Steam machines to make an appearance at GDC next month

We could get a first look at this year’s line of Steam machines within weeks. According to Polygon, Valve’s Doug Lombardi has confirmed that Steam machines will appear at this year’s Game Developers Conference, which is scheduled to kick off on March 2 in San Francisco.

The living-room-oriented gaming systems have been missing in action since last May, when Valve pushed their rollout from the original mid-2014 time frame into 2015.

The company appeared to pin the blame on the controller, whose dual-touchpad control scheme some users found difficult to master. Valve promised to make the controller “a lot better.” Since then, we’ve seen images of a revised model with an analog stick.

Faced with the delay, some of Valve’s partners released their Steam machines sans Steam OS last year. I’m guessing we’ll see some new models at GDCโ€”and hopefully, those won’t wind up as pricier Windows machines in six months.

Comments closed
    • BobbinThreadbare
    • 5 years ago

    So I have actually installed steamos on a livingroom computer to give it a try. It’s pretty old hardware, Phenom II X3, and Geforce 9600GT. Here’s my thoughts.

    Big picture mode rocks for TVs. I just turn on the tv, computer and a controller and I’m good to go. Can sit on the couch and do 90% of everything I’d want to with the computer.

    The openness of SteamOS rocks. I’ve installed all kinds of linux apps on it, and even compiled a Nintendo DS emulator myself to squeeze some speed out of it.

    The game selection on SteamOS is actually not-terrible. I don’t care for most modern AAA games anyways and indies have fully embraced linux. Been playing the Grim Fandango remake and Apotheon since release day. The only game it doesn’t run that I really wish did is Dark Souls. Of course that’s not on current gen consoles anyways, so not like Valve is losing out if you compare libraries. PS3/360 are obviously much better, but that’s another story. For those counting, I have 444 games in my steam library (a bit shameful I know), and 101 of them have linux ports. Probably 200 or so are games I wouldn’t want to play with a controller (or at all) anyways, so nothing really lost there.

    Valve needs to do more work for the “livingroom experience”. They need native apps available through Steam for Netflix, Amazon, etc. Especially for general uses who aren’t going to want to mess with desktop mode and adding repositories. This also needs to be integrated into the steam framework. XBMC/Kodi has some problems with getting controller input (let your controller turn off because you haven’t used it in 15 minutes, and when you turn it on, Steam detects it, but Kodi doesn’t). They also have a music player built in which is nice, but it needs steaming services and some kind of party mode with visualization and stuff.

    Wheezy is pretty old debian at this point, and it can be hard to find precompiled stuff for it. Launchpad is a great service for linux software, and Valve should try to be more compatible with the stuff on there.

      • DarkMikaru
      • 5 years ago

      Thanks for your perspective. When I first heard of SteamOS I was thinking, oh yeah… I’d love to give that a try. But unfortunately I didn’t know soon enough as I think you had to throw your hat into the ring to get the Beta. ๐Ÿ™

      I just got done having a debate with someone on a forum recently about how Linux is so unpolished in so many ways and what you listed is exactly what we were talking about. Basically, SteamOS needs to run like XBox & PlayStation concoles OS’s do. Basically, turn it on, pop in a game and that is it. No tweaking, no testing…. just on and ready to go.

    • southrncomfortjm
    • 5 years ago

    Will Steam OS support all normal htpc functions like Netflix and live TV streams? Even if it does, I don’t see enough quality games that I want to play on Linux. Would love to see Steam OS take off.

    • Kretschmer
    • 5 years ago

    My gut reaction is that Steam Machines will fizzle on the marketplace due to Valve’s hands-off approach to the hardware platform.

    I envision two classes of Steam Machines:
    -Cheap, tiny units that stream games from your existing gaming PC
    -Full-fledged gaming machines in small form factors that are suitable for 1080P gaming in the living room

    Tiny stream-capable units are available now (e.g. Intel’s NUCs), and there isn’t much profit to be had in bundling SteamOS on them before shipping.

