar about various things. Or then his later talk and again another uproar because of what he said being so vague as to being Biblical in how you can interpret it any way you like.

    It seems clear. If you mean to say that Windows is unifying the SDK so that apps run from various versions, then say that clearly and concisely. It’s easy. He sure said it the second time, right? But the first time, he said it vaguely, hoping to get headlines and to get that into the overall public consciousness. It’s funny how clarifications rarely wind up in that consciousness as much as the original statement does.

    So he hopes that people will hear it, perhaps by hearsay, and believe it years later even though he “clarified” his way out of actually meaning that by the end of that hour. This is different from Ballmer’s put your foot squarely in your mouth approach, but not really more useful or honest.

    It’s just a whole other kind of incompetence unless it’s not. In which case it’s deceptive, which isn’t better. At least with Ballmer I felt like his lies were because he’s just shy of running into doors on a regular basis.

    With the new guy, I feel like he’s snickering at us while he’s hiding away the stains under rugs, behind curtains, or spray paint. I had hoped Microsoft was turning over a new leaf and really thinking of the consumer, but at this point I feel like they’ve simply become more aggressive in spin and lies of omission, forcing you to constantly harass them for what they actually mean when they say something because it’s so vague out the gate…

    At least with Apple they just say nothing, which means you can make up whatever you like. Or with Google or especially with Steam, they just blather on like your high school science teacher after the bell rang for you to go and he’s still in the midst of a long-winded rant about Creationism versus Real Science (TM 2014).

      • destroy.all.monsters
      • 5 years ago

      > I had hoped Microsoft was turning over a new leaf and really thinking of the consumer

      You’re much too smart to believe this. MS only cares about new potential customers, not the installed base which they foolishly think will follow them anywhere.

    • Shouefref
    • 5 years ago

    I’ve just heard an awfull story from a friend.
    Usually he uses Windows 8.
    Now, for some or other reason, he decided to use his Windows XP computer again, probably because there was some information on it.
    He noticed there were 100’s of e-mails on it, all doubles from the mails he had on his W8. Therefore he deleted them.
    When he went back to his W8, he saw that the e-mails were deleted there too!
    Only explanation: he’s using Windows Live Mail, without knowing how that exactly works, and still thinkg it works in the same way als MS Outlook or Outlook Express.
    Now he has lost all his e-mails and is real in panick.
    That things like that can happen, is scandalous. It’s as if a car brand decides to switch brake and gas pedal.
    MS does that kind of things again and again.
    They will say: “Hey, you get Live Mail for free!”
    Yes, bot we got Outlook Express for free too!
    And Live Mail is worse.
    They didn’t give us something, they took away something.
    And that happens again and again and again.
    And you know what?
    That Google Chromebooks are all at a sudden not so much worse anymore than MS.
    For somebody like him, Google is good enough. I don’t think his next computer will have Windows on it.

      • GrimDanfango
      • 5 years ago

      That’s more a case of – if you don’t know what you’re doing, it’s probably a good idea to double check before you start mass-deleting things.

      Not really a case of Microsoft being rubbish. It’s not exactly a new and incomprehensible notion that email might be cloud-stored or syncronised by default these days.

        • Shouefref
        • 5 years ago

        It was on TWO DIFFERENT computers! Get that in your head, dick.

          • hieu.noob
          • 5 years ago

          So if I delete emails from my Nexus 5, you know, just to get them off my phon- OMG THEY’RE GONE WHEN I CHECK ON MY DESKTOP. WHAT’S GOING ON, WHAT UNIVERSE IS THIS?

            • Shouefref
            • 5 years ago

            It’s actually worse: he deleted mails from one pc, to notice that they were gone on another pc.
            PC’s preivously didn’t behave like that, unless you used webmail. But to use webmail, you had to be ont he web. Right?
            Now, however, the thiefs – sorry – managers at MS have decided that you should always be only. So they can steal our information and bill us according to the time we use there software. And decide we shouldn’t have access anymore to our own documents when we stop paying that bill.
            Oh, yes, they will to do that.
            Just the same type of tactics big computer companies before the age of the PC did, extorting money from governments, which means from taxpayers. IT has the information. They will use it to steal and deceit.

