HP’s new Core M-based EliteBooks are ultra thin, ultra light

Intel's Core M processor has landed inside some hot new business notebooks from HP. Due next year, the EliteBook Folio 1020 series combines the new Intel silicon with a 12.5" 2560×1440 display and some fairly impressive physical characteristics.

The EliteBook Folio 1020 Special Edition. Source: HP.

The flagship of the series, the EliteBook Folio 1020 Special Edition, uses an "exclusive blend of magnesium-lithium alloy and reusable carbon fiber" to trim its weight down to 2.2 lbs. The regular EliteBook Folio 1020 isn't much heavier, at 2.68 lbs, and both systems are only 0.62" thick.

Under the hood, you can expect fanless cooling, 8GB of RAM as standard, 128-256GB of solid-state storage, and a nine-hour battery. Business users will also find a bundle of enterprise-grade security features, and HP claims the EliteBook Folio 1020 series even passes MIL-STD 810G military tests for drop, shock, temperature, humidity, and pressure resistance.

HP plans to release the vanilla HP EliteBook Folio 1020 in February 2015. The Special Edition model will follow in April. No pricing has been announced yet, but I hope these aren't too expensive. I'd love to get my hands on one.

Comments closed
    • chrissodey
    • 5 years ago

    I still don’t understand why companies are pushing high res screens. Windows is not ready for it. Until Microsoft can figure out how to scale properly, count me out.

      • Klimax
      • 5 years ago

      Apps. Windows were ready long time ago…

    • NeelyCam
    • 5 years ago

    Fun. My Core M based Dell tablet arrived today. No keyboard though – apparently that’ll arrive tomorrow.

    Why would they do this to me?!?

      • chuckula
      • 5 years ago

      Because We Can!
      — Dell

      • MadManOriginal
      • 5 years ago

      Private company: fucks given, zero.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 5 years ago

        Shits given by Dell is and always has been zero. They would have done this as a publicly traded one, too.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 5 years ago

      Weird. You’d think that shipping everything in the same box would save some money. They’re always cutting corners.

        • NeelyCam
        • 5 years ago

        Probably coming from two different warehouses..

        You know, because [i<]that[/i<] makes sense

    • LoneWolf15
    • 5 years ago

    Of course, this isn’t marketed as a technician’s laptop, but my one gripe is that stuff this thin usually doesn’t have a full Ethernet port and requires a USB cable adapter.

    Really hoping Dell will come out with a Latitude E7250 and E7450 (to replace the nice E7240/E7440) with Broadwell, and Iris. That unit does have a full Ethernet port, and a trackpoint.

      • smilingcrow
      • 5 years ago

      I have an E7440 and wish they hadn’t reduced the max battery size compared to the 6430u from 65W to ~45W.
      At idle it’s great but I do actually use it and under medium or heavy load it’s worse than the 6430U (Ivy Bridge).
      I’d like to see Broadwell with a 60W battery or a highest Bin Core M with a 50 or 60W battery for a fanless Latitude.
      Keep the upgradeable RAM and mSATA + 2.5″ bay and keep the screen at 1080P for goodness sake. The business machines hopefully won’t join the pixel madness race.

    • sschaem
    • 5 years ago

    just out of curiosity, anyone know what laptop first use this wedge shape form?

      • nico1982
      • 5 years ago

      The godly Vaio X505 is among the firsts (2004).

    • NTMBK
    • 5 years ago

    Oh good, we get 2010 performance in a slightly slimmer chassis with DPI scaling problems and too few ports.

      • chuckula
      • 5 years ago

      Spoken like someone who just realized even Carrizo-L is delayed until half-way through next year so you might as well dump on the whole thin-n-light category until AMD “invents” it halfway through next year.

        • NTMBK
        • 5 years ago

        Spoken like someone who actually gives a crap about that fanboy nonsense.

      • smilingcrow
      • 5 years ago

      … and fanless with it although you are clearly not a fan. 😉

    • blastdoor
    • 5 years ago

    [quote<]No pricing has been announced yet, but I hope these aren't too expensive. I'd love to get my hands on one.[/quote<] I could say the same thing about a Tesla. These specs sound a lot like a retina MacBook Air. It's not going to be cheap. But back in the real world... I think it's nice for Windows fans that PC OEMs have been picking up their hardware game. Every PC user who buys one of these things should give thanks to El Jobso. Without him, you'd be lugging a 7 inch laptop with a 720p TN screen. And Apple fans should be happy that the PC guys are finally showing up to compete. Without that competition, the MacBook Air would start at $2,000.

