GeForce GTX 960 appears in import shipment record

Unconfirmed details about unannounced graphics cards can be found in the most unusual places. The latest tidbits on the GeForce GTX 960, for example, come from Zauba, "home to India's import and export data." Searching the site for "GTX 960 graphics card" reveals an import shipment record that appears to include key specifications for the upcoming product:

According to the shipment record, the GTX 960 will have 4GB of RAM and a 256-bit memory interface. The "993/6008" likely references the GPU and memory clocks, but it's unclear whether the former is the base or boost speed. For comparison, the GTX 970 has 1050MHz base and 1178MHz boost clocks, while the GTX 980 runs at 1126/1216MHz. Both of those cards also have 4GB of GDDR5 memory grafted to a 256-bit interface, but they enjoy a higher 7 GT/s memory transfer rate.

The evidence suggests that the GTX 960 uses the same Maxwell-based GM204 GPU as its big brothers. Unfortunately, the shipping entry doesn't detail the number of active shader units. Odds are the GTX 960 has fewer than the 1664 shader processors firing inside the GTX 970.

According to the manifest, the GTX 960 will have DisplayPort, HDMI, and dual DVI outputs. The 10-card shipment's per-unit price is listed as 15,474 Indian rupees, which translates to $256 USD—roughly what we'd expect for a mid-range card destined to supplant the current GTX 760.

Interestingly, the shipment apparently happened on September 29, suggesting cards have been circulating for more than a month. The official launch probably isn't too far off. Thanks to TR reader SH SOTN for the tip.

Comments closed
    • HisDivineOrder
    • 5 years ago

    This just reiterates something we already knew. The 960 was meant to be released already. The thing is, with AMD idling and yawning their way through several generations of cards, nVidia’s sat on new tech a lot lately. It’s no surprise they want to maximize their sales of 980’s and 970’s, the latter of which were already a crazy good deal for the most part (assuming you’re fine with coil whine). The 960 would have been necessary had Tonga been anything except a slight decline from the 7970 it apparently replaced. It is not. Hell, they even dropped the VRAM on Tonga to less than the 3GB that was already kinda subpar by the time Tonga shipped.

    Given AMD’s modest target (ie., mostly match the 7970 but at a cheaper price for AMD per GPU), the 960 was unnecessary. nVidia can slam dunk the 970, sit on the 960, sell all their remaining 760’s by dropping it to $200, and shrug away the remainder of 2014.

    Then in early 2015, when AMD starts to rev up the engines for something a little 3xx-ish, they can magically show up with a 960 that drops the 970’s pricing some and gives you 90-ish % of what a 970 is (and 80-ish% a 980) for well below $300. At the same time, as if by magic, you’ll see 970’s with 8GB show up (and 980’s too if they haven’t already shown up by then), opening up a world of hurt on AMD again across all their lines.

    As long as AMD stretches their competition out as long and slowly as possible, nVidia is going to have many opportunities to use their superior R&D to smack them around.

    • Tristan
    • 5 years ago

    GF 960 is yet another star from NV. It will deliver performance of 780 / R 290 for 230$ and 130W.

      • PrincipalSkinner
      • 5 years ago

      And how do you know this?

    • vargis14
    • 5 years ago

    The Single Slot low profile market needs love too!!

    Now if Nvidia would drop the price on their GTX 750ti cards to $109 for 2GB and $99 for 1GB cards, the GTX 750 to $89 for 2GB and $79 for 1GB cards and get themselves and their partners to make some nice single slot low profile cards I think they would grab a lot of new gamer’s that just never get enough gaming performance out of their inexpensive mini tower or slim Computers that have crappy PSU,s vendor specific connectors and such with the available cards to them that do not use a AUX PCIE power cord. It is not like they will not make a decent profit also. There is not a lot components on a GTX 750ti/750 card and they look simple to make compared to the bigger cards and I would think a simple oem low profile card would be cheaper to make the a full sized board. I definitely think they are overpriced for the actual ITEM your holding but they do perform great for as simple as they are. A fantastically powerful chip for its size and power use and cost to make.

    They are very low power cards that Nvidia could use to get new PC gamers jumping from their consoles to taste the CPU gaming world and get decent performance that it is not a depressing experience when they 1st try PC gaming.

    Plus I want a low profile 750ti to replace my LP ASUS HD6570 1GB DDR3 card:)

    • MadManOriginal
    • 5 years ago

    Must….wait….for 20nm Maxwell.

      • ColeLT1
      • 5 years ago

      A 20nm GM200 would be nice.
      [url<]http://www.kitguru.net/components/graphic-cards/anton-shilov/alleged-specs-of-nvidias-gm200-gpu-revealed-50-faster-than-titan-black/[/url<]

        • Prestige Worldwide
        • 5 years ago

        It will be on 28nm, guaranteed.

      • Prestige Worldwide
      • 5 years ago

      There is no high performance 20nm node, nor will there be one.

    • swaaye
    • 5 years ago

    I thought this would be GM206.

      • deruberhanyok
      • 5 years ago

      Same, I still expect a different die to cover 950/960 parts and a further cut-down one for parts below that (940,930, whatever).

    • 3SR3010R
    • 5 years ago

    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 960 Allegedly Postponed To Q1 2015 Due To Strong GeForce GTX 980 and GTX 970 Sales

    [url<]http://wccftech.com/nvidia-geforce-gtx-960-allegedly-postponed-q1-2015-due-strong-geforce-gtx-980-gtx-970-sales[/url<] The GTX 960 will only be released when the demand for the GTX 970 slows down.