            • kamikaziechameleon
            • 5 years ago

            From everything you’ve told us with your comprehensive understanding of the subject it seems like you dropped the all on this. I don’t know that MS did anything wrong given that most of the people on this forum use their services across 2 or more devices with different OS’s etc I’m pretty sure if what your approaching was a MS error you’d have some thumbs up on your comment and someone on here agreeing with you. I have XP in my office w/o the issue you are not clearly explaining. 🙂

      • Chrispy_
      • 5 years ago

      Absolute user error and nothing else. The same thing would happen with [b<]any[/b<] web-based mail client, whether it's Microsoft, Yahoo or Google. If he can't even understand web mail then blaming microsoft just highlights the ignorance involved. I'm not calling him stupid, I'm calling him ignorant and he should learn how the internet works before complaining about it.

        • Shouefref
        • 5 years ago

        I’m sorry, but this was NOT a case of user error. That’s MS randomly changing things were you don’t expect it.
        You are calling him ignorant, because you tell that all our clients who run into that sort of problems cause by the fickleness of MS and IT industry as a whole.
        The IT industry has always been very good at telling it’s the clients fault. Because IT takes its clients as hostages because IT exercises power on them by means of the clients data. IT has the client by has balls. And IT is always willing to pinch.
        And don’t treat as if I don’t know. I worked in IT during the Millennium bug crisis.

          • Whispre
          • 5 years ago

          I think based on your level of uproar that you are the one this happened to… and I think the problem is PEBKAC (Problem Exists Between Keyboard and Chair).

          The Millennium “bug”? That wasn’t a bug, it was short sighted programming by some devs, and for others, it was simply that they didn’t expect people to be running their old code so long… not a bug, the software was designed that way.

          I don’t believe you worked in IT, or if you did it was some low level position. You don’t seem to have a grasp on how cloud based services work (my 12 year old daughter knows the difference between a local email client and a web based service), or how IT views its clients.

          I’ve made my career now in IT for over 20 years, and any decent IT worker knows that the client’s experience is the most important thing, because the client is the source of your income.

          • Chrispy_
          • 5 years ago

          If he deleted Windows Live mail emails, then he [b<]IS ignorant. It's [b]IN THE NAME[/b<]. [b<]LIVE[/b<] deletions are being deleted from the [b<]LIVE[/b<] mailbox. It's an [b<]ONLINE[/b<] service that he'd needed to have signed up for [b<]ONLINE[/b<] at some point, clicking through and agreeing to an EULA, creating an [b<]ONLINE[/b<] account and unable to use the mailbox without being shown the "getting started/welcome-to-your-microsoft-account" emails and tutorials explaining how his mailbox works. Throughout using it he'd have constantly seen how much [b<]ONLINE STORAGE[/b<] he had remaining in his [b<]CLOUD-HOSTED WEBMAIL[/b<] account. He must not only be ignorant but also blind if he missed all that. As GrimDanfanog states, [b<]PEBKAC[/b<].

            • kamikaziechameleon
            • 5 years ago

            Its like a guy using a weed wip and complaining there are not wheels on his lawn mower. This guy is not right in his head. Everything he says logically implodes on itself or himself. It is rather funny though.

            • Shouefref
            • 5 years ago

            MS tells you they sell you an upgrade, implying it’s “better”.
            They don’t tell you: “and now all your e-mails are in the cloud in OUR computers”.

            Is their actually anybody here who ever got a decent explanation about his new Wndows when he bought a computer in a mall? How many people behind the sales desk want to spend time to explain you everything you really actually have to know? During the Xmas season?
            The only do that in shops where staff has time at hands because they don’t have enough clients (after which they will be made redundant, of course)

        • Shouefref
        • 5 years ago

        He had NEVER EVER used webmail, but now it turns out that his mail is webmail.
        He did as he had always done, and as he expected his pc to react.
        It did not react to expectations, because MS changed things.
        I call that deception.
        He did NOT choose webmail. He bought a computer as he has always done, but now it turns out it uses webmail.
        He is not ignorant. He is deceived.
        Who knows what else has been changed.
        Now he asked me whether it’s possible that his other documents, like text documents, could be in the cloud too.
        Mind you: he does NOT use Google Drive.
        But after this, I aks you, what’s the advantage of MS over Google? None.
        Calling his error a user error, is utter bull..

