Dr. Evil asks: GXP problems?

OK, so this is an issue that’s been touched on at HEXUS.net, on the Storage Review’s forums, and at The Inquirer; do IBM’s 75GXP and/or 60GXP drives have abnormally high failure rates? I don’t know the answer any more than anyone else, but I think that some input from our readers about their own GXP experiences will help shed some light on the issue.

Now, before we get started, I want to lay down some ground rules similar to the Via post a few weeks ago. I don’t want this to turn into a flamefest, so any “75GXP’s suck!” posts will get nuked. What I’m most interested in is first-hand or second-hand accounts of experiences with these drives. If you (or say a friend of yours) have experienced one or more failures with these drives, say so.

Just for giggles, be as specific as possible: How long had you been using the drive, which model/capacity was it, and how did it exhibit its death throes?

Likewise, if you’ve got one of these things in your system and it’s working great, I’d like to hear that too; it’s difficult to gauge things if we only hear about the bad ones. Once again, model/capacity and how long you’ve been using it would be helpful.

I’ll start things off by saying that I hav…er… had two 30GB 75GXP’s, though now I’m down to one. The one in my main machine has been humming along with no issues whatsoever for the six months or so that I’ve had it. On the other hand, I bought another one (same model/capacity, factory sealed) last month, and it bit the big one in a hurry.

It started with those “click of death” noises that strike fear into the hearts of anyone who knows the sound; a low-level format found some bad sectors that it supposedly fixed, but the problems continued. Within 24 hours, if the drive was plugged into either of two machines I had handy, it would cause the POST screen to spit a bunch of multicolored text goop right after “Detecting Primary Master…” Ugly.

So that’s my story and I’m sticking to it; I think Damage has a (second-hand) story as well, but I’ll leave that to him. Anyone else’s experiences (positive or negative) are greatly appreciated.

Comments closed
    • AlexGK
    • 10 years ago

    My 45GB 75GXP (307045) just died after 8 years of 24/7 operation.
    Quite an achivement considering that it was clicking and claking ALL eight years :)))

    • droopy1592
    • 11 years ago

    lol my 45GB 75GXP is still chugging along

    IT WON’T DIE!

      • AlexGK
      • 10 years ago

      My 45GB 75GXP (307045) just died after 8 years of 24/7 operation.
      Quite an achivement considering that it was clicking and claking ALL eight years 🙂

    • shaq_mobile
    • 11 years ago

    my first and only deathstar died after less than a year of use. i rma’ed it to hitachi and they sent me a new one. has been running fine for two years now. flakey buggers. keepin the thread alive.

    • Aphasia
    • 11 years ago

    Still have 75GXP that lives. And several 60GXP as well.

    • PerfectCr
    • 11 years ago

    Best thread ever?

    • Sargent Duck
    • 12 years ago

    Never had a deathstar, but I just feel like I have to help contribute to a piece of TR legacy.

    • Krogoth
    • 12 years ago

    Post 1508 and 75GXP legacy still lives on!

    • Captain Ned
    • 12 years ago

    I’ve got a Hitachi DeskStar that just let go.

    • PerfectCr
    • 14 years ago

    Long live Duke Nuked! “Nobody steals our chicks…and LIVES!”

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    Go away, SPAMMER!

    Nobody cares about your pr0n crap, they get it free from “Usenet” and other sources.

    Welcome to the thread that simply refuses to die.

    —Krogoth255

    My account doesn’t work here BTW

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    seagate rocks!!!!!!

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    I have a 40gb ibm hd. it came in a dell 8100. the warrenty expired 2001, so the drive would not boot in 2001(about 3 months after warenty). I tried my best but just would up getttine a new seagate barracuda, worked just fine, and still is. the funny thing is though, i plugged the ibm behind it aa cavle select and from my comuter was able to access all my files, but sure enogh, it started giving me problems again, in the way that i was using it as the swap file holder (uses a hd like ram, just slower) and my computer flubbed out and slowed to a snail like pace. And i have rd ram, 300 bucks for 126 mb so now im looking for a new computer. The funny thing is, ive reformatted it 5 times and each time, it works for about 40-60 days and then i get these problems. I just recently gave up after reformatting and letting the drive cool for about 5 days, no luck.

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    I’ve had two IBM drives, a 14GXP and a 60GXP. The 14GXP is
    still going strong after 6 years and a lot of use.

    The 60GXP was bought in early 2002. It had the updated firmware. It’s been a good drive until the past few weeks when it started making the occasional odd clicking noise.

    I was swapping it out onto another system anyway, and backed up
    the important directories onto a CD.

    The clicking and whirring got worse and in the course of copying files across onto new partitions on the older system the PC hung.
    Eventually it was a power-cycled and the drive was recognised, but windows thought the partitions were not formatted.

    Tried booting from a Linux rescue disk, which could see the disk and the partition table.

    I tried the drive in another machine and sometimes the BIOS could see it and sometimes it couldn’t. Eventually, it couldn’t see it at all and then it couldn’t see anything else on the same IDE channel on either PC.

    It sounds like the NVRAM corruption problem.

    I tried sticking it in the fridge then trying it, no dice. Maybe if I can get another one – for nothing, I can try swapping the boards. There isn’t really anything that’s important on it that isn’t backed up in some form. If it was got to work again, it couldn’t be trusted.

    I suppose that 4 years is OK for a consumer market HD and well past the 3 year warranty; you can’t trust any hard drive with the sole copy of important data. However, I have always been used to HDs soldiering on to well past the point when their capacity and speed were useful.

    I think the next time I’ll go for Seagate.

    Hitachi is a different company to the one that made the DeathStar,
    but I think I’d take a lot of persuading before I buy another drive from them.

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    please can someone help

    i have an ibm 120gb hard drive, it started making those noises click click clikerdy click ones you know, then it stoped booting then stopped spinning, oh no now what, so i bought the same one of ebay,and changed the pcb over and result!!! it spins, with no noise.
    But now the thing is suffering a bit of shyness and doesnt want to appear anywere on the pc,including the bios autodetect
    the only time i get any evedence of its existence is when i connect it using usb to ide, but it only comes up in the device manager not my computer on xp. ive also tryed fdisk and that cant find it ither.

    I am not a member of this forum but would appriciate any advice

    thanks matt. mattster501@yahoo.com

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    I got a DeathStar 60GB (June 2003) which was an RMA of another faulty one, except this one has a little orange sticker on it with “Servicable Used Part” printed on it.

    The symptoms started a few months back with the click/whine noises. It did not happen all the time, only sometimes. I thought a few times that it must be one of my CD/DVD drives with a media in it just spinning or something. Never occured to me that it might be the hard drive.

    Finally 2 days ago my wife woke me up early in the morning saying my computer is complaining of something (around 8am). Well the motherboard I have tells me something is wrong. It was telling me in a robot voice that the hard drive has problems and a constant click/whine/click/whine/click/whine… The PC was on over night. I don’t turn it off often. Every morning at 8am also my AVG virus scan kicks in and does a full scan of the drive.

    Anyway, so I stopped the PC went back to bed. When I woke up I took the HD out and did some research online, found this forum, others too and everyone is complaining about the DeathStars.

    I also found a sample of the noise my Hard Drive is making.
    §[<http://www.dataclinic.co.uk/ibm-deskstar-buffer-corruption.wav<]§ It seems it falls under the "corruped buffer" category. The scientific explanation can be found here... §[<http://www.dataclinic.co.uk/ibm-deskstar-hard-disk-drive-data-loss.htm<]§ I really need to recover the data on this Hard Drive. Any ideas/suggestions are pretty welcomed and much appreciated. Once I recover my data I will use the Hard Drive as fishing weight. 2 things I learned. -Do constant backups of your valuable data. I had a spindle of blank DVDs and a DVD burner, never bothered to backup my data. -When you hear any (I mean any) funny noise from anything, there must be a good reason. Diagnose before it's too late. Here is more details of the HD I have. Model: IC35L060AVER07-0 Made in Philippines June 2003 Was running Windows xp Intel cpu 2.53Ghz , 1GB RAM Thanks for any info/help you can offer. kevorkd at hotmail dot com.

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    Hi all!

    I used to run two 180GXP (IC35L120Avv207-0) as RAID 0. One of them is gone now, saying goodbye with that not-so-funny noise of death :(. The drive cant be recognized anymore and the disturbing sound starts with turning the PC on.

    (A recording of that noise can be found at:
    §[<http://www.computerrepairs.at/Ibm_Festplatten.htm<]§ In my case it has been the second sound.) I just started to find out if there is any possibility to get my data back. But it doesnt seem to look that good for me....

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    IC35L040AVER07-0 40 Gb hard disk
    Dell Dimension L933r

    I guess I’m another deathstar victim. Hard disk (3 yrs old) started making grinding noises a few days ago, next time I tried to boot up windows xp stalled. Windows Repair from install CD and chkdsk /F eventually let me gain access to windows again, but ever since then windows runs tremendously slow as it tries to access (bad sectors?) on the hard disk. Belard advisor (free utility) gave me info about model, type of hard disk in my computer(IC35L040AVER07-0). Googled this information and found out about the problem. Quickly moved all my critical files out. Western Digital Data LifeGuard Diagnostics (another free util)seems to be doing a good job marking bad sectors as I write these lines, but still have to wait till it finishes to see the result. Seems to be time to sing the miserere nobis for my hard disk, I’m not interested in getting a replacement, I don’t want to know anything about IBM/Hitachi hard disks ever again.

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    80.3 GB Deskstar 2002 Drive. Failure on around 10/25/05
    E-mail if I can get my money back & data. Mmavin@aol.com

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    I have (had) a Deskstar IC35L080AVVA07-0 (Thailand) 82.3GB (80GB) that died like a week ago….never had any problems with it until now that is…bought 2002, warranty out in July.
    I just sat as usual working with the computer…turned it off…and then later when i turned it on nothing happens and the ‘famous’ sound appears…
    Lucky for me that i didnt have anything important on it…

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    A little late, but my IBM drive has just failed, (suddenly). I found this site whilst looking for ideas of how to fix it,

    my drive has lasted a good 5 years or more, of fairly constant use in my old laptop, until after a fairly rough car journey it’s finally failed…

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    IBM Deskstar from Thailand, IC35L060AVVA07-0 model 120GXP. It’s been “failing” for the past month, although I’ve been using it for nearly two years. Had no idea that the Deskstar line had so many problems (primarily because it was a Buslink-branded drive, so I didn’t know it was an IBM until I opened her up).

    Sporadic disk write failures, but SMART said all was well. Today, I was playing music from the drive and it stopped playing, although the click-click-click continued. Shut it down immediately, waited for it to cool down (I’ve noticed that the drive has been physically hot, and thought this might be part of the problem), and plugged it in again. Spin-up was OK but once I plugged it back into FW (internally it’s ATA/IDE), click-click-click again.

    Going to try the freezer method, and will report back.
    – Mike

    PS: If you are writing about your experiences, please include the manufacturer, the location of manufacture, it’s model, and family.

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    *[http://www.opendrivers.com/categorycompany/1375/168/storage-hitachi-free-driver-download.html<]§

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    *[http://www.opendrivers.com/categorycompany/1375/170/storage-ibm-free-driver-download.html<]§ IBM Deskstar Tools: §[<http://www.opendrivers.com/categorycompany/1375/170/storage-ibm-free-driver-download.html<]§

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    *[http://www.dposoft.net/#b_hddhid<]§ Good luck!

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    (see previous two posts)
    looked in the device manager and I see the drive, but I can’t access the drive from my explorer. When I click on device properties of the drive and populate the volume information, I see status = foreign…partition style = MBR. The rest is all zero. Is a firmware update usefull /i.e. possible??

    regards,
    Guus.

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    Today started with good hope to fix the deskstar (see previous post). I’ve resoldered the contacts on the PCB that make contact with the other part of the drive. No luck there. The harddisk had the same problems as before: it starts spinning, but after 10-15 seconds it stops spinning and the drive is not recognized. Sometimes it even doesn’t spin up.

    I’ve tried the drive in a USB casing for IDE/ATA drives and set the drive as master (and to several other options), but it didn’t work (with other drive it’s ok, so the casing is ok). Tried also freezer spray, but also doesn’t work. The drive also doesn’t get a chance to run hot. Also tried several jumper combinations.

    It’s a IC35L080AVVA07-0 (around 80gb) model. Warrenty expired in march 2005 according to the ibm site 🙁

    Any suggestions are more than welkom.

    regards,
    Guus.

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    Hi,

    also have an IBM Deskstar. Was dazzled to see that much troublems with the harddisk. The problem occured some time ago. I didn’t pay much attention to it. Yesterday I started (i.e. tried) to use the drive again. Once it appeared in windows xp but gave a failure when I tried to read from it. Then the trouble really started. The drive was also not recognized in the Bios anymore. In all those posts I read something about the solder and the contacts of the controller PCB. This evening I’ve tried to push a little bit on the controller pcb. Now it was (sometimes) recognized in the Bios. I even had it once a minute running in windows XP. Now it just stops spinning within a few seconds whenever I’ve managed to get the drive started.

    Tomorrow I’ll fix me a torx screwdriver from my work and will check the soldering on the controller PCB and will probably try to resolder and clean the contacts. If the drive is running, I’ll back it up a.s.a.p. and will probably never use the drive again (at least not for data I really need to have safely stored). Never a deskstar for me again.

    I’ll post again when I’ve managed to fix the drive (or if if didn’t work, but guess my chances are prety good because some mechanice pressure on the controller PCB helped the drive to run for a short period of time).

    Really bad engineering if it’s true about this lousy contacts.

    regards,
    Guus.

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    Thanks for the url. Sadly it didnt help

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    *[http://hem.bredband.net/b106202/IBM/contacts1-Cleaning.JPG<]§

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    My Deathstar 80gb died today and it sucks. Had it for over 3 years so no chance for RMA.
    This was my second IBM drive, the first one died too. But this is the last one for sure.

    Is it somehow possible to retrieve data from the disk even if it wont show up on boot?

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    I should say I sit i[

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    Hi again! This this the same person as the previous post. The drive now works…I sat in the vertical position outside of my case and it was recognized in POST and Windows started right up.

    I copied all the contents to my primary driver & just purchased a Seagate 120 GB to be my storage drive. I’m keeping the IBM drive as is and going to put it away someplace safe for now.

    -sigh- what a scare!

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    In short, it appears my secondary hardrive, an 80 GB IBM “Deathstar” that I’ve had since around mid 2002, has died. It had been my primary drive since about June or July of last year when I made it a secondary drive to store files on. It was replaced by a 160 GB Seagate.

    Here is how it appeared to go down: I had just finished formatting/reinstalling/etc. on my primary drive since it had been about 8 months since doing so. I was in the process of accessing some files from my backup IBM drive when a blue screen that I had never seen before popped up and said something about “Cannot do something blah blah…attempting to dump physical memeory”.

    It was a hard lock so I hit the power button and rebooted the computer. The computer proceeded to hang at POST, going reeaaallly slow through the startup diagnostic. It would read that there is now NO Primary Slave drive and would just sit there, not going into Windows. I should also note that the hard drive access light now continously shows amber (activity) when the IBM drive is connected.

    I was able to go into the BIOS after waiting a few minutes but I’m not able to auto recognize the Primary Slave drive. It says basically nothing is there.

    A few troubleshooting things I’ve done:

    *I’ve reconnected the drive cable and power lead to a different drive and that drive (a Maxtor) is recognized fine as a Primary Slave drive.

    *The drive didn’t make any weird noises, nor did I smell anything unusual leading up, during, and since the drive was connected and powered.

    *The jumper pins are all there and in the correct settings for Slave.

    *No pins are bent, broken or missing on the drive itself where the PATA cable connects to the drive. Same goes for the power connections.

    *Not sure if this had anything to do with it but I had just installed the NForce drivers (from the IBM drive no less) for my motherboard and DID NOT select to use the Nvidia IDE Controller. Since the drivers are installed in a Windows environment and the other hard drives are working, could this have somehow screwed something up

    I do and have realized that there had been a “problem” with the IBM Deskstar models but I’ve never had a problem with this drive until now. Here is the exact specs of the IBM drive taken from the drive label, if it can help someone help me:

    Manufactured: March 2002 N79
    Model: IC35L080AVVA07-0
    S/N: A4C8ZSZA
    Capacity: 82.3 GB
    P/N: 07N9210
    LBA: 160.836.480
    RPM: 7200RPM
    MLC:H32657
    SECTORS CHS: 16383/16/63

    The drive spins up and sounds completely normal but it just isn’t recognized at all. I’ve tried putting it in an external USB enclosure and tried to access it from Windows XP. No luck. I even took to Best Buy and it did the same thing on their computer.

    -sigh-

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    Add another to the list. My 75gxp 60gb came with my gateway approximately 4 yrs ago. The computer is just a home computer that gets around 8-10 hours of use per week. It (the 75gxp) has always been noisy since the day it was new. I started to get errors and crashes in windows, and the thing would take forever to check the disk and defrag. Ran the DFT software and it told me everything was fine, no firmware needed…WTF?. I installed a second drive (NOT IBM!!) on my comp to run linux, and found that even when i wasnt using the drive it would suddenly start with the grind-grind-grind click, and do it constantly until i accessed the drive, then it would stop. This would repeat like clockwork every 15 minutes. Then when i would try to boot the drive in XP, it would be noisy and crash leading to the scan the drive for errors on reboot of xp (which found and fixed errors every time). Booting back to linux i saved all important files on the second drive, replaced it with a western digital and all is well. IF YOU OWN ANY IBM/HITACHI GXP DRIVE BACK UP EVERYTHING IMMEDIATELY. Also, dont trust the IBM DFT software to tell you everything is alright, as it said my drive was just fine and it failed like so many others are reporting here.

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    I have a Hitachi Deskstar 160 GB drive.

    Windows XP has just started resetting itelf for no apparent reason then displays windows recoverd from a serious error , windows was unable to read/write to the drive.

    Its also started to click.
    Because I have lost the recipt for the drive but its way less than 1 year old whats the policy on gettnig shot of this heap of crap , and getting a refund (its also SATA)

    supermexxx@hotmail.com

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    *[http://hem.bredband.net/b106202/IBM/Om.du.har.en.havererad.IBM.Hitachi.60GXP.htm<]§ Unfortunately only on Swedish.

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    Well I have a 80GB deskstar “ohh what a drive dum de deum” Mine was manufactured in 2002 so you gussed it out of warranty.

    My drive after about a year started to do that very strange click wine noise , but i thought nothing of it at the time.

    Then suddenly BANG !!!!!!

    Wont detect on boot , and it sits there wine click wine click wine click you all know the noise by now.

    One of the iC on the control board gets well hot very quickly (and apparently its a NVRAM corruption fault). Anyways… Searched high and low for a solution but came to dead ends because the drive Jams the IDE lines on the pc and it refuses point blank to boot.

    So i thought what have i got to lose whack the drive in the frezzer ( i am still waiting for it to get cold) and it occured to me I used to see this problem all the time from re[airs to TV’s and videos IC would get hot and fail. You can purchase freezer sparay from RS components (or maplin) which freezes the chip very nicely.

    Its very cheap only a few

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    I have my laptop’s hard drive in front of me because of what: Click of Death. A few days ago, it started clicking on the rebooting, then I could boot the system up for a couple of times. Then since yesterday, it goes to the click, click, click mode forever. Now I removed the hard drive from the laptop, found it is: Travelstar Model: IC25N030ATDA04-0 (30G), made in Thailand by IBM storage. I’m so unfortunate since I bought this laptop from eBay and it has out of warranty.

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    As I’m sure others have said, Hitachi isn’t much/any better than IBM in getting these drives to be reliable. For the 3rd time, I’ve had to send a Medea VideoRaid R/T back to CA (from VA) for a Deskstar drive dying the ClickOfDeath way. I don’t remember the model numbers, but the first group of 4 IBM DeskStars lasted 2 years, the next 1 year (at which point they were swapped out for 120GB Hitachi Deskstars), and the last group only lasted about 2 months.
    Each time I’ve lost lots of data. Medea refused to put in different drives, regardless of my angry protestations. When I get the unit back from them, I’m going to find out what RAID board they use, and try to find any (ANY) other drives that will work with it.
    Damn these drives. Damn them straight to Hades.

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    I had a 80 GB DeskStart quit on me receantly. No click-boom-bang, it just caused XP to reboot once in a while, then moved on to not booting at all and now completly dead – the motor does not spin-up at all. I tried to measure the voltage to the motor but it seems that it is getting no power. I’m still hopefull that it is the logic that has died and that I will be able to change the cirquitboard from another IBM HD. Have anyone succeeded doing that? Does it have to be from a drive with the same capacity? I have another DeathStar hangin around with different capacity (30GB) which is quite identical to this bigger drive. Furthermore, IBM’s (or is it Hitachi’s now?) DFT did some effort to try to detect the drive. One out of ten times it stopped for several minutes trying to detect it. Anyway, with the motor not spinning, no drive was ever detected.

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    Yeah unplug the slave drive and everything will be OK. It’s some type of microsoft application to kill off Linspire on Slave drives. Meaning Slave drives are history unless you put it behind the Secondary CD-ROM as a Slave Drive. Also I have no problems running a slave that is clean without any files as a Primary Slave either.

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    I have two 40 gig Deskstar drives that have died ??

    One is just recent, and im trying all kinds of thing to get my data back, with no luck.

    If it is possible to retrive data, WHY DOESEN’T IBM GIVE US THE SOFTWARE TO RESTORE THE DATA ???

    Only makes sence that they would have the best chance of getting lost data back from there maufactured drive ????

    Mayor

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    In 2001, I bought a laptop that came with a 40GB IBM HD. (Travelstar?).

    I used this laptop quite abit. For school work, work, projects and graphic intensive games. The thing kept chugging away until a few days ago it started making a clicking sound (The clicking sound of death?). It must have been because the drive died just this weekend. 🙁

    This is 2005, so it did have a pretty good run, for a laptop? I don’t know because this is the first harddrive I have ever had die on me. This means that I am really hoping to be able to retrieve data that I (silly, silly me) didn’t back up elsewhere.

    At least I know I’m not alone in the “Lost Data” department.

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    I got a ibm deskstar 40Gb hard drive that lasted four years (just after the warranty expired last year) then the other day it just started making heart-beeping noises every 1 second and won’t boot up – Bios says it can’t find any drive there. Tried putting it in another computer and it had the same problem. Anyone know if the this hard disk can be fixed?

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    While freezing hard disk to recover data from physically damaged hard disk, I get water condensation on the disk after I get out to room temperature. Wont that cause any short circuit on the cuircuit board of the hard disk ?

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    IBM/Hitachi seem to have some general problem. My laptop was giving me troubles since the very beginning (frequent blue screens). Finally, a few days ago, it did boot, but then click, click, click… I have disassembled the computer, yes, an IBM Travelstar (another IBM died in one of my machines at work – I have NEVER experienced a HDD failure before). Replaced the HD with a Western Digital, and then my laptop became a completely different machine…

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    do you have any thing else to do ??????????????

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    In my work we boght more than 20 computers with IBM Deskstar 40GB and 60GB hard drives. The first ones to fail under warranty were replaced by similar IBM drives, that also failed after a while. Later we started replacing all of them (under warranty) by units from other brands. All execpt one (that failed today) lasted less than 2 years… Stay away from IBM hard discs. We lost some valuable data and countless hours of work because of these discs… I wouldnt want one, even for free!

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    Who wants to earn a quick US$200??

    I had a 45GB 75GXP and two 30GB 75GXP and all three are dead. The 45GB unit died on me just after 1 year and I though that was pretty unlucky and threw it out and gave the two (then working) 30GB drives to my brother. I was going through his IT cupboard just recently and found the two 30GB drives and asked him about them and he said they died soon after I gave them to him! Damn these drives are shitty.

    I have the two 30GB drives here in my hands and I’m in Australia so I don’t think I can get compensated in the class action at §[<http://www.ibmdeskstar75gxplitigation.com/75gxp-serial.asp.<]§ The first person to write in their email address after this post (write it like something AT something.com so you don't get spammed)....I will send you the serial numbers of the two drives so you can hopefully collect US$200 for them in the class action suit. You'd have to be from USA. The two faulty drives are both DTLA-307030. My main motivation is seeing the money getting taken from IBM for this!!

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    Have a IC35L080AVVA07-0 here the 80GB model-the second one. It has s ome weird clicking. freezing and whirring beahviour-when, as an example, I’m browsing a page with a lot of images and want to scroll down the long page, or I’m looking at particularly large pdf file and so on, the hard drive will make a single click, the page will freeze for say 2 seconds, then the hard drive wll make another single click and then the page will unfreeze and the PC will then continue on as normal.

    This is an RMA repalcement for the original disk that died in its 3rd year-thankfully still within the warranty period.

    Another thread on the topic here: §[<http://www.sysopt.com/forum/showthread.php?s=&postid=1290546#post1290546<]§ I seem to think-thought before finding this thread that is-that it's a PSU or MOB problem-sounds like a drive problem to me! Matt Sydney, Australia

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    I’ve had the same problem as post 1332, same model, IC35L040AVVN07-0, 40 GB. I suspect the firmware and plethora of jumper combinations, as well as the quality of the components.

    I got the same results running it as master (boot); failure to detect in POST, gobbldygook when detected, unreliable when detected and found by the OS. Same chuffing on FDISK / reformat struggling either over bad sectors or because the control circuitry went crazy.

    As a slave it caused problems on the data channel and screwed up icons on the desktop when booting from a known good master HDD. Removal of the drive and reboot restored everything back to normal. Thankfully.

    it’s a quality control and possibly design problem. I won’t use Hitachi again. What am I saying ? I’m stuck with them in my laptop.

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    Calling all tech enthusiasts! In desperate need for new forum members! PCNX needs you! Help needed to revive nearly-dead forums! If you’re up to the challenge, please visit §[<http://www.pcnx.com/forum/<]§ and your needs will be met! :D Oh, and to sprice things up, those who become most actively involved in the forum will receive Basic Plus!, Deluxe, or Premium myPCNX image hosting accounts (details at §[<http://my.pcnx.com<]§) - free image hosting will always be made available in the Basic plan.

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    Never, ever!!! will buy something from Hitachi or IBM. I just lost everything!!

    Thank you

    • Anonymous
    • 14 years ago

    *[hfmoller@ananzi.co.za

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I have maxor 60GB 7200rpm 2 mb cash ide and it makes a noise when search something
    if you can help me pleace write on
    brankodim@mt.net.mk

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    hi all i have a weard problem my amd duron 1.0ghz Box ( wxp pro sp2) whith a 120gb maxtor hdd i have the pc for 3 days on continiously and my hdd drive wasnt reconizable for the computer after reseting not even in the bios i have let the harddisk alone out for 4 days out off the pc and i tryed in an other computer asus 1 ghz pIII and it reconized it again so i put it back in my amd and its working again 🙂 ?? amazingly enoug i was able to secure data but what is it why is it doing like that??

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I just had a 60 GB Deathstar 180 GXP (IC35L060AVV207-0) disrespect me with it’s constant clicking noises. After spending a couple hours swearing at my eMac and power-cycling the computer about a hundred times hoping for the hard drive to spin up, I finally found this website and read about the “freezer trick”. Well now I can wholeheartedly vouch for the freezer method. I froze my hard drive down for about an hour and was able to get the hard drive to spin up without clicking at me. As another poster suggested, I operated the drive sandwiched between two freezer packs for about 3 hours, switching freezer packs when they started to thaw [the drive was hooked up to an external Firewire enclosure], enough time for me to get everything (~50 GB) copied onto another drive. What’s odd is that once I got all the data off the drive and even managed to run a few directory repair utilities (Mac OS X’s Disk Utility and Alsoft’s DiskWarrior), I put the drive back into my eMac and it’s been operating fine ever since. However, this REALLY disturbs me, as we all know one hard drive failure is a harbinger of much worse things (I was lucky I was able to recover my data). Now I need to figure out how to tax the hard drive so that it fails again so that I can get it fixed under the computer’s warranty which ends in two months because I’m never going to trust this hard drive anymore.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I have 2 (bigger fool me) IBM Deathstars giving problems, and another that I would like checked B4 it gives up.

    I don’t want to lose my data and am thinking of giving the link on post 1334 a try. §[<http://hdd-repair.mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/index.html<]§ Has anyone else tried it?? Seems cheap enough

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    /stupid post

    weeeee I’m a 1337 poster, beat that FPosters =P

    / stupid post

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    the new settlement is kinda of a moot point now….

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    *[http://www.ibmdeskstar75gxplitigation.com/<]§ I\'m guessing the offers being sent were triggered from the two RMA\'s I did. Unfortunately The four drives I had fail were the 60GXP not the 75GXP, two of which I RMA\'ed for the other two which failed at which point I gave up on IBM. I am not sure why I recieved two offers for settlement because it doesn\'t cover the 60GXP drives I have unless I actually RMA\'ed the 75GXP and recieved the broken 60GXPs, which I have now, in return. Did anyone else recieve notification for this settlement who only has 60GXP model drives? Does anyone know if there are any other class action suits going on which the 60GXP is included in? Any Ideas?

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I have just got my drive repaired and data recovered for 25GBP at
    §[<http://hdd-repair.mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/index.html<]§ only took 8 days!

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I have an IBM 180GXP 80 gig 2mb buffer and the damn thing just started clicking and going crazy. I have really important info on it and I dont know if there is any possibility for me to try to get it back… well anyway I think it’s real garbage and on top of that it came with my dell comp and on the bill it says western digital… So Dell is stupid and Hitachi took over IBM’s hd division and screwed it all up.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    IBM Deskstar problems: I am running two Deathstars IC35L040AVVN07-0, 40 Gb 7200 RPM as slave for data only, and DTLA 307045, 46.1 Gb 7200 as Master with WIN2000 and applications programs. A few days ago, I noticed that my AMI BIOS would not detect the slave HD as logical F drive. At times, when I rebooted, the Volume label appeared and I could read the F: directory. The last time it worked, I got a prompt to “chkdsk /f” the F drive, and like a “dummy” I followed the Microsoft instructions. The chkdsk/f fix routine found errors and quickly truncated the file names completely filling up the HD. I wasn’t able to stop the chkdsk in time.
    I downloaded DFT and booted from a DFT floppy, it “found” my F drive (40 GB) and defines it as a 380 GB hd?!! Gave it a weird serial number and model number (impossible numbers). I rebooted and my BIOS found the drive, but not the volume label or contents.

    Does anyone know how I can inexpensively recover the data from this drive? I called IBM…they referred to me to Hitachi and they told me that they would “give” me a “rebate credit” since it was under warranty. BIG F Deal. I have an idea!

    IDEA: Try to find some High value business/governemnt IBM equipment that contains an IDE HDD…something important like payroll records, accounting records, tax records etc.

    Yup, you guessed it….Make a switch (on IBM serviced equip): IBM would quickly learn how expensive poor quality and poor customer service will get!

    Kwitch

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I have a couple of 120 GB IC35L120Avv207-0 discs, 2 years old. The first year I ran a RAID 0 on them. Then I seperated them for a less risky setup. Shortly after that, I noticed a strange Whirr-Click sound from one of the discsm, that I had not heard before. I was not sure if it was a new sound or not, but from that time it occurs every 2 to 3 hours or so, only when there is no disc activity. The machine still runs smooth, without any data loss and does not hang. I have a back up of my more valuable data, so I’m just going to live with the whirr-click until something happens.

    I have been trying to find some real technical information on what is causing this sound, without much luck…most of the information seems to be speculations from people with very little knowledge.

    I have had a lot of HDDs fail on me in the past, …none of which were IBMs, I have put togeather a couple of machines for friends with those same 120 GB disks, without any problem so far.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I would like some feedback about this.

    I have been reading some posts to see if someone experienced what I am experiencing right know, I found some but not quite exactly.

    I own an IBM/Hitachi Deskstar 80GB
    hda: HDS722580VLAT20, ATA DISK drive

    I run both linux and windows, and in any of both systems the machine reboots unexpecteadly and randomly, sometimes its uptime is about 3 days, sometimes more, sometimes less. This started happening some time ago, I really didn’t think it was my hard drive until now. I already bought a new one but I havent received yet. I am still using my faulty drive.

    This is my story: After 4 month of buying it and using 24/7 I started hearing those “noises”, I thought: “4 month old, COME ONN!!!?!?”, I called my dealer for a replacement but he told me he has to analyse it for 48 hours bla bla bla, and I really couldn’t have my computer stopped that much so I sticked to that drive. It’s been more that a year now and the drive still making some noises now and again, but the real thing that annoys me is the rebooting issue.

    Finally, I made the time to try and find the reason of this rebooting, I disconnect everything except CPU+Memory+HD and it was still rebooting.

    Something funny that happened was once, I turned off the machine to unplugged everything, and when I turned it on again, the drive wouldn’t start at all, making horrendous noises. Without shooting myself, I tried to power on the drive without the IDE cable and it started ok, but If I turned it on with the IDE cable it was making that same thing all over again. Finally, lost by lost, I powered on the PC without the IDE cable, and when the drive started, I hotplugged 🙂 my ide cable on again and WOW!!! The drive was detected again :). After 6-9 reboots within the first five minutes of using it the drive started working an ussual (rebooting in an average of 3 days), now I can turn off and on the machine without any problem again 🙂

    Anyway, after doing this and reading a lot of info on IBM drives I think the problem is and was my HD. I bought a WD Caviar 80 GB and I will let you know if my reboot stops or not.

    Do you think that a HD failure could produce this rebooting behaviour?

    Greetings,
    Ariel.=

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Similar thing here with an IBM Deskstar IC35L040AVVN07-0. A few weeks ago, Windoze started to reboot spontaneously – no BSOD, just bam, gone. When it came back up, it would sometimes not detect this 40Gb drive. Odd because it hadn’t given any warnings, clicks of death or anything I’d noticed, and nothing untoward in the event log that I could spot. Don’t think it’s directly heat-related either, because my case only hovers around 29 degrees C.

    Up until then it was one of my other 30Gb drives (DTLA-307030) that was making bad sector ‘pffth pffth pffffth pfffth pfffthsshh <pause…repeat>’ noises and, for some reason, wouldn’t mark the bad areas as bad so it could avoid writing to them like all drives are supposed to. I regularly (every 3-4 months) reformatted/sector repaired it with DFT but it didn’t seem to fix it, just gave me another month or so before it did it again. Oddly, S.M.A.R.T. wouldn’t stay enabled on this drive either, despite DFT allowing me to enable it; running DFT up again would show it as disabled. I’ve just upgraded the firmware of my 307030s to 0A5AA, so I’ll see if that helps.

