Build your own water cooler with Thermaltake’s new kit

All-in-one liquid coolers have become quite popular over the past few years, but there's something to be said for doing your own plumbing. Thermaltake apparently agrees, because it introduced a DIY liquid cooling kit at CES today. The limited-edition Pacific RL240 includes all the parts required to build your own liquid cooling setup:

Source: Thermaltake

The kit includes a reservoir-and-pump combo with a 400-ml tank and 500-l/hr flow rate. The accompanying CPU block fits all modern sockets; it has a copper base and a "0.15-mm microfin internal structure."

A beefy, dual-fan radiator sits at the other end of the cooling equation. Two LED-infused 120-mm fans are included, as well, along with six chromed compression fittings, 79" of medical-grade tubing, and a jug of "eco-friendly" red coolant. Here's how it all looks inside a complete system:

Yeah, that looks a lot more exotic than any of the closed-loop setups out there. To be fair, Thermaltake sneakily added some 90° fittings that aren't included in the kit. I suspect the tubing is too stiff to turn tight corners without them.

Comments closed
    • south side sammy
    • 5 years ago

    i saw the price on line. i was off by $150. It’s 300.00 dollars…….. ouch!

    • Deanjo
    • 5 years ago

    [quote<]The accompanying CPU block fits all modern sockets; [/quote<] And AM3+ too. 😛 Sorry, had to.

    • Mad_Dane
    • 5 years ago

    Must say Thermal Take has been starting to impress me as of late, gone is the tacky, whatever they changed in the product design department its working, still there is room for a Rolls Royce company in the PC hardware business.

    • Welch
    • 5 years ago

    Maybe I’m missing the point here but……………… This is exactly what water cooling kits were back in 2004 and beyond :P. There isn’t anything “DIY” about this other than its not assembled for you, which is all the water cooling setups were before. I suppose if you compare it to an AIO enclosed system then sure.

    Curious the price, but the last thing I want to screw around with if a system like this and the likelihood of leakage! On top of that, with an open system you have to change the water out so that it doesn’t get nasty after so many months… I mean there is a lot of up-keep to it that I just never thought was worth the hassle.

      • f0d
      • 5 years ago

      actually you dont have to change the water at all if you choose the right parts and use a silver killcoil and demineralized water – i have had systems that have gone for 3+ years without touching the water and the water was just as clean in the end as it was when i put it in (current system 2+ years and i havnt touched the water and its crystal clear)

      zero upkeep except for cleaning out the filter on the fans every now and again but you should be doing that anyways with any system

      leaking is all to do with your own ability – sure if you do a horrible job of putting it together it might leak, but if you do a good job it wont leak at all, i guess it all comes up to how much faith you have in your own skills

      imo these systems are more reliable than AIO systems as the d5 pumps have been proven to be rock solid and choosing the right parts (parts with similar anodic index) and demineralized water will last forever

        • Chrispy_
        • 5 years ago

        +1 for the D5 pump.

        I’ve also seen dozens (only a couple in person, so I guess I should say I’ve [i<]heard about[/i<] dozens) of failed AIO cooling loops. A DIY kit is chosen from parts and you can pay for quality, known-decent parts if you go for a homebrew loop. It's assembled as well as you build it - if you put the hours and care in it will definitely be better made than an AIO. By contrast the AIO's are designed to a price point/profit margins and quality is sacrificed if it net result of cost-savings divided by RMA expenses works out for the vendor. There's never any concern about collateral when it leaks and takes out all your hardware, because that's not covered by their warranty.

    • Generic
    • 5 years ago

    “I suspect the tubing is too stiff to turn tight corners without them.”

    Yep. Tygon is a lovely product, but you either drop head pressure with 90° joints, or make large sweeps with more tubing.

    That really is a handsome little setup in my opinion, less the god awful LEDs of course.

    • Chrispy_
    • 5 years ago

    I’m glad they picked half-inch tubing over quarter-inch tubing.
    I know it’s unwieldy and makes joints/fittings space-wastingly bulky – but:

    – better flow rates
    – less resistance for a quieter pump
    – it looks unnecessarily over-engineered and manly (what’s not to like?)
    – it’s less likely to kink

    Their press image seems to be shooting themselves in the foot though; The poor choice of case would imply that the reservoir is so big you have to rip your drive cages out!

      • DrCR
      • 5 years ago

      7/16 would actually be my recommendation, but I’m much of your mind.

        • Waco
        • 5 years ago

        I use 3/8″ Norpene. 1/2″ tubing is too damn hard to route nicely even in a larger case if you have a complicated loop.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 5 years ago

    No GPU water blocks? This is ALL for the CPU?

      • south side sammy
      • 5 years ago

      they’ve had gpu blocks for years. shouldn’t be too much of a problem putting one in the loop.

      thermaltake also used to have an all in one for the gpu.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 5 years ago

        Right, I’m just surprised there’s not at least an option for one. Then again, you’d need more of those 90-degree elbows that aren’t included.

      • Mad_Dane
      • 5 years ago

      Well since each GPU needs a unique block design, they would need to make a gazillion versions to cover all bases, you can easily buy a waterblock for your current card and 2 more fittings, then you are good to go.

    • alan242
    • 5 years ago

    And the hard drive(s) go where? Strap a SSD to the outside? Or dangle it where bay area was?

      • derFunkenstein
      • 5 years ago

      Some cases have space for 2.5″ storage on the back of the motherboard tray. Or else, get a bigger case.

        • the
        • 5 years ago

        I have a [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_Star<]bigger case.[/url<] Now what?

        • epicmadness
        • 5 years ago

        thats not his point, the build case of having a reservoir is too space inefficient.
        cases like these aren’t meant for these sort of builds.

        if you want water cooling with massive pipeworks and large reservoirs, while still having a reasonable number of harddrives…
        then using dual-chamber cases are the only way to do it, Node 804, Core V21, Air 540/240, etc.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 5 years ago

          The reservoir is huge, and I’m a little surprised that this is just for the CPU. If it came with a water block (or at least had an option with specific ones) then it’d make a little more sense.

        • f0d
        • 5 years ago

        yep bigger case works
        i have a much larger and more intricate watercooling system in my 900d with 9 hard drives

      • nexxcat
      • 5 years ago

      eSATA 🙂

    • terminalrecluse
    • 5 years ago

    what is the pump strength? price? will TR review it?

      • f0d
      • 5 years ago

      looks like a d5 laing pump which would be plenty of pumping power

    • rika13
    • 5 years ago

    I just hope that the lava lamp reservoir/pump is sold separately.

      • f0d
      • 5 years ago

      there are plenty of similar res/pumps like that from proper watercooling manufacturers
      xspc have their photon line which is similar

    • south side sammy
    • 5 years ago

    most important thing is the price. .. $150 U.S. maybe?

      • wujj123456
      • 5 years ago

      Newegg says $300…

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