          • Whispre
          • 5 years ago

          Outlook Express has never had the ability to create a cloud based email account and attach to it for you automatically. The user has to configure this.

          Outlook Express is a client, not a service. Live Mail is a service, not a client.

          Education… try it.

          • Chrispy_
          • 5 years ago

          /facepalm.

          I hope you told him that Facebook is online too.

            • l33t-g4m3r
            • 5 years ago

            Lol. I have relatives that are that bad too. Don’t know the difference between a web browser and a web page, let alone internet from a wifi connection. It’s a freaking nightmare troubleshooting their problems over the phone.

            • Flying Fox
            • 5 years ago

            Actually, a lot of users may like it if they can delete stuff from their Facebook. 😛

            • Chrispy_
            • 5 years ago

            Indeed, but that’s a whole different can of worms!

          • Flying Fox
          • 5 years ago

          Is he hosting his own email server? If not, then the server is “online” somehow. What email address suffix does he have? live.com, hotmail.com, gmail.com, yahoo.com? Those are all web-based and unlike the old “emails hosted by your ISP” model, a lot of them expose IMAP interfaces which means if you “delete” an email it takes effect on the server. And multiple mail clients just go into the same server. So of course the emails are gone.

            • Chrispy_
            • 5 years ago

            The main thing is that if he asks Microsoft nicely, rather than in an accusatory “OMFG-MICROSOFT-YOUR-STUPID-SOFTWARE- BROKE-MY-EMAILS” manner, they can probably roll back his mailbox to how it was before he deleted everything.

            They’re professionals who are 100% expecting people to not RTFM and then go and do stupid things.

            • Shouefref
            • 5 years ago

            And how is he supposed to know that?
            MS has since year a “cut down” policy: new versions they sell you, has less than the previous versions.
            Don’t tell me about education. People expect their new computer to do the same as the previous one, and hopefully better.
            But that’s not what happens.
            What happens is, it works different.
            And the customer has to learn new things to do the same thing.
            That’s stupid.
            The only beneficiary, are the sellers, not the buyers.
            If the buyers have to get educated, than that only means they’re loosing time.

            What this also tells me, is that MS isn’t interested anymore in the consumer as client.
            MS only wants business clients, and only that explains all those stupid decisions they have been making the last years.
            They know they have virtually lost the consumer, and they are not trying to keep him.
            In the mind of MS, consumers are no clients anymore.

            • Flying Fox
            • 5 years ago

            You switch to iMail and gMail, the results will be the same. Actually Google started the trend trying to sell you more cloud stuff, but it may apply to this “friend” of yours: just don’t delete anything.

            New concept, I know.

            • kamikaziechameleon
            • 5 years ago

            Pretty sure this guy is a troll, or a bot, or an idiot. Either way we might be over gratifying him with responses. I don’t think he’s overly concerned with responsibility or resolution of his personal issue (we all know this is not a friend).

            • Shouefref
            • 5 years ago

            The word “troll” is only used when somebody expresses an opinion which somebody else does not like.

            • Shouefref
            • 5 years ago

            It’s true: Google started the trend.
            But: Google is cheaper, much cheaper.
            MS originally did not use that cloud thing, and is now pushing it in people’s hands who don’t expect MS to behave as the much much cheaper Google.
            See my point?
            MS prooves himself to be worthless.

            And, then again: tell my why somebody who has more than 80% market share always tries to imitate companies which are at least 4 times smaller.
            By doing that, they admit they do something wrong, and they admit their much smaller competitors are actually much more interesting.

            • Whispre
            • 5 years ago

            I suggest you get rid of all of your (and your friends) computers, buy an iPad and just use that. I don’t think you understand the stuff you are complaining about….

            • Flying Fox
            • 5 years ago

            Well, if you happen to have more than iPads/iPhones, then deleting email on one will result in the deletion in the other. Oh the horror, Apple sucks!

            • Chrispy_
            • 5 years ago

            You’re not interested in solving his problem are you….
            You only seem interested in whining about Microsoft. That’s okay I guess; Have fun and enjoy being angry and miserable.