    Anyway, I managed to coerce the 40Gb drive back to life and backed up anything that wasn’t already done. A couple of days later, the machine wouldn’t get past the Detecting IDE drives… bit of the BIOS until I disconnected the disk. I did some hardware swapping and found that any device on the same IDE channel as this drive (including the IDE-RAID) wouldn’t be detected; I tried all combinations of master/slave jumpers, primary/secondary and channels/devices I could think of (including pairing it with CD/DVD drives) and every time, the channel with the Deskstar on it would show “Not Detected” for both devices. Go figure. Since DFT now won’t even see it, I have declared the drive FUCT and given it a one-way ticket to paperweightsville: at last, it can truly star on my desk 8o)

    All my IBM drives are about 2.5 – 3 years old now so, compared to some people posting here, positive dinosaurs and I kinda feel privileged to have had this much mileage out of them, given their track record. I like the speed of the drives, it’s just a shame IBM (Thailand, it says here) can’t make them last longer.

    *sigh* next stop is searching the ‘net for a spanking new drive (non-IBM, of course :-))

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I’ve read circa a hundred of posts, IBM is losing a lot of fans here… I’m from Italy, I own an IBM 120GXP ICblablalbla, it’s a very weird thing happening here… The drive freezes after a couple of hours, of “not so heavy” work… I mean I’m in Windows doing my own business and the drive suddenly start to “click click click”, my HDD temperature utility says “cannot retrieve temp from the current HD”, thing starts to slow down and the drive slowly fade away… yep, it really fades… this process lasts about 10 minutes, then the drive is not yet on my system, explorer doesn’t see it, it’s not listed on the device list… DISAPPEARED!!

    I think it’s a matter of heat, if I unplug it for at least a couple of hours then it’s again recognized by the bios and works for about an hour.. well I’ve never seen a hd needing to be relaxed before working… damn IBM!

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I have a strange (not as common) failure to report of my IBM Deskstar HD model IC35L040AVVA07-0. While dealing with a virus I attempted to quick restore my computer to an earlier time and somewhere during this process one of my RAID-0 HD’s died. It turns out that I experienced an electronic failure of the onboard controller card rather than the physical mechanical portion of the drive that many folks are reporting. Well, in order to restore my drive to operational condition I need to get a replacement circuit card. If anyone has a donor they would like to sell/donate please email me at: b{

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I had a hard drive crash a week ago (with very little backed up) so am majorly bummed…my own fault i know but in looking for reasons found this site.

    Mine was a Hitachi (1 year old almost to the day) Model #:
    IC35L120AVV207-1

    Just like the one in the email I am replying to.

    A few questions:
    Any chance of a class action against Hitachi (couldn’t tell from notes if these Hitachi’s fall under IBM’s class action suit)?

    I am a teacher and mostly use for writing, curriculum development etc (no vid games or heavy usage). I have been told that it is more harmful to the drive to turn it on and off daily then to just leave it on. Any truth to that?

    I talked to these tech guys at the place where I bought my replacement and some of them have like 11 fans installed on their towers. Is that necessary these days?

    If overheating is such a risk, why don’t towers come already outfitted with additional fans?

    And why don’t they tell us of the risk when we purchase? Do they assume everyone knows?

    Thanks.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    A friend of mine bought two 40GB IBM Deskstars (P/N: 07N6654, Model: IC35L040AVER07-0, made in Hungary) in Oct 2001. Both died within the the same month (March 2005). One got the “click of death” and died suddenly, the other developed bad sectors and died one week after. All two were in the same desktop computer that gets daily use and shutdowns. The computer didn’t have adequate cooling so the 3.5 years of life for these two drives were not unexpected.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I had 2 IBM Desktar drives die on me. 40 gig model, the 60GX. Fuck IBM and Hitatchi. I just bought two Hitatchi drives not knowing they were the same as the IBM, one of them is DOA. I am very frustrated at this point. I don’t ever plan on keeping any important data on the Hitatchis though, at least I know better now.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I bought IBM DTLA 307030 30GB drive in february 2001 together with my new pc.
    Several monts later, when I turned on my PC like any normal day there it was… click..click..click… sound from my drive. Damn, I thought, my data is gone now. Scandisk could not finish scanning and windows didn’t boot up. Then, when I thought that drive was dead I turned off pc. After couple of hours I turned it on again just to check and drived worked normal… That was a strange, but good. No data loss and no bad sectors.

    Through years drive was giving power-off power-on/clicking sounds when copying large files (cd images and stuff), and defragmenting.
    When I updated firmware clicking sound stopped (at the beggining) but returned with time. Sometime drive wasn’t even recognized by bios but turn off- turn on pc resolved the problem 😉 without any loss of data.

    In October 2004 i bought new Maxtor SATA drive and old IBM drive was now serving as Linux/non important stuff hdd. Surprisingly, just couple day before, the IBM deathstar was not recognized by bios and whole post screen was garbled. Drive just clicked once and stopped. I turned off pc and turned it back on but it didn’t help. Then, I opened my PC, diconnected power and IDE cables, and connected it back again. After turning PC on, drive was functioning normaly (!?) and there was no data corruption.

    Currently drive works fine with Linux.
    I am just waiting the day when it will be 100% dead…

    Greetz to deathstar owners…

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Hm. Interesting use for a old drive. But how many people here have Linux on their home computers? On a non-server version of Windows you can only make automatic backup of some partition to another, there is even some simple software solution to do this automatically, can’t remember its name right now.

    Creation of mirrored volumes is possible on Windows platform, too. But, unfortunately, Microsoft crippled Windows XP Home/Pro and 2000 Pro to remove support for RAID1/5. All code is there, just controls is disabled.

    There is some information for REALLY risky people… 😉

    §[<http://www.storagereview.com/php/tiki/tiki-pagehistory.php?page=DesktopMirror&preview=6<]§ This (of course) violates EULA and before each service pack installation you'll need to backup, break mirror, then install SP, patch files again and recreate mirror.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    About a 1.5 years ago, we got a number of problems with 75GXP (20/30GB IBM DTLA) drives, that suddenly developed a lot of bad sectors… All such drives was taken out of service, data was backed up, firmware updated, and attempt to remap all bad sectors was made. 10 out of 12 drives has been remapped successfully, but we decided that it is not reliable enough to use it as usual.

    Ironically, now these DTLA is used to store most critical files, in same systems… 😉 Replacement drives was much larger than 30 GB, so we reserved some space at end and make software RAID1 volumes (portion of new drive and “repaired” IBM is mirrored). Now, if any of two drives will crash, there is much less risk to files stored on that 20G partition (there is a .bat file that runned at the end of each working day and make a compressed backup copy of mail database, and some other critical folders to that volume).

    There was PC3000 mentioned earlier on that page… It is not end-user tool, so I perfectly understand why there is not so much effort to sell you one… 😉 With PC3000 someone can do a lot of interesting things with failed drive, like rebuilding defect map, turning off defective head (making for example usable 20 or 30G drive out of failed 40G)… But it require a lot of knowledge and some additional diagnostic equipment. Sales to end users will make zillions of stupid questions and a lot of frustrated people. So, they prefer to sell this stuff to repair shops. It is not so cheap, after all.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Follow up of post 1319..

    Try freezed the drive for more than 24 hours. now connect it to computer… same.. no hope…

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Now I joined all who had a deathstart…

    My drive is (was) a DTLA-307045 46.1G one. It was bought late 2000 or early 2001 (Manufactured Oct 2000).

    It went fine without problem until yesterday night, I found my computer cannot be recovered from suspend mode. Pressed Reset, harddisk spined up, then “click—— ka–click—— ka–click—— ka–” and BIOS cannot detect it at all. DFT reported no device 0x20 and pressing the PCB won’t work.

    Next step is to freeze it and hope I can get something out of it…

    CL

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I have a 20MB 60GXP IC35L020AVER07 which I’ve had in a couple of systems put together from bits. I occasionally had problems which I put down to various other dodgy components, but I now see the disk drive was probably to blame for most of the problems.

    Every 6 months or so I’d have bad sectors etc. Occasionally the disk wasn’t even recognized by the bios, but this latter problem usually recovered itself, although I have had to reinstall windows a couple of times. I thought it was due to my dodgy motherboard, memory etc.

    I recently upgraded my system, but kept the hard disk, and I’ve had a couple of scary moments when the disk has not been seen by the BIOS. After a bit of messing around, removing and reinserting power and IDE cables, it spontaneously recovered. I can’t remember exactly what sounds it was making.

    The microcode is version ER20A46A. When I downloaded and ran the checker it said I should load the updated version, which the site said was 45A. When I ran that it wouldn’t apply the firmware and said I didn’t need to update (which sort of makes sense as 46A sounds more up to date than 45A).

    Having seen this, I’ve made a full backup and am ordering a new hard disk quick before this one dies completely.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    My IBM drives died again and again, it’s not worth it…

    • Steel
    • 15 years ago

    One thousand three hundred and fifteen. Wow.

    For the record, my 75GXP is still working just fine ;-).

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I have had my IBM Deskstar 60GXP 60GB since early 2001. In early 2003 I started to hear the click of death and new of the problems these family of drives had. Then IBM released the firmware update wich I used to nervously update my firmware. The firmware update went well and I since have only heard the click of death once. I am still using this drive and writing this post on my IBM drive. I do not have anything important on the drive and will continue to use the drive. I will keep the drive until it either dies or I upgrade to a new drive in the future. One thing I will say is that from now on, no matter how fast reviews say a Hitachi drive is I will only buy Western Digital hard drives.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Phew – a lot of posts here. I’ve read through dozens and dozens of selected posts – 1 or 2 from each page – all the way through to page 53.

    What a hell of a lot of misery IBM have caused. Yes, this is undeniably true.

    I was the proud owner of an IBM 40 GB 7200 HDD (Model: DTLA-305040, Made: Dec-2000). From the start, while using the drive, it would occasionally make a “scratching / clicking sound” which really worried me the first few times I heard it. However, scan disk could find no errors, and the drive kept working OK, so gradually I came to ignore such sounds as normal for a glass plater drive.

    Anyway, the drive totally failed without further warning in October 2003. The drive was still under warranty, so I RTM’d it.

    I was supposed to get a brand new drive back, but the replacement drive had a “Servicable Used Part” sticker on it, but I (stupidly) assumed that the drive was 100% OK, and that IBM / Hitachi would have thoroughly checked it out and verified it before sending it to me.

    Anyway, just over 12 months later, in January, 2005, the replacement drive totally died on me without warning – a few days ago …

    My PC is in an airconditioned office, the case has plenty of fans, and I am not an overclocker – so heat was NOT as issue.

    One IBM Deskstar failure was a very bad thing. Twice is simply unforgivable.

    This time, I have demanded a replacement drive (and it must be anything but an IBM drive) and I also want ALL of my data and files recovered at IBM’s expense.

    However, even if IBM agrees to this (which I doubt), then I will still be up for many 100’s of hours of inconvenience and anguish.

    e.g. Even if they recover the data, can I really trust the files ? Will I need to go through and individually check each recovered file to make sure that nothing is corrupted / damaged / missing ? I had well over 10,000+ files on the drive – so this checking could take months / years of time, and I may still never really be sure.

    I’ve also emailed the above information to the Sheller Ludwig & Badey class action web page :
    §[<http://www.sheller.com/Practice.asp?PracticeID=114<]§ Mike "Moose" O'Malley ____________________________________________________ Moose's Software Valley - Established July, 1996. WEB: §[<http://move.to/moose<]§ ____________________________________________________

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I have an IBM/Hitachi 60GB Deskstar which just failed without any warning last week. It became invisible to the BIOS and, in fact, caused the BIOS to fail to see any other drive on the same IDE channel. It was clearly demonstrating the “click of death” when power was applied – the repeated clicks and beeps were the same whether or not the IDE cable was attached. Needless to say, I didn’t have a recent backup and was set to lose 5 months of precious digital photos and video of my youngest daughter (nearly 1).

    I tried freezing the drive as some had mentioned here and rapping the drive (not too hard) on a table leg – no luck. I tried repeatably turning the drive on and off and holding the drive at different angles – no joy. I bought an external 3.5″ enclosure with USB2 connection to make things easier.

    I decided that the drive was a gonner and started to look into the costs involved in having the data recovered professionally.

    A week or so later I decided to have another go with the drive having read somewhere about pressing the PCB controller on the underside of the drive. The circuitry felt very hot but I noticed, as I moved my thumb across different areas of the board, that the clicking and beeping sound was changing. I continued to press and move my thumb around thinking that I was probably going to short the board or cause serious physical damage to the drive (it was making some loud clunking noises) when it went quiet. I though that that was the end when I heard the dum-dum noise of Windows recognising that an external storage device had been connected. I quickly copied all the files to another drive on the system. Some of the larger AVI files (~13GB) failed to copy – the drive just kept some quiet scrapping noises and, eventually, Windows gave up and reported an error. I downloaded some software which splits large AVI files into smaller chunks and managed to recover practically everything from the drive.

    Needless to say, I will never use the drive again (and will never buy an IBM/Hitachi drive again) and will be much more careful to ensure I frequently back up important data.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    And here comes another frightening st2. in my HDD the small flat-cable that connects to spindle motor has only 4 tracks. Measuring with a multimeter (HDD unpowered) there is low resistance (< 1ohm) betweenory.

    It started somwhen in november 2004 when one of our IBM IC35L080AVVA07-0 (80GB) started to fail in a RAID-1 array. Nothing to worry about too much, “harddisk failures happen here and then”, I thought.

    Then some days before xmas one of our customers workstations that we support had troubles with his harddisk that would switch off occasionally. I drove to our customer and found that the harddisk was the same model (IC35L080AVVA07-0) that caused the previous problems. I was lucky enough be able to copy its data to a new harddisk and litter the defect drive, though.

    And right now I’m sitting here and have to deal with another harddisk crash, this time it’s a VIP fileserver and you can guess it: the failing harddisk is a IC35L080AVVA07-0 again.

    3 disks of the same model failing within just 3 months is horrendous.

    Never ever will I personally or my company ever buy such crappy IBM resp. now Hitachi drives.

    I never would have believed that big company like IBM with at least some kind of reputation to loose produces such trash.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Hi everyone !

    I am the frightfull owner of a 60Gbyte IBM deskstar, and have been so for a few years now.

    Soon after I bought the IBM drive, I discovered that a huge amount of people had very bad experiences with these drives.

    By an incredible stike of luck, I have never yet had 1 single problem with this drive.
    – And it has certainly had a lot of work to do in the past years.
    Furthermore, I have had it installed in a computer, where I (after a month or more without turning off) discovered, that the fan in the powersupply was malfunctioning, causing no ventilation of the tower. This ment, as of course you all realize, VERY high temperature inside, so the deskstar had been toasted for at least a month – still without no malfunction what so ever.

    My motherboard though… now thats another story… It went very unstable after the toasting period, and had to be replaced.
    – This unstableness whas the reason why I discovered the malfunctioning fan in the powersupply in the first place 😉

    Well, Anyway, I think I have been very lucky indeed, with no deskstar problems so far.

    But I have seen trouble with these deskstar’s, a good friend of mine bought a 120 Gbyte drive, and that most certainly have made a lot of trouble…

    So, eventhough I have been lucky myself, I cant recommend these drives, and will most certainly not buy anymore of those myself. That goes also for the Hitachi Deathstar – changing the name of the manufacturer doesn’t make that much difference in this case, I think…

    best regards,

    Jack

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    has anyone had success taking the electronics board from a working drive and hooking that up to a dead one for data recovery?

    Would just replacing the hitachi 90G2018 fix it?

    just lost a 45G dtla-307045.
    last backup is a month old.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Everyone please remember that if you want to get in on the class action lawsuit against IBM, please go here…

    §[<http://www.sheller.com/Practice.asp?PracticeID=114<]§ When you send in your defective DeathStar hard drive to IBM/Hitachi for replacement (because it was still under warranty), and they replace it with another defective DeathStar hard disk that is just going to go bad in a few months...what good is the warranty?

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Had an ibm deathstar 60.. started doing the click of death and then went dead on me.
    Recovery fails due to damaged reader..
    I didn’t loose anything that cost a lot of money, but the photos of my grand dad are goner.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    IBM Travelstar drives — I am calling them “TroubleStars” — are also problematic. My 32GB Travelstar developed the click of death recently. Using the freezer method, I managed to copy some of the data just once. After that it clicked out and I can’t revive it any more. Three out of six TroubleStar drives I’ve owned died within two years. I will never buy any Travelstar again.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    You know, its funny how reports claim that the “GXP” series are the affected set when every series of Deskstar seem to exhibit the same problem and its not firmware related. The drives seem to generate “bad sectors” at shutdown as if the heads are getting spiked and depositing erroneous signals onto the disk. I’ve seen it happen in many sizes from 20gb to 120gb, all with the exact same failure.

    The drives are recoverable but usually not data as it requires zeroing the entire disk. For Deskstars with the “freeze-and-grind” problem (you can tell by putting your ear to it, you’ll hear “crunch-crunch-crunch-crunch <pause> crunch-crunch-crunch-crunch <pause>) you can usually make them usable again by running a tool like maxtor’s floppy bootable “MaxBlast” and running a zero-fill on it. Then you can reformat and bring the drive back to life if you dare use it again.

    The drives seem most reliable when never shut down, not recommended for regular desktop use. I had two running in a four-disk array and they ran perfectly fine for two years until I shut the machine down. Powered back up and crunch-crunch-crunch-crunch… Luckily, the reason I had shut the machine down was because I had just finished migrating all of the data to a larger volume and was ready to re-purpose that machine.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    *[http://www.jeff7.com/anandtech/hitachidrive.mp3<]§ The heads keep repeating the same pattern. It does at least spin up normally. I\'m thinking (hoping) that the PCB is defective, and that the platters are ok. Someone recommended a device called PC-3000 to recover the drive, but the website for it, §[<http://www.acedre.com<]§ doesn\'t seem to want anyone to actually purchase their products. At any rate, the drive is a 92.6GB thing, an RMA replacement for a 120GXP that died of a horrid head crash. 60GB drive. 85MB was recovered with R-studio. Model number is IC35L090AVV207-0. So if anyone happens to have (or know where I can get) a PCB for one of these things, give me a message. E-mail is jeff7 (at) jeff7-dot-com.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I suppose asking for the Hitachi anti-meow firmware might not be that easy:-

    §[<http://www.pcnx.com/articles/article.asp?articleid=2004070002<]§

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Maxtor are not much better and Western Digital are about the same. Like all electronic equipment heat is a killer. Keep everything as cool as possible, use a good power supply run through a ups and if the machine is not a server do not leave it running all the time.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Hey guys. I never knew there was such a big problem with these disks!
    I was using a Deskstar120 60gb, as an external disk for my laptop. it had all my pics from school, my a-levels results day, the parties afterwards and all sorts on it! music, u name it, if it was important, it was on that disk.
    anyway, i leant forward to plug in the usb, and my neaklace touched one of the 4 contacts for the motor at the top of the spindle. (Yes silly i know…. and even sillier to leave it out of a caddy, circuit side up…)
    anyway, the same clicks of death, and the disk stopped spinning…BUT…

    the disk has a lot of features similar to what you guys are finding… the clicks etc. have any of you touched the chips on the board to see if they get hot?????

    Somebody in post 1278 was explaining about the chips and jumper numbers! – Good effort!!!!
    “The 4-wires that cames from J3 (spindle motor connector) go to the Hitachi chip labeled *** * 90G2018. It seems to me a custom chip in 64-pin TQFP.”
    The first few digits i have replaced with an * change, but the last ones are all the same on my disk. it is the smaller of the 3 chips, furthest from the IDE connector.

    Anyway, that chip gets really hot when i plug in any power to the drive! have a check and see if you guys have the same!!!
    Think that if i change the circuit board, the drive will live once more! Now only 1 challenge, find a similar disk on ebay or in the shops!

    Good luck!!
    Del – Yes that is my real name, not a spoof!!!!

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    i’ve had many GXP’s gone bad. i’m up to 5 now – and my last one just went bad – this time, for a very odd reason. One of the IDE pins snapped. I hardly forced it, so it’s a bit concerning.

    I have a IC35l060AVV207-0
    P/N: 07N9212

    If anyone has one of these drives, that has gone bad – i am interested in giving you some money for it – to try out a part swap.
    my email is alphakry AT hotmail.com. hit me up asap.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I just picked up a Retail 160GB Hitachi 7k250 that I could swear reported as 157GB when I hooked it up to the mainboard. I used partition magic to partition, format and set the partition active. Somehow, now it shows up as 33.82GB . CHS are reported as 65530/16/63 in the bios and with the util that cam with the drive but it should be 16383/16/63. Anyone have any ideas?

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    IC35L120AVV207-1
    one of ibms makes… im a newbie to PC`s im having a problem with the “deathstar 180gxp” making noise before crashing.. like its just poweing off .. then BAM it goes have to restart… its only when been used in heavy loads like playing my PC games … this renders my PC to be a nice new paper wieght… well i wish they would do somthing to sort this shit out… ya know im getting fed up of it… i work at my local college and we had a bad batch of maxtor 20 GB hard disks …. and when 30 of them fail withing 2 weeks its no joke … 🙁 well thats my ranting over

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    This is all very interesting. Yesterday, I was copying 15GB from my primary hard drive to my secondary (IC35L040AVER07-0 Made in Thailand IBM Deskstar). I was not at my computer at the time it crashed (I was logged in remotely from work) so I wasn’t around to hear any noises. I’ve had this drive for roughly 3 years and never had any problems until now. And as most of you probably did, I started searching the web for info. on hard drive crashes to see if there was anything I could do myself. Anyway, found out it was out of warranty in August and so I decided to take it apart. There is an obvious ring around the top platter where the head has scraped into the platter. The BIOS on two of my computers won’t recognize it anymore. Oh well. It’s amazing there are so many of us with these crappy drives.

    Too bad I didn’t know about this before it happened…. Maybe I should go research my other drives too just in case. Good luck everyone.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Just thought I’d let everyone know my experiences with my 30 GB and 40 GB IBM Death Star drives. Mine both experienced the click of death in less than a year of owning both of them. The only way I could get my data back off of each of them was to freeze each drive in my freezer for about 4 hours and then quickly hooking one drive back up to my PC and quickly copying files over to a good drive. Then, after I had all of the data copied off of the first Death Star drive, I hooked the second Death Star drive up to my PC and quickly copyied files to a good drive I purchased.

    You’ll have to do this quickly though because as soon as the Death Star drive starts to heat back up, you’ll start hearing the click-of-death sounds again. It’s very similiar to what the guy posted a few posts below my post did (read below), but I didn’t use a freezer bag and I didn’t freeze the drive for two days. I just froze them for four hours, then connected them to my PC and if I heard click-of-death noises again (because the drive was starting to heat back up), I’d stick it back in the freezer. You do have to be very careful that moisture doesn’t form on the Death Stars circuit board or the hard drive will short out. But this technique worked for me about 2 years ago when I tried it.

    Obviously I’ve never bought a hard disk drive from IBM or Hitachi again, nor will I ever purchase one again from them. For those that don’t know…. Hitachi bought IBM’s entire hard disk drive business.

    Hope this helps

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I beleive my gxp 75 gig deskstar has joined the ranks of the great floppies in the sky…

    i had it running for a couple of years, put my computer away for a few months, and now can’t get it to be recognized in the bios…

    still tyring to convince myself its a setup problem, but i’ve heard about all the problems before, i was just thinking mine would be ok…

    but it aint…

    it makes a very faint click noise, but i though it was normal…

    but at least the platters are spinning…

    is it finished, or can something be done?

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Does anybody have a functional driver board for the 80GB “Deathstar” drive (P/N IC35L080AVVA07-0)?

    My drive does not spin-up and it seems to be one of the driver chips. The data is probably OK on the drive so I figure that by swapping the board, I should be able to get the drive up and running long enough to retrieve the few tid-bits I had failed to back-up.

    Along the same line, if I determine that my data is worth $80-$90, I am considering buying a new 80GB deskstar, pulling the board and replacing bad one.

    Questions:

    a. Must it be the 80GB drive or can I use a 40GB or 60GB drive (i.,e. are the driver boards the same)?

    b. Any reasons why I should not attempt this?

    Thanks in advance ;;-)

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I am very very very!!!!!!!!! angry when I see all of this. I bought a IBM Deskstar 40GB drive. So when I read the post ofhendrik2105@yahoo.com I was shocked because MY HD did the same stuff!! I just HOPE all of my stuff can be retrieved will try to follow your example because I lost like 4 months of work for clients and such that I didn’t backupped and most of all. I lost my own work Lot or art and Animation.

    GK_studios@hotmail.com

    I will post more If I can fix it

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    So glad I found this article… I’m using a IBM 60GB ATA drive now and it seams like I am experiencing the ‘death signs’ – sometimes the drive would continuously read/write and in return it would hang windows xp and it would leave me with no choice but to restart.
    After the first hang the internet speed got a lot slower which looks to me that some bad sectors have developed that corrupted some TCP related files. If I reformat the internet speed gets to the normal speed but after about a month I start having the hanging again…

    I must get a Maxtor ASAP before I lose all data.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Hi,

    I got all the data back. I tried the technique of keeping the HDD in to the freezer (max freezing point) for 2 days packed (airtight) in a plastic cover (with tight ropes on the package). After the HDD got a dead cool temperature, I connected it and found that my PC detected the HDD (now i heard un-interpretable noises from the HDD).. “GREAT”.. my Win2k booted up and i am lucky to copy all the necessary data into my secondary HDD.

    But the HDD stucked up 2 3 times and I used the same freezer technique to recover the remaining data. Dont remove the plastic cover over the HDD while you connect to your PC. make a opening at the connector end of the HDD or better place the HDD in a tight thermocool box in order to keep the coolness while the HD is in operation. After doing this, i found that the HDD is running for more than 2 hours without any problem.

    Also I found that, the previous click-ckick has created lot of bad sectors (i got many CRC errors in many files, while i am copying files).

    While you are taking bkup, remember the following.
    – dont overload the HDD by doing more than one copy.
    – but try to copy the needed files as quick as possible.
    – do not try to write the data in a CD or some other slow writing media, as this may take more time and ur HD might stop at any time.

    If you succeed in this HD freezing technique, it is like you are just lucky to retrieve the needed data and do it AS QUICK AS POSSIBLE. it is something like you have got the GOD’s grace.. LOL.. (if u r not an atheist)

    I found this HDD freezing technique worked with some other HD also (i saw in some forums).. But I am not clear about why this dead HDD (sometimes) works under very cool temperature.

    I am very eager to know about the technical details.

    Thanks
    R.Padmakumar

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Oops, forgot to close the tag. Sorry about that.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Well… finally my old DTLA3070 30.7 GB 75GXP died. I can’t say it didn’t do its job, because it did. From May 2000 to October 2004. One of the best 75GXPs ever?

    Crr crr crr. Crr crr crr crr. mmmmmmmMMMr{BEEP}<choke>. Crr crr crr.

    DFT Error 0x75.

    I just wish I had had enough money to backup the data on it before it died, or kept a list of what I had on it.

    Please, everyone, keep a regularly updated recursive dir listing of your drives and partitions; I recommend it.

    Now, I have a 60 GB 60GXP that’s acting a bit weird lately. It’s been humming along in my old trustworthy dual Celeron 400 MHz on a BP6 for way over a year without problems. One day, the server locked up and refuses to boot and POST with the drive installed. This drive works in my workstation which is a P4C 2.4GHz@3 on a P4P800 Deluxe. Even works on the shitty VIA 6410 controller. I don’t dare use it anymore. I’ll copy all the stuff over to a new drive when I can afford it and then throw it away.

    I wish there were a cheap and easily maintained backuping solution, but alas…

    Funny thing, I still have an old 15 GB 25GXP Deskstar going in the server as the uploading drive. It’s from January 1999 I think. I had an identical one that died 18 months ago.

    I’m not trusting it to live for long 🙂

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I’m on my 4th 75 GXP. Always the same problem- The drive will be reading the disk and will go “SCRATCH, SCRATCH, click click then spin down, then repeat. Sometimes it will read the file, sometimes it wont. When rebooting, about 3 out of 4 times it cannot even detect the drive. When it does, Windows may start about 1/4 of the time. I have worked with the IBM techs and not only are they rude, but they would not cover my drive because I did not have proof of purchase. It did not matter that the drive had a manufacture date stamped right on the drive of DEC 2001, indicating that the drive was still covered by the 3 yr warranty. The techs will tell you straight out,that there is nothing inheritly wrong with these drives. “All drives fail” they say. NOT LIKE THIS ONE, I say.

    MCSE

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Hi,

    I have been using my 8GB Seagate u4 (Model: ST38421A) hard disk for nearly 5 years without any problem.

    But, Yesterday, when I started my computer, I found the “dard disk detection failed..” kind of message. Also I heard mild “tick-tick” sounds from my hard-drive. I tried in Auto-detecting the hard-drive once again with the help of bios-setup and it is not detecting the hard drive. I once again tried manually setting the drive parameters thru the bios-setup and it also failed to detect.

    I checked for the correctness of cable (power and data) with my friend’s HDD and it is working fine. I also checked with the jumper setting and all look fine.

    Finally when I kept my ear very very close to the HDD surface and restarted the system, I heard the following sounds.
    1. sound of disk spinning up
    2. a sudden “tick-tick” (or tlick-tlick / tilk-tilk / trick-trick) sound..
    3. sound of disk slowing down

    this repeats and repeats..

    What is the actual problem in my HDD.? (Please give me techncal details)
    can it be fixed.?
    or can the important data inside be safely recovered.?

    Please assist me.. I am in real confussion.

    Yours
    R.Padmakumar

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    In my previous post, I forgot to mention that the 40 Gig DeathStar drive failed by the Drive Fitness Test as fault “0x71” Device Not Ready. Why????

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I have a 40 Gig IBM DeathStar drive which is now dead, manufacture date was March 2001 so it is out of warranty. It was not used much. The drive was making weird sounds like rezeroing itself when indexing – grind then clack sound. Since so many of these drives have failed, is IBM/Hitachi offering any extended warranty coverage if not, is there a Class-Action suit against them for compensation????

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Two IBM drives one 76.87 GB other 20GB are now dead and two months out of warranty. Failure code 0x70 Defective device. Drive fitness test could not fix anything.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I’ve had 4 deathstars.

    In 2002, 2 died after 11 months use (no clicking, just unidentified by the bios screen). The 2 replacements are IC35L040AVVA07-0 (made in Hungary), and one died yesterday – again no clicks, just unrecognised.

    One to go…

    Out of the 20 or so disks I’ve had (WD, maxtors and Seagates) none except the IBMs have ever failed – I just upgraded and passed them on to someone else. Deathstars are nice, fast, quiet when they work but….very disappointing when they stop 8-(

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Yup I have joined the group of people not trusting IBM brand name anymore.
    I own 2 of this crazy drives 82.3GB (this one was trying to survive death by crashing and reading data for verry long time, 4 smaller crashes(will hung in the middle of running something being unable to read) before final death, dead silent now) and 61.4GB (making clicking noises, not detectable by MB).
    Anyone found controllers for them? As I have swapped the PC board from another 82.3GB from a friend of mine and was able to recover all my data from the 80GB drive.
    Still looking for the PC board for 61.4GB, as the pc boards look the same in all the models but swapping it from the 80GB did not help drive still clicks like mad.
    For the curious and brave ones:
    It seems like inside the drive part of the way on strip leading to the reading head there is a signal booster chip, surface mount and I think it is a problem with this drives which click.
    Clicking

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    REPLY TO 1277

    I dismantled the PCB of my DTLA307045, carefully removing the ribbon. The 4-wires that cames from J3 (spindle motor connector) go to the Hitachi chip labeled 0G3 5 90G2018. It seems to me a custom chip in 64-pin TQFP. The spindle motor tracks go to pin 64, 63, 61, 60 (if I look correctly).

    Look for some low-value resistor (bigger than usual), such as the one at the left of ribbon connector, left to C11. Its VALUE is R30, i.e. 0.3 ohm. It is connected to GND, so it MAY be a current sense resistor. Another resistor is near pin 48 of Hitachi chip, it is labeled R47, i.e. 0.47 ohm.

    However, +12V is connected straight to pin 8 of Hitachi chip (and may be to other pins)..so if you find that +12V is present on pin 8, the reason for not spindling may be one of two:
    1. the Hitachi chip is destroyed (look at its surface for some small cracks, sometimes they are visible in power IC)
    2. the chip is ok but it lacks some enable and/or reset from other parts of the circuit.

    Finally, if you are so lucky to find a schematic pls tell me!

    Pedro

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Thanks,

    I am not seeing the 12V differential on the 4-wire ribboin cable, which tells me that the +12 is not reaching the circuit(s). I started tracing the power line and I was waiting to hear back before going further. I suspect a possible pico-fuse and although I can scan the board (with a good lighted magnifying glass), I was hoping that someone maybe had a schematic diagram or component placement list… can’t blame me for “hoping”;-)

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    REPLY TO 1274:

    Based on my experience (and test on my DTLA-307045):

    1. yes, the drive should spin even without IDE cable

    2. in my HDD the small flat-cable that connects to spindle motor has only 4 tracks. Measuring with a multimeter (HDD unpowered) there is low resistance (< 1ohm) between all of them. On an oscilloscope I can see irregular PWM waveforms on all tracks, amplitude 12Vpk (between 0 an +12). I think the tracks carry the outputs of two or more H-bridges that create the rotating magnetic filed necessary for spindling.

    Hope this will be useful

    Regards, Pedro

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    RE: DEATHSTAR DTLA-307045 kills PSU?

    I have a problem with a DTLA-307045. I use a Maxtor 60GB as a primary disk and the (in)famous IBM as backup disk. When I try to copy many files from or to the IBM, sometimes (50/50) the PSU shut off!! I don’t think it’s a PSU problem (brand new, 400W type with PFC), since it works perfectly without IBM HDD, and the total power consumption on +5 and +12V is WAY below the maximum. May be some nasty surge current on +5 ? Anyone found something similar? Thanx.

    Pedro

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    My IC35L080AVVA07-0 80GB drive died… it no longer spins-up. Using a separate ATX PSU on my desktop, I checked the voltages on the power pins and the +12 and +5 are OK.

    Now, I have read about various issues tied to these drives, but most refer to noise and bad contacts between the board and the drive (contacts below the board).

    My questions are as follows:

    a. Should the drive spin-up with power applied or does there need to be a signal (i.e. IDE connection)? I assume that the drive should at least spin-up with power applied.

    b. There is a flex cable betwwen the board and the center hub of the drive. I assume that these are the power lines (stepper motor?). What should I be seeing there voltage and/or signal wise?