    The 2014 “Steam Boxes” from Alienware, iBuypower, and the like – meant to run games – were often too anemic for AAA titles. If 2015’s Steam Boxes follow this route many buyers will find that their brand new PC chokes on Call of Battlefield and word of mouth will sink the platform. OEM’s can’t be trusted and will mercilessly cut corners on critical parts like GPUs and SSDs to boost “box specs” like HDD space.

    If Valve wants this effort to succeed, they need to set minimum parts thresholds and test Steam Box hardware against their catalog of games. Imagine being able to purchase an OEM box with intelligent gaming parts that is transparently rated; (no more recommended specs rubbish). “Based on your hardware configuration, Valve has determined that this title will perform poorly on your current machine. Please click here for a list of games that are well-suited to your current hardware.” At the cost of a bit of benchmarking, Valve could spare consumers from the toughest part of PC gaming – OEM crapbox roulette – and push the industry to more intelligently allocate machine budgets between the CPU, GPU, RAM, and storage.

    Without active management, Steam Boxes will be a market disappointment with influence disproportionate to their pedigree. Users will drop hard earned dollars on a machine like the $400 iBuypower from October 2014 – replete with R7 250X and 2.5″ HDD – and watch it stutter and fail next to their $300 traditional console. Instead of introducing curious newbies to the wonderful world of PC gaming, Valve would be exacerbating the platform’s deficiencies.

      • sweatshopking
      • 5 years ago

      Microsoft tried with the Experience index and it flopped. Valve MIGHT be able to pull it off though.
      I pretty much agree entirely.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 5 years ago

        The experience index was vague and relative, thus had no inherent meaning. Valve could do something like basic classes at least – Steam Stream and Steam Play or whatever.

          • sweatshopking
          • 5 years ago

          I don’t disagree.

          • BobbinThreadbare
          • 5 years ago

          Those categories wouldn’t work because specs change over time. Plus enabling fancy effects and such.

          • Concupiscence
          • 5 years ago

          In its early days the Experience Index also had to accommodate hardware that honestly should have been graded on a different scale. GeforceFX GPUs and pre-Shader Model 3.0 Radeons also received ratings despite their inability to perform on the same playing field as then-current graphics processors. If I remember correctly the only concession at all was that an x*00 Radeon couldn’t score more than a 4.9.

          The lack of any quantitative measurement of the benchmark besides a two-digit number with a decimal point was also an impediment to its perceived credibility.

          • Concupiscence
          • 5 years ago

          I can see this breaking down a lot of ways, but can there please, [i<]please[/i<] be an entry-level streaming or casual game solution called a Steampuff? Just take a NUC, put the Steam logo on top, and call it a day, but that could be so cute.

      • VincentHanna
      • 5 years ago

      I can’t forsee a situation where that works out well for valve.

      Steam-boxes that aren’t rated as “adequate” for game xyz, steam issuing a firm non-relative steambox value index that rates OEM boxes on hardware(I’m going to assume that this would be a checkmark system?)…

      Whether valve tries to limit the use of their OS by OEMs, or objectively rates them, they will quickly find themselves partnerless if they try to exercise any form of legitimate control.

      Though I do agree, that without that control, they are setting themselves up for failure.

    • bfar
    • 5 years ago

    With big picture mode and streaming, most of the ducks are already in place.

    I’m not sure if the controller or the linux os will make it, but as it stands, Steam has already found a worthy place in the living room on so called HTPCs.

    • puppetworx
    • 5 years ago

    NVidia’s mystery device confirmed to be a Steam-streamer.

    • geekl33tgamer
    • 5 years ago

    I’m going here: These are almost as overdue as HALF LIFE 3.

      • sweatshopking
      • 5 years ago

      And they’ll be just as much of a letdown when they finally arrive.