            • kamikaziechameleon
            • 5 years ago

            Between his punctuation and his diatribe I don’t think we are working with your average internet troll. I’m thinking below average here…. No witty remarks or clever baiting.

            • Shouefref
            • 5 years ago

            There was actually only one person on this forum who hinted at the fact that contacting MS could restore the lost mail.
            So don’t give me that “You’re not interested in solving his problem”.
            And then again: problems like that shouldn’t arise in the first place, and they arise because MS stubbornly pushes changes on their clients, because they want to be like Apple, or like Google, or like some other of those companies which often have a smaller marketshare then MS itself has.
            Okay, next time I buy a Ferrari, I’ll ask the sales persons whether Ferrari is clever enough to imitate, let’s say, Suzuki. Or Volkswagen. Or Skoda.

      • kamikaziechameleon
      • 5 years ago

      This is one of the most amazing rants I’ve read, lol.

        • Shouefref
        • 5 years ago

        But tell me what’s sensible about MS changing things, so you have to act differently for actually really doing the same thing as you did before?
        Isn’t that what the whole animosity against W8 comes from?

          • Flying Fox
          • 5 years ago

          IMAP and web-based mail services haven’t really changed. Changing the subject to Win8 doesn’t help here.

            • Shouefref
            • 5 years ago

            What did change was the standard implementation in the e-mail program you gt with Windows.
            I did not change the subject to W8, because it was on W8 that he got the problem, after years of using XP.
            He is problem IS the result of unnecessary change.

            • BIF
            • 5 years ago

            You’re fighting a losing battle here.

            You (I mean “your friend”) should get off MS in every way possible. Now. Without delay. “Both” of you will be much happier. 🙂

            • kamikaziechameleon
            • 5 years ago

            Your assertion that the change was malicious or unnecessary is very misguided. As explained by another, you can probably go through the MS maze of customer service to get this resolved. Or you can own the fact that the user probably did something wrong. Or that MS made a security change that swapped a standard setting(however unlikely that they did).

            My experience is when MS changes such a setting there will be a prompt or two that makes you aware.

            So lets put it this way, looking at the replies you’ve gotten from everyone, looking at the facts on the table… It was either user error or an anomaly. If it was some thing rampant that happens all the time other XP users (like myself) who use MS services across multiple OS’s would have jumped on your band wagon. Instead other users have read what your written and basically corrected the assertion that it was MS being a bad company. They do lots of things this community doesn’t like, that is for sure. But your example is not tied to any of them.

    • ronch
    • 5 years ago

    So to run apps that run on your PC which is (unless you’re from some other planet) based on x86 on your smartphone or tablet, your smartphone or tablet had better be x86 as well, right? Isn’t this ultimately gonna kill ARM? I mean, ARM is relevant only mostly in the smartphone and tablet market. Sure, they’re also being used in other places but mobile is where they really struck gold.

    ARM surely isn’t happy with Microsoft now. Right now, Google with their Android OS is their best friend. But then, it’s not like Microsoft never gave ARM a chance either. Going forward, Windows will always be paired with x86 and Android will always be paired with ARM. Android+x86 and Windows+ARM just don’t seem like they’ll ever take off.

      • Zizy
      • 5 years ago

      “So to run apps that run on your PC which is (unless you’re from some other planet) based on x86 on your smartphone or tablet, your smartphone or tablet had better be x86 as well, right?”

      Probably false.

      When you develop an application for Windows store (PC or phone), you target architecture – x86, ARM, both. ((plus OS version, hardware capability etc, but that does not matter here))
      If your application does not need any ARM only or x86 only libraries (typically doesn’t, stuff that needs x86 is usually desktop only because it needs win32 as well. But there are some x86/ARM only applications out there), it makes no sense to restrict yourself to x86/ARM.
      Therefore, both x86 and ARM phones/tablets/laptops/PCs are and likely will be equally viable as far as store ecosystem goes.
      So, where is x86’s advantage – desktop. Lets take a look at tablets and phones and how will that merge affect them.

      Tablets:
      Windows store gets boost with access to WP stuff. This helps both x86 and ARM, but decreases the ecosystem advantage of x86 -> ARM tablets become more viable.
      => ARM gains more with unification.