      • Deanjo
      • 5 years ago

      The MacBook Air fell below the 2k mark a long time before it had any competition.

      • NeelyCam
      • 5 years ago

      [quote<]I could say the same thing about a Tesla. [/quote<] Yes!! I'd love to test drive one!

    • odizzido
    • 5 years ago

    not really that ultra light at 1kg is it? Maybe it’s okay for a 12 inch, but my cheapo netbook is the same weight. The surface pro 3 is 12 inches and 1.76 pounds.

      • DavidC1
      • 5 years ago

      2.2lb(1kg) is pretty light for a laptop that size. It may not seem like it but it seems pretty hollow if you lift one.

      That said there’s FAR lighter Core M device if you live in Japan. It’s a Convertible too.

      [url<]http://news.softpedia.com/news/Panasonic-Let-s-Note-RZ4-Is-a-Super-Light-10-Inch-Notebook-with-Intel-Core-M-Broadwell-460858.shtml[/url<] " 1.65 lbs / 0.72 kg" It would have been quite amazing, if Core M performed like a Core chip rather than like Atom.

        • esterhasz
        • 5 years ago

        [quote<]It would have been quite amazing, if Core M performed like a Core chip rather than like Atom.[/quote<] I hear you, but it seems like thermal design was more of a culprit in early benchmarks than the chip itself. C't just tested the passively cooled Envy 15 x2 with a M-5Y10 and performance is much better than on the Yoga 3, not much behind the 15W i5-4300U (1.9/2.9). Yeah, the x2 is huge, but it seems that Lenovo went too thin with the Yoga 3 and we can expect better performance from Core M in other machines.

          • DavidC1
          • 5 years ago

          By the way, from reading the forums the 5Y70 performs worse than the 5Y10.

          from c’t
          “The Core M-5Y10 in the passively cooled HP Envy 15 x2 reached in 3DMark Ice Storm around 39 000 points in Cinebench R15 197 points – and also reproducible in multiple passes in a row. ”

          The CPU score of 4200U is 229 and 4300U is 253 points, making 4300U about 28% faster. 4200U is 16% faster. According to Anandtech, Surface Pro 3’s 4300U also gets 48k in Ice Storm, and this gets 40k. It seems getting near Haswell U score in 3D is more likely than getting that for CPU.

          I haven’t got a clue why they only cap the chip at 4.5W or why they bother sticking in a much more expensive 5Y70 when the performance isn’t ANY better(worse in some cases). Trademark of stupidity among PC manufacturers or they think we’ll really fall for the marketing completely. I’d like to think that Core M really does not live up to the hype at all and PC manufacturers are caught off guard – another theory.

    • allreadydead
    • 5 years ago

    Well, military standards or not, I prefer having my Ice Storm on 3DMark running my laptops screen not around whole notebook.

    Extra tuffness for FREE OF CHARGE is good tho. If there will be such thing.

    • Duct Tape Dude
    • 5 years ago

    I was curious what military-grade tests an ultrabook like this would pass, but apparently MIL-STD 810G is an [i<]environmental[/i<] standard, not a durability standard... Unless I'm reading this wrong: [url<]http://everyspec.com/MIL-STD/MIL-STD-0800-0899/MIL-STD-810G_12306/[/url<] EDIT: I was reading it wrong after all. Thanks, Melvar.

      • Melvar
      • 5 years ago

      Looks to me like it defines a requirement to survive an environment, not protect one.

        • Duct Tape Dude
        • 5 years ago

        It appears you are right. I was reading too much into the “material acquisition program” and its managers and interpreted that as “making sure materials are sourced in an environmentally-friendly way.”

        Wikipedia has an outline that is more readable: [url<]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MIL-STD-810#MIL-STD-810G.2C_Part_one_-_General_program_guidelines[/url<]

    • NeelyCam
    • 5 years ago

    It looks pretty nice, but I would guess the price is north of $1200

    • chuckula
    • 5 years ago

    Interestly. Too bad they got beat to the punch by Lenovo & friends though.

    I’ve posted some thoughts on my Core-m in the forums. I’ll be happy to run any benchmarks that I can reasonably get going if there are requests. (Link: [url<]https://techreport.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=98633[/url<] ) I'll tell you right now: 3D Mark Ice Storm runs fine, the Hyper-gate runs slower-than-twitch-game speed but still viewable, Sky Diver looks like a fast slide show, and Fire Mark looks like a slow slide show 😛

      • Ninjitsu
      • 5 years ago

      To be fair, Fire Strike runs at 2-5 fps on my Q8400+GTX560 as well.

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