The TR Podcast 170 video: What the kids put in their PCIe slots these days

We recorded the latest TR Podcast live on Twitch last night, and the video is now up on YouTube. You can watch us answer questions from the audience and also discuss smart TVs, Spiderman, Dell’s Venue 8 7000 tablet, and Intel’s new Broadwell-powered NUC, among other topics.

As always, we’ll be posting an audio version of the podcastโ€”just as soon as Jordan finishes working his editing magic to make us all sound much smarter and better-spoken than we were. Godspeed, Jordan!

Thanks to everyone who tuned in last night. You can make sure you don’t miss the next stream by following us on Twitch or following Scott on Twitter. While you’re at it, you might as well subscribe to our YouTube channel, too, so you’ll be notified when we post new videos there.

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    • mcnabney
    • 5 years ago

    The economic math was terrible when I last calculated the price of a NUC-based HTPC and it really hasn’t changed much with this generation:
    $400 NUC
    $40 4GB RAM
    $60 smallest SSD
    $100 Windows

    So already at $600 and haven’t even added I/O or a display. That is entering Ultrabook pricing with the same Broadwell chip – and buying the Ultrabook includes the display, I/O, a more elaborate case, and one-stop warranty coverage.

    This product line-up just can’t seem to get out of the boutique/novelty category.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 5 years ago

      If all you’re doing is an HTPC, you can get a NUC i3 for about $300. Still kinda sucks, but now you’re only out $500.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 5 years ago

    I miss the 3 articles you promised. ๐Ÿ™ ๐Ÿ™ ๐Ÿ™

    [spoiler<];) ๐Ÿ˜‰ ;)[/spoiler<]

    • puppetworx
    • 5 years ago

    [b<]WANG.[/b<][spoiler<]Wireless, Audio, Network and Graphics cards.[/spoiler<] When PCIE SSDs really start moving it will be WANGS.

    • Concupiscence
    • 5 years ago

    In addition to a GTX 750 Ti I have a wireless PCIe adapter in my Linux workstation, and an old but functional PCI video capture card for making VHS rips. The i5 750 I’ll be turning into a server won’t need cards as much as hard drives, but the onboard SATA should suffice for my needs. The need for expansion isn’t what it was, but a dedicated sound card could still be a nice feature in my workstation – I just don’t know what to choose given my use cases. The output quality of a dedicated card could be significantly better for use with my Sennheisers…

    • timon37
    • 5 years ago

    Aaaah guys please don’t say “I don’t think we can change anything”, if you start talking about these issues* publicly readers will at least notice them, and may start thinking about them. I constantly meet tech-savvy people who have never heard or considered some of these, and it terrifies me.
    You influence a bunch of people who in turn are often tech-gurus for other people.
    Whether the impact is minor or significant depends on a lot of factors, but saying it’s not worth even trying and just ignoring these issues* is plain wrong for a website like yours.

    “The hottest places in Hell are reserved for those who in time of moral crisis preserve their neutrality.”
    — whomever [url<]http://quoteinvestigator.com/2015/01/14/hottest/[/url<] * stuff like: online requirements, horribly invasive drm, lack of support for common standards e.g. gsync vs freesync, tpm chips (or rather by now it's becoming cpu modules, as predicted by some wise people) P.S. listened to more of the podcast, glad to see you're not ignoring the security/privacy issues:)

    • Krogoth
    • 5 years ago

    – The vast majority only use their PCIes for GPU/GPGPUs, but leave most of the slots empty
    – There are a minority who still use the PCIe slots for sound cards, HBAs, extra NICs, SSDs PCIe cards, risers for USB 3/2 ports etc
    -Prosumers who throw in more exotic hardware but such systems are geared for real-world.

    • Kougar
    • 5 years ago

    Thanks guys for the podcast!!

    I knew I should’ve clarified my question but my post was already lengthy! I wasn’t interested in gaming the licensing system. I was interested in showing that if the Upgrade license invalidates the original Windows license, then Microsoft could in no way, shape, or form force users to buy a subscription if they take advantage of the free Windows 10 upgrade.

    Not that I think they would do so, I’d bet that the subscription version of Windows would be a separate edition if they go that route.

    • LoneWolf15
    • 5 years ago

    I still have a SoundBlaster X-Fi Titanium PCIe. Suppose I’m a glutton for the days it was done in hardware.

    I did have a Hauppauge WinTV HVR-1800, but once Comcast encrypted all cable (until then I was getting the basics over the QAM tuner) that was a bust. Still have the card, just no need for it in the system.

    I suppose I could put the Intel dual-gig NIC I have in, or the Intel dual ten-gig NIC, but the latter would require GBICs (which I have) and to be patched into the network via fiber, which seems incredibly silly given home network bandwidth. And a PCIe SSD sounds expensive.

    • MarkG509
    • 5 years ago

    I wanna know what the “cool kids” put in their PCIe slots, not so much the kids.