    Although I my system is runninbg with a new WD drive, I wopuld liek to see what I could do to get this old druve to start… at least so that I could scan it for any tidbits of data that was not backed-up. It’s more of a challenge than anything else.

    Can someone (tech?) help out 😉

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    got an e-mail regarding that firmware issue from hgst :

    The product you have purchased is our generic product intended for general
    usage.

    Some companies who use our hard drive in their products require that a
    unique firmware to be developed specially for them. Drives with these
    unique firmware are fully tested by these customers in there systems to
    ensure that all the individual components ( mechanical/electrical &
    software ) work correctly and are compatible with each other.

    The tools normally available from the support web sites of these companies
    are specific to the product which they supply/support. The drive firmware
    update tools will in general not allow you to change a drive with generic
    microcode into one which has the customer specific microcode.

    Therefore you get the message from the IBM tool that your firmware does not
    need updating.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    just wanted to share my IBM experience with you guys

    1.
    8.5 GB U-SCSI Drive (don

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Possible Solution:

    I flip the drive and mount it either
    – pcb side up
    – sometime vertically (40 pins facing up)

    then zero fill drive to get rid of any bad sectors.
    (after backing up your important stuff, of course.)

    worked for all(4) of my 75GXP 45GB and one rma’d 120GXP 60G
    (I run them 24/7. I don’t know whether this method works for frequent shutdowns / reboots.)

    Hope this help ya all.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I am currently working on fixing a computer running WinXP. The system had lost its system32\config folder with all the .sys files and wouldn’t boot. I reloaded them and got the computer running. After running for a little bit it loses the system.sys file in the folder and wouldn’t boot again. At first I was thinking: virus. But none of the virus do that kind of stuff. That is when I noticed the sound like the floppy drive was trying to access a floppy, only it was the hard drive making the noise. I remembered reading something about “the click of death” a year or two ago on the internet and did a search and found this forum. Needless to say. I am going to have to replace the hard drive and IT WILL NOT BE AN IBM. I personally have been using WDs for 6 years and have NEVER had one die on me. My question to the people who keeping buying IBMs is WHY???????

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    After a year and half, my IBM laptop 40GNX couldn’t boot into windows and made clicking eeeee-clonk, eeeee-clonk sounds. I shut it off and found this forum. Most of the posts here are from people acknowledging that they too had the problem. I wanted my data so I was glad to see posts 1112, 1118, and 1127. Unfortunately the ACR

    • cojoco
    • 15 years ago

    My 80G IBM IC35L080AVVA07 just died tonight with my MP3
    collection … boo-hoo! (Dec 2001)

    Had my 20G IBM DTLA-307020 die two years ago with all my email
    (May 2000)

    My 200G Maxtor at work died last month … never any problem
    with Seagate or WD, I still have 2x80G and 1x200G going strong.

    Oh, well!

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Hi there,

    I’ve had two IBM Deskstar DTLA-307030 through years, just like many I’ll never ever again trust IBM to hold my personal datastore.

    Some years ago the first drive gave up. Up until that it worked fine, no noice of death. It just died early one morning after I’ve used all night, working on my Execl accounting sheet… logged out. Remebered that I needed to do one more thing, therefore I logged back in and while waiting for the loginprocess to complete, I started to suspect that something had went wrong… every app (shortcut on desktop, Win2K) I clicked on just told med that the availble app was not found!? At the same time the “noice of death” kicked in! I went blank! Almost started to cry :o(

    Turned off the computer and said a prayer that there was no problem, that I justed had dreamt it. Little did I know the magnitude of problems with the Deskstar GXP series. The drive was gone, I tried to run CHKDSK, after some hours of running and physical crunching noises I got tired and turned the computer off and gave up on the harddrive.

    In my desperation before that I bought yet another IBM GXP 30GB, thinking that maybe there is a possibility that one can clone the data on one disk to the other. I didnt succed.

    After that I started to use the new GXP instead. At first everything went fine, up until this summer. This time I actually heard the infamous “noice of death” and actually remember thinking to myself that I really ought to clone the disk before it went to the higher grounds ;o)

    But as you all know, what one ought to do and actually end up doing arent alwas true hehe… lazy me. Thus I enlived my second crasch with a IBM Deskstar GXP DTLA-307030. I got devastaded once again, how stupid can one get, you ask perhaps… there is no limit in my opinion.

    This time the information that I lost was so dear to me that I decided not to give up on the data. Therefore I started to search for data recovery program. I found several. I bought Steve Gibsons SpinRate v6 (it sucks). Its main functions is on pre-crasches, telling in what state your drives are and if they are in risk to crasch. My problem was that my drive already had crasched. 89 bucks down the drain.

    To my endless joy, on a swedish discussion board just the other week a guy was describing the exact failure I had and asked if someone could help him out. He got an answer about some software called, GetDataBack. He had tried it out, and it actually did help him salvage his data back from the crasched harddrive.

    That got my hopes up, I downloaded the software and setup a computer with my first crasched IBM drive (yep, I didnt throw it away hehe) and to my amazment, it can actually read and get back awhole deal of the information on the disk!? Amazing isnt it!

    That is my story, hope I didnt bore the hell out of you guys.

    Finally, I just want to tell you this:
    DO NOT EVER EVER TRUST A IBM Deskstar GXP DTLA-307030 drive. It is not worth it.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    My 80 G IC35L080AVVA07-0 died this morning…. alone with my 70G data (mostly movies.) What a shame. IBM should really check all these complaints.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    My 30 gig IBM deathstar ground to a halt, literally, about a month ago.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    My Hitachi 60GB (IC35L060AVV207) died this morning. I had had it for about 1

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    *[dolphin_cs@yahoo.com

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    My IBM 120GB hdd died too.
    I used it for almost 2 years as an external drive(with USB 2.0 connection) no problems(no noises no weird stuff,) until 3 days ago when I attached to my new PC (SONY VAIO) left it powered on for 24 hours and when I got home the drive was making a repeating “click-shreech” sound. The drive no longer was recognized by the system, so I think I lost EVERYTHING.
    The drive was working before that.
    I don’t reboot very often and have the comp on almost 24-7.
    I am very disappointed as I had 11 months worth of digital pictures of my daugther that I will probably loose, unless somehow I can recover this data. Anybody has any ideas that could help me get this data of this hdd. Any help is welcomed, please email to dolphin_cs@yahoo.com

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I was given a 120GXP 80Gb drive from my friend for free, who told me that it had died on him. I switched it to cable select (why does that help so much with dodgy drives?) and used it as a slave for a while, and it worked fine. However, I recently made it the master and removes the other hard disk, and it seems to be creating bad sectors. I dont think these drives can take much stress at all! No clicking noises yet though….

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    back it up and get ready

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Hi!
    I had a 60GO 60 GXP (made in Philippines) , it died one month ago. I am about to receive a replacement drive today (seems that this one will come from Malaysia). The crash came suddenly windows screen frze and when I rebooted, abnormal noise inside the drive (“krrr” “krrr” would be the sound in my language, French :-).
    Hope the new drive will be better (anyway, i bought a seagate 160 Go two weeks ago)!

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    <a href=>link </a>

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    <a href=> news</a>

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    i have a compaq persario 5714 more than a year ago i purchased a cdburner worked fine kinda slow but worked then we added more memory and last of all we upgraded to xp well burner hasn’t worked sence. I’ve taken out the memory and uninstalled the burner and restored my pc back to 98se burner still don’t work I’ve tried connecting the IDE cables all different ways my pc has a zip drive and when I plug the hard drive w/ the zip drive on the primary IDE and the cdrom (my F drive) and the cd burner on the secondary IDE plug with the cdrom being the master and the burner the slave when I reboot i get a black screen with a little sentence across the top saying can’t find operating system on any of the devices. but like now I have the cdrom and the secondary with the zip and the cdrom still the master and the burner as the slave on the primary with the hard drive my cdrom is gone it’s not detected in device manager or listed in my computer the cdburner is and if I switch them around putting the burner as the master on the secondary it’s not detected. at one point I was able to detect the secondary but it only noticed the drive it never detected any type of cd i would put in and try to run. according to the cdburner installation manual both the cdrom and burner should be on secondary with cdrom as master but nothing I’ve tried including the useless startup disk will locate my operating system i almost feel like reinstalling xp feel like it can’t make it no worse but look where xp has me now. anybody PLEASE HELP!!!! you all know in my opinion xp is the aprevation for EXPECT PROBLEMS!!!!

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    re. Capacity Problem.

    I’ve had a similar problem with a 60GB IBM 60GXP that now appears as a 33.82 GB drive. At least in my case the problem isn’t due to a corrupt MBR since the drive misreports its size to the BIOS and IBM’s drive fitness utility, too.

    I’ve also has the same problem as some others here when trying to update the drive’s firmware. The drive inspection utility tells me that the firmware needs updating but the firmware utility tells me it doesn’t.

    I’ve lost an entire partition of data which has just disappeared without trace and everything ive tried to retrieve it has failed. A Western Digital drive will be replacing my Deskstar and I don’t intend on buying any more Hitachi-IBM drives.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    RE: Capacity Problem
    if you lost the data and size you problem is something isn’t where it should be in the Master Boot Record, probably due to a virus. I would suggest erasing the MBR and the whole drive and then reformatting it if you are just looking to save the drive … download IBM’s/Hitachi’s Drive Fitness Utility. Then use something like fdisk/windows or partition magic to reformat the drive

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    hey man check out §[<http://www.r-tt.com<]§ (r-studio) if the drive powers and is seen in bios. Nice personal data recovery for $50. ALso the periodic freezes could be adware/spyware/bad registry, check out norton systemworks and adaware

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I have been using IBM for quite a while after having problems with Western Digital on an old Pentium system. My current system is 4-5 years old and it has been run strong with a 45gb ibm 75gxp (mfd.1998?) series drive. It died once or twice on my with the so called “click whirl” whatever but it was only because of a boot sector virus which can be cleaned out to get the drive running again. IBM Drive Fitness Tools are the best I have found in terms of useability. It can quickly diagnose the problem your drive is having and then gives steps to go about fixing it.
    Recently I purchased another 45gb 75gxp (mfd. 2003) to set up into a raid and the drive had the classic “click whirl” sounds. So i loaded up the IBM tools and did the quick test which shot back Corrupted Sectors Error. So the next step was a drive erase which the drive failed to do through IBM’s tool therefore as far as the tools are concerned the drive was faulty and needed to be returned. After a few hours of browsing the web I came up with a new approach to erasing the drive using a dos based drive erase program. Started up the program and let it run, it did make the “click whirl” at the corrupted sectors (noted location from the ibm tools) but keep going and finished sucessfully. So I then loaded up the Ibm utilities and tested the drive (which still as of right now makes “click whirl” at first stage of basic test) and it came back as a good clean working drive. I loaded it up with 43gbs of files to test the surface and it has been almost a week with no problems. I have completely copied the drive to another one as well to test the reading with no problems. I think the problem lies not in the drives but in the firmware, and unprotected computers (aka no anti-virus scanning all incoming files). I believe if you take a good try at it the drives can be restored and work again even if they say defective drive in IBM tools.
    For more info, help, or suggestions to fix the last little problem please feel free to contact me @ Stuntbikor@hotmail.com or on AIM @ LostCube

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Please help. I have a Seagate 40 G HDD and I think it crashed. The scandisk doesn’t read it. It just display error saying unable to read driver and it stops. When I connect the HDD (as slave) with other one, I can see it but I can’t access it. The machine just hang for a long time then the message appears ‘can’t read driver’.

    I real need a way to recover this drive cause it contains crucial data.

    Anybody please help!!!!!!!!

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I have had a 120GXP 100GB Hard Disk (purchased September 2002 at Fry’s Electronics) and it was great only for so long. I kept hearing a periodic whining noise (probably Auto Spin?) that kept happening. On one hot Arizona September 2003 Day, the hard drive powered down for a second during its whining, and it interupted a file copy, proving the drive unreliable. Fry’s Electronics gave me a Maxtor 6Y120L0 120GB replacement drive under warranty, and Maxtor proves to be better.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Capacity Problem:

    My IBM Deskstar 120gxp, 41Gig worked fine for one year. Last week it crashed.. I had read/write errors all the time.

    When I added a new drive (a maxtor) to my system, I noticed that the bios auto-detection gave only 33.82 Gig for the IBM desktar.

    My new disk (80Gig) is being displayed correct, so I don’t think it’s a bios-issue. I’ve tryed all cable positions and jumper settings, but nothing could bring my full capacity back.

    Does anyone have a clue on this?

    Thanks in advance!

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I returned a 60GXP (40gb) that died three days shy of its three year warranty expiration date with the error code 0x73, “excessive shock.” (Manufactured June 2001, installed August 2001, died July 29, 2004) Hitachi replaced the drive, no questions asked, with a new 180GXP (41.1gb) model. The entire RMA process took about a week and a half.

    I count myself in the lucky group since the drive warned me of its failure about a week in advance with a lot of clicking and beeping noises. It was the hottest day of the summer and I was expecting that the noises were coming from a 1999 Western Digital drive also installed in my computer. Nope, instead I found out that it was my main system drive, the 60GXP, making the noises. I knew it wasn’t a good sign when my computer locked up as these noises started. I decided to let the drive cool down for a few hours and later I ran Hitachi’s drive fitness test on it which reported no errors. I was able to get all of my data backed up to a replacement drive before the 60GXP completely failed about a week later.

    I didn’t find out about the updated drive firmware until after it had developed problems. That doesn’t surprise me given the way that IBM has hidden it on their website and the fact that I never go looking for firmware updates for my drives. The drive did run in 24/7 mode for at least 12 months of its life, so I guess I am very lucky to have gotten nearly 3 years of service out of it.

    Being the glutton for punishment that I am, I replaced my 60GXP with a Deskstar 7K250. This new drive runs so much cooler and quieter than the 60GXP ever did. I don’t know what I’ll do with the 180GXP RMA replacement, perhaps I can store games and other junk I don’t care that much about on it.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    god damn it me too. I had a sixty gigger with all warez and porn. Now it’s gone the way of the dodo. This is from a company that did business with hitler selling punch card machines what can I say I was stupid.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I built 3 computers in 2002. One for my sister, and a server and desktop for myself. Each of which I used the 60GXP HDs. So far, the one in my server went first, and the one in my computer and my sister’s computer are holding up. My sister reports that sometimes her computer freezes for several minutes at a time, which is quite likely a HD failure, but can’t be certain.

    At the moment I’m going through a grueling data-recovery process. You see the 60gxp in my server was there as a backup, and contained some very critical data.

    I’ve been quoted anywhere from $800 to $2300 to recover my data. For god’s sake I’m just an end user with a bunch of schoolwork and sourcecode on his drive, WTF!

    I wish I could find the number for the company charging 800. damn.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Is this the most commented news? 😉

    Have two 75GXP (DTLA-307030). They’ve worked fine for a year alone first, and in a stripe set for 3 years now. Run, however, not very intensively. Will see…
    Bought two 120GXP (IC35L060AVER07-0) 3 years ago and put them into a stripe set too. After a year of usage the show started. Random hangs of a system appeared first (caused by random and jumpy holes in binaries). Finally the partition with software crushed ultimately – happy me. Luckily managed to restore all my data. Lots of fun with – two weeks of lousy work. Had to copy single files many times and crosspatch them in a hex editor. Aghrrrr. One of the drives simply caught a “bad sector propagation” – Great Spirit, tear down SMART (maybe only the IBM implementation). Maybe the reseller staff kicked it before. The second drive began to malfunction last week with the famous click of death. Lucky me again. Saved all my data once more. This time it lasted for 3 days. The drive had been worked for +- half an hour following the system start, and needed an hour rest after that. Periods of the work where shorten and the rest time grew of course day by day. During the clicks, rock, pop, and so drive overheated, so I put a CPU fan on the top of it. After the data backup, DFT usage and some my kicks the drive died finally. DFT have been indicated errors 0x75 (component failure) or 0x73 (excessive shock) alternately.
    Hint maybe: observed random resets of the CMOS quite long time before crush. Hdd was occasionally invisible for the BIOS at the system start.
    Hint 2: AFAIK the only low-end drives that unofficially support the 24/7 mode of work are Maxtor made. Maybe some of these drives would’ve been SCSI, if they had passed a QC. All other producers declare the 8/5.

    Greetings, M.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    It’s a heat problem. I’ve let mine alone for an hour to cool right down, and now a drive that seemed totally dead isn’t.

    I’m going to back up and get rid of this thing ASAP.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Went through… lets see… 4 of these. In 1 year.

    In 1999 I bought a Dell. It shipped with a 45gig IBM Deskstar.

    It worked great! Until about 2 1/2 years later it failed. I would turn on the computer, and the harddrive would kindof grind then click click click.

    My computer was still under warranty, so they mailed me a new harddrive for a DIY replacement. It was DOA: Grinding and clicking sounds.

    They sent out a tech to install another one. It worked! Everything was great for about a month, when it came to a grinding, clicking halt.

    So, they sent another one, with another tech to install it. After installation, it worked for about 3 months, before it started making the familiar clicking sound when trying to boot up.

    I called Dell one last time. They informed me that my computer was no longer under warranty, and they could not help me with the crap parts they had been sending me.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I’ve bought a 60 gig IBM drive in February of 2002. In 2.5 years, it has been replaced 3 times. It just died again last night. It’s still under warranty, but I think I will find a clever way to destroy it instead >:(

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    got an hitachi deskstar 180GXP 40GB ic35lo60avv207-0 from ebay as is I know about the failure rates of these drives but decided to get one to play with. upon hookup spun up, click,click,click,beep,beep,beep,repeat so on so on. it finally recognized then booted to windows and i formatted it with no problems and transfered shit to it to test it out, no problems there
    after power off and power back on same click,beep,click,beep no recognize, so i unhooked it, and rapped it against the table, now no clicking or beeping and i can use it in windows I am not going to trust it , its just for play now, i cant warranty it back as its an OEM drive i guess for IBM machines. I spent 20$ and i really dont care, im gonna play with it some more. but also had another 30GB 180GXP and 75 and 60GXP’s all failed within a short time. there junk drives i bet even the newer ones arent as good the 7k250’s i wouldnt trust any deskstar at all IBM=I buy maxtor

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    ibm did me wrong i bought 5 305040 40 gig deskstar’s
    they all died after warrenty same funny sound n all
    the last one i have left is clunking away
    but it still werks 40% of the time

    i think scsi is the way to go

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I just sent two GXP-60 20-gig hard drives back to Hitichi. Both were still under warranty, just barely! But Hitichi is going to replace them. The problem is what to do with the drives. I have so much distrust of the IBM/Hitichi drives that I really don’t want to trust my data to them!

    I have two more IBM drives that have not failed…yet. The warranty expires on them soon, so I hope if they die, it will be very soon!

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    1228, I wouldn’t trust a WD, myself.
    My personal experiences at a computer retailer have led me to feel that Samsung hard drives are currently soem of the most reliable.
    Seagates are also nice… but the Samsungs… Lowest failiure rate in years on them.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    IBM Deskstar model IC35L060AVER07-0, serial number TZ0X7673, 60GB 60GXP, made in OCT-2001, died in July of 2004. Drive is making clicking noises but data is usually readable, until the drive heats up and starts clicking so much that the OS halts due to disk timeout. This is my personal third 75GXP/60GXP failure, and the 15-16th I have seen die in the hands of customers or employers.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    In the past 2 years I’ve lost 1 x 10.1GB GXP (Thailand), 2 x 30GB GXPs, all to the click of death and scratch/scratch/scratch syndrome. One of 30Gb drives was sent back to Singapore and returned with the orange sticker “servicable used part” on it. It died again less than 1 year later. Still have a 60GB GXP running (but I doubt for much longer).

    • J-Frog
    • 15 years ago

    The vendor I returned the drive to gave me my money back instead, so I found a Maxtor D740X on ebay and it’s going strong. Oh, and my 45gb 75GXP is still running strong!

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I also have a 60GXP which is connected as a slave drive to my PC. Although (as yet) I do not get the click, click, clicking problem, my PC does intermitently (and regularly!) freeze for no apparant reason which then results in my having to power off and on.

    I was hoping to find a solution to this on the net but having read through some of these postings it appears that its just down to duff drives !!

    I’ve had to resort to disconnecting the drive and doing without !

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I also have a IBM Deskstar (80GB). I`ve had this drive for over 18 months now. My previous system which it was installed in, started making the clicky beepy noises, now know as the click of death. Unaware of this at the time (and putting it down to some other device or even software) I carried on using it until it eventually failed (14months use!). I re-formmated this drive with no problems. Being a computer store owner, i decided I needed to stay ahead of the times, so I got myself a 64bit setup with a new 120GB seagate HD. Only problem was, I used my 80GB maxtor as my main (OS) drive. You can guess what happened next. A couple of days ago, it started with the same chirping, beeping, clicking. With the whole system being new, I knew what it was. I decided yesterday to copy what I had on my 120GB to my 80GB maxtor, format my 120GB seagate and put a fresh install of my OS on there, then transfer all my work from the 80GB maxtor back to the 120GB seagate. AND TRASH THE 80GB. The first transfer and fresh install went fine. When I started my computer up ready to move my data back to the 120GB, IT DIED. NO SPIN, NO NOISES, NO HEAT. NADA. Nothing. 70GB of valuble family photos, music, video etc. GONE. I even got another drive (same spec/model) made within a month of each other and swapped the boards. Yay, it spins…but still dead.
    My advice. Dont trust IBM Deskstar drives for data backup. Or anything for that matter.
    Thats my 2 cents.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I am glad i found this posting thread. I too have a IBM Deskstar 60GXP 60GB drive story, although very short. I am not a gamer, just a small business user with a decent setup. AMD 1.6 ghz processor, gigabyte 7dxr motherboard and lots of server application software for powering web-based GIS. My hd has worked flawlessly for a little over 2 years, but in the last 2 weeks has been crashing and today is on it’s deathbed. I will be RMAing it back to the computer manufacturer and am hoping I can retrieve my important data (mostly work related) since my last backup in Feb, 2004 by connecting to a new drive.

    My question is, I have seen good reviews of the new IBM/Hitachi hard drives but am also getting 2nd hand advice from a Western Digital hd user since he has never had problems. I had a Dell at work that had a 60 gig Maxtor drive that didn’t even last 6 months. What drive should i invest in next? I am getting a Maxtor equivalent from my warranty but I want a second drive and a big one. Have been considering WD unless anyone can recommend otherwise. Are external drives better?

    MStone

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    I have a older 1400 computer with a mother board that has a bilt in sound and video card ,,,,,,,well for a year she ran great,,,,,and one day of drinking and listining to music and playing online pool , she started acting weird and the moniter was flicking on and off and it was starting to detect no sound and video card,,,so in my drunkin stuper I shut it down and she would not start back up,,so i got pissed and told my brother i had a bad motherboard ,my brother a cpu tech that works for a cpu comp. in hunington told me to wait a week he would get me another board for 120$

    well in the time of 2 days I got restless without my computer and messed with it ,I installed a new hard drive to try and get xp on it and i keept getting errors and shut downs ,,,,,,,,then I looked closer and found that my processer was getting hot ,so I cleaned the fan and the heat sink witch was clogged with filth and dust and installed a bigger fan to work with the old one,,then I put my old hard drive back in and started it up, well no luck ,,then I put the new hard drive back in in hope to reinstall Xp pro,,,,and I had good luck,,,,,Im giving this message from this computer right now lol,,evidentlly when the motherboard overheated it killed my hard drive,,,,,,,,I guees im lucky the motherboard still runs. and my computer is now fine,,,,,,,,,,,,Has anyone ever had this problem?

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    In response to comment 1219, I’ve had 2 60GXPs fail on me, and I’m not running an OC’d computer. Blaming this problem on OC’d mobos is clearly letting IBM and Hitachi off the hook way too easily.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    After two years of loyal service my 60Gb 60GXP just gave up on me – well it’s reporting errors in the DFT so it’s getting RMA’d.

    I’ve kept it in a bay cooler so I think that is what has kept it going.

    The drive thrashes when reading certain sectors of the disk – and comes up with a disk failure when DFT tries to fix it. At one point the DFT also suggested excessive shock – that claim has since disappeared.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    Hey, I’ve had a Deskstar 45GXP 30GB which failed on me (click of death), I RMA it and they gave me a 60GXP 30GB. One week later, my 60gxp was dead again, suffering from the same symptoms.

    No need to say that since 2 IBM drives failed on me, I’m not even considering wasting more time RMA’ing this drive.

    No more IBM or HITACHI drives for me. I’ve been using Western Digital since this problems (2001) and I’ve never had a problem with hard-drives again.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    While I’m not dismissing the problems that ppl seem to have with IBM drives, primarily the GXP series. I still do not think IBM are entirely to blame for these problems.

    I come across a number of IBM drives in my time, they’ve always been very highly regarded and quite reliable. My brother currently owns a 75GXP since 2002 its never caused him any problems or made any weird sounds. Then again he doesnt push the tolerances of his hardware beyond spec that much, if at all.

    While reading through the 1200+ posts I can’t help notice that it seems only 3 ppl have actually admitted they had NOT OVERCLOCKED their mobo fsbs and 3 who have. Seems strange to me. Because before western digital drives became the prefered overclockers hard disk, many ppl on numerous forums had admitted using and were fanatically promoting the IBM GXP drives as the de facto storage medium for oc’ers around the world.

    While it was perfectly obvious to me that overclocking your fsb can have dire implications for the sensitive hard disks at the time. People were glad to boast they had an ‘IBM GXP’ in their insanily oc’d systems and enjoyed pushing the bounderies without due concern for the longterm damage they may be inflicting upon their hardware.

    While not being absolutely sure I can’t help notice that ppl have kept extremely quiet about one of the main causes which could have attributed to their harddisk failures, namely oc’ing their systems and bravely and openly admitting so. Where have all those proud oc’ers/ speed fanatics, who stood so firmly side-by-side with IBM before this fiasco had hit the fan, strangely dissappeared off to?

    If it weren’t for a few tell tale signs (RAID 0, recommended oc’ing hw {cases, mobos, psus}, surplus fans) I might have been less skeptical as I am now. Or perhaps the smoke that I’m seeing is only that which is coming out of my toaster.

    Come on everybody if we want a more objective thread shouldnt you at least admit a few things first. Well at least bring up the overclocking issue when you prescribe a solution.

    PS I don’t work for IBM and if you’re going to flame me read through my post thoroughly before doing so. You’ll only look stupid and waste valuable storage space if I had to correct what you’ve typed with those hasty fingers of yours. Ah butter fingers.

    • Anonymous
    • 15 years ago

    yes, u can. xp -admin tolls,storage management. you can format the drive from there.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I am the lead tech for a medium sized Internet Service Provider. We purchased approximately 40 of 60GXP drives in 1st qtr of 2002 for a new batch of servers. The manufacture date on the drives was Sep-2001 and they indicate they were made in Thailand (60 GB). In the 2 years we used them, no less than 5 of them have had to be replaced.

    12.5% failure rate in the first 24 months is the worst drive reliability I have ever encountered in a given model of hard drive.
    I’m just glad we are running those drives in RAID arrays.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    tgetgy,

    I’m assuming your operating system cannot see your new Hard Disk (with the exception of the BIOS and Device Manager). You’ll have to FDISK your new drive for Windows to see it. This is done with a Start Up Diskette. (I’m not sure if you can do within the DOS window of Windows, as I don’t use XP myself).

    Hope this helps,
    Tom

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    4 IBM drives crashed in less than 3 years!!!

    I had a 60gb I think GXP drive and after 4 months of use, a cricket noise started happening in the drive. Sectors went bad and while trying to access data that had been put there, the cricket sound would appear and try to read for about 5 min then error out. I called IBM and got a new 60gb sent to me and sold that new on ebay. I then went out and I get a new IBM 75gb GXP. 8 months later, the cricket appeared and data was again lost. I called support and got a new 75 gb GXP sent out. I put this in and 2 months later the cricket was back. Same issues. I called IBM support and asked about this problem and it was of course denied and they sent me another 75 GB GXP which I sold on ebay and went out and bought a 120 GB Western Digital. I have been using the 120 GB wd now for about 3+ years w/o a single problem. About a year after the last swap I was at work doing some disk intensive stuff, and what do you know, I hear a cricket coming from my case and my data gets lost again. I open the case to see what drive it is, and it’s a 75GB GXP drive… 4TH IBM DRIVE TO CRASH ON ME IN 3 YEARS… And only drives to crash on me EVER. So please don’t sit there and tell me coincidence, or that the drives are great, or that it was just bad luck. The drives have a defect and IBM should pay the piper. Hours and hours of time and data wasted. One thing I can say, is that the cricket ALWAYS appeared after much disk intensive downloading and file management. Downloading of files over night, renaming or moving or unzipping for hundreds of files. Everytime this was done, the drive would go bye-bye. Since the last drive was replaced, I have had 4 drives all WD and none have crashed. All run fine w/o a singe problem, and I WILL NEVER OWN, BUY OR EVEN LOOK AT AN IMB DRIVE AGAIN!

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Well, I checked back to see if this thread was still active, and yup, it sure is. 1207, it’s tough to tell – I had a WD that lived just long enough to copy all of the data off of it onto CD after starting clicking – if your drive lasts that long you should have no problems. I’ve heard of putting drives in the freezer to revive them for a little bit. I’d say just copy from windows – using an imaging utility it’s possible you’ll end up with a lot of incomplete files if the drive dies partway through – in windows at least you’ll know what you have.

    -mattsteg who can’t remember his old password

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Just saw a Deathstar 60GXP (IC35L020AVER07-0) 20GB out of a Dell die at my school of stiction. I’m going to go throw it in the freezer…

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I figured I should post because I was actually able to get most of my data back from my dead 75GXP. I used a program called ntfs reader from §[<http://www.ntfs.com/products.htm.<]§ The only problem I had was that it did not save long file names, but I did get back my old family pictures. Hope this helps some people.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    As a PC tech, we have rolled out about 200 Netvista workstations with the Hitachi IC35L060AVV207-0 40GB hard drives. We have had these machines for about 6 months. I have just discovered the first faulty drive. The PC appears to have been shipped with HD problems which showed up in the win2k system event log. IBM’s DFT utility discovered corrupt sectors. So far, not a bad % of failure.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    *[http://www.overclockers.com.au/image.php?pic=techstuff/a_hdd_anatomy/contacts2.jpg<]§ The contacts on the back of the PCB are really just very small \"mounds\" of solder with oxide, and a backlash causes the fault. §[<http://www.overclockers.com.au/image.php?pic=techstuff/a_hdd_anatomy/contacts1.jpg<]§ Clean it or better resolder. So the combination of heat, vibrations and oxygen causes the fault. Well! IC35L0xxAVVA07 PCB is similar with IC35L0xxAVER07 in case of fault, oxide in the solder.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    So I have an 80.4 gig Hitachi Deskstar, it started making the famed click click click silence… click click click etc so I turned the machine off. The bios will still recognize the drive, but was making the noise still, so I unplugged the drive completely, set it in my desk, and am waiting for a new maxtor I ordered to arrive. Once I get the maxtor in, (I have a 6 gig os drive I’m using to operate the computer) what would be the best way to get the most data off before failure? some sort of dos based disk imaging utility? just booting to windows and copying all the files from the damaged drive to the new one? anybody have an estimate as to how much time I’ll have to work with, or ways to extend it.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    *[http://www.overclockers.com.au/image.php?pic=techstuff/a_hdd_anatomy/contacts1.jpg<]§ §[<http://www.overclockers.com.au/image.php?pic=techstuff/a_hdd_anatomy/contacts2.jpg<]§ It appears that the sole form of electrical contact between the PCB and the components inside the drive is through a series of contacts which are literally \"pushed\" together - there\'s no soldering or anything other than the pressure the PCB exerts on the hard drive casing keeping the electronics on the PCB connected to the components inside. I\'m no electrical engineer, but to me, that doesn\'t seem like a totally reliable way of making the connection required. I\'m sure IBM had suitably qualified electrical engineers on staff to design these drives though, so I am probably wrong in my assessment of the reliability of contacts like this. Either way, that\'s the way IBM decided to do it, as you can clearly see. The contacts on the back of the PCB are really just very small \"mounds\" of solder, while the contacts on the drive casing seem to be \"spring loaded\", in that you can push them down and they sink back into the casing.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I HAVE FOUND THE SOLUTION !!!!!!!!

    At least, for my specific problem. I own an IBM 60GPX drive of 82.3 megabytes, that has served me well for about 2 years. I leave it always on in my server, and i (foolishly) did not have the bios update installed. An when i returned from a short holiday yesterday, is did not function anymore. The drive made horrible sounds (click-click scratch) and was not recognised by the bios. It must have been running like this for days. But i decided not to give up on it directly, because of the imporance of the files on it (websites).

    Then i read a lot of techniques on this site to attempt recovery. They included a lot of things that did not work. But during one of the tricks i was manipulating the drive while it was running and clicking, and suddenly the problem stopped! I was so happy i accidentally moved the drive a little again, and the clicking instantly returned. Some experiments tought me that there was one exact position that allowed the drive to spin freely, and boot and function normally. About 3 degrees angle from normal flat position was best. Something to do with loose heads and gravity i suppose. I booted succesfully, and backed up all my data.

    So i recommend the following procedure: Spin up the drive, move it around slowly, trying all possible orientations until the clicking stops. Then reboot the computer without powering down while holding the drive still, and you can rescue your data.

    In fact, i built a construction that holds the drive in the right position, and it has been functioning for several days now! Of course i dare not moving it until i am completely sure all data has been backed up.

    Good luck with your old drives…

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I have seen one die several months ago, after running OK for 2 years.

    It started to make strange sounds (clack clack dziiiii ) and hung the OS when accessing some directories. A low level format was able to somehow revive the drive, but only for a short time. After 2 weeks, it definitely bit the dust, making “clang” sounds and becoming inaccessible from the bios.

    I now have a Maxtor 80GB Diamondmax that is working flawlessly for now.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    My DeskStar 75GXP 45GB died last christmas.

