Acer neo-netbook offers Win8.1, solid-state storage for $199.99

Less than a week after becoming available, Asus’ EeeBook X205 neo-notebook already has some competition. Say hello to the latest version of Acer’s Aspire E 11, which costs almost exactly the same, at $199.99, and is superficially not all that different from the Asus machine.

Like the EeeBook X205, the Aspire E 11 has an 11.6″ 1366×768 display, 2GB of RAM, 32GB of solid-state storage, and Windows 8.1 with Bing pre-installed. Acer has gone with a dual-core Celeron N2840 processor instead of the quad-core Atom Z3735, though, and it seems to have opted for a smaller battery. Acer quotes a run time of only five hours for the Aspire E 11, compared to 12 hours for the EeeBook X205. Finally, the Acer system is a little heavier, at 2.84 lbs instead of 2.2 lbs.

Since these two notebooks cost basically the same, I’d say the EeeBook X205 is probably the better buy here. The Aspire E 11’s arrival does, however, tell us that Asus isn’t the only player trying to bring netbooks back into style. Perhaps we’ll see more contenders at $199 as the holidays approach.

By the way, the Aspire E 11 is also available in several other variants, which have more RAM and mechanical storage instead of eMMC flash. Prices for those other models start at $249.99. (Thanks to Liliputing for the link.)

Comments closed
    • Klimax
    • 8 years ago

    Who knew that frequency delta can result in such performance gap.
    [url<]http://ark.intel.com/compare/65694,65693,71995[/url<] (Also a product differentiation by way of AES/AVX fusing off)

    • Klimax
    • 8 years ago

    Differences are in outer layer It still is Atom CPU. Bay Trail is not Core class CPU. Nothing simplistic about it.

    It is up You you do state why You think it shouldn’t be classified as Atom, when it is Atom. (What “disqualifies” it.)

    ARK’S comparison tool can help… [url<]http://ark.intel.com/compare/80269,82103[/url<]

    • MadManOriginal
    • 8 years ago

    Click the Intel ARK links provided in the article an educate yourself a bit about the differences. Just saying ‘BAY TRAIL!’ is too simplistic.

    • ozzuneoj
    • 8 years ago

    Just like a Celeron 1037U is from the same Ivy Bridge family as an i3 3220?

    Same family, large performance difference.

    • crsh1976
    • 8 years ago

    It’s worth noting that HP has the Stream 11 with the exact same specs for USD 199 as well, Celeron instead of a lowly SoC Atom; it’s shipping south of the border but not in Canada (yet?).

    • derFunkenstein
    • 8 years ago

    Yeah, f 3rd party developers were better about implementing scaling and high-DPI assets, then a higher resolution would be great for a more powerful system. Even then, you’re probably right that 1366×768 is the perfect effective res for such a system.

    • Chrispy_
    • 8 years ago

    I judged you, and sharing your real-world TN experience outweighed your poor choice of TV show.

    • Chrispy_
    • 8 years ago

    As an 11.6″ 1366×768 laptop owner, I think that’s the perfect resolution for the size.

    I have a 3200×1800 13.3″ laptop to my left right now, and a 13.3″ 1080p panel in a cupboard behind me and both of them are squinty-small at the distances I would normally use a laptop (and no, my vision’s still better than 20/20, though I’m not sure for how much longer….)

    • Terra_Nocuus
    • 8 years ago

    I was using my wife’s chromebook the other day to watch some Agents of SHIELD (don’t judge me!), and I was horrified at how blocky and artifacty the darker colors were. Lots of banding & noticeable gradation that were not visible on my phone (IPS) or my desktop (S-IPS).

    In short, for “surfing the web” TN panels are definitely useable, but they’re problematic almost everywhere else.

    • Chrispy_
    • 8 years ago

    The Nexus7 2012 started the trend of a sub-$200 tablet with IPS.

    Since then, major OEMs like Asus, Acer, Amazon all have even cheaper models with IPS screens. I just sent my family a £70 Asus MeMo Pad HD7 which is basically a rebadged Asus Nexus7 2012. It is by no means the cheapest tablet with an IPS screen, but one of the incredibly popular entry-level ones on the market.

    Don’t forget that IPS adds less than five dollars over a TN screen – a significant majority of the screen cost is in the backlight, power, housing, touchscreen layer etc. Don’t believe me? Just look at some iSuppli BOM teardowns.

    • Chrispy_
    • 8 years ago

    Is that experience of this exact model or just a generic comment on TN?

    In my experience (I deal with a huge number of laptops, maybe even over a thousand spanning various makes and models) there are OK TN panels, and there are TN panels so bad that the whole laptop should be discarded/sold/avoided.

    • auxy
    • 8 years ago

    You could send this as a PM on the forums.

    • LostCat
    • 8 years ago

    Build needs a dedicated vidcard. And what took so long to get the 7500 and 7600 procs out anyway? As an AMD fan, I remain disappointed.

    • Klimax
    • 8 years ago

    You do realize it is from Bay Trail family aka Atom?

    • faramir
    • 8 years ago

    The article clearly says “Windows with Bing” (which is the “free Windows 8.1 for OEMs”).

    • trabi
    • 8 years ago

    Hello Cyril, not sure how else to transmit a message to you or the TR team, so here it goes.
    (You once responded to my message a couple weeks ago by editing your post and I thanked you for it; someone mistook my thanks to be sarcastic and down-voted me haha.) To me personally, that was a biggie getting a response from you !