    • anotherengineer
    • 5 years ago

    “What the kids put in their PCIe slots these days”

    Dedicated Intel Network cards BABY…….YEAHH………………

    • geekl33tgamer
    • 5 years ago

    Erm, other than graphics cards (duh!), mine are empty in both the gaming PC and the HTPC. Everything on a modern day mobo is good enough for most, from the networking, to the software RAID and the on-board sound.

      • Spyrano
      • 5 years ago

      I realized a couple years ago I could go mini-ITX and not lose anything. Haven’t looked back since.

    • Bauxite
    • 5 years ago

    -GPUs, obviously
    -Mellanox Infiniband adapters (40GbE peer to peer is actually quite cheap!)
    -Various 2nd-hand intel server NICs (ultra-cheap)
    -SAS HBAs, all LSI based, all passing through to ZFS because hardware raid is terrible
    -(near future) Really want to test out Intel P3x00 SSD

    Given up on soundcards, they all royally suck these days. Only bother with a DAC on the gaming box, hdmi/DP audio for anything else that needs it.

      • Takeshi7
      • 5 years ago

      Hey, don’t say the Asus Xonar soundcards suck. They are awesome.

        • Bonusbartus
        • 5 years ago

        My xonar still sits in a PCI slot… The xonar dg

        • Bauxite
        • 5 years ago

        Mine suck, the headphone ports on 2 different cards slowly got out of balance to the point I thought I had a hearing problem in one ear. Bunch of different headphones, its all the cards.

          • Krogoth
          • 5 years ago

          Sounds like a shielding issue with the wiring on the headphones.

            • Krogoth
            • 5 years ago

            Headphone wiring isn’t exactly build to the highest quality and it only takes a little cable stress for the wiring to fray and have shielding issues.

    • Phaleron
    • 5 years ago

    Best Podcast name yet!

    Also, Cyril had previously mentioned the a Vancouver meet up.

    Geoff, how’s that coming along?

    • d0g_p00p
    • 5 years ago

    Soundcard and iSCSI HBA in my desktop PCIe slots. NICs, iSCSI HBAs, & RAID cards in my servers.

    • obsidian76
    • 5 years ago

    Big OEM’s like ASUS do advertise overclockability on gaming laptops, so under EU law the product has become different to the one initially advertised and is therefore breaking consumer protection law

    [url<]http://www.asus.com/Notebooks_Ultrabooks/ASUS_ROG_G750JZ/[/url<]

      • Takeshi7
      • 5 years ago

      Just like when Sony removed Linux from the PS3 even though they advertised the Linux. EU law doesn’t mean anything.

        • Melvar
        • 5 years ago

        I though they got sued and lost (or settled) and had to give everyone a cookie and a high five in compensation.

          • Takeshi7
          • 5 years ago

          According to Wikipedia:
          The class action lawsuit was dismissed by a federal judge, stating: “As a legal matter, [..] plaintiffs have failed to allege facts or articulate a theory on which Sony may be held liable.”

          [url<]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OtherOS[/url<] Edit. I guess that wasn't an EU judge though.

            • Melvar
            • 5 years ago

            Actually, I think I had gotten this mixed up in my head. After a bit of googling I think I was remembering a story about someone asking for and recieving a partial refund.

      • Welch
      • 5 years ago

      The EU and its consumer protection laws, sometimes I can’t help but laugh. People must feel safe knowing their government is making sure no one is out to screw them, and I mean NO ONE!

        • wierdo
        • 5 years ago

        Works fine in general, sometimes even great. Wish we had some of that here in some areas, for example broadband and telco markets.

          • Welch
          • 5 years ago

          Some protections are fine and all… but the EU and Australian governments go over oard sometimes. So much to the point that the cost of good go way the hell up. I would never want to be a store owner in australia for instance. If the consumer so much as says the color is 1 shade off what they thought it was they can get a refund pretty much. Screw that. Consumers can be really dumb and/or malicious and abuse often abuse those protection laws.

          • Glix
          • 5 years ago

          Still get screwed over in the UK even with the protection as ISP’s don’t really care if your connection isn’t performing well due to their congestion issues as they did sell you an up to service after all?

      • Krogoth
      • 5 years ago

      I doubt EU courts care enough but that and technically you can still overclock the gaming laptop itself, but not the GPU in it.

    • PainIs4ThaWeak1
    • 5 years ago

    So what [i<][b<]DO[/i<][/b<] the kids put in their PCIe slots these days? (TL:D[b<]Listen[/b<])

      • Shambles
      • 5 years ago

      Quad Intel NICs, Thunderbolt adapters, and PhysX physics processing units!

      • Takeshi7
      • 5 years ago

      They plug their Sound Blaster 1.0 cards from 1989 into their PCIe slots using a PCIe to PCI bridge, and a PCI to ISA bridge.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 5 years ago

      tongues.

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