      Phones:
      WP store gets boost with access to Windows stuff, but this does not change x86 vs ARM at all.
      x86 WP9 phone does not necessarily mean you will have ability to get full fat win32 desktop – WP will have phone stuff and W will have desktop/laptop stuff. Not sure if MS is going to let us install W9 server edition on x86 phones, but it might be possible.
      => x86 might gain with unification, IF MS gives that option and IF people see the benefit in that option. I personally don’t. Docking phone sure, but not to run Matlab on it.

        • ronch
        • 5 years ago

        So they can write programs that will run on BOTH x86 and ARM? Is that possible? x86 CPUs and ARM CPUs accept different instructions, you know. It’s the same way Windows RT couldn’t run existing x86 Windows applications. Software needs to be written for a specific ISA.

          • Zizy
          • 5 years ago

          Sure. Language is ISA agnostic.
          Most of the stuff in the store is both x86 and ARM, at least on Windows store.

          Windows RT couldn’t run x86 code, because x86 applications were compiled for that ISA only. Plus some (most?) applications used at least some Win32 API, which is x86 only and you couldn’t simply recompile the program for ARM even if you had the source.

          —-

          Application process goes like:
          Code and design stuff, typically C# for logic and XAML for UI.
          Create appx package of the app.
          -> if you use x86/x64/ARM only code, your application is x86/x64/ARM. (can be all 3 if you create separate code paths)
          -> if you don’t, your application is available for any architecture. Difference between neutral and selecting all 3 is that neutral should be immediately available in the store if MS decides to support MIPS as well, while selecting all 3 would require you to at least recompile.
          Upload appx to the store.
          App is then compiled from MSIL to all the hardware ISAs.
          Users download correct version from the store (store gets device info and displays possible apps. This also prevents users with 512MB phones from downloading games requiring 1GB or displays suitable version)

            • ronch
            • 5 years ago

            Ah of course, programming tools/languages can generate low level code for different ISAs. I thought you meant that a piece of x86 code can run on ARM or cross-iSA.

          • Flying Fox
          • 5 years ago

          If your app uses only browser-derived technology, namely HTML5 and Javascript, then of course it can run cross platform.

          If you develop in .NET, then the IL can be JIT-compiled into supposedly any ISA, provided a native compiler exists.

          The only thing that I am not too sure is if you write in C++ (even if it targets the WinRT runtime).

    • soryuuha
    • 5 years ago

    i think Nadella meant by “_one_ SDK that can create to run at all Windows-related OS”

    *dreaming about Batman Arkham Knight (steam) runs at Windows Phone 8.1/9*

    • l33t-g4m3r
    • 5 years ago

    [url<]http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2014/07/nadellas-one-operating-system-aint-new-and-wont-be-one-os/[/url<] Meet the new boss, same as the old boss.

    • NotParker
    • 5 years ago

    Win7 was a giant step forward.

    Win8 was Vista.

    Win9 potentially could be Windows ME.

    • Voldenuit
    • 5 years ago

    [quote<]Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella specifically talked about a plan to "consolidate overlapping efforts"[/quote<] [i<]Ash nazg durbatulûk, ash nazg gimbatul, ash nazg thrakatulûk, agh burzum-ishi krimpatul.[/i<] Or in the Common Tongue, One Ring to rule them all, One ring to find them; One ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 5 years ago

    Good for everyone!!!

    • WillBach
    • 5 years ago

    The kernel convergence is long (and openly) planned: [url=http://www.zdnet.com/blog/microsoft/microsofts-windows-phone-8-finally-gets-a-real-windows-core/12975<]Microsoft's Windows Phone 8 finally gets a real Windows core[/url<]. Nadella is just articulating the engineering aspect of that plan (which may have included laying me off) and articulating the possible benefits. Up until there are unified developer tools and "unified experiences" none of the benefits have been transparent to users and only some have been transparent to developers, see "[url=http://mobile.theverge.com/2013/5/21/4352654/xbox-one-powered-by-windows-app-development<]Xbox One is powered by Windows, but can Microsoft make you care?[/url<]" at The Verge. Disclaimer I am currently (technically) a Microsoft employee that recently worked in the Operating Systems Group (should it be "System" now?) and was recently laid off.