        • geekl33tgamer
        • 5 years ago

        Yep. Let Valve learn the hard way. They get a lot more respect than they deserve. It amazes me how many jump to their defence no matter what they do!

        Edit: Typo

      • Goofus Maximus
      • 5 years ago

      I was going to post “Steam Machines! Valve’s Half Life 3 for the Hardware World!”

      • w76
      • 5 years ago

      Amazing if you think about it: They’re going to customize their own OS in a shorter period of time than they’re taking to develop Half Life 3.

      • odizzido
      • 5 years ago

      Valve could release HL3 for free for anyone running steamOS as incentive. Or other free games…and have a massive sale.

      I am with SSK mostly with his view on valve, I don’t think they’re that great. However if steamOS does well we could have a real alternative to windows for PC gamers which I would be quite happy about.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 5 years ago

    I’m happy for the controller and big screen version of steam. Those are sweet. But a dedicated system, well seems 3rd parties like ubisoft and EA and blizzard are not really going to support the Linux steam.

      • l33t-g4m3r
      • 5 years ago

      Which is why alienware released theirs with windows. Cue SSK, “Windows doesn’t count”.

    • Deanjo
    • 5 years ago

    Steam Machines, oGL Next and Nvidia’s secret revealed all at the same time……. hmmmmmm

    • Ninjitsu
    • 5 years ago

    Is this what Nvidia have been working on for 5 years?

    • JustAnEngineer
    • 5 years ago

    I’m looking forward to Valve finally releasing a finished product. Steam machines could energize the HTPC space. Even if SteamOS doesn’t replace existing operating systems, I’m interested in improvements in controllers and in SFF system components suitable for gaming.

    • l33t-g4m3r
    • 5 years ago

    Cue SSK, “Steam Machines don’t exist”.

      • sweatshopking
      • 5 years ago

      Don’t worry, I’ve already read the article.
      Steam machines DON’T exist. They may in the future, and I don’t think I ever said they wouldn’t. I said they’re too late, and DOA beside a VERY small market share. I think that position still stands.
      Even read the comments here. When I said I didn’t think it would do well when the announced it I was rabidly opposed. Now, people generally agree with me. A year ago they may have been on to something. Now? Too little, too late. Classic valve.

        • bittermann
        • 5 years ago

        How in the world are they DOA? Was there some promised release by date you are aware of that the rest of us weren’t? Did Valve kick your dog or something? Are you opposed to gaming getting better on Linux? Careful, your bias is showing.

          • sweatshopking
          • 5 years ago

          Lol. My bias? yeah, I am biased. Valve gets way more love than they deserve and this will go nowhere. They’re a mediocre software maker that behaves hypocritically and then nerd fanboys eat it up because they liked a game they made 14 years ago.
          These are DOA because nobody will buy them. I think that should be clear.

            • puppetworx
            • 5 years ago

            [quote<]gets way more love than they deserve[/quote<] SSK, are you a little jealous?

            • bittermann
            • 5 years ago

            Wow, all I can say is yes, bias against Valve at minimum. If a company making money sets you off I guess you must be pissed all the time. And to even respond to “nobody will buy them ” is stooping to your childish troll level so I’ll pass.

            • sweatshopking
            • 5 years ago

            hahaa. well done, sir.
            A company “making money” is my issue. Not their horrible support quality, the way they talk trash about their competitors then copy them, or the fact that because you like some game they made they’re not DRM.
            I use steam. I just don’t pretend their god’s gift to me. Just like I don’t OMG LOVE my grocery store if they have cheap tomatoes.

            • ALiLPinkMonster
            • 5 years ago

            You just described every big time company in existence. Like literally every.

            • sweatshopking
            • 5 years ago

            To some extent. However, few companies command the irrational love valve does.

          • cygnus1
          • 5 years ago

          Actually, yeah, there was a promised release time frame that they pushed back. You know, I think Cyril mentioned it in the post….

            • bittermann
            • 5 years ago

            What was this promised release date?