      • Luckyo
      • 5 years ago

      Old news. Newer ones suggest that 960 is coming this year to answer AMD’s price drop in mid end. While high end is profitable, NV cannot afford to surrender mid end sales to AMD for this holyday season, as that is where bulk of revenue comes from.

    • Chrispy_
    • 5 years ago

    So the 960 is just a die-harvested GM204 by the sounds of it, which is exactly what they did with the 660Ti (stil GK104). Like the 660Ti, these will be the very worst of the usable GM204 dies, with multiple defects or silicon falling short of even 970 clockspeeds.

    The actual smaller die variant didn’t appear until the 660 (vanilla) later and that was the GK106.

    If this is the case with Maxwell, expect a GTX 950 variant with probably a 128 or 192-bit interface and around half the units of a 980.

      • Concupiscence
      • 5 years ago

      At 128-bit it’d look very much like the 750 Ti…

        • derFunkenstein
        • 5 years ago

        The 750 Ti does an awful lot with just a little memory bandwidth, but I have to wonder if it’d do even more with more resources available. Shaders, etc. It appears that big Maxwell has 16ROP partitions per 64-bit memory controller as opposed to 8 in the past (GTX750Ti only has 16 total). Big Maxwell cards have upwards of 4x the pixel pushing capabilities and 3.5x the shading power. Cutting everything in half would get you quite a bit more than just a 750Ti.

          • cake
          • 5 years ago

          I hope they put out something of the sort Q1 next year, I’m in the market for a $200 baby and I can wait a few months. Was going to splurge on a 750 TI this Black Friday but no overclocking headroom = no deal.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 5 years ago

            Yeah I’m kind of in the same boat. Having just gotten a 2560×1440 monitor I’m finding my GTX 760 isn’t quite enough. I’m looking to replace it, put it in my wife’s PC, and then sell her GTX 660 to make back some of the difference. I could go 350, but would rather stay a bit lower.

      • Luckyo
      • 5 years ago

      That is a much better option than the 500 gen, where 560 and 560Ti used a weaker chip than 570 (GF114 vs GF110).

      High end chips generally perform better even with multiple busted cores shut off in hardware. This was demonstrated when NV released 560Ti 448 core, which was a scaled down GF110, basically 570 chips that didn’t pass the 570 tests. This card crushed the plain 560Ti in tests.

      Bring on the slowed high end chips in mid-end cards. I’ll happily buy one when I need to replace my 560Ti.

        • Chrispy_
        • 5 years ago

        “much better” is subjective; For people who are primarily concerned with heat and noise, the heavily-harvested GF110 was hot and noisy compared to the relative cool and silence of a GF114, whilst only being a few percent faster.

        If you’re after best bang for your buck with no concerns for heat, noise, power-draw, physical card size – then yes – a heavily harvested GPU with a whopping heatsink and high vCore will usually outperform the next model down. Nvidia and AMD wouldn’t release them with those product numbers if they didn’t!

    • jjj
    • 5 years ago

    There is no point for Nvidia to launch if they have shortages for the 970 since this one is same die, lower price so lower margins.
    So it’s easy to figure out when it will launch, the day shortages end for it’s bigger brothers.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 5 years ago

      Makes plenty of sense to launch if there are enough GPU dies that fail to meet the requirements for the bigger GPUs.

        • cobalt
        • 5 years ago

        Seems like if fully-enabled yields were a problem, they’d do better on this hypothetical 960 if their bus width were 192, though, because that’s a whole other section of chip they could disable. (And then go 3GB instead of 4GB.) Seems like a 192-bit 960 could still be a good step up from the 760, given the ROP changes (and compression, etc.) in Maxwell.

        (edit: clarification)

        • 3SR3010R
        • 5 years ago

        The failed GPU dies are already being used for the GTX 970. 28nm is now a very mature process and I doubt that there are GPU dies being made with failures that are lower than what is needed for a GTX 970.

        Since the GTX 970 is still in short supply (and high demand) there is no need to release a fused off GTX 970 as a GTX 960 until demand for the GTX 970 slows down.

          • willmore
          • 5 years ago

          Die’s can miss spec not just by having faults that disable portions of the chip, they can fail by not meeting clock speed targets. Note that these parts look to be slower clocked.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 5 years ago

          They can fail validation in more ways than just having non-functional units. If they can’t meet NVidia’s requirement for speeds at certain voltages, they’d either have to raise the input voltage or fail the die. I assume they’re doing the latter.

        • guardianl
        • 5 years ago

        This.

        You actually have to layout all sorts of extra transistors etc. (+ empty die space) in order to be able to disable units and still have the chip operate. It’s not magic – they can’t just laser off some cores and turn it on without planning for operation modes like that. It becomes overhead that never contributes to the performance of the chip, but takes up precious die space.

        If NVIDIA/AMD could get “perfect” chips, they would do market segmentation almost solely on clockspeed (which is something Intel does mostly for their smaller CPUs for example) because clockspeed can be easily changed depending on market conditions and you can design chips with fare less “wasted” overhead.

        In this case, it would be very interesting to know how many GM204’s are making the cut out of TSMC. The reference Geforce 980 has similar-to-lower power consumption than the 970 which screams careful voltage binning.

    • Concupiscence
    • 5 years ago

    I wonder… Is it likely that the 960 will be released followed by a yet-further-hobbled 950 part, and the current 750 models will be demoted to the 940 and 930?

      • derFunkenstein
      • 5 years ago

      They’re going to have to do another GM20x part because at some point it’s not economically feasible to spend so much on a die and sell it at X low price. I’m sure there will be a native 128-bit part with fewer resources and a much smaller package.

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