Fanless ultrabox boasts Broadwell guts, industrial design

For days, the press release announcing Logic Supply's ML100 has sat in my inbox, taunting me to write about it. The funky-looking mini PC packs Bay Trail or Broadwell hardware into a passively cooled chassis that operates in blissful silence. That's a good pitch, but the ML100 is also an industrial system designed to survive "dust, harsh environments, shock and vibration." It's a little bit… different.

Source: Logic Supply

The finned chassis looks awesome, I think, and the serial port adds a dose of hipster irony outside of industrial applications. The ML100 wouldn't look out of place in a tech-chic living room, loft, or office. As an added bonus, the ventless enclosure is impervious to dust.

Inside, there's a motherboard based on Intel's NUC form factor. ML100G-30 configurations will be available with Core i3-5010U and i5-5300U processors, both of which have dual cores, quad threads, and 15W thermal envelopes. Those configs can take up to 16GB of RAM and 512GB of M.2 storage. Sorry, no 2.5" drives allowed.

The ML100G-10 downgrades to a quad-core Celeron N2930 processor. This 7.5W chip is restricted to 8GB of RAM, but it can be paired with mSATA drives up to 1TB.

All the ML100 flavors have 802.11ac Wi-Fi and at least one GigE port. The Celeron is paired with dual HDMI ports and a second GigE option, while the Broadwell doubles up on Mini DisplayPort and adds extra USB 3.0 connectivity.

Pricing will start at around $500, which presumably refers to an entry-level Celeron setup. Premium pricing is common for industrial-grade systems like the ML100. I just wish more consumer-oriented mini PCs pursued similarly passive cooling.

Update: Logic Supply has posted a full spec sheet (PDF) with additional information, including dimensions, memory speeds, and other details.

Comments closed
    • heinz
    • 7 years ago

    Have you ever seen the ULTRABOX from LeviCato Computers?

    • Symmetry
    • 8 years ago

    I was thinking of 6 big cores, not Atom cores. Turning SLS and lidar returns into a costmap then planning in it takes a certain amount of horsepower. We should really be looking into how to do it on a GPU but we’re mostly using stuff straight from ROS at this point.

    • DarekLogic
    • 8 years ago

    The ML100G-10 does feature a quad-core processor, the Celeron N2930.

    • Bauxite
    • 8 years ago

    If you’re into DIY, there have been thin mini-itx fanless cases since ivy-bridge, so you get some choices in motherboards etc. Expansion is obviously limited but you can use lower tdp desktop socketed chips.

    • Wirko
    • 8 years ago

    Here’s a stupid, inelegant and cheap solution. A Haswell Pentium PC with a high efficiency PSU consumes around 25W on idle. An Athlon 5350 PC consumes around 15W and up to 40W on load. Either would probably work for many years if you put it in a micro-ATX box and simply close all vents with duct tape.

    • cmrcmk
    • 8 years ago

    keeping the heat out of the chassis? Also, for applications such as cars where you already have DC power available, you can forgo the big ac/dc block and just get a dc/dc converter to get your desired voltage.

    • Wirko
    • 8 years ago

    What’s the point of having a separate power brick in an industrial PC?

    • WhatMeWorry
    • 8 years ago

    It’s a Steampunk computer.

    • DarekLogic
    • 8 years ago

    Sorry about that, we ended up having to update the URL. Here’s the correct datasheet link: [url<]http://www.logicsupply.com/media/resources/spec-sheets/Logic-Supply-ML100-Series-Industrial-NUC-Computer-SpecSheet.pdf[/url<]

    • Brainsan
    • 8 years ago

    404 on the datasheet link.

    The dual NIC NUC is a good fit for some of my applications.

    • Deanjo
    • 8 years ago

    PETA is stalking you

    • Milo Burke
    • 8 years ago

    But somebody please do bring a cat to an assembly line and record what happens. This needs to be on YouTube.

    • Deanjo
    • 8 years ago

    It’s an industrial PC, colours that stick out in the environment these are meant to be used in is a [u<]good thing[/u<]. You shouldn't be bringing your cat to the assembly line.

    • tootercomputer
    • 8 years ago

    That ugly yellow color has to go. Maybe a charcoal gray or an off-while. Something. Otherwise, it looks pretty cool. Plus, those fins would discourage cats from pissing on it.

    • maxxcool
    • 8 years ago

    “”The ML100G-10 downgrades to a quad-core Celeron N2930 processor””

    Yet would still make a excellent HTPC for non-4k

    • BiffStroganoffsky
    • 8 years ago

    It’s an industrial design. You can use some old RGB covers for the serial port and duct/duck tape the rest.

    • Deanjo
    • 8 years ago

    It’s the Sparkomatic Amp 6000 with the 50 watt ILS rating (if lightning strikes).

    [url<]http://i48.tinypic.com/2s6pwmr.jpg[/url<]

    • Firestarter
    • 8 years ago

    You could probably mount it vertically on a VESA mount behind the screen

    • Symmetry
    • 8 years ago

    Those look very nice but for our robot we’d really like 4 or ideally 6 cores in an industrial package and that’s really hard to find.

    • DarekLogic
    • 8 years ago

    Darek here from Logic Supply, we’re actually in the process of bringing in just such a product to offer with our systems. We’re hoping to have them in-house by the time the ML100 launches.

    Thanks for the comment!

    • Anovoca
    • 8 years ago

    Nice looking design. I only wish these would have some type of cover or rubber plugs for the unused ports.

    • Anovoca
    • 8 years ago

    Most industrial environments will have ample vacuum or compressed air supplies. a few puffs of air to clean one of these off is much easier than cracking open a case, unplugging the fans and trying to clean out the cpu heatsink.

    • hasseb64
    • 8 years ago

    Possibly, but most people have a vacuum cleaner at home, even the “TVSHOP” variant of one would manage to clean those fins.

    • lycium
    • 8 years ago

    I’m not a hardware designer or anything, but it seems to me this thing could be WAY better built if someone’s worried about dust: those upward-facing fins are basically huge dust collectors!

    • playboysmoov
    • 8 years ago

    The design reminds me of the audio amplifiers made by Alpine for cars back around circa 1994. It will probably installed the same way as well, with nuts and bolts on the back of static item (kicker or in this case monitor), to prevent theft.

    • Welch
    • 8 years ago

    Hmmm these are interesting. It’s not like these are the first passive industrial designed PCs or anything, but still interesting to see an up-to-date version of this type of design. I’ve got a few customers who were recently asking about having a “basic” PC in some seriously dirty shops. This would do nicely.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This

Share this post with your friends!