            • cygnus1
            • 5 years ago

            Mid 2014, not an exact day, but a pretty specific time frame nonetheless.

            [url<]https://techreport.com/news/26519/valve-now-looking-at-2015-release-for-steam-machines[/url<]

          • fhohj
          • 5 years ago

          Well it’s true enough that a lot of folks have their consoles bought, now. That could be a bit of a problem. This is essentially a second console. And, if you’re looking at Maxwell in it, it’s not going to be especially cheap.

          I think Valve wanted them out sooner but got held up by either the controller or the semiconductor market and pricing around what it wanted to put in them. It didn’t want to price itself out of the market it was trying to sell to. As well as reservation perhaps on the part of PC vendors.

        • GrimDanfango
        • 5 years ago

        Out of interest, how much market share do you think an unreleased product should have when it first hits the market?

          • sweatshopking
          • 5 years ago

          If it hits and maintains 3% in a year I’d be shocked.

            • VincentHanna
            • 5 years ago

            3% of console? That would be well over a million units.

            SSK the optimist.

    • DancingDirty7
    • 5 years ago

    well, I wish they understand that gamers have a gaming rig and what the need is just a cheap steambox for streaming games to the living room.

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 5 years ago

    A Steam Machine with Kodi, Netflix, and an emulator that’s easy to access from Big Picture would have be screaming “TAKE MY MONEY!” Without those, it’s just an expensive box that will add to the mess of things under my TV without removing any. But that’s just me.

    I saw a small (hand sized) AMD system that would be perfect for this. [url<]https://techreport.com/news/27644/quad-core-amd-soc-squeezes-into-pocketable-mini-pc[/url<]

      • Deanjo
      • 5 years ago

      [quote<]A Steam Machine with Kodi, Netflix, and an emulator that's easy to access from Big Picture would have be screaming "TAKE MY MONEY!"[/quote<] Can already be done in SteamOS. Kodi has plugins for both Netflix now with playback through Chrome and a plugin for flipping back and forth from the Kodi / XBMC UI and there has been emulator plugins forever.

        • DragonDaddyBear
        • 5 years ago

        I read that Kodi was working on the Steam integration but I didn’t know it was done already. And Netflix just recently got semi-official support on Linux. That was a fast turnaround. I guess I’ll be screaming “shut up and take my money” when that mini, passively-cooled AMD box comes out.

          • Deanjo
          • 5 years ago

          [quote<] I guess I'll be screaming "shut up and take my money" when that mini, passively-cooled AMD box comes out.[/quote<] If you go for an AMD box you will be screaming "SHUT UP AND FIX YOUR DAMN DRIVERS AMD!". As far as the Steam integration goes, basically right now it just flips between Kodi and Steams Big Picture UI.

            • Deanjo
            • 5 years ago

            Lol, I can only assume that the down voters have no idea about the real state of AMD’s linux drivers.

            • DragonDaddyBear
            • 5 years ago

            I use them regularly. No issues on my end.

            • Deanjo
            • 5 years ago

            Lol, oh really

            [url<]http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=amd_radeon_285&num=1[/url<] [url<]http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=nvidia_4k_linuxgaming&num=1[/url<] [url<]http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=nvamd_binary_comparison&num=1[/url<] [url<]http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=linux_gpus_high514&num=1[/url<] [url<]http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=metro-redux-22gpus&num=1[/url<]

            • DragonDaddyBear
            • 5 years ago

            My experience is not the same as yours. You’re being confrontational for no reason. I use it, I like it.

            • Deanjo
            • 5 years ago

            Lol, ok

            [url<]http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/adult-health/in-depth/denial/art-20047926[/url<]

            • DragonDaddyBear
            • 5 years ago

            [url<]http://inmyskinnygenes.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Trolls.jpg[/url<]

          • Ashbringer
          • 5 years ago

          Non of you guys seem to run Linux as a daily driver.