    Please accept my apologies if this is the wrong place for this post; and please do let me know if there is a link where us users can submit our requests/wishlists to TR.

    Back to the point. Among the heavy bevy news of Intel-powered tablets, laptops etc. I happened to stumble across a laptop powered by the FX-7500P. Now it may or may not be a great laptop, but it is unique in that: it’s is probably the only laptop with Kaveri FX, it offers an alternative to the mass market, and (I assume and hope) an absence of contra-revenue effort and decent gaming in the laptop even when the dGPU (if available) turned off, to name a few.

    The name of the laptop is “HP ENVY TouchSmart m6-n113dx”.
    The link I saw it in is: [url<]http://www.bestbuy.ca/en-CA/product/hewlett-packard-hp-envy-15-6-touchscreen-laptop-silver-amd-fx-7500-750gb-hdd-8gb-ram-windows-8-1-m6-n168ca/10323678.aspx[/url<] It costs 800CAD. Admittedly, there is a review to be found at [url<]http://www.tabletspecsreview.com/hp-envy-touchsmart-m6-n113dx-silver-mainstream-laptop-specs-review/[/url<] ...but it's a bit barebones. Also, being a reputed neutral site that aims to cover all companies big and small, it would be great if TechReport could give us potential laptop buyers a much more in-depth review than what I saw in the other site. Now for whatever reasons it may or may not be as great a laptop as it could have been made to be, (like we again get a low res screen with a good AMD CPU !!), but nonetheless it looks like it has been positioned as a gaming laptop.... and I would like to hear it from the horse's (horse being you 😛 ) mouth. Once again, apologies if this post was out of place. @auxy: Thank you. I will do that here on.

    • trabi
    • 8 years ago

    Contra Revenue !!

    Not very hard to make… (pun intended)

    • ronch
    • 8 years ago

    According to Intel’s ARK page for the Celeron N2840, the CPU costs $107. Make of that what you will.

    [url<]http://ark.intel.com/m/products/82103/Intel-Celeron-Processor-N2840-1M-Cache-up-to-2_58-GHz#@product/specifications[/url<]

    • Pzenarch
    • 8 years ago

    Mileage may vary, but viewing angles are reduced and colour reproduction can vary across the screen depending on your angle of view. For single person – head on – day to day use, no problems noted.

    TN panels may be notably worse than IPS in several areas, but it seems they’re still often enough to do the job.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 8 years ago

    Right, I was mostly concerned with it being accessible. I guess in my case there’s only “so far” I’ll go before I pass – anything with a warranty sticker, for example.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 8 years ago

    The mechanical storage has to be upgradable, there’s no way they’re making a built-in HDD.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 8 years ago

    Yes, the Celeron is a low-end netbook/passive SFF CPU, the Atom is a tablet CPU. The battery life:performance ratio might be close for the two, although 10+ hours of battery life is hard to resist.

    • ozzuneoj
    • 8 years ago

    I personally would take the dual core Celeron over the Atom due to significantly higher per-thread performance. There aren’t many benchmarks comparing the two out there but here are the results with Passmark (for what its worth):

    Single thread performance:
    Atom Z3735 = 350
    Celeron N2840 = 563
    AMD E-350 = 430

    Multi Thread Performance:
    Atom Z3735 = 949
    Celeron N2840 = 1137
    Atom E-350 = 760

    If absolute maximum battery life is key, I’m sure the Atom is sufficient for basic tasks, but I can’t help but think that performance would be severely limited in many situations. Anything that isn’t highly multithreaded will likely feel very familiar to anyone who has owned netbook in the past 7 years.

    • tipoo
    • 8 years ago

    I wonder if this is getting that free Windows 8.1 for OEMs shindig, or just the old pricing model. Because if the latter, you’re still not going to find many (any?) tablets well under 200 with good IPS panels.

    • Antias
    • 8 years ago

    Same issue with this as the Asus one – if it had the 2.5″ HD/SSD storage option then i’d be interested. these make mean little torrent boxes but only if they had more room, not to mention quick business trips – these are designed for little plane fold-down tables – LOL

    • Ricardo Dawkins
    • 8 years ago

    I got a ASUS Transformer Book T100. Don’t need these netbooks without touchscreen.

    • Shinare
    • 8 years ago

    Time for me to dust off my MySpace account!

    • derFunkenstein
    • 8 years ago

    No way it’s not glossy.

    At least the resolution approaches being usable. Old netbooks with 1024×600 meant the internet was overly-squished before. Hooray for the 1366×768 minimum requirement. These are also big enough that the keyboard should be something you can touch-type on without too much issue.

    I wonder if you can upgrade the RAM or storage. Buying the Asus and popping in a 64-128GB SSD rather than the mechanical storage (in this one) would make it super interesting.

    • Chrispy_
    • 8 years ago

    So, despite IPS screens being available on cheap tablets, I’m resigned to these still using garbage TN panels.

    Anyone have any experience with these? Just how awful are the screens?

    • egon
    • 8 years ago

    And without the glossiness. Neat.

    Would be neat if the X205’s and E11’s screens were also matte. Hard to tell from these kinds of pics, and perhaps it’d be asking too much.

    • Scrotos
    • 8 years ago

    Oh, hey, netbooks are back. Neat.

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