    I’m still trying to make it work, but looks like all tracks are damaged.
    Maybe, i’ll try to do a low level format to mark those bad tracks, but,
    looks like it won’t help.

    i was able to recover all the info under Linux, but Win9x/2K/XP wasn’t able even to read the disk.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I have an IBM 60GXP, and it just started doing the “click of death”. I just checked and luckily I am still under warranty. I was just wondering, what replacement drive is given, since I doubt 60GXPs are still manuf.? Anyone know? Thanks.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    oh and btw it still works fine… i’m still using it ’til it dies, my seagate is ready to take over when needed but i just use it as a backup right now, i wanna see this b**ch die :]

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I have an IBM 120GXP 120GB 7200rpm drive which i bought a year and a half ago, and my computer has pretty much been running 24/7 ever since. It started doing the KXSRCRYYYX noise after a year and i didn’t bother trying to get a new one back, it’d just do the same thing so i bought myself a Seagate 160GB 7200rpm 8MB cache Parallel ATA drive instead… and it’s niiiiiice, when the Seagate 200GB Serial ATA drive will come out, i’ll get myself one of those… my serial ata card is waiting inside my computer ’til it gets some action

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    mine died this week and what a bummer

    keep us informed of what is going on with the class action suit

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I had 3 occurances with IBM GXP drives. One was a 60GB in 2001. And the other was an 80GB of my friend’s in 2004. In 2001, I didn’t know that it was a problem with the product because I had other pc problems relating to a bad PSU. I bought (2) 80GB IBM drives in 2002 for me and a friend of mine and I quickly traded mine with my brother for a 30gb Western Digital. And about the other 80GB drive, I have it sitting on the floor next to me while I put a new 120GB WD drive in my friend’s pc. I’m installing XP Home OEM as we speak. Good luck, IBM.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Another dead. A client brought it in to me. This one had already been RMAed once in 2001.
    IBM Deskstar (DeathStar)
    Model DLTA-307045
    Serial Number 07N5640H319840X22

    spam-jesse@opendreams.net

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    today i was trying to move the files from the deathstar 60GB hard drive to another hard drive, and during that process, it suddenly stop working. then i wasn’t about to access my hard drive again. i still have some files that i need to transfer, but i doubt i can see those files again

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I bought a 60GB GXP IBM drive in Sept of 2001. It ran fine until about 6 months ago. I’ve been using it on my server to house my MP3, but since the board does not support 100 ATA, I need to run it with a controller card. All the other drives (3 Maxtors) are 66 ATA and run with no issues. I have not noticed the “click of death” as the PC is in the basement, however what I have noticed, more and more recently, is that I need to run chkdisk on it due to corrupted data. Well, needless to say, the number of MP3s on this drive are dropping like a rock. I’m hesitant to put anything I cannot replace on it.
    My particular drive was apparently manufactured by Hitachi. According to IBM, Hitachi and IBM were in a joint adventure about a year or so ago, but no longer. In any event, I’ve received an RMA code and am sending it back for a replacement. We’ll see what I get back as a replacement.

    Further questions? email me at mr_b7@yahoo.com

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I had two 45gb 75GXP’s that both went bad with 8 months. I had heard these would eventually go out only after I bought them so I went out and got two 40gb 60GXP’s as backup (RAID 0+1). The 75GXP’s went out withing a couple of weeks of each other, so I got replacement drives from IBM, from Maylasia iirc.

    No sooner had I repalced them than one of the 60GXP’s went out. I sent off for a replacement as well. By the 3-4 weeks it took for a replacement the other 60GXP went out (running no RAID at this time). Within another 6 months all 4 replacement doorstops had failed too.

    I bit the bullet and went and got a pair of WD 80gb SE’s and have run them for 2 years in RAID 0 now with no problems.

    Jeff K.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I have a 40GB 60GXP that I bought 2 1/2 years ago, it was part of a 24/7 server for about a year with no problems at all. Then the thing started making a very annoying whining noise… it sounded like an old 10k SCSI drive. Aside from the noise, the drive worked fine without any bad sectors.

    About 8 months ago I finally replaced the drive cause the noise was getting on my nerves. Yesterday I dug up the old drive for some temporary storage…. and I got the dreaded click of death.

    I am RMAing the thing tomorrow.. luckily i still have 5 months of warranty left 🙂

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I am building a new system and bought a WD 36G harddrive running at 10,000 rpm. It is a sata and is connected through a sata cable to the mobo. I have a WD 30G with an IDE connection running as a slave. Can both be run in the same system if the mobo has both types of connections, or is it a one or the other but not both situation?

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    MAXTOR SENT A REPLACEMENT 40 GIG DRIVE FOR MY SNAP 1000

    I PUT IT IN AND IT JUST BLINKS AT ME WHAT DO I NEED TO DO

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I thought I was safe, since my drives were all in the 120GXP series.
    Not so, grasshopper. One 60 in a raid 0 crashed without warning – so
    long 2years of data 🙁 Tried everything, freezer, hammer, the works!
    Even took the lid off to help it along.(desperate) The remaining 60 has the
    occasional click of death. Same with the the 120. Am waiting for the two
    80’s to go “south” soon. Ran out and grabbed a 250g to offload all the
    drives before it’s too late. Think I saw another post about the 180GXP
    series with the same problem. Sounds like the new owners did not
    change the bad engineering. So that’s 5 and 0 for IBM. I will never go
    back to them. The performance was there, but like a record setting
    drag race, the engine blew up eventually.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Out of 3 75gxp’s .. I now have none. Allied have died with in the 3 year warranty. 1 30gig, two 45’s. Replacements were prompt, but it happened so fast i lost all my data. The 45’s were mirrored raid 1, and the second drive died before a new one was shipped back to me for the first.

    I’m writing this using a 80gig from a newer line — and it seems to be working, but just failed the drive fitness test. Damnit. At least they are replacing them.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Well I just got a 40 GB IBM deskstar (aka DeathStar due to all failures) from a friend.

    Bios didn’t detect it, so i removed the controller board, and pushed the “pegs” inward on the connector to the drive, then screwed the controller back. Bois has detected the drive ok since then, but it will not format..

    I am trying to get my hand on a service-tool executable for those drives now. but anyone with a defective drive, can try ti see if some problem is not caused by it simply being a “loose contact”.

    Hope this post helps someone, now I’m back to scanning the forum.

    /Pengan

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I bought an IBM “Deathstar” 307030 30GB in early 2000.

    4 replacements. Each one has the same fault.

    It begins to noisily retry a sector…kinda kzzzg-zk-zk kzzzg-zk-zk and sometimes a swish (minds eye imagines curls of magnetic material scraped from the platter).

    After one year it failed. IBM replaced quickly, no complaints. After 8 months it failed. Hitachi replaced (tried to charge me shipping – N.F.Wayman!) but took MONTHS to get around to it. They kept losing the order.

    Finally got the drive. After 3 weeks it failed again. This time I asked for another model, not this model as it was useless. They agreed to replace it with a non-recon 60GXP (some consolation, not). By this time my 3 year warranty was begining to come to a close so I was determined to get at least a year more out of it!

    The old unit did not arrive at their offices, they said. UPS, their UPS collected it. I had no other UPS collections. I had the tracking order. Somehow it had got lost. THey refused to release a new unit until it arrived – as if UPS butterfingers were my problem!

    Although pleasant enough, there was some serious lack of critical reasoning at Hitachi – “Bays-bas, nil point!” – not understanding that UPS issues are IRRELEVENT to my getting an HDD back. Their fault becomes my problem? Yeah right.

    Finally got it…and it was still a 307030, so they went back on their word to replace with a different model. Well, 60GXPs were just as bad I hear…so all it would be is more data to lose!

    It just failed again. Out of warranty. Still something is very very wrong here. Same fault. Happened when my other machine was in dock (when else?)

    Thank goodness you can boot Macs from CD!

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Your only viable alternative IMO is to can the drive, keep it in a drawer, and wait for compensation when the class action suit is finally settled. If you live in the U.S. see if there is a suit in your state. Unfortunatley the suit was not allowed to be a national suit. It had to be a state by state suit.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I bought a Deskstar 180GXP 60Gb drive for my father’s PC about a year ago. He’s not a heavy user, it’s not even switched on all the time. But alas last night he was running a regular Anti-Virus scan, and it starts ticking. Windows reboots, and the system can no longer find the drive.

    This worries me a little, because although I knew people had problems with the lower capacity GXPs, I myself own an 80Gb version, and a 120Gb in my own PC. Fortunately I back everything up, but my dad doesn’t have the capacity.

    Checking the serial on the Hitachi site, it seems that the warranty ran out about a month ago. Not sure what to do really, do I still push for a replacement?

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    DTLA-307030 (30GB 75GXP)

    Died for the third time (replaced once by IBM and once by HGST) – usual click of death and can’t boot with drive in machine symptoms. I’ll RMA it until the warranty runs out – if only to bug HGST. Didn’t loose anything as one bitten, twice shy (twice bitten, don’t even use it for a swap drive!).

    With the recent internal document leak I am now convinced that I will never buy another IBM product in either my professional or personal capacity (shame because I like my thinkpads) simply on the basis that they knowingly sold me defective equipment once so I can only assume that they would do it again. If HGST don’t pull their finger out, they too will land on the “Never buy – bad products or support” pile.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Hold on to those deathstars!

    I am personally involved in one of the class action suits against IBM/Hitachi. IMO we got IBM nailed to the wall.

    I wish I could give you guys more info but you know lawyers.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    OH ! I forgot to tell you what drive I have. Its an IBM Deskstar 40gb 72000 rpm thats 2 or three years old, and have been working fine until now.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Glad I found this thread ! My wXP started by throwing sad sad bluescreens with KERNEL_STACK_INPAGE_EROR and message like that. After that I experienced the click click click phenomenon and BIOS wouldnt detect it. Tried scanning it with partition magic but got read fault. Tried a scandisk from DOS at one time but it hung itself ! Second try didnt generate any bad sectors at all.

    Finally got BIOS and XP to detect it and managed to recover my data. Formated and installed linux but had big problems there too.

    If I, just after power on, hear a squeeching sound I know BIOS wont detect it, but sometimes its silent and then I know BIOS will detect it. Ive bought a new drive from Seagate now, i just dont have the time to mess with the IBM one.

    Very glad I could recover my data, im sorry for you who couldnt. Sue them !

    Contact me if you have any news or questions:

    stmi8017@student.uu.se
    icq: 12575835

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I just bought a IC35L120AVV207-0 120gb drive and is just 2 weeks old.. guess what… suddently the drive has become unaccesible.. it just doeas a click every 3 second and i cant even boot succesfully if the drive is on master ide from mainboard. if i connect it to the controller or to a usb external box it just is ignored by windows xp. the fun in this is that i bought this drive to recover datas of a failed maxtor drive. in my last year i bought 5 maxtor and one was defective but somehow i managed to get data back.. as i copied them to this desk (death?) star drive after 3 days it was filled up it did this!!! Before finding this page i didnt knew about this click of death thing and tought ibm drives were bad some years ago. it makes me really nervopus to know it hasnt changed anything and i didnt knew hitachi was just putting name on drives while they are 100% IBM inside. Now tell me what to do. i dont want to loose my data. i am willing to pen the drive if necessary and manually male it restart… it seems it doesnt start the spinning or somethign it is blocked as soon as it gets the power. what shall i do ? is there a way to get axs to drive from some low level point ? just in case i cant figure out anything.
    send me opinions at mail please: feffotto@libero.it
    Federico

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    i think u r discusting our society

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Hi,

    IC35L040AVER07-0 40 GB 7200RPM,
    bought in June 2001,
    clicking noises since a week and data loss.
    Sometimes the drive works for a few minuites until the clicking occurs…

    The drive worked well for approximately 30 Months

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Putting in my fresh news. Just yesterday I came home with two Hitachi/IBM deskstar 60GB’s. I wish I had seen this earlier.. no wonder they were so cheap.. ($79 each).. I have never had a hard drive fail in my entire life. I been building computers since 1996. After all this, I’m just going to invest even more money and get rid of these. It’s more of a hassle to return them, since i already have my system back up and running now.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Well my company has returned much of the GXP-75 drives it has ever purchased over the last 3 years via IBM/Hitachi recall program. The failure my company experienced was around 70% over 3 years out of about 500 of the 75GB drives. My personal experience is about 75% over 18 months out of 40 ~ 45 of the 75GB drives.

    We switched over to Western Digital. Their failure rate since 2002 has been about 10%. Still not the best but better than IBM.

    On a good note for IBM, I keep much of the GXP-37 drives my company tosses after the end of life cycle. Those drives have been running 24/7 for over 4 years and they still run nicely. Must have been the best drives IBM ever made…

    – Lodi

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I work as the system administrator in a small greek newspaper. We have 2 medium serers with disk arrays and a smaller one and about 70-80 PCs that were bought in three batches.

    My experience so far has been rather bad with the IBMs. The WDs. Maxtors and Seagates seems to last for about 3 years give or take when they operate day and night and a large eprcentage of them (6070-%) a bit more (4-5) when they are in PCs that work about 30-80 hours per week.

    The IBMs before the Deathstar series were pretty good reliable disk but this series (40GBs but mainlt 60s and 75s) has the worse history of malfunctions so far. About 70% of the disks have failed so far ,and about half their replacements ahve failed as well !

    So I;m now using them as secondary disks and keep a few of them as spares “just in case” as i know I’ll probably need to replace one per 50-60 days in average.

    No more IBM/Hitachi disks thank you.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I bought 1x60GB GXP IBM(at the time!)60GB HDD, a while back in 2001, worked a treat! But has recently been making worryingly loud grinding when accessed (may be due to fragmentation). &#8211; But all data is backed up on my makeshift home server anyway.

    BUT! I have been building good high spec PCs for people over the last couple of years or so – looking heavily into product quality and my own experience. Looking at the reliability of my IBM 60GB and the long running good rep of IBM as a company – I supplied each and every PC with its very own IBM HDD – ranging from 40GB to 120GB.

    After 4 months of an install of a 120GB – my customer got well into downloading anything he could find on the internet!…. then BAM! the hard drive failed with next to no warning. – took about 3 weeks to get a replacement due to stock levels. now after just a few months of the new drive being installed,..yes you guessed it! the hard drive has failed AGAIN! &#8211; again the palaver of getting RMA&#8217;s and forking out the cost of posting off a HDD, which isn&#8217;t cheep!

    If that wasn&#8217;t bad enough – during the whole fiasco another of my customers HDD failed – this time was a 40GB IBM gxp! again! there was a long gap in waiting for the replacement part – and being that I don&#8217;t have HDD’s to give out willy nilly, each customers system was down for the duration of time it took IBM / HITACHI to get their act together!

    I work in a large company supplied with compaqs, each PC uses Fujitsu, Samsung and Maxtor drives, the Fujitsu and samsung last for aprox 3 years (which for pretty much 24/7 usage is damn good!) as for Maxtor, not one has failed on me at work yet!

    All my drives are now switching to Maxtor – ive had one fail with them, and the replacement was with in the week across Europe! plus due to their lack of supply, they upgraded me from 120GB to 160GB so I didn&#8217;t have to wait – now that is a proper service. As for IBM / HITACHI – I recon don&#8217;t buy, don&#8217;t even think of buying, even if the drive is given to you – turn the offer down, and if every other HDD manufacture in the world goes bust, leaving HITACHI to run the show, buy all drives in twos, and back everything up at leased once every damn second!!

    Finally, I think IBM SHOULD be held responsible for this, and palming off the problem to HITACHI was a sneaky move. Full refunds on market priced equilivants should be very readily available and and total recall of al the HDDs should be made. We don&#8217;t buy HDDs and PCs to have them fail after a year! Thankfully, its not just my custom they are loosing, its every PC I will ever build for anyone too, I suggest all other PC builders out their do the same.

    Dave.D

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    i have two DTLA307030 in a raid0 for my workstation. there are no important data (they on the server), so i need no backup, if the machine screws up. the harddisks are cooled.

    i have them since 2001 and up to 2004 no problems. two months ago i’ve heard the clicking of one of the drives. after repowering the noise disappears.

    two days later the same problem, but no resolve. so i powered computer off, opened it and put the disk out. there it runs without problem.

    putting it back, i use only one screw for the drive; it lays without any outer force in the computer and the system is running fine since then.

    on one server are two 80 Gig IBMS (raid1) and two 120 GB IBM (raid0) without problems (also well cooled).

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    75 GXP Deskstar DTLA-30705
    45 GB

    Bought 2 1/2 years ago. In December 2003 started the whirring-clicking. Now quite frequent, but isnt dead. Occurs every time on startup, making new folders, navigating the file sys, saving, cutting, copying pasting. In my case, the whirring clicking noise isnt the main problem. It’s the delay that occurs EVERY single time that happens, about 3 minutes. So to merely save a file, it takes 3 minutes to bring up the save dialog, if I browse to a location to save to, another 3 minutes. Another 3 minutes on closing opening files. Backing up my important files after this started happening has been torturous. I finally have gotten a new pc (old one was ancient anyway – 400 MHz pentium 2).

    Given the posts of a lot of people, seems like I got lucky having it last this long.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Sitting here today reading the latest Deathstar news on /., chuckling inwardly at the poor suckers who were still relying on them — suddenly, the primary RAID went down. That’s when I discovered there was an IBM hidden among the Maxtors. Damn, I thought we’d got rid of all of them. Luckily we’re paranoid and have a (small, slow) RAID-5 backing up the (big, fast) primary RAID-0. Slap in a Max and we’re ready to go. Still, it’s going to take a week to restore.

    IBM IC35L120AVV207-0
    123.5gb 7200 rpm
    pn 07N9214 MLC H69205

    Manufactured OCT 2002

    In service 24/7 since June 2003 (we think) in 4-drive RAID-0 with 3 Maxtor 180’s

    Suse Linux Pro 7.2
    Dual-Zeon 500 server, 512 MB

    No warning, just disappeared from machine.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I started with 4x 45GB deskstars in RAID 1+0, after the third drive failure (about a year after purchase but all within two months) I split it into two raid1 arrays. Since then I have replaced two more, one was replaced with a 60GB hitachi that seems to be going fine. Another one has also failed and I suspect it may no longer be under warranty. The other two are sitting on my desk, I’m not sure what I should do with them, I Suspect using them will only end in heartbreak (they have however survived for several months running in a server 24/7, although they get very hot and are noisy….).

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I had a friend who bought a 75GXP and had it replaced three times, all failed. I think on the last time he decided eating the cost for a new drive would be better than the headache and the trepidation he had from knowing his data was sitting on a time bomb.

    The 60GXP’s aren’t much better. I one of those, and it died three times, too. I was able to get most of my data off, but instead of sending it back to IBM I used their drive utility to zero it out and after that it would work fine. Put my data back on, it’d last for maybe three months, rinse and repeat.

    I got tired of that too, so I ended dropping a Seagate into my comp, loading the firmware update onto the GXP, and putting it in my modded Xbox. Haven’t had a problem with it since 🙂

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Mistakeny thought these drives were good and when I and a bunch of my friends needed new systems, built them with IBM Deathstar 60s and 45s. Purchased about 6 drives in total. Replaced 3 of them and learned that when they started making the tell-tale “whirr-click” noise it was time for that drive to die. Had a few of them replaced but then lost all hope when the replacements would go after 6 months of use. I will never, ever buy another drive from IBM (or now Hitachi) – I have had no problems (or very minor ones) with Western Digital and Maxtor drives.

    I am no longer using any of the drives and actually took one apart because it was more interesting as a “Mr. Wizard” type project than an actualy storage device.

    -frosted

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    i bought a 4 drive 60GXP 60GB raid 5 array setup 3 years ago. only 1 remains.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Had a 60gb Deskstar which was I using as my main Windows drive for about a year. Was the only IBM drive I’d ever bought, but after a year I started having regular Windows crashes, poor performance, and Windows would take an age to boot accompanied by the whirring sound everyone has discussed.

    Backed up everything, just in time as the drive then promptly died and I replaced it. Don’t think I’d ever touch another IBM product based on what I’ve heard here – the Deskstar is the only drive I’ve had fail in about 6 years.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    He’s a copy of my email sent my field people.

    I spoke with IBM this afternoon regarding our failure rate on the 8305’s. We have a critical case open and are in the fact finding process. They have the listing of our machines & serial numbers and are in the process of identifying how many fall into the range. (A few missing serial numbers, but I’m getting those from Configs.) From the initial listing, it appears we have 20% impact; approx 112 units. Some of which have already been replaced. Any impacted machines are either covered under maintenance or warranty.

    Complaint Management Tool # =
    Description: 8305 Reliability / early life failures ofhard drives and system boards
    Resolution Owner:
    Resolution Team Leader:
    Service Manager:

    The range is a manufature date with Maxtor hard drives that are showing an early failure.
    This problem is an industry problem and not isolated to IBM.

    Our call next week will be to assess the impact, then develop a plan for replacement.
    I’ve already stated that “fix on fail” is not acceptable.

    Part of the discussion was IBM would replace the identified hard drives as the process works today. Again, not acceptable as they would leave the store with a blank hard drive. That would require the member to load recovery CD’s and software. IBM understands our customer base is a retail envrionment with some technically challenged users. We need to implement a plan that would require little interaction from our end user side.
    Options are being discussed.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Bloody Hell !!!

    Mine just die today, and I found this page while i was searching informations about this disk…

    60GXP 41Go … Build Jun-2002

    Some mechanical sounds (cr cr cr cr) …

    Anyone knows a way to recover data in it ?

    Thanks !

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I had three IBM 30 Gigs, I cannot remember the model numbers. Two of them died after about a year, just out of warranty. One of the reason why I Switched.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Had an IBM drive 30GB that also failed in 3 months, after replacing it (very fastly i have to say) i sold my entire PC a switched to an iMac (and the drive is IBM..doh!)

    My 6 y/o *japanese-brand-maybe-fuju-maybe-samsung* 4gb was /is still perfectly working, as my Quantum Fireball Lc 10gb (5 y/o) (and they’ve been laughing, probably)

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    My friend had 3 die within a year (back in 2002.) These drives were utter sh*t.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I have two 40GB Deskstars in the PC I built back in September 2001.

    Both drives have worked flawlessly for nearly 2

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I have two IBM GXP’s, the 40 GIG version running in Raid 0 Array. I have a hard drive cooler, the kind that runs the entire length of the drive (a long flat heat sink) and I applied heat sink compound on surface of the entire drive to ensure heat transfer. I took care however, not to get anything in the breather hole the drives have, nor on the seals.

    I’ve been running them continously, 24 hours at a time for weeks and I’ve never had a problem with them. I’ve had this configuration for over 2 years now.

    From some of the posts I’ve read, most people have problems with the GXP series–are a lot of the issues are related to heat? Mine seem to run fine…so far.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I have a Deskstar DTLA-307030 30.7GB drive.
    Made in Thailand on August of 2000.
    i have not had any kind of problems with it and i have used it hard, sometimes it would say on days and weeks downloading and it had to work extra hard to play games that i did not have the ram for.
    it was in a removeable hdd caddy with fan, mayby that saved it. i know my athlon 900 puts out alot of heat but with it in the caddy it had the fan pulling air from the room over the electronics all the time but even so it did get hot.
    mayby the first batch or where they were made makes the difference between a good or bad unit or i might just be lucky.

    on a side note i have a 60gb maxtor drive that is about a year and a half old and make an odd noise but i see no problems from it.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I bought a 75GB IBM Deathstar 75GXP when it was first introduced, based on great reviews from numerous magazine and sites. It was the worst purchasing decision I have ever made.

    The drive first failed a little less than 6 months into its life, taking with it almost 70GB of precious data.

    After the RMA, the drive worked fine for another half a year or so.
    Then began the click of deaths. Random bad sectors. Random Windows Registry corruption. Random file loss. I would perform a low-level format on the drive using the tools downloaded from IBM’s site every month or so, until I finally got fed up and RMA’d the drive a second time.

    Since then, I don’t put any files on the Deathstar that isn’t already backed up on a DVD-R. (Which, needless to say, limits its usefulness). Right now, the drive has begun making high-pitched spinning noises, as if the platters are lopsided and mashing into each other. Whatever it is, it is noisier than all the fans combined, and noisier than all the optical drives operating at maximum speed.

    Stay far away from IBM and Hitachi drives.
    I won’t be buying anything from IBM anymore.
    If they can deceive consumers with their hard drives, they most
    certainly will deceive you with servers, notebooks, PCs, etc.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I have 3 60GXP drives, 2 x 20GB and 1 x 60GB. The 20 GB drives are exemplary, but I upgraded the firmware in both as a measure of precaution. Both are in their 4th year now.

    The problems are with the 60GB IC35xx drive, which was the last of the three that bought, mainly on the basis of my good experiences with the 2 20GB drives. It had all the usual symptoms described here. I was unable to upgrade the firmware – the same 45A/46A issue already described in other postings. After experimenting for a while, I found that I could run it reliably, with the original 46A firmware, under the following conditions:

    1) Run it with a hefty, reliable ATX SMPS (300~450 W).

    2) Maintain a good air-flow and keep the case temperature down.

    3) Run it as a slave and keep the frequency of accesses low.

    4) Don’t fiddle with the power cable or the IDE cable once it starts working. The contacts with the pins are not gas-tight, and the PCB uses low-grade solder-bumps to make contact with the head electronics. It’s easy to shake things loose.

    5) Get everything critical off while it’s in this state. Mine has been working with problems for about 4 months now, with about a 50% duty cycle (12 hours/per day).

    I’ve switched to Maxtor DiamondMax Plus 8/9 for all recent purchases, and I’m evaluating them for a RAID array that I’m thinking of building. No more IBM for me.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Okey, here’s my experience with GXP-series drives.

    I owned a 40GB “60GXP” drive, it failed after about 9 months. Then I got a replacement drive, 60GB “GXP120”, which I sold after using it for 1-2 months. It turned out that it died also, after about a year.

    On the other hand, I have two “120GXP” discs, 40GB and 80GB running in a FreeBSD server, they’ve been under heavy load for over one and a half years, and they seem to be in good condition.

    But still, I’d never buy an IBM hard drive again.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I’ve had two 75GXPs, one 30GB, one 45, and a 60GXP and a 120GXP and never had a problem out of any of them.

    I’ve had the 75GXP since it was sold and it’s been running fine.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    For the past three years i have been selling systems. I have only ever laid my havds on 4 60GB HDD’s.,
    /me looking for system building records.
    All of the drives intended for a raid 0+1 array. Two of the drives failed DURING WINDOWS INSTALATION ~ running time 15 minutes. Both drives started clicking with in 3 seconds of each other and the raid array failed after another 10. All of the drives were replaced with WD’s. The other two were tested in systems and both failed with in a weak. My distributor was very resonable about it and refunded them for 5 WD 40GB drives.

    None the less i have had 5 Seagate baracuda IV’s fail with in three weeks (all in different systems tho)

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    actually to be fair to ibm i’ve also had 2 maxtor plus 9’s fail on me in the same time frame (maybe i just work them too hard 😉

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Forge you want some nice fujitsu man or atlas 10k iv drives if you’re going scsi.

    Anyway I’ve had 2 180gxp’s die on me in 2 months, had a 60gxp die after 3 and antoher 180gxp on the way out at the moment. Just as well I run raid 10 🙂

    On a side note, 45gb 75gxp i have no idea how old is still running fine with not a single problem in another box

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Had a 30GB 75GXP, it last around a year before I started getting the ‘click of death’ =( cost me $330aust. I couldnt be bothered RTM it; I was too angry. I hit with a hammer repeatedly & threw it in the bin.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    During the two and half years that I used these drives I have been through at least 5 starting with the early 30gb gxp 75s. The 30gb lasted about a year which were replaced by the retailer, then again within the year both these failed. These were replaced with 40gb 60gxp which again failed and had to be returned to manufacture (hitachi) who have replaced them with another two 40gb drives. I have keep one and sold the other, so far they have been ok but they have not made the year yet hopefully these will be more reliable. I tried to get in touch via email with hitachi to not replace the drives but give me current market value, but the chose to ignore me, then the replacement drives turned up. I have also used many other makes of drives (seagate, maxtor) and none of these have given me any problems and any that have have lasted for well over 4 years.

    I agree IBM should be held responsible for high failure rate and we should be reimbursed for our inconvience.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    my ibm 46gig drive was having some problems, even after the firmware update (it actually started to give major problems after that)

    ran 2 level low formatting and the drive seems to be doing ok now…

    its not used everyday so I guess thats why…

    still it did click a few times and in the beginning when i purchased the drive i had to take it back because of the clicking…

    ibm sucks!

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I had an IBM 60 GB drive that I used for several years. It started to make the nasty clicking sound after about 6 months but I kept using it because it was too much of a hassle to get inside my all in one computer to replace it again. Many bad sectors and noises. I had to run scan disk all the time to keep it alive. In the end, I sent it back about 2 months before the warranty supposedly expired. Of course the end the warranty period did not correspond to 3 years after purchase or manufacture. Hitachi sent me a 80 GB drive replacement. I do not use it for anything important.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I had a 60 GB IBM drive… that failed wthin 3 months. Lost everything.

    Then I got shipped another one from Alienware, and that died again, but my warranty expired. I think that’s what they wanted. Couldn’t gimme sth else. Well, lost everything again.

    Then I bought with my own student $$$$$ a 100 GB Western Digital… that died in a year. Queite and s0 fast th0. =( Lost everything… yea i dun bak up stuff 😉

    and den now i got a slow noisy 120 GB Maxtor… and it hasnt died, runs like molasses, but it’s got a 4 year warranty on it, so all i do is go across the street and they replace it right away (it actually is a free replacement for my WD)… cant beat that. =)

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    OK , I work for a small shop , We ordered 50 IBM Harddrives in the (60GXP, and 75GXP) 30 ~ 60 GB range , 49 have failed, 40 of them failed in the first year .

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I am also a victim.

    3 IBM Deathstars
    #1 November 01 – May 02
    Sent in for RMA IBM kept harddrive and told me that it was my fault it messed up… click click tssk tsssk tssk tskk.. click click? I dont think so

    #2 November 01-Jan 03
    Same Problem RMA sent fixed Look below for fixed hdd

    #3 March 03 – Today
    they sent me back my harddrive fixed BUT
    Scratches and scuffs are found all over my caseing
    and my labels were peeled/peeling.
    Clicking started 4 months ago after fix. Ibm can burn.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I have a 40gb 60GXP model for 2 years now, and it’s been clicking for about 1 year. Today I wanted to reformat, I’ve never been able to reinstall, even after low-level format with IBM’s tool.

    BTW, the sound is not a “click”, it’s “crrr-crrr-crrr-crrr” (4 times) then a little pause, then crrrr-ing again………….

    I think I’m gonna buy a new HD. But no IBM anymore. Never.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I have a 60GXP and it’s a regular NIGHTMARE. It worked really well for the first 6 months, then it started accting really strange, locking up and stuff. It just goes completly dead and I have to do a reboot. It sucks… I’ve tried to update my A46A firmware to A45A (strange way to update, but the IBM HD tool tells me to) but when i try it just gives me the “No update required”. Only thing I can say is, don’t buy IBM. Anyway im getting a new HD…before this one passes completly to the dark side…

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    i have a ibm djna 371350 13.5 gb drive i cannot get it instaled on my g4 panther installed i had going on os9.1 w/ with formedia disk.any one know of a differnt download

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I had an IBM Deskstar ATA 40GB drive and it failed after about one year of use, don’t remember model specs. Sent it to manufacturer and was sent a reconditioned 60gb GXP which tends to “disappear”, i.e., my bios can’t find it at boot and O/S occasionally can’t find it & computer locks-up. I’ve ordered a replacement drive. My wife has one of the 40GB Deskstar drives in her PC and Disk Manager 2000 has informed me the drive should be replaced.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Oh Shit! I just found this thread… I have bought 2 IBM 180GXP Deskstars (both 80Gb) about mid 2003… One is in my own computer (which i’m using right now) and one in my parents pc which i built for them… Today, i get a call from my dad saying their computer don’t boot… he also says the hd is making a “click click” sound…. *sigh* My conclusion: The hard drive if screwed after only 6 months use! (i spent hours compiling all the latest version of linux and tools only 4 weeks ago, all lost…) 🙁

    The real worrying thing is my own computer seems ok, BUT every few hours it makes a weird noise like a pc-speaker beeping, just 2 beeps, a click, then its ok for another few hours… I have no io errors, but i’m really worried about the bastard dying with no warning like my parents HD… I have too much valuable data on my pc to risk using duff drives, so looks like l’m ordering 2 Western Digital drives to replace IBM rubbish 🙁

    How on earth did they get away with producing such an unreliable HD… Where is the justice?

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I have IC35L040AVER07-0 , 40GB it was working about 2 mounts and now when you start with windows it’s OK. for 10-20min but than it stops working.I don’t know what is it.It doesn’t make any sound. That is pissin me off. IBM is nothing but a shit.
    Hy from Croatia

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I have been using mine for 2 years now in the same machine. It is the 40 gig version which is known to have less problems than the 60 gig or greater. I’ve had no problems with it. I just recently heard about the lawsuits surrounding this model and that is what led me to this forum. To see what others experiences were. I guess I am lucky.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    There already are class action suits against IBM regrading the ‘Deathstar’ in a few states.

    As a matter of fact I am the Plaintiff in one of them. Unfortunatley I can’t say anything about the case at this time.

    If you want to be a participant in the Class Action Suit go here:

    §[<http://www.sheller.com/Practice.asp?PracticeID=114<]§

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    OK, sunday 01/04, my 34GXB 27.3GB drive would not spin up. My question: Will the onboard controller for another size, say a 20GB drive, work on my 27.3 drive? Same series, manufactured in Hungary, etc… I have found a guy who has a couple of controllers .

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    my Deskstar 60 gb makes noise and can’t boot up. All my data was lost..lost..lost forever… : -( .The drive was made in Thailand on Dec-2002. Is there any way to get ibm reliable for this?

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    After one year of service my ibm gpx60 failed on me with the popular click.. click.. click.. sound. Windows XP slowed on running and windows 98 stopped totally with my harddisk enabled.
    Looking for some solution to restore part of the data I finally came across GetDataBack ( §[<http://www.runtime.org/gdb.htm<]§ ). Since my Harddisk failed under Windows 98 it didn't work there but with windows xp it worked just fine. While it took over 10 Hours to check the disk (making me think nothing would be recovered) I was able to restore over 95% of my data - lost were only some mp3 and some movies. The nice thing about this tool is that it shows you all the directories/files that may get recovered and you can choose individualy what you want on the target disk. Since the Price of the program is reasonable ($69.00) I recommend it to others having the same kind of data recovery problem.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Anyone here know a good lawyer(s)? See if they would be interested in a class action lawsuit against IBM/Hitachi for massive failures in their product.
    Just an idea.
    BTW I have had two IBM Deskstar (30GB) drives die on me. The first drive that died (I had my data backed-up) IBM would not warranty because of a packaging problem (apparently they don’t like their drives being shipped back in the same anti-static bags that they were shipped to me in the first place). The second drive that died was warrantied (however, I lost half of my files because they were unrecoverable). The third drive (the replacement for the second drive) is now only used for non-critical tasks, i.e. a hardrive in my childrens machine for young kids games.