          #1 Kodi works just fine. Since SteamOS is debian, you just add the repository and install.
          #2 Netflix works with Chrome. Just go to their website and download the .deb and run it.
          #3 Emulators are also available on Linux. Pretty sure all of them are, even Dolphin.

            • DragonDaddyBear
            • 5 years ago

            I’m actually quite familiar with Linux. I do use it most days. I just don’t have the time to “play” with it like I used to. It’s more admin work these days.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 5 years ago

      Add kodi and retroarch (both have debian versions that work fine), and you have exactly what you want.

    • deruberhanyok
    • 5 years ago

    I still think they missed a great opportunity to call it a steam engine.

    Curious to see what shows up and how it compares pricewise with a “roll your own” small gaming box.

      • Deanjo
      • 5 years ago

      And call the users “Steam Punks”?

        • deruberhanyok
        • 5 years ago

        I keep pressing the thumbs up, but it won’t let me give you more than +1.

          • sweatshopking
          • 5 years ago

          YOU HAVE TO PUSH IT 10000 TIMES THEN HE’LL GET +1000!! JUST KEEP AT IT!

            • JustAnEngineer
            • 5 years ago

            Be careful. If you’re clicking away at thumbs up and the page reflows itself, you may click on a different comment than you intended for the subsequent clicks.

    • Melvar
    • 5 years ago

    I still don’t understand the point of a steam box, but I want the controller.

      • Anovoca
      • 5 years ago

      To make money.

      • drfish
      • 5 years ago

      I don’t understand the box or the controller or the OS… What’s wrong with using a wireless keyboard and mouse from the couch?

        • Deanjo
        • 5 years ago

        A mouse and keyboard isn’t the easiest thing to handle without something like a lapboard to hold them on.

          • sweatshopking
          • 5 years ago

          And neither is this controller by the sounds of it.

            • fhohj
            • 5 years ago

            Whaa? Noooo. People say the Steam controller isn’t good? Noooo. That’s disappointing to hear. I need corroboration!

          • drfish
          • 5 years ago

          I hear that but that just isn’t the case for my usage. Maybe people are holding their couch wrong. ๐Ÿ˜‰

            • Melvar
            • 5 years ago

            For a while I had a board across the arms of a chair with the KB & mouse on that so I could play FPS’s on the teevee. Those were some great ergonomics right there.

      • fhohj
      • 5 years ago

      I’m not going to go on an enthusiast forum and harp on PC being too expensive. I’m fine with there being a high end.

      I think, however, that reducing cost of a gaming PC was one of the goals of Steam Machines. There’s three.

      One, give PCs the same “living-room” appeal and feel as a console, so the platform is no longer looked at with the reservation that comes with seeming too technical, as well as so it’s not looked at with the disdain of being nerdy.

      Two, make it cheaper, as for most people, especially those who do not know how to minimize costs without really making some dangerous choices with regards to their machine’s actual capability (which is partly the fault of the PC market both in terms of marketing and what’s available), their first PC can end up being too expensive, especially when you consider what they’re getting.

      Three, try and stabilize the system requirements and software environments somewhat. This is one thing that the consoles have over PC development in spades. And I think developers might be getting snotty about it. Nobody wants to support anything anymore(again, speculation). It was different long ago. Lots of different vendors, lots of different everything. Consoles sucked compared to what PCs could do. Developers were used to the variation and would release on PC anyway because of the attractiveness of the platform versus the consoles. But now the consoles are PCs, just highly standardized ones. If Valve has a target, or at least a loose one, they can plan and advise around such a thing.

        • Melvar
        • 5 years ago

        My response to all three of those stated goals is “it won’t though”.

      • tuxroller
      • 5 years ago

      A standardized, game-tuned os (similar to a console) but with the hardware of a PC.
      Yes, it takes work, and if you’re wedded to windows it’s a problem, but the reasoning makes sense.
      The problems people have had is that they don’t realize how much work this is to do, or don’t see the point.
      If you’re happy with your current system, and can’t really imagine anything better then it makes sense that this wouldn’t interest you, at this point.

