$105 unlocked Kaveri quad coming to FM2+

Although AMD's next-gen Carrizo APU isn't coming to desktops, the company is prepping a new Kaveri-based processor for the FM2+ crowd. The A6-7650K has quad Steamroller cores with 3.3GHz base and 3.7GHz Turbo clocks. The CPU multipliers are unlocked for easy overclocking, while GCN-class Radeon integrated graphics ride shotgun.

Source: AMD

Those six GPU "cores" in the spec table refer to compute units, each of which has 64 shader processors. That's 384 SPs in total, the same as for the A6-7600 we reviewed this time last year.

Pricing is set at $105, effectively undercutting the 7700K, which is only 100MHz faster at stock frequencies. AMD says the A6-7650K is due toward the end of this month or early next.

While talking the company at the Consumer Electronics Show, we learned a little more about the A68H, a recent addition to its A-series chipset lineup. This scaled-back I/O hub is limited to four SATA 6Gbps and two USB 3.0 ports. It was introduced last year, and it's already selling on a couple of Asus boards priced under $69.

Although RAID 5 is off the table, the old Promise RAID firmware has been swapped for fresh code from Dot Hill. AMD claims the new firmware's performance is up to snuff. More importantly, perhaps, the Dot Hill tech supports Trim for SSDs in striped RAID 0 arrays. Maybe it's time for an SSD RAID face-off against something from the Intel camp.

Since the new RAID goodness is just a firmware update for existing silicon, it's possible that FM2+ boards based on other chipsets are eligible for upgrades. Some may have even received them already. We're waiting for confirmation from AMD on the exact details.

Update: AMD has confirmed that its A88X, A78, and A68H chipsets all feature Dot Hill RAID.

Comments closed
    • swaaye
    • 8 years ago

    The compute stuff that is supposed to be taking even the consumer segment by storm probably benefits from ALU throughput.

    Stacked DRAM doesn’t sound like something cheap. And hey Kaveri’s die appears to have a 256bit memory controller that was not utilized. Maybe GDDR5 support as well. But it costs more to implement this stuff and maybe since bandwidth won’t make the sad CPU more competitive it was seen as unlikely they could up the selling price and have it all make sense. How exciting is a 512 shader GCN GPU really?

    • daviejambo
    • 8 years ago

    G3258 struggles when a game needs four cores though. Nobody should be recommended that chip (for gaming) anymore

    • AJSB
    • 8 years ago

    You, apparently…and again :))

    • derFunkenstein
    • 8 years ago

    [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lWsuokWmEZI[/url<]

    • AJSB
    • 8 years ago

    You, apparently.

    • chuckula
    • 8 years ago

    [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lWsuokWmEZI[/url<]

    • AJSB
    • 8 years ago

    There *never* was a A6-7600….you meant A8-7600 for sure and yes, it was released.

    • AJSB
    • 8 years ago

    My builds are all powered by 75W AC/DC bricks (and DC/DC converters inside the case, of course), usually using A6-5400K, A6-6400K or A6-7400K (witch is Kaveri, so i’m not exactly waiting for a Kaveri).

    I was waiting for the right QUAD CORE Kaveri that i could squeeze in the power drain limits of my builds and at the right price (seemed always a bit of a waste buy a A10-7850K to downclock/downvolt if there was a part less expensive).

    The A10-7800 and A8-7600 because are locked, even with 45W cTDP weren’t exactly good options (no matter was tempted to use them) because some builds i need more iGPU power, others need more CPU power….with a unlocked APU i can customize it exactly as i want it.

    My typical build uses a case 220x215x65mm with 8/16GB DDR3 at 2133MHz, 1 ODD (DVD or BR), WiFi+BT/mSATA and one or two HDD/SSD drives (usually 2 Samsung 2.5″ of 2TB each for a total of 4TB) all this with custom cooling solution….
    When using 2 HDD/SSD + ODD there is no WiFi+BT or mSATA.

    Yeah, i like AMD but not for any special reason except that they don’t overprice their products as much as Intel or NVIDIA (no matter i actually like a LOT some video cards from Nvidia like the GTX 750Ti for other type of builds)…

    • chuckula
    • 8 years ago

    So you have waited (and continue waiting since the A8-7650K is currently in vapor-stage) all this time to buy a Kaveri just for AMD to launch a lower-end rebin throw-away part?

    If you actually liked AMD (snark) then you would have gone out last year and bought a 7850K or even an [url=http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819113360<]A10-7700K that's only $20 more and is faster than the A8-7650K[/url<]... Oh, I have a quote with just as much evidence as your "quote": [quote<]Lisa Su has officially announced that AMD will be leaving the technology business and will continue as a thee-ring circus with the Greatest Powerpoint Show On Earth(TM)![/quote<]

    • ronch
    • 8 years ago

    Their packaging (box) supplier must still be printing out the boxes to put these new chips in. Being a small sweatshop in China or Malaysia means they could only afford one used printing machine that frequently breaks down. /s

    • ronch
    • 8 years ago

    Wow, another (slower) binning of current AMD silicon. Change some multiplier settings, give it a new model number and voila! New Kaveri chip!

    Mark Papermaster was right: AMD ISN’T standing still!

    • AJSB
    • 8 years ago

    This is excellent news, the Kaveri that i wanted…and following the links i read also about Carrizo-D, the rumored Carrizo for Desktop:
    “The main difference between with Carrizo and Carrizo-L is that Carrizo will ship with Excavator cores while Carrizo-L will feature PUMA+ Cores. The desktop part will be on FM2+.”