    I will never buy an IBM/Hitachi drive again.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    My advice to anyone out there with an IBM Deathstar is:
    BACK UP THE FILES AND CHUCK IT IN THE BIN!!!!
    If your hard drive has already gone, your as unlucky as me !
    I had a 40Gig & a 60Gig Deathstar which both failed within 1 year
    both full with extremly valuable data to me.
    Surely with this amount of people complaining about these particular drives we could do something about this.
    IBM Should be made bust and go to hell for all of our lost data and waste of time and money, i hope u all agree.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I bought a 45gig 75GXP HDD back in July 2000. I’ve yet to encounter any problems with it. Being a little paranoid, I mounted a power supply cooling fan underneath it to keep the temperature down from the very beginning. I also updated the firmware on it some time ago, as well. So far, so good, no problem yet.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I have a deathstar 60 gb and it’s been working good for the last couple of years.. i’ve had a couple of clicks of death, but there has just always been a reformat and defrag issue, weird, and then i got a grinding sound too once, it *kind of* died that day and didn’t start working until the next day. I’ve also had these beeps and clicks (the beeps sound like old pc-speaker game-sounds) and they come like beep-click-click-pause-beep-click-click-pause, and so on, for about five seconds, it’s been doing that for the whole time i’ve had it. It freezes the system for the time that it makes the sounds and then starts working again like nothing happened. weird.

    -Korhojoa

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    A friend had hist Deathstar DTLA 307045 die on him and turnaround was lousy. Mine has been having problems since the beginning but I did not want to send mine out for 2 months and now that I have a spare drive they tell me I’m out of warrenty even though it’s within 3 years of when I bought it. I’m very unsatisfied with their customer service and will avoid IBM and Hitachi brand products from now on. Maxtor may have had a lot of bad drives but they were number on with customer support I had a drives replaced withing 3 days of them dying. IBM/Hitachi tells me hey it’s the new warranty policy, sorry buy your SOL. So that is 2 IBM Deskstars to add to the huge dead list.

    Dave

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Wow, 45 pages deep…

    We’ve experienced the same issue with our DeathStar’s, infact, I have three (this week) to send back under warrant. the total so far is 15 disks; sigh…

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    And the worst part is that the clowns don’t cross-ship a new hard drive. No offense, but they do SUCK, big time.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    IBM – &#1093;&#1091;&#1077;&#1074;&#1099;&#1077; &#1078;&#1077;&#1089;&#1090;&#1082;&#1080;&#1077; &#1076;&#1080;&#1089;&#1082;&#1080;… &#1087;&#1083;&#1072;&#1090;&#1072; &#1082;&#1086;&#1085;&#1090;&#1088;&#1086;&#1083;&#1083;&#1077;&#1088;&#1072; &#1080;&#1084;&#1077;&#1077;&#1090; &#1085;&#1077;&#1091;&#1076;&#1072;&#1095;&#1085;&#1091;&#1102; &#1082;&#1086;&#1084;&#1087;&#1086;&#1085;&#1086;&#1074;&#1082;&#1091; &#1080; &#1073;&#1099;&#1089;&#1090;&#1088;&#1086; &#1088;&#1072;&#1079;&#1073;&#1080;&#1074;&#1072;&#1102;&#1090;&#1089;&#1103; &#1082;&#1086;&#1085;&#1090;&#1072;&#1082;&#1090;&#1099; &#1084;&#1077;&#1078;&#1076;&#1091; &#1075;&#1077;&#1088;&#1084;&#1086;&#1073;&#1083;&#1086;&#1082;&#1086;&#1084; &#1080; &#1087;&#1083;&#1072;&#1090;&#1086;&#1081; &#1082;&#1086;&#1085;&#1090;&#1088;&#1086;&#1083;&#1083;&#1077;&#1088;&#1072;. &#1085;&#1086; &#1101;&#1090;&#1086; &#1087;&#1086;&#1083; &#1073;&#1077;&#1076;&#1099;… &#1077;&#1089;&#1090;&#1100; &#1077;&#1097;&#1077; &#1082;&#1091;&#1076;&#1072; &#1073;&#1086;&#1083;&#1077;&#1077; &#1089;&#1077;&#1088;&#1100;&#1077;&#1079;&#1085;&#1099;&#1077; &#1087;&#1088;&#1086;&#1073;&#1083;&#1077;&#1084;&#1099;

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    RESTORE YOUR LOST DATA: Follow-up to post 1112

    My 21 month old IBM Deskstar 40GB drive (IC35L040AVER07-0) started making sounds and freezing my system for 10 second periods a month ago. It was limited to when I accessed a temp directory, in Windows 2000, so I didn

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I just learned about this issue with IBM Deskstars, and found my way here, and let me tell you what happened to me back at the beginning of this year, March of ’03.

    Previous to the day of hell, as I call it, my server would have strange sounds coming from within the cabinet, but I could not pinpoint the true source of it. I just made sure my backups were good and stayed current. Well, I walk into my office on a cold March morning to see my server has rebooted, and it is at the ATA Raid screen, reporting that the array was Non Functional.

    I reboot, and the server goes into NT. About thirty minutes later, after I have run several checks, I hear a grind and a click. Oh shit, I know that sound.

    The server locks, and never comes back up. I grab a pair of WD 80GB drives and settle in to start the tedious restore process.

    I pull out the old drives, and lo and behold they are IBM Deskstar drives. I put them aside, and get the server back up and running with the WDs.

    It was just two weeks ago I pulled them off the back corner of a shelf and began testing them. Both drives work fine, now, but I will be damned if I trust my data to them.

    Funny thing about this, I had the same Deskstar on my home box, and it failed a while back as well, close to the same time as the two in my server took a dirtnap.

    NEVER again will I buy a IBM drive, especially an IBM Deathstar.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Bought 4 40Gb 60GXPs in November 01
    1 failed Jan 02
    1 failed Apr 02
    2 failed Nov 03
    Each time I have had to pay the postage to RMA them from London to Holland.
    I have now told them
    I have no confidence in their product as they are of
    NON MERCHANTABLE QUALITY
    and
    NOT FIT FOR THE PURPOSE
    and
    I want my money back.
    Time will tell!

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Follow up to last post!
    Double checked the two drives are actually 40Gb.
    For ref. both post as:
    IC35LQ40AVER07-0 39266MB
    The added complexity with my drives was their stripped RAID arrangement. But good news I managed to boot the drive up and am burning CDs like a real pyromaniac as I speak. Here is what I did.
    1 swapped raid cable into an onboard IDE controller.
    2 found an old floppy drive to run the IBM disk test utility and plugged it in.
    3 booted in to bios set up and told it not to do any drive auto searching and setup the other drives.
    4 booted using the floppy and mobo didn;’t look for the bad drive.
    5 I ran the full scan on both drives.
    6 exited the program and rearranged the drives the way they were.
    7 PC booted as usual
    I know this shouldn’t make sense but it seemed to work and may be worth a try before shelling out

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Bought a 60Gb deskstar about 2 years ago. Bearings failed after about 2 months light use, got 30% data back, RMAed but had to buy another drive to rescue the data, so another 60Gb deathstar (i like that pun). I mounted both drived vertically and for 6 months had them fail on a weekly basis I have no idea how much time effor and data IBM wasted for me. I have just had one fail again as part of a RAID and lost 120Gb of my film for a documentary, serious shame on you IBM.

    I’m looking for more info regarding the class action against IBM, these products *can not possibly* be described as fit for the purpose they are sold for.

    in the mean time i have to try and recover this data from a RAID that won’t start up.

    Olly
    techreportforum@hooligantools.com

    PS click click of death, sometimes reverting to a swishswish, swishswish everytime.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    §[<http://www.pheuron.de/index.htm?deathstar.htm#faq1<]§ AFTER YOU GET THE DRIVE BACK FROM RMA UPDATE THE FIRMWARE IMMEDIATLY!!!! IT APPEARS TO SOLVE THE ISSUE!

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    b[http://www.atl-datarecovery.com/mtl.htm<]§ (I had version 3.3) - A copy of "Ontrack EasyRecovery Professional 6" [FULL] §[<http://www.ontrack.com/easyrecoveryprofessional/<]§ - A floppy diskette [For these instructions, the BAD drive will be called Drive-B, and the good drive will be Drive-A. Drive-C is where the data will be restored (This CAN be an FTP site)] 1 - Hook up Drive-B and Drive-A onto your mainboards IDE controller (NOT any onboard HPT, RAID, etc) 2 - Boot off the floppy containing Media Tools Pro 3 - Select the Drive-B and choose Clone, Drive-to-Drive 4 - Select the Drive-A as the destination, and press Ctrl-S to bring up the options screen 5 - Change the rety attepts to '1', and click off the 'disable error control codes on last attempt' 6 - Choose to 'Invert' the clone (the last check box on the options screen) 7 - Start this process and wait for days (my 60GB drive took 49 hours) You will hear ALOT of clicking and it will the remaining time will bounce around from 200,000 hours down to 2 seconds. This is normal, but be prepared for a LONG wait. --After clone is done-- 8 - Reboot into WindowsXP, with Drive-A connected (disconnect Drive-B) 9 - Open up Ontrack EasyRecovery Pro 6 and do an advanced recovery 10 - Choose Drive-A and select the Advanced Options 11 - Choose Advanced scan, and 'Disable MFT' 12 - Start the scan (this took 1.2 hours). Then it will present you with a file list of what it files it found. 13 - Select the files/directories you want to restore and then select Drive-C as your destination 14 - As it starts to restore, it will prompt you to 'Overwrite' files. DO NOT OVERWRITE ANYTHING. Most of the files are cross-linked, and you will end up with garbage. You need to either 'RENAME' each one, OR, wait for it prompt you to rename, then in an explorer window, delete the files that it restored, and then click overwrite. Here is an example: - You have selected the dir 'mp3' - It starts restoring by putting all your *.mp3 files in there (ex: e:\mp3\*.mp3) - After it restores all the files in that dir, it will restore the same files, with different data. - At this point, it will ask you if you want to overwrite or rename - Open Explorer, and delete all the files in e:\mp3\ - Then click 'Rename' in the dialogue box - It will then write out the GOOD data AND THANKS TO THE GRACE OF GOD, YOUR DATA IS BACK! I got %99 restore, using this workflow. The ONLY thing I didn't mention was that I updated the drives BIOS before I did this. I have NO clue if that made any difference. I would love someone else to try this, and see if it works for them! I cannot tell you how happy I was to get all my data back. And 'shame' on IBM for making these defective drives. I for one will never buy an IBM product again. Cheers! b[

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Is this thread still active?

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    People i have 1 thing to say MAXTOR all the way. there its out of my system.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    The W2K PC

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    The W2K PC

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    [b]Update to #1106[/b]

    I received an answer from Hitachi concerning my concern about the squaling sound. Quote:

    [i]We suspect that the occasional ‘sound’ you are hearing is the Idle Time
    Function that has been introduced on our latest drive designs as a
    reliability enhancement. You need not be alarmed by this,

    This “sound” is due to a brief but deliberate head arm movement every so
    often. This has been added to maximise the reliability of our disk drive
    products. This function is only invoked if an extended period of inactivity
    is detected, so has no impact on active performance. [It is bad to leave
    the heads hovering over the same data track unnecessarily].

    Even after a period of time of activity the Idle Time Function can be
    implemented as the Idle Time Function is a cumulative function.

    The level of sound emitted may vary from one drive to another and as such
    this should not give rise to concern or be considered an impending failure.[/i]

    I also found a report on the web which seems to confirm that such idle time head movements may indeed sound the same as a defective bearing.

    Hmmm, I’m still a bit nervous. I guess I’ll run some DFT tests every once in while, just to be soothe my nerves.

    – Klaus

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I have 1 40GB, 1 60GB and 4 120GB HD of the ICL35LxxxAVER07 series. The 40GB HD and the 60GB HD were bought shortly after they came out. The only problems whci I had were related to two catastrophic power supply failures (PSU blew up due to line voltages >1kV). I assume that teh sudden power loss right in the middle of write disk access corrupted the data. Both drives were brought back to life with the repair software from IBM (a corrupted sector; I assume this was the sector which was being written during the PSU failure). After the repeair had finished, no permanent damage persisted (even the corrupt sector had been fully functional again). Both HDs are still at work in my computer. The computer usually stays powered up for 12-14 hours/day during the weekend and less than 6 hours on a normal working day. A friend of mine has also been using the 40GB model for about the period of time, but his computer has much longer uptime per day. No problems so far.

    Three of the 120GB models are used as removeable HDs. They are less than 9 months old and sometimes run in my computer or another machine. Typically, one of the three works inside the bay in the computer and the two others rest in a transport case. No problems so far, but they are not as stressed by work as the HDs usually are.

    The fourth 120GB model is just a few days old. It sits in an external enclosure with an IEEE1394 (Firewie) interface, usually connected to my laptop. It contains large files which are rarely accessed (so it’s kept spinned down my the OS most of the time). No problems so far, except for squealing noise every once in while, which really gets on my nerves, (a) because goes off right beside me while I’m sitting in a quit office and trying to think, and (b) because I have little confidence in a HD which makes funny noises. This squeal sound (which lasts about one second, and occurs at unknown intervals a few times an hours) reminds me a bit of a piece of rubber which rubs somewhere. It also reminded of something else which I have heard many years ago. I finally remembered what it was after two days: my old VCR made the same sound when spinning the capstan with high speed. In the case of VCR, it was a fault in the bearing (which means that the VCR had turned into a dead VCR quite a few years ago).

    Yeah, cool, and when I searched the web for noise-related issues with IBM/Hitachi HDs, I found this page with 1.100+ posts already. Despite having had positive experience with this series of HDs, my confidence is now at rock-bottom, of course. For me, Quantum and IBM were the only manufacturers of reliable HDs. Well, I also have an 40MB (MB, not GB) Seagate HD which still sort of works (after the drive electronics failed over ten years ago and I had to repair with my trusty soldering iron…).

    [b]Does anybody know how much I have to be concerned about that squeal sound? Does it indicate an imminent failure, or does it just get on my nerves?[/b]

    – Klaus

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Understand the click of death I heard it for about eight months but one weekend the hard-drive was dead 74 films 130 lps and software went out the window. I just do not understand how a big company can do this with us punters. IBM has made me not trust them! I had my second drive as a back-up drive and lost everything it was the IBM Desk Star 60gb. I know now NO MORE IBM HARD DRIVES, doh!

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I’ve 2 Deskstar 60 GXP and they start fo fial almost at the same time. Run the HDD Drive Information tool from IBM and I get “Firmware Update to A45A Required”. After many trying the truth is that DFT toll does not upgrade the firmware at all (current version is ER60A46A). Don’t know what I can do more?!

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I have an IBM 80gig hardrive (IC35L080AVVA07-0) been having it for almost 3 years now. My computer is pretty much on all day playing games and encoding video files. I’ve been hearing clicks and strange noises once in a while ever since day one. but so far.. to tell you the truth… haven’t had much problems with it. Its quiet and runs the way its supposed to be. I do hear those strange beep/click noises once in a while… most of the drives i’ve been hearing lasted up to 3 years… is almost due. Getting me paranoid and i’m gonna buy a new HD over the holidays as a primary one just in case. i guess i’m just the very few with the good drives… bought it over at newegg just in case any1 wants to know

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I’ve got two 60GB models (ICL35L060AVER07) which I purchased in early 2002. They were both hooked up to an HPT370 controller built into an Abit BL7-RAID board in a mirrored configuration. After 1 year, one of the two drives failed. No noise, but unable to read certain sectors of the disk. Going through the format process failed when it could not format beyond the 36% point. I am still using the second drive without problem, but will stick with Seagate and Western Digital for IDE drives in the future.
    – Bill

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I’ve had four-five IBM Deathstar failures at work – only one Maxtor failure – and I would say the IBM drives are in the minority of a system with over 200 drives.

    At home: my second Travelstar 60GH IC25T060ATCS05 has just failed in five years. I only have two laptops. Go figure.

    Someone said earlier that IBM Disks suck…I agree.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    IBM 60GXP 40 GB has been in Win 98 machine for 2.5 years. No problems. Updated the firmware a couple of months ago.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    (Sorry for posting such a misformatted post as my previous).

    Hi! My r{

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Hi! My r{IC35L060AVV207-0} (DeskStar 60GB) lost it’s partition table this evening! I have Linux and I was only taking a reboot and the bios couldn’t find valid boot device. Additional plundering concludes that the partition table is “unknown”. (I found a guide that may help me to recover my partition table if the rest of the disk is still working)

    The disk has been in use since mid summer this year (b{approx. 5 months}) It has been running mostly but with idle spindown when system is suspended (atleast once a day, during night). After reading the previous posts, I am sure that it’s the same problem. I’ve been wondering what click I just found out was called the famous r{“click of death”}, really was. Was it a “failure-sound” or nothing to bother about, i thought.. I’ve had this clicking from time to time let’s say during the last two months. Sometimes it sounds like a big “clunk”, but the PC didn’t halt or anything.
    The last three weeks I’ve r{seen secto} (can’t remember if it was the very same sector as stated in a previous post) failure {“hda: SeekRequest Failure } or similar messages, exessively today before the partition table disappeared and I’ve had problems when checking filesystems.

    There’s also another sound that has sounded more often from the disk from it was new. It hard to explain, but it’s like a weak random singing lasting just a couple of seconds. It happens maybe once per hour or more seldom. Sound like wet rubber (shoes) slipping on linouleum-floor, but softer. It’s separated from the clicks of death. But anyway I’m not using this disk anymore…

    Fortunately I started using this disk only a few weeks ago. I had this as slave-disk and used it just for some extra storage. So there’s not much new Mp3’s/Ogg’s and workings that may be lost.

    [b]bIs it a “guarantee” on the disk since it so new?[/b]

    PS: This is the second failure disk for me, and I’ve just had 3-4 main disks in my computer life. The previous disk was a r{Fujitsu MPG320AH} or something (heard of three occurences of this failure from other people with same/similar disk). And I thought that this brand new disk would take me away from all disk-problems…

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I posted a few times here. about problems with 60 and 75GXP, MY name is chris, the 180GXP i got worked for almost a year. Sold it to a friend. and unable to install XP to it. tries to load the main system files, then Beep,click,scratch. I ran DFT and the same old Scratching noise and beeps. So he put windows 3.1 (yeah windows 3.1!) then installed XP and it seemed to work ok after that. but who knows for how long. i thought they changed the drives after 120GXP but the 180’s arent any better. Stay away from the deskstar, IBM stands for I buy Maxtor! Maxtor and Seagate are the way to go. If you value your data get Maxtor!
    Currently running a diamonmax 9 plus 160GB 8mb cache and no problems here at all.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I built 2 XP computers using KG7 Raid 0 Mobos, Full tower cases, enermax power supplies and 2 fans in each. Oh yes 2 b{

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    messed up kid

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I had a IBM DESKSTAR about 70GB.
    It went down after 2 months of hard use.
    It was installed in a SNAP SERVER 4100.
    Very sad. IBM can’t be trusted with a DESKSTAR
    harddrive. VERY disappointing harddrive comming
    from IBM. Not just angry but violated.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I originally bought a DTLA307045 of 45gig capacity which gave me a bad sector from day one.
    Windows’ checkdisk identified the bad parts and indicated them as such in the FAT so they gave no problems in use. As I had no alternatives to turn too to store my data I thus hung onto the Deskstar until the day it started creating more and more bad sectors at random which even IBM’s own Drive Fitness Tool (DFT) couldn’t master anymore. The scratching sounds many people refer too from the heads trying to access the damaged parts. Therefore I quickly unloaded the data onto a Western Digital drive and called upon IBM’s warranty. They shipped me a replacement drive five days after my sending off the faulty drive at my own expense to their nearest service centre. The replacement drive, manufactured in Hungary, was according to the packaging label a ‘reserviced useable part’. This second drive worked in a normal way until six months later it give way to its first bad sector(s). Here the latest version of the DFT managed to correct the errors. However after this the disk blatantly refused to spin up unless it was installed vertically.

    Fast forward to the beginning of October 2003, six weeks after the first bad sector, when after being left on during the night, the next morning after restarting my PC the Harddrive had become totally corrupt.

    Now even the DFT gave up halfway in its analysis advising the disk to be returned. Which I did and I am now waiting for my third IBM harddrive.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Can anyone recommend (or advise against) any uk based data recovery agents?

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Since now, I had no time to perform the full install of my PC with 2 twin IBM Deskstar 60GXP 40GB ATA100.
    In this weekend I wondered myself because I discover that I can NOT partion the slave Deskstar as a normal HD, the master by example.
    Windows 2000 before and Windows XP now show me the slave as a service only disk type.
    My system run on an Asus A266V-E mobo with an 1600+ Athlon with 512MB of DDR PC2100 RAM.
    Fortunatly I adopt a myddle tower case with an additional big cooler so by now the HDs work fine.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Since now, I had no time to perform the full install of my PC with 2 twin IBM Deskstar 60GXP 40GB ATA100.
    In this weekend I wondered myself because I discover that I can partion the slave Deskstar as a normal HD, as the master by example.
    Windows 2000 before and Windows XP now show me the slave as a service only disk partion type.
    My system run on an Asus A266V-E mobo with an 1600+ Athlon with 512MB of DDR PC2100 RAM.
    Fortunatly I adopt a myddle tower case with an additional big cooler so by now the HDs work fine.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I have a 80GXP drive since 1 year and I have no problems with it (yet).
    But I had in the past a 20GB Western Digital BB serries which did the exactly scratch-click thing… exactly as you all described it here with the IBM drive.

    I still have a 20GB WD BB series which runs fine and the replacement for the other 20GB which died never caused any problems.

    One thing about the IBM… it makes a bit louder noise now then the first time when I bought it. Should I change it now before ever possible failing me ?

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    i got two IC35….. 40GB. the first drive crashes after 3 month with the typical IBM-NOD, running just 10 or 12 hours an day. i was crying `cause i lost all my data. i returned it to my local dealer and got a new one, same type. it worked fine for approx.13 month in 24/7 mode, before it died with the same annoying klick-klick-scratch ! at the second drive, i was happily able to recover some data of the last 3 partitions (of 5) on it to another harddisk. i returned the drive to ibm and got a new one, i instantly selled the original packaged peace of sh** to a dummy @ eaby 😉 ! after this i changed to a seagate 60gb (<- the quitest and best drive i ever bought) for the operating-system and some dispenseable data and a raid1 consisting of two 80gb maxtor. all drives still work fine 24/7. i also got an old DTLA-305030 (just for emule-stuff) that still works, wondering why.

    this drive was also marked as defective in the past, after there where some problems with it in another system (not the usual noises of death but temporary spin-downs during operation). i decided to give it another try and the drive also did it for one year now in the same system also 24/7. i got the NOD at this drive also during boot up, but since now i always was able to get the drive running by jiggling at the ide and/or the the power-connector. maybe the reason is a slack-joint ? i don`t know. if this drive dies i throw it out of the window with a smile on my face or maybe i make a bbq of it 🙂 … burn – baby – burn !

    for me there is no good reason to buy another fu***** ibm/hitachi hdd since i know the quality and reliability of seagate/maxtor hd`s.
    to all other ibm-users: save your data instantly !

    greetz from germany (it`s still 1:22pm)

    zwiebelkuchen

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    My 2nd ic35lo40aver07-0 has recently failed. It is still working presently but has failed to initialize 3 times. The DFT file I sent to Hitachi was analyzed. The tech said It had unrecoverable errors. If anyone is interested each time it failed to initialize I powered down & lightly tapped on the hardrive & powered back up. I know it sounds scary but it worked every time. I have a feeling my luck is going to run out soon though. Both of my hardrives failed right around 9-10 months. Good luck evrybody!!

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Extortion Racket?

    Is anyone aware of any UK “data recovery” companies running what amounts to an extortion racket? I may go into more details at a later date but wondered if anyone else was having problems.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    PC dummies : rule no. 1 DONT BUY IBM HARDISK!!!

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    i ve 4 ibm hardisks all f**ked up. i send one for repair at the agent but it never came back meaning they cannot repair. f ibm.
    anyone out there can show step by step zero-fill the hardisks?
    thank you.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Hi
    I found this site doing some research on IBM drives. I had two
    60gxp 40gig drives running in raid 0 . They failed on me a total
    of 3 times. After that I decided to replace them both. I know they
    are still under warranty but why go through the hassle again
    again and again? I certainy will not buy IBM junk anymore.
    Sincerly Bland Terry III
    Virginia Beach, Va.
    terry4u9@hotmail.com

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I bought 2 60GXP 40 gig drives in August of 2001 for a striped array. No problems with them at all until Sept 2003 when i came home to my pc making a “click-click-click-squeek” sound. I knew it was the hard drive right away so i downloaded the DFT test from Hitachi’s website, ran the test and sure enough one of my drives gave a 0x73 defective device: excessive shock result. Thankfully the drive was semi-functional and was i able to back up some data to my reliable Seagate Barracuda 20g. This was the first hard drive to ever fail on me. I have 2 2gig Seagate medalist drives from my first PC i bought in 1996 and they are still running strong with no bad sectors. I think i’ll stick with Seagate from now on 😛

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Oh man! If only I’d read this before today. Yet another IC35L040AVER07-0 that has died. I can now think of many things that “IBM” stands for, none flattering. Mine did not make any noise, it was working fine. I powered-down, returned a couple of hours later and the drive just could not be detected. Checked on different power leads and the thing is as dead as a dodo. Has anyone had much success resoldering/ replacing the controller? Mine is covered by an Hitachi warrenty but no data recovery included. From a quick search it would cost at least

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    After changing all my drives to Maxtor Diamond Max9 at home and be happy to be away from the IBM nightmare, I finally have time to experiment a bit with my DeathStar 40G drive.

    After reading the posts here, I find that besides the possibly heat management / head seeking problem, the connection of the PCB to the drive’s internal is also another problem. I think that is why so many people find their DeathStar to have problem after fiddling with the IDE cable.

    My drive sufferred from the problem no being detected in BIOS, one night suddenly, with click-click sound. Today I remove the PCB from the bottom of the drive, and found that the small from the drive body was too flat, and also the solder “ball” on the solder pad of the PCB were also too small and all having small holes caused by the pits. Then I used a small solder gun to resolder all the solder pad, made the holes disappeared, and make the solder “ball” a bit larger (of course it requires some soldering techniques).

    Hurray! To my suprise my “not detected” drive can immediately be detected by the BIOS afterwards, and no click-click, and can be booted properly. Now it is undergoing DFT test, up to this moment no problem is detected.

    Of couse a harddrive being treated like this cannot be trusted anymore, but for those having precious work “trapped” inside the DeathStar drive, this could be a way to try to rescue the data. (Of course I assume no liability on this method, as it is just a leisure to me, having fun with a “dead” harddrive).

    Regards,
    Darik Leung
    darik@mica-ava.com.hk

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    i bought it at longleet in england in 2002, its the worst thing ever had for a computer.. ill never buy ibm things again

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Also been getting blue screens, and my computer freezing when trying to upload video off my video camera. The drive wouldnt detect sometimes either.. its also a loud drive. I want to kill the gits who made this drive i have spent alot of money buying things i didnt even need to fix this the pigs !!! 🙁

    Shadow /.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Oh.. and it also feels verry hot after an hour or so

    Post by shadow/.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I’ve been using this drive for a while and im getting lag problems in games, it can happen every 40 seconds or less. I’t would make my fps go right down from 70 down to as low as 30 on sof2 this only lasts for a few seconds but it is indeed very annoying plus now that i read these posts with problems it is probably the hard drive, it is a 60GB IBM 7200rpm drive. i have been buying new motherboard, cpu cooler cos i thought my cpu was overheating.. new ram.. now everyhting replaced in my computer except the hard drive, and i havent tried the seagate one i have here in fact i think it works fine i will try it later, this ibm drive also makes noises as if its shutting down? like a machine failiure type noise i cant explain it.. i’m not sure what is wrong with it but im now very certain its the drive, for games players do not buy these drives their terrible and will make lag alot as i hav seen.

    Post by shadow/.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I have an iomege external 120 gb hdd, whcih contains the ibm/hitachi drive. It went wonrg, clicking noises. The data recovery specialist I took it to said that IBM know about the problem and have a law suit against hitachi. Apparently the ceramic inside gets too hot and fails. The worst think is I didn’t have a back up, and am now trying to negotiate a refund from iomega, unfortunatley I cant fine any concrete information in the fault.

    If any one knows anything, please mail me on ross.weir@totalise.co.uk

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    To the last poster and maybe to everybody else. I run the pz2z25us.exe utility and it said that I needed a A45A firmware upgrade.

    So I downloaded the file pz2z24us.exe and extracted to a floppy. Booted from the floppy ran the utility and got a message saying that I didn’t needed that upgrade.

    One of the two. Either the identification utility is flawed, or the firmware they have on that page is old.

    Any other suggestions?

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Just found this, looks like an official fix from IBM regarding the dreaded Deathstar!

    §[<http://www.storagereview.com/php/tiki/tiki-index.php?page=DeathStar<]§

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I just got f*cked today with a DTLA-307030. No more IBM forever.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    @1064:

    §[<http://www.hgst.com/hdd/support/en/warranty/english3.htm<]§ says: Warranty Period: [...] Deskstar Products, all 8MB cache buffer models - 3 years Deskstar Products, 512K or 2MB cache buffer models sold prior to November 15, 2002 - 3 years Deskstar Products, 512K or 2MB cache buffer models sold on or after November 15, 2002 - 1 year [...]

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Hi, guys, it’s very sad to read such long listing of grieves… I have currently entered the club of people with dying/dead IBM HDD. I was happy enough to have 40gig beast running approx. three years, but this very evening I was able to listen to the Death Knock from my very own drive… Well, it was pretty scary and I was really conviced, that all my data will blow skyhigh with the drive… fortunately I have had one Barracuda in removable HDD bay, so I have replaced the disk, make Barracuda primary disk, put IBM to the bay etc. In this very moment I can use for communication only my GPRS PDA… I’m reinstalling OS, all the programs and moving important data to Barracuda and the less important to the IBM. I hope that the Deskstar will be able to serve at last for archiving of the unimportant items for a few weeks more. Well, it’s bad for me but not THAT bad as I can read from stories of other people. Hope you will be lucky too. Greetins from Czech Republic, Mike.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    The company I worked for bought a ton of the 82.3GB 120GXP Drives.. Found out today that the warranty on those are just a little over 1 year. They were manufactured in Nov-2002 and the warranty is up in January 2004. I’m not a happy camper 🙁

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    i have an ibm deskstar dtla 307020 its 20gb and i dont know it is i the GXp familly or not. but i had the drive for a wile and i loved it it was fast and i never used to get the clicking noses but then it started to make them and it fail my computer crashed lost all my data

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    i had a problem with an IBM Deskstar DTLA-305020 20.5GB Drive At 5400 RPM, which after about 16 months started making a skweak, click noise, continuously for upto an hour, always after the computer had been on for over an hour usually, and it often caused shitloads of errors in the data, still usiong it but with a lot of cooling, and no cables near it except the ide and 12v power leads, cooling seems to have sorted the prob for now, but for how long?

    curious though because in my primary computer i have a 40GB quantum fireball(accuratelly named, speed like one, and the temperature that it runs at is astronomical), a 4GB seagate and a 3 GB fujitsu, all of which run hot and perfectly hot, admittedly bettert since adding 6 80mm case fans and a 60 mm chasis exhaust fan to the system, and i’ve never had a problem with this tyaan based system that wasn’t caused by crap from microsoft,

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    R.I.P (should be R.I.H maybe ;)) – IBM 45GB DeskStar – he was a reasonable temp drive who had a hard life for the past 9 months of his 2 years 11 months usage (that’s right, it’s under warranty). Har har.

    He died without warning, from severe bad sector development (the Dr. DFT reports that he had the disease 0x70). Stimulation with the help of DFT results in more brain-damage each time he is analysed.

    He will be sent to the great RMA department in the sky (I’m feeling masochistic).

    Heat may have been a problem, as this summer has been rather hot, and he definitely has chosen a “hot” time to die.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    My IC35L060AVER07-0 died the other day. I don’t know if it exhibited any of the telltale symptoms as I was running it in acoustic management mode. Now I can’t boot Windows from it nor mount it under Linux. IBM’s DFT is useless as the sector repair functionality crashes the program. Next, I’ll try the firmware update and bunging it in the fridge for a while, just so I can get the important stuff copied before chucking it (through IBM’s windows).

    The drive was bought in the fall of 2001, and I still have a working IC35L080AVVA07-0 that’s about a year younger. It’s working fine, but I don’t dare leave it in the machine and will change it ASAP.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Please join the class action lawsuit against IBM GXPs at this site:

    §[<http://www.murrayandhoward.com/class_inquires_Granito_IBM.html<]§ My 30 GB failed after 2 years of use. I've tried everything to get the data back - no luck. The famous click, click, click....etc.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    SysAdmin for an engineering firm in Phoenix, with one machine running a Deskstar 60.
    User (Marketing Mgr.) complained of noises shortly after a Windows UG. Today she logged on & received the following error:

    “DETAIL – An I/O operation initiated by the registry failed unrecoverably. The registry could not read in, or write out, or flush, one of the files that contain the system’s image of the registry. ”

    After a search on that error came up with no real solution I recreated the user and tried to log-on again but no dice. User ran scandisk a while back & got a few bad sectors, so here I am, recipient of your hindsight and able to save the data (user should have put on server!!) in time!

    Thanks to this list (and a timely search)!
    Best of luck to the rest of you. Fan cooled or not – no more IBM for me!

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Hi,

    Purchased an ibm 30-70-30 gig in september 2000, ran fine for about 18 months but then started to get the clicking sound, finally died on 22 july 2003. (R.I.P u piece of s***) Managed to get all my data off of it but was very time consuming as this could only be done in small chunks before the click of death reared its ugly head again. One point id like to make also is these drives do run extremely hot, as has been stated before, if you’ve got one keep it cool, or risk losing your cool Now have a samsung 120 gig 60gb per platter that doesn’t even feel warm to the touch and the build quality far exceeds that of the ibm model, good solid fast quiet drive. I used to think IBM stood for quality, what a joke – also have an 18 inch flat panel ibm tft which bit the dust after 18 months of use….never again IBM your products suck big time. Vote with your wallets people, I sure will.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Hi,

    Do not own an IBM 75GXP. For what worth, I just bought two IBM 180GXP (or Hitachi if you like) HDs type IC35L120AVV207-1 (i.e. 123Gb with 8Mb cache version). Yeah, call me crazy.