      • bittermann
      • 5 years ago

      Thanks for the info and sorry about the layoff…hope you find work soon!

    • jdaven
    • 5 years ago

    I hope they will consolidate the Xbox OS as well so that developers have one less platform to program for.

    Edit: I also hope they release versions of all their software for every platform conceivable.

    • willmore
    • 5 years ago

    Anyone else getting the feeling that Satya Nadella is going to go down in history as the guy who hung around to turn off the lights at Microsoft?

      • Concupiscence
      • 5 years ago

      I just don’t think he’ll be able to turn the tide. The company’s built a tremendous amount of inertia, and he still has to contend with the board of directors. Gates is advising him and presumably helping him to deal with the politics, but Ballmer’s still on the board, and doesn’t seem pleased to have been pushed out of his old job. The upcoming layoffs may make a positive difference, but most of the dead wood being released is from Nokia. Impact on the rest of the company remains to be seen.

        • insulin_junkie72
        • 5 years ago

        [quote<] Ballmer's still on the board, and doesn't seem pleased to have been pushed out of his old job[/quote<] I think Ballmer's not pleased because he's currently having to deal with Donald Sterling, and probably attempting to avoid bashing his own head into the wall from frustration 😛

      • JohnC
      • 5 years ago

      That’s a good possibility.

      • windwalker
      • 5 years ago

      I strongly doubt that.
      They won’t be the Microsoft of the ’90s anytime soon but they’ll still have plenty of successful products.

      A good comparison is with Adobe.
      Their grand ambitions were destroyed by the death of Flash, but their other important products are still raking it.

      • kamikaziechameleon
      • 5 years ago

      I think if you look at this sorts of organizations they are really good at surviving. They never die once they reach a certain size they just keep chugging along. GM went through bankruptcy, Crysler got bought by FIA, Navistar keeps on plugging away. Microsoft will never die, it might get merged with another entity in a worst case scenario but it will never die like a smaller business.

      -1 for what? Have you been in and around these companies??? They practically print money! Bill Gates is the wealthiest man in the world and you guys think MS is failing??? He’s worth over 76 Billion. MS is worth 70 billion. MS might loose a little market share here or there but its not about to go away. If worst case scenario it took enough of a hit or got over taken it would merge with a larger company and the brand would likely continue.

    • Deanjo
    • 5 years ago

    [quote<]So that’s what more I was referencing and our SKU strategy will remain by segment, we will have multiple SKUs for enterprises, we will have for OEM, we will have for end-users.[/quote<] Read: "We will continue screwing of our customers by removing features that every other OS has by default and charge premium for those basic functions."

      • ultima_trev
      • 5 years ago

      Let’s be realistic, the competition doesn’t have any features what-so-ever. When one needs a productive environment, one needs Active Directory, IIS, SQL Server, Exchange and MS Office.

      Samba, Apache, MySQL, Ximian Evolution and Libre Office never have been nor ever will be viable alternatives to Microsoft’s products. Red Hat, Oracle, SuSe/Novell, IBM, Apple and Google have all desperately tried to take down the Giant of Redmond but they have failed miserably. Google only has the edge with Android but it won’t be long until Windows Phone over takes that.

        • Concupiscence
        • 5 years ago

        I was about to bite, but this is some vintage trollin’. That or you’ve never heard of LAMP and have ignored half the goings-on in the tech world for the last decade… Microsoft’s a serious player with some entrenched mindshare and excellent products, but they are NOT the only game in town.

          • MadManOriginal
          • 5 years ago

          It was pretty vintage…the suspension of disbelief was only lost with the last sentence.

          9/10, would troll again.

    • GrimDanfango
    • 5 years ago

    The key thing here is to realise that each platform requires an entirely different way of interacting. Unify the OS, sure… just don’t force desktop users to fumble around on a touchscreen interface with their mouse. The core can be unified, the user experience needs to be tailored to each platform separately. If a desktop user wants to use a tablet, they’ll pick up the goddam tablet they have sitting next to their workstation!

      • DarkUltra
      • 5 years ago

      Please join my slow riot and nag Microsoft about this, just in case they still wanto force a touch UI on desktop users even though the Start Menu is coming back.