        • Melvar
        • 5 years ago

        [quote<]A standardized, game-tuned os (similar to a console) but with the hardware of a PC.[/quote<] That's what consoles are now. Steam boxes need to either be something different, or competitively priced. The Steam box as I understand it is basically following the marketing strategy 3DO used for their console; give the hardware makers no cut of the game revenue and make them charge unsubsidized prices if they want to make a profit, and then lose because their competitors ARE subsidizing their hardware. Only this time you don't even need one to play the games.

    • Zizy
    • 5 years ago

    They took too long.
    If these are released at GDC they would have only some months in spotlight but with unavoidable caveat that Windows 10 is around the horizon. Anything later and nobody would even bother.

      • Anovoca
      • 5 years ago

      These are to be direct competition against consoles and to allow avid PC gamers to take their games they already own through steam into the living room. Windows 10 release isn’t going to matter one way or the other for these devices. Direct X 12 on the other hand might start changing the landscape a little bit, but its going to be a long way off before that is deployed and we start seeing games utilize its full potential.

        • nico1982
        • 5 years ago

        They will never compete against consoles because of price – soon to be under the 300 mark – and I don’t think there are many PC gamers that would consider a SM over their own custom built PC, whatever OS they are running on it, whichever the room they game in.

        They have always been an answer looking for a question, IMHO. The most interesting part was the effort to pack the component in the box: too bad it never result in a standard. And the controller.

          • Alexko
          • 5 years ago

          If Steam machines were built around semi-custom SoCs, like consoles, then they might offer compelling performance/$ in compact form factors. Basically, they could have most of the advantages of consoles with the software flexibility of a PC, and I think that could be appealing to a lot of people. They might even ship with a free copy of Half-Life 3.

          But yes, if they’re just regular PCs bundled with Steam OS and a shiny sticker, I don’t really see the point.

            • nico1982
            • 5 years ago

            I think is more about economy of scale and subsidizing: SMs will never seen the same volumes of console and Valve’s partners are not going the sell device with little to no margin, because they will cash on the hardware only.
            Only Valve would have a chance to compete with Sony/MS and they choose not to. This is telling.

      • VincentHanna
      • 5 years ago

      Its not really that they took too long, its that when all was said and done, they are still left without a viable mainstream OS.

      They could launch their steam machines in october, in direct competition with Windows 10, if they wanted too, and that wouldn’t really matter as much as whether or not their modified linux OS had the game libraries and 3rd party PC drivers to actually stand up against MSFT… Unfortunately they have either not pursued that kind of depth, or they were just unable to pull it off. As a result, SteamOS is basically just another linux distro.

        • rahulahl
        • 5 years ago

        Yea, But its a distro with better gaming potential than most.
        All I ever expected from Steam was to bring gaming to Linux as well. This was always going to be an uphill task, since its about convincing the devs to spend money on the linix version and getting the drivers sorted out for the OS as well.
        While, its nowhere near Windows level of gaming library, they have managed to considerably improve the position for Linux compared to what it was before. Especially the fact that they let you play the game on Windows, Mac or Linux if you purchase it once was a nice thing in this day and age, where most companies try and charge you as much as they can. People end up buying multiple versions of the same product for different platforms.

          • VincentHanna
          • 5 years ago

          I get it. I thought it was a great [i<]idea[/i<] when it launched. I thought it had [i<]potential[/i<]. I'm just saying that (1)They can't compete with the other consoles, and they never will. Xbone and PS4 both have developer support, and are custom-optimized based on their standard specs. This can never happen for steamOS because there is no standard spec. The best that they can hope for is a nextGL port that doesn't use dx9-12, and that doesn't even scratch the surface of sound cards, 3rd party remotes, Bluetooth chipsets, etc...Even MSFT has trouble keeping universal compatibility in this area. (2)The same hardware can play more games if you just use Windows. SteamOS offers no, zip, zero, nada in terms of advantages over windows, and at the same time offers a slew of disincentives. Steam boxes are overpriced even though the OS is free to the OEMs, they lack key hardware and software support, and is simply harder to use. Aside from a person declaring "I hate MSFT," I can't think of a single reason why you wouldn't grab a copy of 7 or 10 and use that; And before you say "dual boot" consider that nobody, and I mean nobody, wants to be playing a game, have their friends pop online, invite them to a co-op game, and to ask them to hang on while they reboot their system. Its very inconvenient.