    A few minutes after installing and formatting, one of the two drives treated me with the apperantly famous IBM music – seek, seek, seek, click, click…..
    A brand new drive! Drive temperature is “hand warm”. Should not be a problem.

    I bought these drives because they got good critics, being fast, produce low noice and being competatively priced (EUR100 each). It may be just this particular drive but after browsing the web and finding dozens of web-sites discussing similar issues with other GXP models have rendered my trust in IBM harddrive products below zero.

    Have a money back guarentee. Both drives will be returned.
    Will probably not buy and IBM/Hitachi drive again.

    Best regards,

    Hessel – Amsterdam – Netherlands.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Ok…now I’ve got the creeps. I’m reading a plethora of stories about deathstar..er, deskstar hard drive failures in this forum here. Well, I was about to say that I am the proud owner of a recently purchased (and previously USED..no less) owner of a D120 GXP 40 gigger. I paid $70.00 Canadian for it thinking what a great deal it was. I had NO idea these drives were causing havoc among their owners. I now also realize why the person sold me his. Obviously, he did his homework and got rid of it while the getting was good. I’ve had the drive for a week now..and as pessimestic as I am, I have yet to watch my employment insurance clams be washed downstream. The only sounds emanating from this drive that I get, is an occasional audible, single click that occurs when I’m accessing the drive (as it is a slave) Gawd forbid if it was the almighty master (by the sounds of it.) In my middle age, I’m supposed to be wiser in the ways of the world…I thought buying an IBM ..now Hitachi harddrive, and foregoing IBM’s history of the “Mwave lawsuit saga” that I would be getting an excellent product. Now I pray everytime I turn on my computer on…(I mean, with Windows one should pray anyway).
    Obviously, I cannot help but feel that the school of hard knocks is going to pay me a visit once again….and the nostagic feeling of that first year out of high school and getting my first job…(not knowing anything) rears its ugly head once more….
    Why do people only listen to what they want to hear when buying things?

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Hi Everyone,

    I have 5 servers and 1 home pc with this dirves, dlta-307060 and ic35l060aver07. The servers work 24h/7days from 2 years. The result is: THESE DRIVES NEEDS AIR FLOW!!!!!!

    See, I don’t say that they need cooling, they just need air flow to work fine. In every server I use 2 DTLA drives on HTP370 in mirror. I place low speed 80×80 fan on front on drives. This fan takes air from outside of case.

    And I have no problems at all. Drives runs at 30 degrees celsius. If fan stop after few minutes it’s temp rises to over 60 degrees celsius. All drives I control with exelent linux utility hddtemp, under windows I can’t find utility that can read drive temp when attached to HighPoint Raid controller.

    I see difference between DTLA and IC35L. DTLA’s offer more speed that IC35L, but run’s hotter.

    If there are interest I will publish some pictures of my fan airflowed drives.

    I all cases I think thah 2 years are enough to any drive that run in server machine, so I think to replace DTLA’s with new drives, but will leave them running as backup storage. If one drive stop working both will be changed, this is idea of highpoint controller hardware mirror.

    IBM make great mistake thah not warn users about high power dissipation of this drives. The result is very high failure rate. This drives before 2 years offer perfomace close to scsi drives, but is there anyone that run scsi drive in server witout cooling????

    Regard,
    Svetozar Mihailov
    zarhi@zarhi.bankya.net

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Lost my data drive, a IBM 75GXP (30Gb) around a week ago…same symptoms as described throughout this entire thread.

    And now my one remaining drive a IBM 120GXP (80Gb) has just started to make the “cliiiiiiick…….click” death sentance sound…

    Two different series of drives, bought a year apart,
    Exactly the same conclusions!!!

    I don’t think I will bother with RMA procedures, I just want rid of them completely. WD Raptors here I come…

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Back again… my previous posts are #535, 560 and 744.

    So here I sit with another 60GXP that has given up the ghost. At first, it started making the typical head seek sound (see below); DFT reported 0x70, Defective Device. Later, it wasn’t detected by the BIOS, and ultimately gave a 0x20, Device Not Found. As recommended by Hitachi, I tried to erase the entire disk and recover the sectors, but this didn’t work… DFT simply sat there and did nothing.

    I’ve made recordings of the weird sounds the drive made as it was dying, like I did last time. All of these files are available at §[<http://lunar.darktech.org/drivesound/<]§ if you'd like to listen. "IBM60GXP-0-48k.mp3" is the same sound (with a different filename) that I linked to in my previous post #744; sounds -1/-2/-3 are from this latest failure. Anyway, I just received the e-mail with my RMA number. Here we go again!

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Massive thanks to marathonfl for his data retrieval advice (post 1039). I tried this and i’m not sure the drive controller actually failed or anything, but win2k ‘removed’ the device after a very long startup attempt and when i rebooted it detected the IBM fine and I managed to retrieve several gigs of important and unimportant data, although very slowly and with much wincing at the agonising sounds the drive made while the data was being copied. Drive is now RMA’d and ready to go, though i won’t be using the replacement assuming i get one….eBay methinks. Going to buy a couple of Seagate Barracudas tomorrow, maybe a WD. The Maxtor 120Gb which is my primary’s started making worrying noises since the IBm was removed….strange how Maxtors are only happy when connected along with a slave.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I am System Engineer’s in Nigeria, i have a problem presently, i just assemble 4 computers for a client and six months later two of the computer had a harddisk problem, (Bad Sector).They have insisted that an engineer i should be able to fixed the system to make it work withoutthem buying a new harddisk. how do i seperate bad sector in harddisk to one side and make the remaing part usageble for my clients.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Had 2 40gig GXP’s both RMA – one being RMA again – looks like they’re replaced with the same faulty drives – thats clever ……
    failure code: 0x70
    TRC’s : 700042be
    7000057d

    I’m in the Uk, theres a class action lawsuit against them in the US for these §[<http://www.sheller.com/ibmclassaction.htm<]§

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    IBM DTLA 75GXP (30GB, 7200)

    klikkliklklikliklikliklik…krrrrt, krrrrt, klikliklikliklikliklikli…. krrrrt, krrrrt…

    IBM Fitness Tools – Result:
    Serial: YKNB4649
    Failure Code: 0x70 (Defective Device)
    Techical Result Code (TRC): 7000C687

    Windows XP Pro says the drive is “Dynamic – Unreadable”. Is there ANY way i could revive any of that precious information from the drive? And, this was my second drive of the same kind. The former one also died like this, but i was managed to retrieve the data from it…. No IBM’s for me EVER again. 🙁

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    That happened last week, not last night. Oh, and expect to see a shameless request for a compatible board in the near future, once I go get the part number for that drive.

    A

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I’ve had a 40GB GXP. It’s been working fine for almost two years. I’ve gone through two 80GB Maxtor drives in that period of time. Last night, I was about to move the GXP to a machine at work (to make a backup on the tape drive). I shutdown Windows, waited until it said it was safe to turn off the computer, and being the moron that I am, forgot to turn off the computer. Just as I connected the power supply to the drive, I noticed that the processor fan was still running. In the split second before the bright flash of light and the crackle of the controller board frying, I relived all the special moments I had shared with the drive over the past two years. Then all the lights in the room went out (fucking surge protectors, thank god *they* don’t work… and it also turned out that a coworker had previously soldered a wire across a blown fuse in that machine’s power supply).

    Then it took me about 2 days to figure out how to reset the clock on the microwave that was in that room.

    Now I have to play the stupid hunting-for-drive-controller-boards game. I wish they just sold these things separately.

    I’m retarded.

    A

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    in reply to POST No. 1037. Posted at 07:12 am on Jun 25th 2003
    Anonymous Gerbil
    Just a brief thought and I am making a big assumption here that you may have taken account of; did you replace the IDE/ATA cables in your original PC and with the newly purchased gigabyte board?

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Bought a pair of 307030s in 1999. Both have a ton of hours and are still working fine. No unusual noises. Getting lucky is welcome.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    My IBM 60GXP, which is about 1,5 years old, has started acting funny on me lately. At first the problem happened rarely but now it happens once or twice a day which lead me to buy a new SATA RAPTOR 🙂
    The description of the problem follows:
    The issue mainly occurs during intensive disk access operations and the HDD lead will remain on. Then, WinXP crashes but without going BSOD – the display is working fine but i have nothing, no keybord – no mouse and if i press reset the HDD will not power up (spin up) on boot. I have to shut down the computer, wait a good 10-20 secs and it will then power up.

    This is wierd…

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    My IBM drive just died suddenly with no warning. No odd noises leading up to it. Just a sudden crack then a repetive CLI-CLICK SKREE noise. I haven’t really done any extensive research into it but i’m assuming it’s died the inevitable death of a 60GXP (41.0Gb, manufactured Hungary Dec 2001). I was using it as a secondary drive, and it didn’t have a terrible amount of important data on it apart from a ‘Backup’ dir full of some documents and images I was stupid enough to keep on it. I’m hoping if I leave the drive to sit long enough I might be able to reconnect it long enough to salvage this dir at least. I’ve filled in my details on the RMA page on the Hitachi/IBM site, but one thing concerns me- the diagnostic software i’m supposed to run. I don’t see how i’m supposed to use this software on the drive when the BIOS won’t even detect it and brings the system to a grinding halt once the CLI-CLICK SKREE’ing starts, which is pretty much when I turn the system on with it plugged in. I guess all I can do is send it in and hope I get a replacement. A refurbed drive’s better than a kick in the teeth. Could probably run Linux off it or something.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Two IBM drives – one has packed up and apparently taken my primary ide line with it! I am interested in the comments made about these drives and may well try one of the recommendations and Freeze the knackered one, I will post up the results! My story still has no ending and I am hoping that someone out there can help!

    I have been running a gigabyte GAVXP ultra motherboard, with a creative ti4800 graphics card, 1gb of ram and a creative live drive II for 3months, and it has been working very well. 1x sony cd-rom drive and 1x dvd reader drive. I had a 40gb drive with XP formatted with NTFS and a 60gb drive formated FAT32 (From an earlier machine) for user files, both drives are udma100 ibm deskstars. The two hdds were on IDE-0 as master and slave and the two cd/dvd drives on IDE-1 as master and slave drives.

    One morning – for no apparent reason the cmos stopped recognising the HDD’s on IDE-0, after checking the settings I swapped all the drives around and using another PC with a GA7VAXP motherboard concluded that the 60GB drive had failed, however the 40GB drive with the OS on continued to work properly on either IDE-0 or IDE1. Upon replacing the 40GB drive in the original system on IDE-0 the bios still failed to recognise it. However, when placed on IDE-2 it works perfectly. Convinced that when the 60GB drive failed it had damaged the IDE-0 line I then purchased a gigabyte GA7VAXP board to replace the Ultra version that appeared damaged. After careful installation I STILL HAVE EXACTLY THE SAME PROBLEM? The system recognises anything attached to the secondary IDE connector, but nothing connected to the primary IDE connector. I have re-tested all drives on another system running the same M/board and they work – It is unlikely that I have a hardware fault on two m/boards that produce identical symptoms is it not? I have carefully been through the manual, checked the cmos settings and am now at a complete loss for a reason. Have I overlooked something?

    I would be most grateful if anyone has any ideas as to what may be going on with this, as I’m in danger of going nuts!!

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I have two DTLA-307045 on KT7 Raid running Raid 0.
    Got them in late 2000.
    Last year and a half runned them 24/7.
    About half a year ago one of them started to make noises.
    And a month ago it finally died (mobo can’t see it).
    Went to ibm (no hitachi) website, aparently I still have warranty on it. Filled all the info, shipped the drive, about two weeks later got replacement. Looks like new drive with old parts.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Hi,
    I have 2 DeskStars, both are 7200 rpm, 40 GB. The first one, IC35L040AVER07-0 has failed two times in one year. Fortunatelly, I’ve recovered my data with this great data recovery software, called GetDataBack for NTFS, from Runtime Software (www.runtime.org). The other hard drive, IC35L040AVVA07-0, still works fine, although I can hear some strange (and loud, too) noise from it, as I’ve heard a lot of times before with the first one hard drive.
    However, my another IBM drive, 7200 rpm, 13.5 GB, has been working for about 4 years without ANY problems at ALL!
    Shame for IBM, nobody expected that this could happen with their drives.
    Greetings from Bosnia!

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    My first IBM drive failed after I dropped it. This was MY fault. At the time I thought it wasn’t a serious fall, but it failed to show in the BIOS, fortunately I was able to RMA it back to the Netherlands and received the replacement ‘used serviceable part’, fair enough I thought but it didn’t last more than about six months before making the ‘click, click’ of death and had to RMA it back again. I complained to IBM and they agreed an ‘upgrade’ to a 120GXP. When this arrived I ran DFT and it immediately told me there were damaged sectors, I tried sector repair and erase disk but this failed and DFT came back with device not found ? Undeterred I tried to install Windows 2000 but it only managed to get 6% of the way through before a blue error screen STOP and hexadecimal characters. I ran DFT again and this time I got a TRC drive faulty. Maybe it’s my fault for dropping the drive in the first place because it was ok. But once you enter the RMA process, IBM can just keep sending you shit drives which don’t work until you give up or the cost of shipping makes it uneconomical. I would not buy another IBM drive. On a final note I condsider the rest of my hardware setup to be excellent. PSU-Enermax, Mobo-Asus and a Seagate drive working fine.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Posting my dissatisfaction with IBM Hard Drives will not fix my drives but it will make me feel at least 1% better. I pride myself in knowing the ‘top of the line’ products and as the local computer guru I recommend to many what they should buy. I told a lot of people that IBM’s were the best. I sold many machines with IBM’s. It was not long before I realized that I was in trouble. So many people lost thier data. Even when the Hard Drive’s were RMA’d many of the replacements died too. It’s seems like it is futile to have them sent back for repair. Once a lemon, always a lemon. I now firmly rely on Maxtor Hard Drives as they seem to have the lowest failure rate of them all.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Another one bites the dust,

    this goes without saying the worst thing that most of us have experienced and I am just another name on the long list of victims.
    It simply occured without any notice, but I return from work and the drive was emitting a clicking sound and windows reported that my secondary drive has been uninstalled in the middle of performing a task( 40GB deskstar thats only 10 months old ).
    I attempted rebooting the system to perform a diagnosis using the DFT, but couldn’t do it let alone get into the BIOS instead I was greeted with a clicking sound and with the message of “1782 disk controller error”.

    I am attempting to figure out how to access the drive one more time just to retrieve some data from it, since the cost of getting it professionally done runs anywhere from $900-$2400 (USD) depending on the severity. But no such luck as its not allowing my system to bootup, as a slave or master setup.

    I’ve held IBM drives in high regard and I still have a 13.6 GB deskstar thats 4 years old that still alive running on 24/7 mode, but after this and reading the comments on this forum, I’m not gonna be dealing with them again.

    And thats my story.

    If anyone has had success retrieving data from their drive after the crash, please include it in your postng the general process of recovering the data to help those less fortunate.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I got my 30g 75gxp (07N3929) almost 3 years ago. I can’t remember when the first failure occurred, but it did start with the clicks-of-imminent-death. Since then, I’ve had to low-level format the drive 4 times. Call me a glutton for punishment, but each time I was able to recover my critical data (it wasn’t bootable, but I could access most of the data by letting Windows find it as a secondary drive), and didn’t want to go through the hassle of returning it. About 6 weeks ago, I discovered a problem such that my computer would randomly reboot (but only when upright, it worked fine when I put it on its side). It took me all day, but I eventually discovered it was the harddrive. This was the last straw, so I decided to return it (prompted by the fact that the sticker on the harddrive states June 2000). I called tech support to see if they would ship out a replacement first, so I could backup my existing data – no go. Strike 1. Sixteen days after they received the defective drive, they finally shipped the replacement. Strike 2 (16 days isn’t horrible, but it’s certainly not good [more prominent since it was my primary HD and I’ve been using my backup p2-400 in the meantime]). I then requested tracking information. They informed me it was being shipped from overseas, would take an additional 6-10 days, and they had no tracking info. Strike 3.

    I had hoped that I would receive a newer model, but based on a previous post, and the fact they had to go overseas to find it, I’m dreading the worst.

    I had also [i]considered[/i] buying a Hitachi for my next drive, because, let’s face it, they still make one of the fastest drives available. Elsewhere, I had read the 120s and 180s were more stable, but after reading some of this thread, I think I’ll be looking elsewhere.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    One more sample in the horror list, my 60gxp 40gb had some problems from time to time (causing the “no system disk” at boot time) but now it crashed completely while installing a big soft..whith a strange noise…

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Just lost my IBM Deskstar 60GXP. I was hoping that I would not have errors with this drive but I just joined the millions of people with problems with this model 🙁 Mine came up with a 0X73 Excessive shock error. Came home from work Win XP was stuck rebooted. Drive spins up. click click click pause click click click pause. I sure hope the replace this with something better. BUYER BEWARE. smanies@hotmail.com

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I had a 30GB 75 GXP that died two years after I bought it. I also replaced a 75 GXP in a customer’s server that was losing data. Both drives died from the click of death, with unreadable secotors. DFT tells me my drive is permanently damaged.

    IBM (now Hitachi) refuses to admit the blindingly obvious fact that this series of drives are faulty. But even if they won’t say this publically, I would expect them to replace faulty 75 GXP drives with new ones. No such luck. Even though my drive is still under warranty, they want me to ship my drive back to them at my expense so they can replace it with another (second-hand) 75GXP.

    This is simply not good enough. And that is why I will never trust my data to an IBM hard drive again.

    I found this site very amusing:
    §[<http://www.hogens.com/75gxp/<]§

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    I had a 60 GXP that died with a click of death and crazy as I am I bought a new 120 GXP because I thought that IBM will solve the problem with the new series. But now the 120 GXP (80GB) makes also randomly the short screaming sound. that I had with the 60 GXP befor it died with click of death (COD) . Thanks to ebay. There are a lot of people who are hot to buy this shit.
    never ever IBM !! -> no problem! -> Never ever Hitachi!

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Another fatality. A log from ActiveSmart:

    Serial Number: YMEYMT5T786
    FirmWare Rev: TX6OA60A
    Model Number: IBM-DTLA-307045

    SMART ATTRIBUTES:
    ID Description Raw Value Status Value Worst Threshold

    ——————————————————————————————–

    1 Raw Read Error Rate 1556153278 FAIL 40 40 60

    5 Reallocated Sector Count 910 FAIL 1 1 5

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    These drives are CRAP. I have had so much trouble with accessmicro.com trying to get them to replace it.

    IBM BLOWS.

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    in response to the whole A45A thing,

    heres the link to the real firmware thing, just learn to read pages all the way dude 😛 Wonder if it works though, in the process of hoping to save a IBM 40gig Harddrive which too wants this update….

    LINK:
    §[<http://www-1.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?rs=0&uid=psg1MIGR-43972&loc=en_US<]§ Good luck to y'all BTW: Broke one of these drives after about a year of usage, no warning or clickking sounds untill it died off, also stalled at about 74% format and later on 20%, took a year for each % to come troug. Anyway, I'm out -Jesper

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    *[http://www.hddrecovery.com.au/downloads/200ways.pdf<]§

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    75GXP here (45GB, 7200RPM), Made in the Phillippines
    2.5 years old since first power-on
    powerred on 24/7 for 2 of those years
    1 bad sector developed
    drive is still functional today, firmware never upgraded (yet, still using A60A)
    knock on wood… warranty expires in 6 months…

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Hey guys I just found one of my pins (#40) was pushed into the connector and where the line goes to the circuit board it was bent upward on my 60gxp. This was causing the clicking at bootup. I carefully pulled it out and it is fine now. From now on I will be connecting the ide cables to the drive outside of the pc’s case.

    Most drives use a dual edge board with thick pins on each side that snap into the ide connector. Not these IBM drives. They use pins with very thin leads so that they can all fit on one side of the board, and the one that was pushed in on mine did not seem to snap into the connector when I pulled it back out.

    Out of 6 relatively new drives that I have, only one other had the thin pins and it was an 18gb WD that physically looks alot like the IBM drives (also dead, but not due to the pins).

    George Little

    • Anonymous
    • 16 years ago

    Alain, France.
    I’ve been advised to buy an IBM 40Go. So I did it for may father and I.
    My father’s one died 3 days ago.
    To be sure it was a HD problem. I set it up in my own computer and mine went down as well.
    Obviously lost all our data. I anybody had success in data recovery (freezing, buildind it up at 45 degrees…as I read), I’ll be glad to hear !

    al1.b@freesurf.fr

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    *[tching12@hotmail.com I would be happy if I could have my money I spent in this product (2hds).
    Does it exist any soft soutions to increase the life of these hd?
    (firmware upgrade, drivers,or anything else)
    gratz for your upcoming answers lol <;-)),

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Greetings fellow enthusiasts!

    Up until the last 3 months I’ve swore by IBM drives, including the ones I mention here – but I’ve had the intermittent click click click whirr problem on occassion as documented very well above!

    I purchased a 40GB 40GXP AVER07-0 variant of this drive some 18 months ago, and a second (identical) about 13 months ago; and this fine morning (4.47AM, UK and I’m going to work today :S) I’ve spent running DFT on the two disks.

    Win2K went iffy last night, wouldn’t boot. Managed to install XP pro over the top and recover the files – odd but true. Cleared out the partitions completely with Linux Mandrake, and set about re-installing win98 for testing purposes. Failed miserably. Managed to FDISK and reformat (from CD boot-up), but win98 refuses to install. A subsequent format of the second disk revealed huge numbers of bad sectors. Cue IBM DFT, which I handily downloaded a copy of after hearing problems months before but not seeing any.

    The second drive failed a quick DFT scan (0x70, no surprise at that) almost immediately, the first is undergoing an advanced check now – in some respects from reading the above, I hope it has errors! Two returns going tomorrow, postage payment is requested, and demands for either a refund or replacement from “reliable” stock will be made. Wish me luck 😉

    P.S. Anyone got any knowledge of how good Hitachi are for returns over the mess IBM made?

    emails appreciated at blacklaw_uk@nospam.yahoo.co.uk naturally remove the nospam. from the address.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Yip,

    Got us as well, we bought an Apple Mac with a 60GB IBM deskstar drive in it last year, after 6 months the drive started making a high pitched noise, and after checking on the Internet I found various reports of problems with this drive, first the noise and then the “click of death” … not wanting to wait for the later, I sent the drive back to the Apple dealer …. its now exactly 6.3 months after the replacement drive was installed … yip, you guessed it … same noise, but now the Apple dealer won’t replace it because the Mac is more than one year old. Off to buy a Western Digital drive tomorrow …… thanks alot IBM I hope the lawyers use this forum thread in the court case … do the right thing and recall the drives !

    Looks like the old mantra of “Nobody got fired buying IBM” probably doesn’t hold true anymore.

    Don the Kiwi.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    in May2001 I purchased 3 75G 75gxps… they have been running without any problems – non-stop – since then…. every now and then I would hear a click or click-click but they never failed…

    now just recently I have been having some problems with the host (based on an ABIT vp6 motherboard).. had what appeared to be videocard issues. and thet frozen system needed a reboot.. ever since these occassions I have what I think is the prelude to the click-of-death noises… I have narrowed it down to a drive in the RAID-0 setup…. so the host is powered down until I can take a backup. need to find 136G of storage…

    in all, I believe these drives are good, as long as you have (very) good cooling.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    well.. to all if you do more research into buying drives, you will see that ibm is rated for 8 hour use, not 24/7.

    i have a 80G GXP , with a 3 inch fan on its ass, and its been working for about 2 years now. works great.. i guess you just need to keep the drive cool !

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I have used IBM hard drive with mixed results and reliability.
    I have found that Seagate manufacture superior hard drives compared to all other manufactures.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I have had two 45 GB deskstars since 2000 and a 40 GB since early 2001 without any problems. I guess that I am lucky, but these drives are not all bad.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    This is for those who have replaced the controller cards with luck. My IBM 60 GXP 60gig died with the click of death and I lost everything 🙁 I’ve never had a drive die in 15 years and always thought I would have time to backup. Biggest mistake of my life. Well next to buying IBM.

    What I want to know is. I’m interested in tracking down and paying for another driver to get the card on the drive to try the swap. But what info do I have to look for. Do i just get the same model number? or does it have to be the same Part number.

    my model number is MODEL: IC35L060AVER07-0

    Thanksfor your help. Please email me at systemunstable(at)yahoo.com(nospam) if you can help me also

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    My 60GXP just died after 8 months of use, it started out with the ‘click of death’ sound that just got worse and eventually it died.
    No overclocking, good ventialtion and it has only been running max. 5-6 hours a day..
    This drive just sucks…..a friend of mine now have the same problem

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I’ve had this driveback in 1999 it’s been replaced 2 times. first time the power molex pin connector burned out and it never worked again. so i got the same model 30GB GXP60 back and then it works for couple months with light usage, and it broke again. now i’m on my 3rd drive which is a GXP75 they said the problem has been fixed in this batch. and i used the drive very very often writing large data files because i do video editing on it. it’s not my main drive though. and now i jsut installed windows on this drive, and getting another one for RAID setup. maybe i should back up my data very often now.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I had installed a 45 gig deskstar in my computer. The next day I had that horrible clicking/scratching noise. I figured that it had overheated being the middle of summer. I returned it and just got the replacement. 3 days later that horrid sound has returned on my replacement drive and I have yet another busted drive. I also have a 120 gig deskstar in my computer and it has been running for 6 months just fine, expect it seems unsually slow. But the 120 gig is still running so I am happy with that drive at least.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I bought a 60 GXP 14 months ago and was very happy with it, so i bought a second one about 10 months ago and encouraged a friend to buy one as well.

    The first one died without warning three weeks ago, my friends died last week and my second one became bad this week(SMART:A CRASH IS IMMINENT!!!!!)

    If IBM/Hitachi does not fix this I will be very dissapointed, i just cannot believe Big Blue sold me these.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    plain and simpled,
    dont by ibm

    just crashed the 3rd ibm deskstar 40-80GB hdd in 1 year!

    maxtor or westerndigital is the way to go

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    First commenting on the deer psu. I had one burn up quite a few parts in my old pc too.

    My story sounds just like most of these. Bought two 40 gig 60gxps to run raid-0. Raid would only last for couple weeks. Thought maybe it was just the controller or maybe a ide cable. Nope stopped tring raid with them along time ago.

    They do all the different things people have described above at radom times. Not posting, those horrible clicking noises, disk faults, bad sectors and so on. I’ve tried to every remedy and more described above too. The only thing that really let me know these drives were bad was when I bought 4 special edition 80gig western digitals and have been running raid-0 for 5 months with no problems.

    On another story. Had a friend buy a 30gig 75gxp. Had trouble with it posting. Lost all his data once and returned the disk. They sent him a 40gig 60gxp in return and he’s never had a problem with it. He now has two.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    b[I sold my problem (IBM Deskstar 60GXP 41.1GB) per US 57.00, because Ibm BRAZIL don

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I have 2 60GXP 40 gig drives, and both have failed after about a year of use. The second one was just sent in to Hitachi. If anyone would like more info, I can be contacted at wahoo_power@hotmail.com

    Lou

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I have equal problem…
    a) the identification utility tells me I NEED an update
    b) the update tool tells me I do NOT need an update

    IBM is really the “big blue” ?

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Ich have a Problem: I can’t update my IC35L060AVER7-0 (alias Deskstar 60GXP)

    The Identification Utility says that I NEED an update (HD ran since Jan. 2001 without problems)

    Here you can finde the identification utility:
    §[<http://www-1.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?rs=0&uid=psg1MIGR-44195&loc=en_US<]§ Tools not related to firmware bugfixes you'll find at hitachi now. Referring to IBMs identification utility I am supposed to update to A45A. But when I download and start the appropriate update tool (which is - for whatever f***** reason - called "DFT/Drive Fitness Test") it says "No drives that need updates". I even removed all other drives, made my 60GXP primary master and created the boot disk again - did not help... Maybe my Harddrive does not need the update. Production date is Dec. 2001, Firmware ER60A464A60 - seems to be even newer than the downloadable Firmware. If I compare the Part number with that from the IBM site (Hitachi hasn't bought the Firmware-Bugfix files...) it really seems that I do not need an update. BUT WHY THE HELL a) the identification utility tells me I NEED an update b) the update tool tells me I do NOT need an update c) Not a single word about this eventual bug in the identification tool Do I need an update or not? How can I find out? Maybe it would be best to sell the drive at eBay immediately... (Samsung SV1204H offers enough space to Backup :-) BTW: how reliable are Samsung drives? [b]Am I really the only person in the world with an IC35L060AVER7 that was shipped with bug-free firmware? Or at least the only one who own such an eventually not affected disk and looked for an update?[/b] I succesfully updated an IBM-DTLA-305040 (ran since more than 3 years without problems) BTW: I suggest you use the Hitachi feature tool to set the acoustic management to level 191 - that results in VERY silent acces, even more silent than the already very silent Samsung SV1204H, but of course the IBM spindle stay MUCH louder than that of the Samsung disk. I guess it will increase the lifetime a little bit. You even can use that tool with other manufacturer's hard drives. BTW: I thought hard drives are expected to WORK reliably without updates. Even Microsofts filesystems are tested better it seems. IBM drives have been very reliable in the past and could have been also during the last 2 years if only they had tested them a little bit better before selling them. IBM even invented a new head parking technology: §[<http://www.pcguide.com/ref/hdd/perf/qual/featuresHead-c.html<]§ (dunno if other vendors also use that) and IBM develop several key technologies related to HDDs. But this firmware bug seems to have killed their HD business, otherwise they wouldn't have sold it to Hitachi. Last week I asked 4 different PC stores which HDs return rarely, which return often: all said that IBM comes back definitely most. I bought Samsung - I think I had bought IBM again if this shit hadn't happened, because I had 5 IBM drives before and all worked fine.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Bought my dlta-307045 drive october 2000. Died today 4-24-03. Lost every MP3 that I have downloaded in the past 5 years. Lost an entire family vacation video of Europe. Lost 3 seasons of sienfeld episodes and much, much more.

    But, I did not loose my system drive, woop dee dooo. Good thing I put all of my important files on a seperate drive. NOT!

    I am just glad I did not loose my entire life’s work, as some have. Thanks alot IBM. I will never buy IBM again.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    hi, just got a RMA replacement for my 40GB GXP60 (IC35L040AVER07). it is labeled on bag IC35L060AVV207-0 (GXP 180). as capacity the sticker says 41,1GB???..this should be an 60GB drive!

    as idid not opened the bag yet, i can’t say what is written on the sticker on the drive itself.

    did HITACHI limited the capacity maybe on the firmware to match my previous drive capacity??? do i get the full capacity with low lewel format?? on ebay germany i see some people selling their RMA ICL36060AVV207-0 drives as 40GB drives.

    any comments out there? should i use this drive? the GXP 180 series seems to have no/less complains…

    greetings

    dirk from germany

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I have a IBM 120GXP 80gb that was in my computer. It started making a “chirp-click” sound every few hours, and would only do this when idle and every month or so. I had it in there with a Maxtor D740X 80gb to back it up. I removed the IBM 120gxp, put it a removable carrier, and put a IBM 75GXP 45gb in it’s place which I have another W2K installation on for experimental porposes(all important data is kept on Maxtor). I’ve been keeping tabs on the SMART status of the 75GXP. Today ago, the raw read error rate attribute went down to 99, then back up to 100 after a few hours and the hex value is zero again. No wierd noises from the 75GXP so far.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    isnt it funny, how when IBM used to have a drive division, and the RMA process used to take almost a month or so, and you still get the same crappy drive back, or someone else’s drive that got thrown around, and when Hitachi bought ibm out, they tottaly turned it around, 1 ibm 60GXP IC35L060, 3 75GXP DTLA307030, 1 40GV DLTA 305020 (quit, DFT,Lowlevel format, Still working). and a friend who has a IC35L0120 120GB 120GXP, losing files, curropt file errors, I sent back the 75GXP’s and all except for 1 got replaced with a 180GXP from Hitachi, in about a week turnaround time, 2nd day air shipping. I am using the 180GXP happily, FAST, quiet, the other 75gxp’s got replaced with 75gxp’s and they failed, one is still going along, but Excessive Shock returned from DFT. OEM drive, looks like its to the trash with you. If you get another deskstar, make sure its the 180GXP, i think they learned their lesson and improved here.Also Seagate Barracuda, and Maxtor drives are the bomb too.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I Beleive I may have found a fix or at least a temporary fix for the drive’s corrupted sector problems, run the tests and if you get the red screen giving you an error code to give to an IBM rep., return the the main screen and choose the zerofill option or whatever they call it it will write all zeros to the media, and I have found it to repair 3 drives I have attempted this on and I havent had another bad sector in at least 4-5 months, given theese drives werent too bad off compared to some i’ve heard of, Theese are about 2.5-3 years old and I finally had some sectors go on 1 of my 2 45gig gxp’s running on raid…. Theese drives are run probaby an avg. of 18-22 hrs a day, (It’s not uncommon having them run 10 days in a row without more than a few hrs.break.) Theese are used quite extensively writing, extracting, manipulating, large files and are usually 75% full. I do have them on a custom aluminium carraige a 1/2 inch away from 2 80mm fans…. I used to defrag pretty frequently but decided it was too much wear and tear for not a lot of gain.. I do beleive though you shuold run “scandisk” or “error check” (in xp and probably 2k) bi-weekly or monthly.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    i have posted here before, Once Anonymous, and other DskStruser, i got rid of my 60 and 75GXP, fell to Beeps, and COD noises. after IBM went to hitachi, and i sent in my faulty 75GXP 30.7 GB DTLA-307030, i recieved in the mail a brand new 180GXP IC35L030AVV207-0 30.7 GB, installed it, and its quiet, fast, has the new Tag N Seek feature found in SCSI drives. I have been using for a couple weeks, its installed in a case with 2 fans in front of the HDs never ever get hot, got a maxtor 80GB diamondmax plus 9, workin great.I will post any findings about the 180GXP, i read reviews, nobody is complaining. ill keep updated.

    if anyone has questions, Email is :dodge152@skyenet.net
    I am pretty knowledgeable in the 75 and 60GXP field.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    At §[<http://www.tech-report.com/news_reply.x/2799n<]§ I saw your posting this month above. I have two ibm model dtla 307030's: one works and the other makes the click of death: whir bang, whir band, whir bang. I would like to try to recover just a a few meg of important data from the dead drive. Thus far I've tried all the following, and still the drive makes noise and is not seen in setup bios. The good drive is seen just fine. 1. move electronics from good to bad. Update firmware. 2. leave bad drive in freezer over night. 3. tighten head screw as described at §[<http://www.tech-report.com/news_reply.x/2799<]§ Any further ideas? I'm ready to move the drive platters to the good drive, but it's not obvious to me how to get head assy out of the way safely.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    just had another 75GXP fail, 30.7 GB in a friends computer. first chkdsk started showing error after error. then 2 days ago. started this”seek,seek, scratch, beep,click” then it would finish reading, Got worse, then seemed to subside. DFT “0x73 Excessive Shock” OH no. even if it had a warranty i know hitachi wouldnt honor a drive that has excessive shock. Well its a OEM drive, they wont honor it. got the drive from Ebay. Well i took a chance, Erase disk, Low level formatted it. seems to be fine now. but will give a thorough testing. I currently own a 180GXP. 30.7 GB nice, quiet, fast it has the tag N seek feature used by SCSI drives. can anyone answer. has anyone had any trouble with the 180GXP series drives? let me know

    My name is chris.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I had two 46gb dtla 307045, mirrored. Both failed (sep 2000 – mar 2003) one night. I have had some success in using a linux disk and dd (dd if=/dev/hda of=/dev/hdb conv=noerror,sync bs=512). I tried freezing one, no luck. I’ve swapped the PCB’s, no luck. After they have warmed up a bit they eventually acknowledge themselves. Sometimes a gentle agitation moves them on.