    Possibly Carrizo-D will arrive very late in 2015 (Q4 ?) or even only in 2016, till then , i will have the A8-7650K to play with it 😀

    So, all in all, i’m no longer disappointed with AMD 😀

    • bfar
    • 8 years ago

    There are a small number of newer games that won’t run on just two cores unfortunately. But if I wasn’t a gamer I wouldnt buy anything else.
    The Athlon II X4 860 BLACK is a good alternative here. Basically Kavieri without the GPU.

    • Geonerd
    • 8 years ago

    That’s the only way any of this APU business makes any sense – with a big cache or memory system capable of feeding the graphics unit in a meaningful way. As is, sucking bits through a 128bit DDR3 straw, graphics performance is always going to be hopeless, so why waste the die space?

    • UnfriendlyFire
    • 8 years ago

    What about the stacked DRAM cache?

    • UnfriendlyFire
    • 8 years ago

    The most the IGP war is going to do is cannibalize the low-end discrete GPUs and force mid-range GPUs to up their performance.

    Nividia is going to be the biggest loser since they’re going to have a harder time convincing consumers to buy their Fermi GPUs other than the constant rebranding and tricking them into thinking that “820m is better than 435m” when they’re actually the same silicon at similar clock rates.

    Fermi vs Tonga and Broadwell/Skylake GPU? One architecture is going to lose badly.

    • chuckula
    • 8 years ago

    No matter how good Intel makes its IGP, a discrete GPU (and you don’t need a high-end one) will always beat it. The same goes for AMD, however, and AMD even counts on it or else they would never bother to make discrete graphics cards.

    • HisDivineOrder
    • 8 years ago

    The problem is that Intel integrated graphics are typically enough for any system where size matters more than any other concern, so you can cut the $100 for the discrete card right out of the total cost and suddenly AMD loses again.

    I think the problem with the AMD APU sales pitch is generally the people who want small systems are going to go REALLY small and pick up a NUC where performance per watt suddenly makes going Intel give you the superior experience. And for the people who prefer GPU, you’ll find most are willing to make the sacrifice to make a little room for a discrete GPU since GPU matters so much. So they’ll make room for a real GPU and get a lot more bang for their buck.

    Finding someone where size AND GPU matter in equal measures, thus requiring an AMD APU, is an extremely niche area and not at all a large market.

    Even that market is being encroached upon by Intel’s not-really-slow pivot to put Iris front and center.

    • deruberhanyok
    • 8 years ago

    It’s actually pretty easy to argue with it, if you consider system form factor.

    If you’re trying to build a small system to shove into an entertainment center, there are plenty of cases that don’t have room for an expansion card at all with a very small footprint (Antec ISK 110 and Mini-Box’s M350 both come to mind, both of which can be strapped to the back of a monitor so it takes up zero desktop footprint) and there are many others which only have room for a low profile, single slot video card (Antec ISK 300/310, Silverstone ML05, etc).

    I’ve been tracking available low profile single slot video cards [url=https://techreport.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=94408<]here on the TR forums[/url<] and the currently available options are awfully expensive for the performance increase they offer over Intel 4000/4600 graphics. The R7 250 is the best available right now, and that will perform a little better than the Kaveri GPU, but then you've got a tiny fan making more noise in your little system - which is definitely a concern if you're trying to put together a small, quiet system. Price comparison on those two configs? Well, the Pentium is $70, an ITX motherboard, $60 for an H81, and then you've got your low profile, single slot R7 250 at around $100. Total for that setup, $230. Also figure you may not be able to overclock the Pentium with that motherboard. Compared to: $100 Kaveri processor, $95 ITX motherboard, that's $35 less. And if you're going for a case without room for an expansion slot (believe it or not, people do this), Kaveri is far and away better than sticking yourself with Intel's onboard graphics. Yes, once you get to bigger cases, the argument breaks down, but then, that's a different class of system. Something with room for an R9 290 and a full size ATX power supply isn't in the same field as something with an integrated 90W power supply.

    • brucethemoose
    • 8 years ago

    Still, it’s hard to argue with a G3258 + discrete GPU for just a bit more money.

    • Geonerd
    • 8 years ago

    I’d cheerfully give up most of the (bandwidth starved) GPU shaders in exchange for another 1 or 2 ‘Roller modules and a few hundred more MHz.

    Throw me a bone, AMD.

    • chuckula
    • 8 years ago

    It did release in July or so.

    BTW: I know it was just announced today, but this part is NOT on sale anywhere I can see. Considering it’s just a rebin of a year-old part, you think AMD could provide same-day availability…

    • HisDivineOrder
    • 8 years ago

    Remember that time TR got an A6-7600 and then it didn’t come out to consumers for six months or so?

    Or… did it ever release?

    • derFunkenstein
    • 8 years ago

    That’s so confusing. Up until now, the A6 had been a [url=http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819113370<]dual-core part[/url<]. edit: nevermind. The graphic says A8. The text in the article is wrong.

    • deruberhanyok
    • 8 years ago

    Intriguing option for a budget “mainstream” gaming setup – add some fast RAM, a small motherboard, and build yourself a steam engine that can handle 720p easily, and higher resolutions… passably.

    I like what AMD has done with Kaveri, but their biggest problem has been getting the chips out. Let’s hope it doesn’t take 6+ months for this to hit the shelves.

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