        • Zizy
        • 5 years ago

        If they launched Steam machines in the middle of W8 hate, with all HTPC stuff working, plenty would be interested to give it a try and play those games available.
        Some would still get Windows versions, but many would opt for the $100 cheaper one without dreaded W8 even if this means you can only stream latest and greatest PC shooters. 900->1000 isn’t such a huge price increase. 500->600 is.
        Free online gaming, still reasonably large library of games etc – should be tempting to many users. With midrange specs of something like R9 280 they could maintain 500-ish price and still make money. No BR but nobody will miss that. Yeah, more expensive than PS4, but with better graphics and better game selection. Plus streaming from your PC. Great gateway drug for PC gamers.

        Now? W10 is probably going to be liked, so the only advantage is price. Still a large factor, but not as dominant as before. There is also more console competition – X1 dropped to 350, PS4 is 400 with a game bundled. Both have better game selection than 1 year ago. X1 has almost all HTPC capabilities and will possibly get streaming (to and from it). While lowest viable (non-streaming) steambox price hasn’t really dropped.
        So, hum, streambox is still possible. A gaming console? I doubt it. Took them too long and missed the spot where it would make sense. Gaming Linux distro? They already have that and yet steam shows Linux to be somewhere around 1-2% with no growth happening. Steamboxes also aren’t needed for gaming Linux to be a success.

          • VincentHanna
          • 5 years ago

          [quote<]If they launched Steam machines in the middle of W8 hate, with all HTPC stuff working, plenty would be interested to give it a try and play those games available. [/quote<] Unfortunately, nobody knew that MSFT was going to ravage our souls when W8 was announced. SteamOS is a direct response to the W8 Hate, so its a little unfair to call it late because of that. [quote<]Some would still get Windows versions, but many would opt for the $100 cheaper one without dreaded W8 even if this means you can only stream latest and greatest PC shooters.[/quote<] Wait, which latest and greatest FPS shooters? Steam doesn't have the latest and greatest FPS titles... In fact, with a few notable exceptions, Steam offers almost no AAA titles released in the past 4 years. Are you referring to some form of shadowplay? [quote<]Now? W10 is probably going to be liked, so the only advantage is price. [/quote<] Actually, for most [s<]people[/s<] geeks n gamers, there is no price advantage. I personally own 3 Windows 7 pro licenses, and 2 windows 8 pro licenses which all entitle me to a free upgrade to 10.

            • Zizy
            • 5 years ago

            [quote<]Unfortunately, nobody knew that MSFT was going to ravage our souls when W8 was announced. SteamOS is a direct response to the W8 Hate, so its a little unfair to call it late because of that. [/quote<] Yeah, I am aware of that and sure, Valve couldn't be ready with SteamBoxes when W8 was released - it was only really started then. But SteamOS beta was released soon enough - if SteamBoxes came then, they would have a much better position on the market. [quote<]Wait, which latest and greatest FPS shooters? Steam doesn't have the latest and greatest FPS titles... In fact, with a few notable exceptions, Steam offers almost no AAA titles released in the past 4 years. Are you referring to some form of shadowplay?[/quote<] I must admit I don't play (m)any non-strategy games. Steam has most of the stuff I am interested in (Civ and TW mainly), so I was under the impression Steam covers almost all games. If it doesn't, it has a bigger problem than SteamBoxes.

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