    I am hoping that I’ll eventually get enough of both disks to put the image back together. It will be some time, scanning the bad blocks takes approx 20 seconds per block. I rekkon 10 days and the first disk should have finished.

    Good luck

    DougPickering picksoft.com

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I bought an IBM drive desktar 60 GPX frive based on the CHIP magazine despite what I heard from one of my friends that is not such a good piece of work. After 6 moths it felt so I lost all my data. Now I discoverd that if I give a few punchis in the side of the drive I manage to have it working for another few months. So my definitve advise is do not buy an IBM hard drive. Beter to have a Maxtor or anything else. Don’t be fooled by “awards winning” products advertised in so called computer magazines

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    hahahahaha…. IBM it

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Hello. My 60GB 60gxp would not boot after little over a year of use.
    But this is what I did to save my data. First I removed the drive from my computer, put in another one, install your OS (I had a 4GB drive already installed with win2k), then you make sure you have enough space for backup (or install a CD-burn prog). Then you (turn your computer off) install the faulty drive, start your computer, let checkdisk do its job (tok little over 3 hours for me), and when windows starts, you should have access to your data. On my computer I rescued all of importance. If you dont find the directory, se if it is in one of the ‘chkdsk’ dirs. (I had 43 dirs named chkdsk0000 and so on).
    So now I am returning the shit. Thinking of getting me a WD.

    And if anybody out there have not yet had any trouble with your drive (60gxp or 75gxp) I would recomend a firmware update. Check the link for information and link to ibm: §[<http://www.pheuron.de/deathstar.htm<]§ Hope this can help somebody out there.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    My father has a Compaq Presario 7000 with an IBM 75GXP (eg. DTLA-307045) 46.1GB drive in it. He’s been running XP Home on it for some time. He’s been having strange, inexplicable problems with his system. I’d assumed it had to do with all his many peripherals (USB Backpack HDD, SCSI driven 1GB Jaz drive and La Cie CDRW drive, HP scanner and printer on USB, Iomega PhotoShop ZIP drive). I’ve redone his computer once and then later, he did a “parallel install” (reinstalling OS over what was already there) while working with MS tech support. Finally he’s talking about going back to a Mac. I went over to his house to examine his setup and see if I can figure out what’s wrong. I open up Event Log and his Application log is full of CRC errors on file reads. Umm okay … so I look at the System log. Lo and behold, many hundreds of “disk0 has a bad block” messages all over! No wonder he’s having so many weird problems, his HDD is bad.

    Imagine my suprise when I get home with his hard drive in hand and I google’d the part number … and saw all these posts. Hmph.

    Any comment from Compaq? Nope. Any mention on IBM’s site (err, scuze me, Hitachi’s site)? Nope.

    I thought it was bad when Fujitsu had a problem with one of their highest selling OEM drives having huge failure rates — thanks to a Cirrus Logic chip with faulty bonding material securing the silicon to the packaging. Now IBM too? Sheesh.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Reply to 982… the GXP120 may not be more reliable. I have two of these, which used to be in a RAID-0 array. I have very good cooling, a fan blowing on the drives, etc, no overclocking. One started clicking, and causing lockups, so I unlinked the array. I turned ‘acoustic management’ up to full, and it stopped the clicking/seeking (the seeking is the ‘click of death’ noise). Now it is getting louder and has started making the click of death again.
    Another theme… One of my 120GXPs (the older one) is made in ?Thailand, and is fine. The newer one, made in Hungary, is the one causing problems. It seems that ones made in Hungary cause more problems.

    In summary:

    120GXPs can have faults
    Hungary-made ones might be worse
    Turning on acoustic management has extended the life of my clicking drive, which was on it’s last legs (it has lasted 6 months symptom-free after the turning-on of acoustic management).
    The little clicking noise, which often precedes click-of-death, seems to occur when seeking from one ‘end’ of the drive to the other – some problem in the mechanics of the head – loose/running too far??).

    Hope this is of interest 🙂

    Hope this helps

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I have found a solution to very common problems in ibm 60 gxp drives. if any one is interested please mail me on abhisheksaigal@yahoo.com

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I had owned about 4 IBM HDD’s, one a 45GXP DTLA-305020, 20GB, 60GXP 60.4 GB, and 3 DTLA-307030 75GXP’s. the First 45GXP crapped out after I had moved the case, and was screwing down the dvd rom, xp was loading “scratch,scratch,click,click” and i get the XP bue screen of death, ok i shut it down and turned back on, drive powers up, and tries to recognize, same “scratch,scratch,click,click” Ok i take itout , download DFT and it reports curropted sectors. I run Erase disk, and the Drive still works like a charm to this day. Ok. I see on Ebay a IBM 60GXP 60GB. i order it, got it in, loaded it up with data, as i had a samsung 40GB 5400 rpm that is still working to this day, and i ran out of space. One day i am booting up to XP, i hear a wierd noise, and my heart just sank “Scratch,scratch,scratch,click,clik,clik” My heart just sank to the bottom, all of my data, GONE, as i cleared off my 40GB samsung and moved all data to the 75gxp, i ran DFT, “corrupted sectors” Ran Erase disk, ok everything cool. I reloaded everything, Did something really stupid, Striped the 40 and the 60, RAID 0. I installed a 75GXP DTLA-307030 30GB, and used it for backup, i liked the specs on it, and being 7200 rpm i knew it would be faster. Well faster yes, safer NO. during a boot, i got to “Welcome” and there it went
    “scratch,scratch,click,clik” Well you know what happenes in a RAID 0 array and a drive goes. your data says BYEBYE. well i ran DFT again, and erase disk, powered off, powered back on”click”, “beep,bepp,click,click” and it kept it up, Drive was not recogznied, and was toast. I sold the 75GXP to a friend, and he loaded XP on it, and during the setup, reboot, “Scratch,scratch,click,click” I ran DFT, Corrupted sectors, I ran erase disk, and after it erased and went to scan, “Scratch,scratch,click,click” so i rain it over again . I was using the drive and had some stuff on it, and it started to get real loud and slow. I knew it was havin trouble reading, and then “scratch,scratch,click,clikc” that was enough, contacted IBM, Got RMA, sent drive back, got my drive in like 2 months. I sold it. Friend is still using in his system, but with a HDD cooler on it, seems to be fine, fast, but i am crossing fingers, i know one day, it will die.Well i had another 75gxp that died, sent back for RMA, and i got it back. let my girlfriend use. and i was inside installing a modem, turned it back on, came to the BIOS, “scratch,scratch,click,click” I ran DFT on it, curropted sectors, the drive was ok then , i took back, same old scratching noises, I sent back to Hitachi, used to be IBM, in about a week i recieved the new drive, but guess what, it isnt the same old 75GXP, IT’S A 180GXP 30.7GB. i have not taken out of the bag yet, but i have read good reviews on this series of drive. I am very anxious to test this drive out. I will keep you posted on what i find, my girlfriend currently has the drive now, I will test thuroughly. I hope that hitachi has turned the drive problem around, i hope now they will recall all the 75 and 60GXP drives, I think the main problem is heat, and the controller cards failing, one thing . if you own a IBM drive, DO NOT cover the hole on the top, that is how they breathe, as if they get too hot, the cards will fail, and so will your drive. keep coolers on the 7200 rpm ones if you can, and if they ever click, or beep a lot, its time to start backing up, try a 180GXP i hear nothing but good things about them. a couple months ago i bought a 80GB maxtor 7200 ata 133, and has been doing really well so far.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I’ve been having problems with my two 60 GXP’s for a long time: “the noise”–>then unrecognized under BIOS –>DFT repair or format and everything goes fine until the next “the noise”.

    Have you tried to update the firmware as indicated at §[<http://www.pheuron.de/deathstar.htm<]§ (aftermath section)? It's suposed to "fix" the problem of the Deathstars. 12 days have passed since I aplied the this update and everithing goes fine until now (I keep praying). Someone has tried the firmware upgrade?

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I too had the Clicking noises. First time around X-mas 2002 with a 80 gig 75GXP, running fine for one year. I received (after more than a month and several phone calls) a replacement drive, a refurbished 75GXP. This second one stopped working after just 3 weeks of service.
    Trying now desperately to convince Hitache/IBM to send me a 120 GXP which i hope is more reliable

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I bought with my new pc IBM 60Gb HDD and it worked about 6 months, and then? You have 3 times to guess… I replaced it and got a new one – but with little orange label on it “Servicable used part”. Can someone explain to me what does it mean? Anyway, the second one worked about a month, then the third one (yes, 3.) worked about 2 months and then, the FOURTH (aargh!) worked about 5 days. I dunno if I have any problems with power supply – it’s just the drive, 52X cdrom, no burners or dvds, no extra coolers or anything on an 300W power supply and it had been all the time on it’s own power chord and ide cable. I know that this sound ugly, but when it dies, you just hit it on the side a bit and install it back and it works for a few days PERFECTLY. No bad sectors, slowdowns, clicks, anything. And then, it dies again. If anyone has a solution to this problem, please please mail me at dj_raven@mail.inet.hr . Thank you in advance…

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Hi… I lost my 36GB of database from my Desktar 60GXP 40.GB and don

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Sorry to hear about that…
    Assume that you have no backups at all..
    I manged to get my non functional disk working by finding and substituting a new controller card. It has to be the exact model etc, I am told. I was fortunate to have a computer shop owner/operator as a good friend…
    Other wise IBM/Hitachi DO NOT provide controller cards. It is entirely up to the unlucky purchaser to find a substitute.
    Another reason for putting a boot up their backsides..

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Please if anyone has been able to recover any data after their HD crashes please do share. Please explain exact procedure. This is very imporant. My whole life’s work has been lost. I desperately need some help here. Thank you very much.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    #976 – Who are you addressing this to and what recommendation are you giving? Are you referring to the freezer trick? If so what exactly did you do?
    Thanks

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Yes just do what i did and leave it all entirely unplugged for a period of time.. mine was about 10 mins but the longer the better… then you may be in luck. GOOD LUCK. I sent mine back working (hope it doesnt come back ) after near death but clearly ill as it suffered the death whine and huge clunk and then refused to boot atall until I did the above.
    Kept on going for 3 weeks but slower.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Yes I wouldnt trust it any further than you can throw it… sell the bugger make some profit and put it towards something hopefully decent albeit slightly slower (which sucks).

    You can do without the aggrevation. Besides you’ll be back in good warrenty then.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    [My last post 968] My replacement disk arrived from Hitachi/IBM support in Holland today. Interestingly the model number this time – IC35L040AVVA07-0 – checks out on the Support site as a 120GXP (my last two were 60GXPs) and there’s an absence of ‘new and used’ parts stickers. Could it be new?

    I’ve checked the web and there doesn”t seem to be anything to match the sheer horror of this thread for the 120GXPs. i[

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Hi,
    I

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    If anyone over here has been able to recover any data at all after the “click of death” please share your approaches. Please be as specific as possible for those of us who can benefit from saving even the slightest amount of data.

    Thanks

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Does the freezer trick seriously work? Can anyone confirm this? I really need to know because if it is possible even for 10 minutes to get access to the file I think I will be very happy (even though this is a miserable situation to begin with-fuck IBM).
    Please share your experiences with the freezer trick. And also how can you keep the moisture out when you’re connecting the cables (IDE and power) to the computer?
    Thanks
    -M

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    All I can say is that this is totally messed up. To think that a company like IBM can knowingly promote and then actively sell products like these (data storage products for chrissakes) like everything is fine. IBM has lost total credibility in my eyes and for those of you who’ve had this experience you should run an aggresive campaign against IBM and inform everyone else of their shady behavior. This is absolutely disgusting. Shame on you IBM!

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Da-dah! Who’d believe it? (My last Post 964).

    I got the email from Holland today saying that my second replacement disk in 6 months is now on its way exactly one calendar month from the day it arrived with Hitachi/IBM, and 7 weeks since it ‘died’. Once it arrives I’ll give it a thorough check and then it’s crossed fingers, lots of prudent backing up, and start saving furiously for that replacement Maxtor or Seagate!

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Hi All,

    Now on my 2nd IBM DTLA 307030 Deskstar 75GXP.. 30GIG.

    This forum has been bought to my attention through such disaster.
    The 1st I had in use about 7 months and developed 2 bad sectors of which i suppose i could have put up with… but choose to return to retailer as a bad drive is a bad drive right?
    Got a replacement 4 weeks later and duly installed in system.
    Now exactly 7 months on its gone again 🙁 This one developed a horrendous whine and clunk and the whole system frooze. Turned power off and then rebooted….. dead as a dodo… most unhappy. Tried 3 times but no luck…… BRIGHT Idea unplug ribbon and power cable and leave off for 10mins. reconnect, turn on…. hey presto life 🙂
    Downloaded IBM’s utility gave it a thorough roasting on all tests without destroying data but reported no errors! I was suspicous.

    Outcame chkdsk,
    & scandisk (thorough) again no errors.. ran defrag as system was now running slow (programs open slower and mouse scroll is now very jerky). Hours later… no improvement…
    Re-install OE as it no longer runs, does a upto date virus check.. nowt found. So theres me thinking its OK.. continue using wondering why system has slowed down… 3/4 weeks has now passed and i’m still experiencing the odd click and whine so report it to IBM and tell me its experiencing mechanical failure. Get RMA returns e-mail and item now on its way back… once data is removed.
    Surprised its still running… but maybe ive just been lucky.. if thats what you call luck!

    Previous purchase was a IBM 10GB 7200 drive and gave me 2.5yrs of sterling, fast service and sold as a going concern! (mate bought 1 at same time and his died a few months previous)With such a background i plumped again for another IBM…. ooo how silly. Perhaps those few early comments i heard on them should have taken more heed… Ah well whats done is done… at least i have a SCSI Fujitsu drive i can use.. which looks even faster… as one would expect from a server drive 🙂

    And now for some good news… my mate has upgraded his pc to the same IBM drive … after his failure and his is still going strong… work that out.

    Steve

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I bought a 60gig 60GXP in June. The thing worked fine for three months, then I moved, twice, and after the 2nd move, it shat the bed. What worries me is this blue screen I get when I try to boot, which says the drive has errored and it may be due to a virus. Has anyone else seen this? Know what I’m talking about? I’m going to try the freezer trick because I really need to get some data off the drive. Man this whole thing sucks!
    -m

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    man I got burned too!

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Dum-di-dum-di-dum

    I know this forum is no place for levity but I’m getting very bored waiting around for my second replacement 40GB 60GXP in 6 months. The disk died on 28th December last year (my earlier Post 618 was on 2nd Jan), arrived in Holland on 13th January and since then NOTHING.The official ine is that they’ll send one out whenever… Not only a lot of lost data now but also no replacent in six weeks.

    Has anyone received a replacement disk since tha handover to the Hitachi/IBM operation??

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I too had a 60GXP. Died first in 1.5 months, got it replaced by retailer. It then died about 9 months later.

    After read this board and testing, I concluded that indeed the power supply had an effect on the drive. When I ran the drive with 2 or 3 other IDE devices, the clicks would start. If I ran it alone, it seemed fine.

    So there definitely seems to be a causal relationship between power and the clicks of death in my case. The main problem is that these IBM drives are simply far too sensitive to power. I mean, NONE of my other drives (Maxtors and WDs) had any problem running with other IDE devices together.

    IBM screwed us all. I will never buy from them again.

    If you need to copy data off a dying IBM 60GXP, try increasing power by removing other IDE devices as much as possible. This may help you get your data off. (I personally had it die in the middle of nowhere in Finland. I got my data off just in time, it wouldnt even spin up shortly after.)

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    A possible ray of hope.

    I was unaware of any problems when I bought three IBM hard drives a couple of years ago. Had one fail right away, then its replacement, in one computer, the ex has that one now so that one must have been a good investment because now it’s doing a better job at it’s dirty work than I could.

    The other two, one recently failed on me completely with a lot of data on it since the last backup. Click click whirr, click click whirr.

    I have found that the freezer trick allows it to run for about 5 to 10 minutes before it starts crapping itself again. So I have been getting data off it, 10 minutes at a time. Wrap the thing in a plastic bag, put it in the freezer for a few hours to let it really cold soak, then hook it up and dump the data off it as fast as you can. Leave it in the bag so as not to let moist air get to it.

    Now the last one of the bunch is making clicking sounds. During write operations. It stops, clicks a few times, thinks about it, then resumes. The Sandra write index is way low, it told me what I knew I observed. So the 80 gig is on its last leg too.

    –97T–

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    A follow up to my post #956.

    I mentioned that the days were numbered for the 60 GXPs in my system. Got a couple of new Seagate Barracudas to replace them this week. In the process of moving off of the 60s, it looks like they were intermittently, and silently, corrupting a file here and a file there. I lost some important data, and I am not amused.

    IBM took a couple of dollars of profit at the expense of my data. What kind of repeat business do you think they’ll get?

    If you have 60 GXPs, beware.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Has anyone tried using the 2GB clip option?

    Capacity clip to 2GB/32GB with logical head 16 This option can be used in situations where there is a BIOS limitation and the drive is not recognized ……..

    i dunno if this could help

    RE playing with IDE cables – you are right -nice one!

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    fucking IBM!!!fuck i have bought an desktar 60gxp 40gig.and it sux only!CLICK,CLICK,CLICK,pause,CLICK,CLICK,CLICK,pause,CLICKCKLICKCKLICK,pause and so on,.fuck!

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I purchased a 120GXP IBM Deskstar after my WD 10gig went bad with skeeching and unable to locate drive error. I bought the Deskstar because of the speed and I know it is usually very quiet, but my new IBM HD does make very strange clicking noises. Thus far, I have yet to experience any failures, but I am worried about the strange sound that occurs at random.
    Yep!!! BACKUP DAILY

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I had a pair of the 30G 75 GXPs in my wife’s PC, both purchased about 3 years ago. These are the DTLA-307030s made in the Philippines. After years of service, one partially failed on the 24th and I was able to salvage most of the data. The other completely failed five days later, but it was backed up, thankfully. Gotta give IBM this: their MTBF tolerance was pretty consistent.

    My wife’s machine now has a pair of Seagate Barracuda’s. My main system has a pair of the 40G 60 GXPs, but after our experience with the 75 GXP DeathStar, my faith in this product is gone. The days that they will remain in my system are numbered.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I’m using mine as a slave drive for backups and other misc files very infrequently accessed. No way will I depend on it for original data of any value.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Don’t use it.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    ok about a year ago, I built my own machine and this is what I have : athlon 1900+ Soyo Dragon Platinum 333, 512 ddr, Ati Radeon 8500 128, and I had a 60 gb gxp… well about 6 months into my system, running almost 24 hrs a day, 2 case fans and a hd cooler fan, my Windows xp started to do some wierd stuff saying it couldnt access files and some files wern’t there some of the time so I ran scan disk and refreshed xp…. didn’t fix it, then I dl’d Drive fitness ran it, all good, two days later, it wouldn’t boot took it to my friends over at Crucial pc and they checked it out, drive had to many errors, rann drive fitness again and formated, 50 gigs of media gone…. says its good, 1 month later, same exact thing, I stopped using it put it in a anti static bag and put it up, formated and Supposedly good to go, but I wasn’t trusting it. next I bought one of the new WD 80 gig 8 mb buffer, awsome drive, well I went to use the 60 gig at a lan party(needed some space) drive had failed completey, sent it to ibm and finally getting a replacement, but there sending me another 60 gxp……….. should I use it?

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Just had to add my own story. I’ve got a Deathstar 307045 (46.1GB) that was purchased in Sep 01 at the same time as I was putting together a homemade system. I used an Abit KT7-Raid, an AMD-850 Tbird, only 256MB ram, an ATI video card and the DeathStar alongside an older Maxtor 6GB HD that I purchased in 1997. The DeathStar was on the HiPoint controller, but not in a Raid configuration – it was by itself and the Maxtor was on the ordinary IDE controller.

    I knew that the 7200 rpm disk would run hot, so I even bought a special HDD cooler for it. The system is cased in a full tower with 2 power supplies and 5 separate cooling fans (3 80mm fans and 2 60mm fans) so there’s plenty of cooling in this unit. The temperature inside the case runs (ran) at 87 degrees F. under the CPU and 81 degrees in the open part of the case when the outside temp is 78 degrees. It’s in a constantly airconditioned room between 70 and 74 degrees 24/7.

    Last year around February, the DeathStar started making “The Noise” but I hadn’t heard of any of the horror stories. I returned to the IBM storage website and downloaded their DFT and ran it, to find it reported 3 easily repaired errors and then everything was reported 100% fit.

    All seemed OK, until January 8th, 2003. “The Noise” had returned – with a friend. Instead of just the “scrape – scrape – scrape – scrape” it was also going “clicking”.

    Instead of trying to do it myself, I sent the drive to Eco-DataRecovery and they said they found that the servo track had failed and their equipment wouldnt be able to recover it. So… I had the drive sent to On-Track – the BIG GUNS. Well, the folks at On-Track found that there had been a severe head crash and total media failure.

    When I bought the drive, I registered it with IBM. They know who owns their drives as soon as they’re registered. They really should have made mention of the possibility of failure at the time of registration or at least the time when I downloaded there Drive Fitness Test.

    Well, enough of this for now. Those responsible should have eternal jock itch and other things unfit for mentioning.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I don’t know if anyone noticed, that almost all drives failed a few days/hours after messing with the IDE cables.

    I’m on my 3rd IBM replaced drive, and in 1 month this one failed twice. Solution:
    – I ran the IBM Utility floppy;
    – Rewrote the entire drive (with zeros)
    – I stopped messing inside the PC.
    … and guess what? 6 months later and still no more problems with the drive, and in the latest 2 months my pc has been online 24h a day.

    I believe that tampering with the cables somehow interferes with some hardware defect, and causes the drive to “write in the wrong places”, causing it to malfunction, until the drive is restored to his factory configuration (all zeros).

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    To post 949, consider youself lucky you didn’t get the deathstar drive, the maxtor drives are good, I have 3 drives like yours in comps in my home. Are they better than the 75GXP’s?, well hell thats a easy answer, they work, and IBM drives are dirt, end of story…………….

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Interesting set of comments. I have just got a new PC with a Maxtor 6Y060L0 drive. It was meant to have an IBM Deskstar 60GPX drive. From the comments on this site it seems that I have been quite forunate although the IBM drive was described as ‘an award winning’ drive in computer buyer magazine!!! Who do I believe? Is the Maxtor acceptable?

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    to the guy on the 15th!
    I think I have the same mobo here -KT133 VIA with builtin promise RAID controller – the clicks just happened to me 3 hours ago and heres my bootup sequence now:
    Promise Ultra blah blah

    Found IBM thingy 1 DMA 5
    Found IBM thingy 2 DMA 5

    <new screen>
    <The big hardware table at the top>
    Verifying Pool data…
    then just a blank screen instead of Windows XP Home Edition startup screen.
    please email phantomsenior@hotmail.com if you havethe same error, on same platform, email me your complete pooter specs

    im gunna try lost and found,ontrack and ghost.

    RE:

    ok, a year on and I have had a 45GB 75GXP die… but..

    It has been running on my normal VIA onboard controller for 2 years, no problems. I then decide to move it to the promise RAID controller on my motherboard, to make room for more drives on the VIA. 2 months later, click click click. (I didn’t even move the drive, just changed cable).

    So many of the stories here refer to the drives being on RAID controllers of some sort, maybe too many for coincidence… ?

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    its me again (last posteR) it seems there is a complaint every half day!

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    it seems the bunch of us should get together and create ibm drives that ACTUALLY work! well … ibm replicas… cus these clicks of death r so annoying! loosing my 120gxp 107gb of data… grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr! all client and master work! gah! im gunna burn those bi*tches at ibm!
    email phantomsenior@hotmail.com if u wanna build a hdd wid me 😉

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Annonymous comment

    I used IBM for years
    Interesting they sold the problem after these 40G have problems

    we are using loads of IBM HDD’s
    Four (2 in each) in raid systems
    One in a different machine

    40GB 120GXP 7200 RPM HDD’s

    We noticed this “sound” – and i have at last got round to checking it out.
    It happens on both (I presume it is both) the HDD’s in one RAID
    the single HDD in a different machine
    but not a second two in another RAID machine.

    Interesting to read the notes
    No suggested fixes

    I now use Maxtor ATA133 40GB’s 7200rpm – very nice.

    IBM’s did come with a 3 yr warranty (until recently)
    The first response when a problem occurs is through the retailer.
    That is the law.
    A small claims court action can be successful to stubborn retailers.
    However, first teh disk must fail… or there is no complaint.

    GL – Raider

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    IBM Deathstar Hard Drives

    Deskstar 20GIG ATA66 7200RPM “1999 Hungary” – Lasted 2 Years

    Deskstar20GIG ATA100 7200RPM 2001 Thailand” – Just got a week ago “2001 Thailand”

    The one I had for 2 Years worked pretty damn well, all the way up untill a few days ago. A friend of mine said he had some extra Hard Drives and gave one to me. I put it on my “IDE 2 Port” on my Promise Ultra 100 Controller Card. From then on nothing but problems!!! Hard Drive wouldn’t detect, finally got it detecting and then random computer lock up’s and then my main Hard Drive the one I had for 2 Years started acting up too. They both started making weird clicking noises as if it was trying to read something but stuck and kept repeating it’s self. Oddly enough both of them seem to work off and on when I let them sit for a while, Heat Problem???? Anyway sometimes they run, but always erupt to a hault at some point which completely lags my system and then the clicking noise starts up. Obviously all Deathstar Hard Drives are shit and if you haven’t had problems yet, in time they will come so replace them and back up your stuff. Luckly I was able to transfer a folder full of Music/Documents/Etc “5Gigs” so I didn’t lose it!!! *Whew* I’m pretty pissed I had to do a Clean Install of my OS which took up about 5 hours of my time doing all that……..All I can say now is I’ll never buy another IBM Product again. Western Digital and Seagate seem to work perfect from my Experience, guess I’ll buy a new one of them.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    After my Fujitsu failed just days outside its warranty (but that’s a whole different lawsuit), I needed a replacement quickly and as cheap as possible. I’d heard rumours about bad IBM drives so i asked the guy in the shop and he assured me the problem had been fixed in the 120GXP’s, but although the drive hasn’t failed yet (in two months), it’s made seriously disturbing intermittent screeching noises ever since I first powered it up.

    I mentioned this to a friend and told him i was looking for a fix and he gave me a fairly dead 60 and 75 GXP of his to see if i couldn’t do anything with them. I’m not even going to try, I’m going straight down to my dealer and asking for a replacement Matrox or Seagate. I’m a student and simply cannot afford to pay 100UKP a year to beta test hardware for i[

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    #920 and #929 here again…
    Nobody has had any answer to my question re the replacement of the controller card to sort out these problems, so I can only conclude a number of things..
    Some people do not know what they are doing. Perhaps they are just posting to pass the time. Others perhaps are just having a go at IBM (And they do deserve it..) The real techies are perhaps too busy sorting out the problems to post…

    Well, the answer to my question re replacing the controller card is that IT WORKS…..

    Yes… Thanks to my good friend in the computer shop, who found and substituted an identical controller card, to discover all was still OK…

    I have my disk structure and data restored and “ghosted” to a SEAGATE Barracuda and I will NEVER EVER buy any IBM product EVER again.

    This raises the questions…
    Why do IBM not provide replacement, Drive specific controller cards? I am not the slightest bit interested in hearing about logistical problems.. Tha is a real crock o’s… !
    The only way they provide Customer Support is to replace the whole drive, usually it seems with a reconditioned one, but the hapless punter loses all his/her data…

    This attitude is just not acceptable.
    When I can retrieve my data by simply replacing the card, how many people have had hours and hours of work and irreplaceable data wiped out because IBM just can’t give a flying phukk …

    I think we should boycott IBM world wide…

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Hi, this is to report that the replacement drive I got for my deathstar 75gxp two months ago just died. It started making exactly the same noises as the last one. Im seriously wondering if I didnt get the same drive with a new sticker on top.

    Lets see how long does the next replacement take to die … that is if I can ever get a replacement since IBM harddrives division no longer exists and the hitachi warranty page just displays an error.

    gnz@corelian.com


    Gnz

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Hello again.

    Uplah here from post 901.

    Just to update you all on things my side. After learning about the problems with Deskstar 75GXPs I went and back-up stuff on a different computer and ordered an external Maxtor.

    Well, about 4 days ago, I decided to defrag the drive and soon heard that awful scraping noise that was posted a while back (not clicking noise). Anyway, my machine still works, probably because the dodgy drive is working as a slave drive for file storage.

    I just received my new Maxtor a couple of days ago and have started backing up the drive. During this process I have found exactly where the scraping problem is. It happens only at a 5MB file!

    The two times I heard the scraping noise, I C+A+D and reset the machine both times to try and stop the constant re-accessing.

    I know that the death of these drives are not really user-related because it reminds me of the problem with Iomega’s external zip drives, i.e., shoddy workmanship and inferior build quality.

    Once a hard drive fails, there really isn’t any point sending it off for repaired, because the probability of it failing again changes from 50% (it might fail), to 100% (it will fail again). Also, would you trust a hard drive that’s failed before with your data? I am gutted that I paid almost 100UKP for a secondhand 75GXP…

    Can anyone recommend a course of action? I was thinking of running a surface scan and perhaps the DFT, but am not sure if that will make things worse. Please let me know at:

    uplah@yaoo.com

    Thanks

    Uplah

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Hi,

    Both my 2yr old 75GXP 46gb DTLA307045 drives began to click click whir repeatedly during scandisk or defrag or even during virus scanning. I bought a WD 80gb drive to transfer their data to. luckily I was in time. I then used DFT which reported and fixed bad sectors. I have RMAd them back to the Netherlands. The Hitachi site acknowledges their arrival, but when will they ship replacements?

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    bvjnhjhgjmnbvgjhgjghj

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    ok, a year on and I have had a 45GB 75GXP die… but..

    It has been running on my normal VIA onboard controller for 2 years, no problems. I then decide to move it to the promise RAID controller on my motherboard, to make room for more drives on the VIA. 2 months later, click click click. (I didn’t even move the drive, just changed cable).

    So many of the stories here refer to the drives being on RAID controllers of some sort, maybe too many for coincidence… ?

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Hello everybody!

    I’ve had great fun reading through all reactions! I was beginning to worry I had done something wrong…
    My first Deskstar (which by some of you is lovingly called Deathstar) began to laugh at me with that skreeking sound last year. This 30GB version refused to do anything whatsoever just before christmass. Couldn’t send the drive to supplier because there were too many important things on it, like a huge graduating project, which they probably wouldn’t hesitate to format. So bought another drive. Oh yes, stupid… a 40 GB Deskstar this time. What joy!!! It took about 4 months to wreck this one, but by that time the first 30 GB brother was back online again. (Which can be a hell of a job to do). So… just worked on… Until, last week, yes…

    Now I’m stuck with 2 bad drives, which will probably not be replaced by the supplier for a drive of another brand.

    Could be ATA Bios problems though. I have an Asus K7 133 something motherboard and I suspect it is waging war on the IBM’s. Anyone agree?

    Some suggestions for people with these problems…
    IBM has something called IBM Drive Fitness Test on their site. This creates a bootable disk (if can find another computer to do it on) and that will start a program which will tell you exactly that your Deskstar is crap (not in those words, in a free translation from computer language)
    If you’re lucky, it will tell you there are corrupted sectors and it will repair them for you (which may keep you disk working for the next 4 weeks…)
    If you’re really in deep … it will tell you the drive is dead and will need replacement. In this case you might be able to extract data from the disk by using DOS (the best software Microsoft ever made) with a bootable DOS disk. Back to the 80’s…
    In my case at first this was impossible, because the smashed ATA BIOS wouldn’t allow the computer to do anything. So, connected the disk by IDE and told the BIOS not to use ATA. (With any luck the drive will even boot again now…)
    Hopefully this will get your computer in DOS, and hopefully you have something to put the data on (an old harddisk like my 2GB fireball that after years of abuse never complained with even a click…)
    And hopefully you remember the DOS commands…

    Right now I’m typing this message with the drive making ‘funny’ drr drr drr noises… I’ve reinstalled my old 200 Mhz AMD to do serious word on and who knows… I might even graduate someday….

    Good luck…
    Jelte

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    My brother and me have both ibm 40Go hard disks.

    One day, my brother’s disk began to make “The Noise” just after he changed the ide cable to a new one. He recovered his disk with DFT (erase whole disk) and said “it’s because this defect new cable…”

    A few months later I got The Noise on my disk one morning when I started the computer… DFT again and I said “it may be the ibm disk”

    Yesterday my brother’s disk failed again. DFT again and he said “it’s this f..kin’ ibm disk”

    Today I’ve read a lot of your comments…

    We’d better buy an another brand disks if we don’t want to go on running DFT more than Windows…

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I have two 45 Gb ibm dtla 307045 and have this problem the first week after buying my new pc with promise raid
    i thought it was a promise raid problem
    but after reading this article i now know it is the IBM HD’s
    the problem is not occurring when i format my local drive E:
    but when i do a thorough scandisk or a defragmentation it makes a krrrrchhhkrrrch and my system locks up
    now i know why my windows XP (residing on drive E:) is often suddenly crashing
    Does anyone know how long the guarantee/warranty time is?
    i have these drives for over a year.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    God !