      [url<]http://blogs.windows.com/windows/b/buildingapps/archive/2014/04/02/extending-platform-commonality-through-universal-windows-apps.aspx[/url<] And here you can nag about getting the beautiful Windows 7 theme with frosted glass windows. So much better than the flat Windows 8 skin. Keep the pressure up. [url<]http://blogs.windows.com/windows/b/windowsexperience/archive/2014/07/14/windows-themes-from-dawn-to-dusk.aspx[/url<]

    • ShadowTiger
    • 5 years ago

    When windows 8 was first announced i was sure this was what they were intending. I am shocked and appalled it took this long to figure out how to do things properly.

      • demani
      • 5 years ago

      If you are shocked then, son, you have not seen enough chairs thrown or armpits stained.

    • NIKOLAS
    • 5 years ago

    Does this mean that all Microsoft Phones & Tablets will be powered by x86 CPU’s?

      • NeelyCam
      • 5 years ago

      One can only hope

        • ronch
        • 5 years ago

        Really rooting for Intel these days, eh Neely? How are those stocks doing?

      • WillBach
      • 5 years ago

      By that logic it would be possible for future versions of Windows to run on ARM.

        • NIKOLAS
        • 5 years ago

        Laptops and Desktops are powered already by x86 and Intel is clearly very close to having Phone suitable x86 CPU’s.

        Can’t see too many Laptop & Desktop powered ARM devices around.

          • ronch
          • 5 years ago

          [quote<]Laptops and Desktops are powered already by x86...[/quote<] Really??! I didn't know that!! Tell us more!!! /s

      • l33t-g4m3r
      • 5 years ago

      It won’t matter if you can’t run Win32 apps, and at that point, we’re better off using android devices.

      Linux devices with wine might be even better if you wanted to run win32 software.

        • ronch
        • 5 years ago

        I think, right now, the only way Microsoft can convince people to ditch Android+ARM or Apple and switch to Windows and x86 in the mobile space is if they offer to run people’s PC apps on their phones and tablets. But most PC apps were never designed to run on a small screen (imagine using MS Word on your smartphone)… until now. Question is, is it too late for this? Android and iOS both have a solid grip on mobile and Windows is still struggling. We shall see, but I’d like ARM and Android to continue to flourish.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 5 years ago

      No, I would expect that the apps that will be sharable across devices will be stuff you get from the Windows store, where the x86 version will have the added ability to run apps from outside.

      • Shouefref
      • 5 years ago

      I looks ot me as if they will all look the same on the outside, but will be different on the inside.
      It’s not possible to run on ARM or Atom the same as on x86. But it should be possible to make hem LOOK the same.
      But… does that mean we don’t get a real Start-button/Start-menu/Desktop? If that’s true, we’re screwed, and MS might be screwing itself without knowing, because the alternatives nowadays are certainly worthwhile for the consumer market. Only the business market is really tied to MS. But the others can choose alternatives.

      • ronch
      • 5 years ago

      Depends how successful Windows for Mobile becomes against Android and iOS, both of which mostly run on ARM. As it is, Windows has, what, probably less than 5% of the mobile market?

        • Shouefref
        • 5 years ago

        Latest figures I had was 3%. And after stories my friend told me today, I don’t think that will ever increase.
        MS will loose the consumer market, and only the business market will remain.
        But I notice that even my big business clients start using …. Google! So, they’re even loosing there.
        In ten years time it won’t be necessary anymore to buy MS products if you have a business.

    • burntham77
    • 5 years ago

    Good bye RT?

      • willmore
      • 5 years ago

      No, RT everywhere.

        • Generic
        • 5 years ago

        Good bye Win32.

        A very [i<]looooong[/i<] good bye.

    • chuckula
    • 5 years ago

    We’ll see ’bout that. Linux has “converged” already in as much as the same basic kernel runs everything from your phone to your multi-petaflop supercomputer. Linux can get away with this since it has extreme levels of modularity that allow for things like the Android runtime to be placed on top of the kernel for smartphones/tablets while completely different userlands are present for desktops and even different setups are employed on servers.

    Apple has partial convergence and seems to be pretty successful with it. That means that while iOS is certainly different than OS-X, there’s quite a bit of technology sharing across both platforms including the kernel and other features like core foundation and preferring Objective-C for development.

    The trick for MS is to “converge” to improve in the weak areas without flopping around and neutering the areas in which they are already strong…. we’ve already seen them panic with Windows 8 and neuter the desktop in the name of tablets, so hopefully Nadella has a better plan in store.

      • superjawes
      • 5 years ago

      Well instead of trying to slam together a “one size fits all OS,” they could be making a fully-functional Windows capable of running anything and everything. That can ship essentially as-is for desktops, then the other versions can be trimmed down and default into more appropriate environments for the device.

      Win 8 reflects the idea of having a unified base, but that philosophy spread too far, forcing tablet-style functions on people using “regular” computers.

        • willmore
        • 5 years ago

        Yes, that’s what they need to do, but that ‘trimming’ down process is non-trivial. Unless the OS is designed with that in mind–and the developers actually stick to the plan–it can be nearly impossible. And, since windows is already developed *withtout* such modifications in mind, MS has a lot of work ahead of them.

          • superjawes
          • 5 years ago

          Such things typically require a lot more work, but they do pay off more in the long run.

            • willmore
            • 5 years ago

            Microsoft did do this when they wrote NT, but they’ve wandered far away from that philosophy.

      • blastdoor
      • 5 years ago

      My impression is that this is pretty much what Apple has done, just much more quietly and successfully. That is, while OSX and iOS seem like distinct things to end-users, it’s a totally unified engineering effort within Apple. And it’s been that way since the beginning, which is why Leopard was delayed in 2007 while the team worked feverishly to finish iPhone OS 1.0.

      It just makes a great deal of sense. The fact that MS hasn’t done this up until now is indicative of its silo corporate structure. Clearly Nadella plans to change that structure. Moving bubbles on the org chart is easy — changing the culture that has grown around the old org chart over several decades will be very, very hard.

    • tanker27
    • 5 years ago

    This shouldn’t be a shock to anyone. Windows 8 was the handwriting on the wall.

      • Chrispy_
      • 5 years ago

      I don’t know why Microsoft is so insistent on making the underlying operating system so inflexibly tied to the interface:

      There is nothing wrong with 8’s inner workings, but people are avoiding it moslty for the trivial reason of hating the looks and the interface. It’s such a stupid and needless step backwards from the skinnable, themeable days of Windows, and it’s something of a laughable issue for Linux fans who literally mix and match their features to their own preference.

        • Flying Fox
        • 5 years ago

        [quote<]people are avoiding it moslty for the trivial reason of hating the looks and the interface[/quote<]Not according to some genius here that thinks it is the forced upon App Store and the anti-competitive moves that make "nobody wants it". 😛

          • nanoflower
          • 5 years ago

          An App Store that no one needs to use and a stance on competition that has been there since Microsoft was formed.

            • Flying Fox
            • 5 years ago

            So it is nothing new with Windows 8 then. It has always been like that.

            • l33t-g4m3r
            • 5 years ago

            Always? Nothing new? What was Win9x-Win7? Did we just imagine their existence, and an open ecosystem? No. Win8 is the odd man out.

          • l33t-g4m3r
          • 5 years ago

          You’re a moron. First, you didn’t know how RT products and WinRT are related. Second, PUBLISHERS don’t want the anti-competitive app store. Third, the public didn’t want or like 8’s GUI, which Metro is directly related to the App store.

          Win9 might fix the desktop, but it doesn’t remove the store that developers and publishers hate, and it doesn’t fix the win 9x boxy graphics that consumers hate. It also doesn’t fix the start menu problems that MS introduced with win7, because they condensed program access to a small single panel, and a user tracking program list. People who dislike 7’s menu will still be using classic start.

          Do you honestly think MS’s app store is a good thing? If so, you don’t know what you’re talking about. MS’s store is the total destruction of the existing software ecosystem, nothing more and nothing less.

          It would only be good if WinRT was open to the public, and it’s NOT.

            • windwalker
            • 5 years ago

            The software ecosystem was destroyed long ago, when Microsoft made it clear that they would compete with anyone who managed to create a very profitable software business on their platform.
            That’s why everyone moved to the web and to enterprise software for Windows.

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