    I cannot believe it + I can believe it..
    Yes those drives at least 60 GXP have 3 years warranty… have to be sent in the Netherlands as for Europe…
    But are they gonna return the same model ??? Lucky me I’m near to their centre, :p :p gonne bring it myself

    you can get online support to create RMA in at :
    §[<http://www.hgst.com/support/index.html?<]§ good luck

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Hicks, # 927, My heart goes out to you… 10 years… Jeez, I would be SO angry.. I am mad enough as it is with my own situation (#920).

    It is not as if the problems we are all reporting are unknown, although we all seem to be discovering it when we each suffer our own mishaps. The posts on this site go back over 18 months now, so what the #@*% are IBM doing to PROTECT us from their d/bodgy products?? Why have they done nothing to remove these kwappy thigs from the market??

    It is not as if we have not tried to ensure the integrity of our data. After all, we have all bought what is supposed to be such a reliable product only to have that cause the very losses we are trying to guard against.. Its a bit like having your head blown off by an air bag in a car going off whilst you are stationary.. Can you see the auto companies trying to explain that away???

    What is happening ot the Class Action?? An IBM suit over here in Australia who I spoke to was very smug that nothing had happended yet…

    Has anybody got any answers to my question about swapping controller cards?? And what is this that I have read about putting the #@*%ing things into a different machine to read them???

    Thanks in anticipation..

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Rather send it back to resellers if you’ve still got your warranty! Offer them the link to this page … As for me I ‘ve no choice, no warranty anymore. No doubt there must be a manufacturing weakness… Good luck.

    Salmon, in reply to post 925

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    New IBM 80 GB, scratching whining sound every 10 min. for about 2 seconds!
    What to do, send it back to resellers or wait for the crasch!
    Elbe

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I have got the IBM Deskstar 60 GXP. Yep there was a noise but I think I found out how to cope with it 🙂 I ‘m like convinced that all of your drives are still in a quite good state ! I’m not expert but I ll try to explain. Well you know there is that flat IDE cable that consists of tiny cables :o) . If I’m right , one of them is responsible for some kind of “alimentation”. It is the only one that is red. well it seems it cannot plug correctly or maybe the pin on the HD may have some problems… TRY PUSHING THE CABLE TIGHTLY INTO THE HD, ABOVE ALL WHERE THAT RED tinyCABLE IS.
    Every 6 month I need to do that in order to be able to boot, I’ve got that HD since 19 months now and that way it is working perfectly; but I admit that long ago, I’d have already organized a funeral. And I love that drive cos it’s so fast now with UDMA100 🙂 so fast that Windows XP runs faster without prefectching. Hoping this might help some of you… dr Salmon salmonette@hotmail.com

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    To post 921: Your disk has bad blocks. Back it up ASAP!!

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Greetings,

    I have the IC35L040AVER07, 40 G, and it is made in Hungary. It died just after New Years, not yet a year old since I did not get the replacement for the first one until sometime in March or April. I was installing a network card in XP and the machine locked up. I rebooted and noticed major problems. I tried backing up some important files to CD, but no go. The little bit I got was corrupted. I am hoping somebody comes up with a way to retrieve some files off of these disks.

    At the moment all I get is clickety, clickety, clickety, clickety, whir. Repeated. Fdisk will not touch it.

    The history of my IBM drive starts with a purchase from Specialty Tech (Out of Business) around Christmas of 2001. It was DOA as per the Drive Fitness Test. The vendor was hesitant about replacing it, and I waited some two months to get the replacement. I noticed errors burning large graphic files. I blamed the burning software, but no one else was having these types of problems. It crashed several months ago, and I blamed XP. I reinstalled XP and started over. Looks like it is down for the count now. I need to retrieve some files. If anyone comes up with a good solution let me know. You can email me at jimw@operamail.com with a solution I would be gratefull. I have not read through the 900+ posts, but I will.

    I just installed a new 80 G Maxtor with the fluid dampening. It is going to take a lot of work to get my system back the way I want it. Will I buy from IBM again? Not.

    Thanks for the chance to vent a little.

    Jim

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Recently while running a scandisk on my IBM Deskstar DTLA-307030, it got to a specific sector and started making a repetitive clicking sound. It could not scan beyond that sector. I have witnessed no other HD problems, loss of files..data..etc. After reading this forum it looks as if I might be in for some trouble in the near future. Has there been any progress made with this class action lawsuit?

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I have just discovered this forum, only because I was searching around for a solution to my “DeathStar” problem.. 40 gig IC35L040AVER07-0
    Bought the #@*%ing thing about 6 month ago “…because it was a reliable IBM product… Ha Har..” (my experience with MCA should have taught me something!!….)

    It failed just the day before Xmas, having clicked and banged a few times over previous month. Unfortunately I did not realise the significance of these noises.. (Have you ever tried to get anything done over Xmas??) After this failure, the IBM test utility could not even find the thing.. Fortunately for me my business data is with my secretary onf a seperate machine. I have lost about 2 months of emails and other graphics and embryonic programming files plus a lot of time spent setting the disk structures up..

    I have had an number of interesting phone calls with various representatives from IBM here in Australia and over at Tech Support (In Singapore would you believe..)
    In a nutshell, they will replace my drive but the data recovery is my problem..
    The underlying theme is that they are actually doing me a favour and offer no apology for continuing to put into the market place such a bodgy product.

    To my questions..
    Does any body know for sure wether replacing the onboard controller card could help?? IBM will not provide me with a replacement controller card, to determine wether that is the problem because they don’t make them separately.. So to test this particular theory I would have to find an identical drive and use the card from that..
    Failing that does anybody have any answers to extracting the data from the drive??

    This is just disgraceful. I can not believe that IBM can treat their customers with such utter contempt.. They are hardly in a very good position to be so blase. Do they still not understand about reputation and customer anger??

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    To post 917: A low level format will probably help and get you a working HD for some time, but these DeathStars will keep developing bad blocks. As with IBM’s RMA policy, it’s the same story over and over again.. 🙁

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    And here’s another 40GB 60GXP. My second new (Thai) RMA’d disk has bitten the dust after 4 months. The first (Hungary) disk lasted 8 months of increasingly erratic performance before it hit the final click. The most recent disk just went to sleep on 28th December and never woke up. It was ticking away like a time bomb in the morning and no swapping of leads/position or the IBM DFT would get it back to any life at all. Luckily my old Fujitsu disk has filled the gap with it’s original copy of Win 98.

    b{http://www.storage.ibm.com/warranty/<]§ r{

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Add me to the list! My 30GB deskstar 75GXP bit the big one today! No warning. My system had been completely stable for the year and a half I’ve had it running windows XP with this drive. My system usually is on only a couple hours a day and is in a very cool environment with an open case, and open slots around the HD. So there are no excuses!! Heat or abuse is not an issue! I was opening an application and all of sudden everything froze and I heard a series of clicks and scratches repeated over and over. The drive refuses to boot. I’ve tried repairing the boot sector, but no go. I guess I’ll have to try the drive fitness test next and probably be lucky if I can get it working after a low level format by the looks of things. I’m wondering if this peice of crap is worth my time. ( Test / Format / re-install OS / software) and then if I’m lucky it will run for a couple months and happen again by the sounds of things. I might as well toss it out now and shell out another couple hundred bucks for something else. So now I’ve installed my old 20G 5400rpm cheap Fujitsu that has been formatted over and over again running every OS and file system without a glitch. Pretty bad when I have more confidence in the Fujitsu than an IBM.

    Screw IBM!

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I bought two 30GB 307030 GXP75 HDD’s and put them in a RAID-0 array. After about two years one started making the clicking noise and failed to read data (just one morning). Lucky for me the only data loss was my windows 2000 user profile. So I copied all data to my backup-drive (maxtor 60GB 5400 rpm) and ordered two brand new Western Digital 800JB (80GB) disks.

    I also once bought a IBM travelstar 20GB (20GN series). First one was Death On Arrival (the IBM DFT-test didn’t even finish with this drive, it just stopped somewhere), so I returned it to the shop and got a new one. This one still works, but occasionally makes a hard head-clicking noise. It’s a matter of time I guess…..

    I never experienced HD-failures (okay, one VERY old Seagate, but that wasn’t mine) until I started using IBM disks. No wonder they sold their harddisk division…..

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    This is my first experience with an ibm drive.. I got the machine from a guy at work who had opened his case to replace a video card and when he booted it back up the bios would find the hd but wouldn’t read anything off of it.. I tried the normals, booting from floppy and putting it in a different machine.. After telling the guy it was messed up he went a bought a new one. (13th month of a 12mth warenty) put in the maxtor no problems there.. Came here later that evening and found out about all the problems with them so I grabed the IBM DFT proggie and ran the diag and told me exxcessive shock bad drive.. so I went ahead and wrote zeros to the mbr and now it works.. Called and he said that Sunday he turned the computer off and Monday power went out, Wednesday he replaced the video card and turned on the machine to find the hd problems… So it looks like the power outage had got the HD but his power surge didn’t even flip and everything else was okay in the machine..
    Brett

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    i like the new maxtors with liquid bearings (dtxl40 or something like that); also, i really like the 5400 rpm wd 800a’s (?) fast as a 7200 rpm hd, but not quite so cutting edge. compusa was selling them for 89 bucks, i think.

    fwiw, i threw away, as in physically tossed in the trash, three 60 gb ibm deathstars with no apparent problems because, after looking at them for nearly a year, i simply could not think of any purpose for them. how can you use an unreliable harddrive?

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I have two 40Gb IBM deskstar drives, one bought in 2001 made in Hungary model IC35L040AVER07-0 and one bought in 2002 made in Thailand model IC35L040AVVR07-0. I use one for the working drive and one for storage. They are only on during the evening. They have both stopped working at some point, and I use the IBM DFT disk to re-start them. I am thoroughly fed up with re-installing my OS.
    I have an aluminium case with SIX fans, two of which are solely used to cool the hard drive bay so cooling is not the cause. Please note Post 800!
    I too had thought I had bought quality drives from a well known company. How wrong I was.
    Post 789, are these drives used for low performance office jobs? I use mine for video recording and according to the specs it should work OK, but it doesn’t.
    Thank goodness I found this sight as I couldn’t guess what was going wrong. As both drives were failing (once they both failed together!) what was causing it? My motherboard? My processor?
    Now I know. It’s off to Western Digital I think.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    YES! Thank God I’m not imagining things. I have 3-60 gig IBM drives and as of last night every one of them has failed! Twice with my OS on them. I also have other IBM drives 40, 47, and 2-80 gig drives. Have had no problems with them, but after what I just read maybe I should start to pray. Come to think of it, maybe I shouldn’t have said “Thank God”. This does not make me feel good. Nope, not at all!!! 🙁

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Bought a 60GXP 40Gb. after about 5 months, it started clicking louldy when powering up. around the same time, a constant high-pitch whining noise appeared, which was more noticable as it spun up/down. sounded like a spindle bearing prob to me. not willing to trust this drive, i sent it back. thought i’d just had bad luck with this one drive.

    retailer replaced it with a 120GXP 40Gb. dont get me wrong, i like the drives – they’re lightning fast and extremely quiet (when they work properly!). so i bought a second 120GXP 40Gb for backups. so now i have 2x 120GXP 40Gb.

    6 months later, one of the new drives is failing again. same prob as the 60GXP. clicking noises at startup, whining getting progressively louder over a period of about 4 weeks. not trusting this drive either, sending it back.

    as we speak the OTHER new drive is now starting to make clicking and whining noises. that’s THREE drives all with the same prob. maybe it’s me?? check case temps – 30 degress C is the maximum i’ve ever had. check drive specs – operating temps are 5 – 55 deg C. im well within the limits, arent i???

    my plan now is to send 1 drive back, get it replaced with something other than IBM, maybe a Seagate Barracuda. when that’s installed, i’ll wave goodbye forever to the other IBM and get that replaced as well.

    farewell IBM, it was a pleasure doing business with u! :-/

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I have 2 30GB GXP75. The first one I had for almost 2 years, the second one I picked up about 6 months ago. When I got the second drive I set them up in RAID 0 on an Epox 8k3a+. The drives were right next to each other in the case and were always warm to the touch. My installations of Windows kept becoming corrupt, after 2 days I would have to do it again. The drive would make an awfull clicking sound as it searched for windows, but it was never found. After running the IBM diagnostic disk both driver were found to be defective. I sent them in to be RMA’ed, now I am waiting to recieve my new units.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    This post is a follow-up to post 865. Before I received my second warranty replacement drive, I was in contact with an IBM End-User Customer Satisfaction Manager who, during a lengthy recorded telephone conversation, suggested that IBM send me a second replacement drive in either the 60GXP or 120GXP series to replace my original 75GXP drive since these drives were more reliable. (See what customers report concerning the reliability of the 60GXP series drives: §[<http://www.geocities.com/bontemps4/ibm_reliability.gif.)<]§ To ensure the drive was free of defects, the drive would be intercepted by IBM in route from Malaysia and thoroughly tested to ensure the drive was free of defects. This delayed the shipment to me by at least two days. I received this "thoroughly tested" drive on 11/27. I attached IDE and power cables to the drive, and ran the IBM Drive Fitness Test prior to partitioning, formatting, etc. The drive failed the DFT with bad sectors detected. In fact the DFT concludes with the statement: "This drive seems to have serious problems." (See §[<http://www.geocities.com/bontemps4/IBM_DFT.pdf.)<]§ I emailed the IBM End-User Customer Satisfaction Manager immediately reporting the condition of the received drive. At first, it was suggested that the drive might have been damaged during transit. When I pointed out that the DFT was reporting no physical damages (those tests run first) and the package arrived in pristine condition, that reason was withdrawn quickly. Since my two experiences with replacement drives has been disappointing, I requested a replacement drive in the 120GXP series that was new and not a "serviceable used part." After ten days of waiting for a response from a "warranty manager", my request was refused. The offer was to replace the current 60GXP series drive (which was "thoroughly tested" by IBM) with a "new" 60GXP series drive, i.e. the same drive type. I have already had the experience of bad sectors developing at an exponential rate with my original 75GXP series drive and know where that journey ended. I have contacted IBM legal to attempt one final request for a new 120GXP replacement drive.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    My 75 gb Ibm GXP has given a lot of problems (Replaced 2 times by brand new discs) untill extra cooling installed (HD cooler).

    No problems since.

    But I agree…. Quite prone to failure under heavy usage.

    All the best,

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I have 2 dtla 307030 of may 2001, made in hungary, used in raid 0
    with promise tx2 controller.
    One month ago the first died. (Click,Click and 0x70 on DFT)
    Ibm Give me a new 40GB, in about a month( sending the disk in Holland for a lot of money!!)

    Now the second disk have the same problem, only a little bit stronger.

    The worst thing is that i cannot be sure about all my data .!!!!

    Sig and when i bought the disk i have choosed IBM (and payed more ) thinking that they would be a more reliable device!!!

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Hi,
    I’m leaving in France and have the same troubles with these HD!
    I’ve bought 3 60GXP 60Go in sep 2001.
    May 2002, one of them crash. Replaced with another 60GXP.
    Yesterday this one crash ! 0x73 – Device damaged by Shock.
    The two others works perfectly !!
    Bad chance for me, the one who crashes is master with Windows ….. :(((

    Eric from France.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I bought IBM Deathstar 60GXP model, 60 gigs, about 9 months ago. The vendor had recommended it because of the reliable customer service, he said. 4 months after, it just died for no apparent reason. Worse thing is, I’ve been away for 1 month vacation and just returned. So basically the drive has been “resting” for quite some time. Still, it just suddenly made that infamous clicking sound. IBM said they dun provide data recovery service. I thought, what the hell, 60 gigs of video and audio files gone… and they can’t be even bothered.

    Anyway, I got the RMA drive 2 weeks later. I thought about how much money I’d lose if I sold this one and bought another brand, so I decided to stick with this IBM drive again. Then, 4 months later (yes, 4 months seem to be the life cycle of this drive), it made that clicking sound again, and yes, it had just died on me again!!! Now, I just suddenly realized why IBM’s customer service is so prompt and reliable… 🙂 Gonna rid of IBM hard drives for good. Switching to Western Digital.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    i had a 75gxp (dlta-307030) run and die after about a year. i was wondering if anyone out there has a functioning one from an rma return or a system pull that they’d be willing to sell me cheap so i can try the board swap for data recovery. if so, please email me at somebadmojo@yahoo.com. if you made it cheap, i’d return your functioning drive back to you after i got the data off of mine.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Well, after spending an extended 5 days (about 20hrs) reading all 900 messages (sad isn’t it?), I realised I have an old 27GB 16GXP (or something like that) and a 75GB 75GXP!

    To add to insult, I bought the latter second-hand for an equivalent of 140USD. However, this drive has only been used for storing data as drive d:\ (slave on primary IDE cable to the other primary HDD). It’s been just over a year now and things seems to be okay. Nevertheless, I’ve backed the data up onto a 120GB Maxtor and will be buying an external 120GB Maxtor for specifically backup purposes…

    Uplah

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Do you want to sell your damaged hard drive?
    I need one DTLA-307045 urgently!!!
    Please mail me: _dolly_@mail.pt

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    This drive started running slow……..a quick check indicated that bad blocks were apparent. When I tried to do a surface scan on it about an hour later it went into the clicking scratching mode and the surface scan would not proceed any farther. I quit out of the program and pulled the drive and called IBM for a RMA number…..it is currently in their hands…….

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Can someone recommend a decent 40 – 60 gig harddrive to FOT please. Im desperate!!!!!

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Hello gerbil.
    Guess what, Ive just experienced the 0x70 error on my 40gig deskstar GXP harddrive. Ive owned this for only 6 months. Is it worth contacting IBM about a replacement or would I get more sense out of Saddam Hussein??????

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    i have a ibm 40gb deathstar. it just recently died. makes the same sound as that which has been posted. only backup was a month old and it wasn’t a full backup. took me forever to recover…had to use linux….

    bought ibm because of its name and reputation.

    i have a 60gb deathstar also. it is still working.

    i have just bought a wd 60gb to replace the failed 40gb. i will be replacing the ibm 60gb shortly with another wd.

    don’t think i will rma the 40gb.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I have a gxp60 60 meg drive. I purchased it 18 Mos. ago. It is working fine, and has been very quiet — I like that. But I am now hearing an intermittent noise (about every 4 seconds) just a light da-da-da-da

    This happens while the cpu is idle. When I start doing activity, the noise goes away. The disk light does not come on while this noise occurs.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I have been servicing pc’s for 18 years and the only drive i have ever experienced such a high failure rate is the deskstar. I have worked w/many mfm, ide, eide, scsi drives and none even come close to the failure rate I am talking about. I manage a technology dept for 400 PC’s and we inherited120 IBM Intellistations and we have had to replace 38 hard disks – that is a real number. I have had very odd problems w/other deskstars in friends machines, outside clients machines and so on. From all my experience w/IBM products – I love some their laptops so I am not a hater of IBM here so lets make this clear – their firmware is the root of all failures. Token Ring cards, controller cards and now the hard disks they manufacture I believe are problems w/the onboard controllers and the machines they are put in. IN other words, I feel people whom dont have problems are more likely to have the ideal combination of bios controller card and deskstar model. I attribute this conclustion to fact these drives eat themselves w/out normal warnings plus repair/recovorey methods are not the norm. I have fixed these drives by putting them in other machines and then sometimes they will again a day, week, yr later or never. Firmware is the achilles heal of IBM and their deskstars and other drives are the biggest problem.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    [continued from post#870]

    I have two 80GB 120GXPs on a RAID card (see my earlier post)… I have now unlinked them and use them seperately.

    One is fine. One makes little clicking noises, which occur when it seeks across large areas of the drive. These clicking noises used to, occasionally, cause a very large clicking/reseeking noise, and / or a computer lockup/BSOD (once, the computer just stopped responding apart from the pointer, because one of the harddrives spun down!.)

    I downloaded the IBM feature tool, switched on the acoustic management to the quietest/maximum setting, and this REDUCED the noise of the clicking sounds!. Also, since then, I haven’t had any of the loud, multiple headreseeking noises etc. I also have put a cooling fan next to the drives to draw air out past them continuously.

    Just a thought. I was quite amused that the IBM feature tool reduced the noise of the little clicks though :). I wonder what their cause is? (is part of the seek mechanism loose maybe, and can’t take the massive acceleration/deceleration which must take place in the drive?).

    Anyway, good luck everyone with your drives!

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I bought a 60Gig GXP last December i am a gamer and hooked, but i would only use about 10 – 15 Gig on the IBM, i had XP installed forgot my pw for XP shut it down to format and reinstall windows and the click of death started, it was 3 months to the day that i bought that hdd… IBM service had it back in a week. In that time i got a WD 100, and i am now using the IBM for the last 3 months with not so much as a peep out of it, but i dont trust it and i am waiting for it to die again.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I have had an IBM 75GXP 40 gig for a while now (around 2-3 years) and I’ve had no problem. However, I just purchased an IBM 120GXP 100 gig and the first one failed within a month (more like 2 weeks of use) and the second one is failing already and it hasn’t been a week yet. The place where I purchased it from won’t give me a refund, but they’ll replace it… I don’t want to go through all that any longer… so does anyone know if IBM will give me a refund?

    John
    hwdeathwatch@hotmail.com

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Hey!,
    I finally found the most reliable IBM product to store my data on, its fast, inexpensive, and will last forever if you keep it right. I found it at my local Pay-less store, its the new improved IBM Multi-Purpose printer paper, but you know, if I do have a problem with it, Im sure the good ole boys at their tech support will say I did something wrong…By the way, 5 RMA’s, 5 dead 75GXP’s, IBM can kiss my ass………….

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I have purchased a Video Editing Turnkey machine that has ALL IBM Drives. The Array of 2 (40 GB) IBM HD(s) has already failed twice with the click and scratch noise. I am now replacing all of the HD with WD and I will ship the IBM HD(s) back to the company that built the editing Turnkey system. IBM can KMA.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I’ve had personal experience with two 40GB GXP’s. One, in a desktop machine, started failing after 9-10 months (it clicks/stalls a number of times very loudly when starting up). The second failed after only 3 months in a test machine (barely used) housed in a 19″ rack case.

    This is appalling – I’m never going to buy an IBM drive again.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I have 2 dead IBM DeathStar GXPs on my desk of about 20GB capacity which failed after 18 months or so, in my son’s PC. Click click and whirrr scrape. I didn’t know the significance of this. I have learnt.

    I had 2 60GB IBM GXPs in a RAID 0 array on an ABIT KR7-R. The first partition of 2 x 30GB FAT32 and 1 x 60GB NTFS was the boot partition for win2000.

    After about 10 months I started getting the occasional Blue Screen of Death.

    Then I got the clicks. Then it would not boot off the RAID.

    I decided to back up stuff to my spare disk. Yep, a third GXP 60GB 🙁

    This seemed to work and the RAID array died, click click……

    I took the spare 60GB GXP over to a spare machine with a Maxtor 80GB drive in it to copy the data. This rapidly got slower and slower and ground to a halt. Click click …..

    Ontrack’s disk checker started to (very slowly) show that virtually every block on the GXP was bad. In fact, after running it for 6 hours there was virtually no data on it at all.

    It took 15 hours to reformat. It seems to be OK.

    So my data is still, I hope, on a RAID array where Highpoint’s RAID controller shows one GXP is “Hidden”?? Unfortunately I have no diagnostic etc. software (is there any?) which will work with a RAID 0 array so I fear the worst.

    I will not be buying any more of IBM’s HDDs. In fact I will not be buying any more IBM stuff period.

    Richard49@ziplip.com

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I got a 80GB IBM HD 6 months ago..and it fucked up last week…

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I had a 45 GB 75GXP die on me after 2 years of abuse. It died on me in the middle of a very important project. But what amazes me is that it died just after coming back from Suspend mode. Maybe the damn controller chip overheated and died while in Suspend mode.

    Now I’m running my system from my new 120 GB 120GXP. I hope this drive has a better track record. The 75GXP was returned to the online store (www.pcenlinea.com) because it has 3 year warranty.

    I can’t believe I still have an old 240 MB Maxtor connected to my Amiga system that still runs, considering it was bought on 1994, it has gone thru 24/7 service (phone-based BBS), and now it has daily use, and ZERO bad blocks. Great record.

    – seatiger from Northwestern Mexico.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    IBM Deskstar 75GXP 45GB, Worked 30 days and just shut down while I was typing. I thought – “oh, no big deal, just restart” …”oo, no drive pressent.” and then noises – “Tz, tzzzzzzz, tttzzzzzzzz, tz,tz tztz, tzzzzzz, tztz.)

    little searching here and there told that reading head failed.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Bob,
    Whatever you do don’t throw away your RMA drive; you see they make excellent paper weights for all those copies of emails to IBM tech support. Also you could wrap it up for Xmas and send it off to an IBM executive for a cherished gift for their home PC. If push comes to shove you could see how fast it spins up by plugging it directly into a wall outlet, come on Bob, you see, they aren’t that worthless are they?…Am I sarcastic, ohhhhh, just a tad, you see, I sent back 5 of the 75GXP’s with the same results, another worthless drive in less than 3 months. Happy Holidays to all!!!, and may you all find a MAXTOR drive under your tree.

    Santa Clause

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I have 2 Deskstar 120’s manufactured Apr 02. I was using them in a Raid 0 config with a Gigabyte GA-7VRXP motherboard. I also have a 20 GB Maxtor that I backup the Raid array to every night – fortunately (using Norton Ghost). The machine is on continuously. The drives have been in service approximately 3 months.

    Two days ago, I awoke to a command prompt indicating Ghost had failed – read error on array. The machine was still functioning, but diagnostics indicated a Smart failure on one of the two drives. I experienced no other symptoms – no noise, no boot problems, nothing. The drive will not fdisk nor format.

    I have an RMA to return to IBM but am wondering if I shouldn’t just toss them, or attempt to get IBM to refund the purchase price. From what I have read here and elsewhere, I don’t want IBM drives in my PC any longer.

    Any suggestions?

    Bob

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Wow, I’m amazed at this thread! I had no idea so many people had the same problem.

    In December 2000 I bought a 30 GB 75GXP, it started scratching then failed in May 2001. I sent it back to my retailer and they sent back a new one – same model though. Last night the replacement died without warning. It makes different noises this time, but before there was an audible problem before it went – this time I came back last night and woke my computer up to find the drive not responding. I restarted and it no longer boots, just click-pings at me.

    Luckily I have a backup of my things from 3 months ago and I haven’t done much since then, so I haven’t lost very much. Last week I was thinking to myself “I really should get round to making another backup…”, how ironic. Still, I’ll have to download all those gigabytes of game maps and mods again though grr…

    I was running out of space anyway, time to go for an 80 GB drive… not IBM though! Although I heard they’d stopped making them, or sold their HDD business to someone else… good riddance, hopefully the new owners aren’t using the old designs.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I know it’s not a french thread but I’ve seen nothing about this in France ( you know this little country of Europe) I will speak french for frenchies as it’s my native language. What I say in french sound very similar to other comments on this forum.

    Comme tout les gens dans ce fil de discussion , j’ai achet

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Bought one 60 gig IBM and ran it for about 4 months. Decided to
    buy another to run RAID in stripe mode. This worked for about 5
    months. Went to a LAN party and was very imbarased to find that my machine would not boot. Both drives died at the same time.
    Glad I found this string before I replaced the motherboard. I figured there was no way both drives would die at the same time.
    (Spin, clicking noise. Spin, clicking noise.) I will definitly RMA both. Not sure if I will use them or not? This sucks. I specificaly bought IBM drives thinking they would be of good quality.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I’ve Had a 60GXP 40g 7200 rpm Deskstar for about a year. I leave my system on 24/7. I do have a case fan in addition to the Power supply and cpu fan. I also make it a point to open it up at least once a month and clean the dust out. It has been rock solid reliable, I have it in a gaming rig, so it sees some pretty heavy usage. I filled it up , however, and upgraded to an 80g drive. I was so satisfied with the IBM, that I actually planned to get another one. My favourite PC parts store didn’t have the IBM in an 80, so I got a Maxtor, instead. My family has 5 PC’s on a LAN. All are Maxtors (now) My friend’s HD (a Seagate) croaked on her , So I just put the Deskstar in her’s. It’s running like a champ. (fingers crossed)
    I have yet to see a dead Maxtor, I’ve bought 5 so far . I have had 2 Seagates die on me. I won’t buy another. Out of 3 WD’s Ive had 1 go bad, although it did not compleatly die, just bad sectors and such. It was an older 4.3g and I’ve heard that particular model had some problems. I guess I have been lucky with my IBM, or perhaps the extra cooling makes a difference.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Can somebody send me by mail the drive fitness executable. I have no drive A and therefore can’t run the install programm…

    My mail is slhermit@yahoo.com or ICQ 6906783

    Thx.
    Serge.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I just got back two of the three GXP75 drives I just on RMA’s to Holland. The’re sending back the same crap, “servicable used parts”, don’t expect me to ever buy an IBM drive again.

    Lets see…. that’s five drives I have now returned. And I’ve only bought two GXP75 drives !!!

    Homing drives… these things just keep on flying home, back to IBM.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I had an IBM Deskstar 45 GB drive. After a year I got some
    messages to run Chkdsk on D, which if I let it do, it never returned. Two days later, it wouldn’t boot at all. Many days of trouble before I was back up with a new drive.
    Steve Silverman

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Hey, 870, check this:

    §[<http://www.tech-report.com/news_reply.x/3465/<]§ The problem is not with the specific model, it is with the overall technology. Model 60 GXP, 75 GXP, 120 GXP are basically the same pixie dust crapola. Why do you think IBM sold their hard drive division? If they had viable hard drive technology, they wouldn't have abandoned "the most successful hard drive in history". The bull they put you through in the RMA process, the shipping charges on their faulty replacements, the runaround, the denials, the lack of a recall, that is what will keep me from ever buying anything branded by, or designed by IBM again.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Well, this explains a lot! I’ve had 3 60GB IBM hard drives fail on me in the last year, but for some reason i never thought to look around for similar issues! I finially convinced gateway (under warranty) to give me a non-ibm drive (after a LOT of time on the phone).

    the drive that came in my pc would install the os okay, but would crash trying to reboot. got a new one which worked for a year and then started growing bad sectors. the replacement came and installed nicely but then failed horribly on a subsequent reboot. about half the drive was lost, thankfully all redundant data. finally got a non-ibm drive which is working just beautifully!

    finding this thread though, really annoys me. i can’t believe gateway is still shipping these drives out! (and i’ve generally been happy with gateway service, btw).

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    r{

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I am now on my 4th exchange(ic35L…) and now my 4th post. I am sick and tired and have nothing to say about them anymore.
    We all know the truth.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I have owned a 60 gxp 40gb ( IC35L040AVER07)since aug of 2001. this is my second IBM drive, my first lasted me 3 years then it could only take an additional two years under my moms control of multiple formats and restors(pretty damn good for an already 3 yr old drive). I have had two maxtors go out on me that neither one has lasted for more then 3 years. I have on western digital but it is just a back up so i cant really tell yet.

    I have had absolutely no problems with my ibm hard drive and have been very happy with the reliability and quality of IBM. I only know one friend that has had to rma an ibm and have several that are rma’ing maxtors and western digital drives. I am getting ready to get three more IBM drives, all to replace my friends failing maxtors. i’d rather work on my friends machine once every 5 years instead of every three.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    To post 886…Give it up, you can screw around with a piece of junk and what you have left is, well, a piece of junk. I’m sure a lot of people have them for sale on E-Bay, but what I would like to know, what is a good deal on a hard drive what will fail?, you can find a better deal on a paper weight at the Salvation Army, or other thrift stores……………..

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Hello. This is Jesse Molina, post number four in my continuing saga to recover any data from a failed IBM modem DLTA-307045. I have heard it elsewhere, but I suggest that we now call these IBM Deskstar drives “IBM Deathstar drives”.

    The original drive failed on Friday November 1st, 2002, between the hours of 02:00EST and 06:00EST. I can narrow down the circumstances that may have caused the drive to fail to four things. The first is heat, the second is that the drive may have reached capacity, the third is mechanical failure due to drive activity, the forth is random failure. The cause was the I left my computer on overnight with Gnucleus running in server mode, on my 1.5Mbps bidirectional VDSL line. Normally, I do not leave my computer on in server mode, but I decided to do so this night, and also share a very large number of new directories which I previously had kept private. Due to the high processor and seek usage, the drive could have failed due to heat. The drive could have reached it’s capacity and the entire disk was filled, causing some sort of error within the drive (possible, but unlikely). Because of the random seeking upon the drive, the mechanical usage could have caused the drive to fail combined with the high heat factor. Finally, the drive may have failed randomly for no reasons connected to the use of Gnucleus.

    In addition to the death of the DLTA-307045, an IBM 60GB 60GXP drive also died upon the same night while attempting to salvage data from the original failed drive, bringing the death count to two of four IBM drives that I own.

    Today I obtained an identical model DTLA-307045 IBM 45GB 75GXP drive in the mail. I bought it on eBay for about $90. The drive that I obtained was refurbished, but it is functional. My objective was to exchange the controller electronics in the hope that the drive might have failed in this potion of the drive.

    I did replace the controller card successfully, however the symptoms of the failure stayed with the original drive, resulting in a failure to recover any data. This attempt was unsuccessful. Furthermore, the original controller card proves to be working in the new drive, thus isolating the cause of the failure to the internal mechanics or control electronics for this drive.

    My final option is to send the drive to a professional organization like Ontrack. I imagine that they might extract the spindle and attempt to read it with special equipment.

    I thought that I should share the information that I have gathered about Ontrack and data recovery since someone else some day will probably be dealing with this situation again.

    Today I called Ontrack at 1-800-872-2599. I spoke to a woman named Kelly who talked me through some of the process that Ontrack uses to find out what the problem is and find a resolution for it. I specifically asked for Ontrack’s “In Lab Data Recovery Services” because I am well aware at this time that nothing else is going to retrieve my data.

    The first part of the process is to mail Ontrack your dead disk drive. You will be provided with a mailing address and information upon how to ship the drive at that time. When Ontrack gets your drive in the mail, they enter the Evaluation period. This is the initial evaluation of the problem and thus leads to the Ontrack engineer being able to propose and test solutions. I get the feeling that Ontrack will process the drive entirely and save any data that they can as soon as they can, if you ask them to or not. This is because at the end of the Evaluation, Ontrack will provide you with a file listing of whatever could be saved. If they are providing you with a file listing, then they probably already have access to all of the data that they are going to get to.

    The evaluation costs $100, if any data is salvageable or not. If no data was salvageable, then you can start crying now.

    If on the other hand, some data can be salvaged, Ontrack will tell you what data it is by providing you with the file listing so that you can decide if the data which can be salvaged was valuable to you or not. At this point, you must provide Ontrack with authorization to proceed in their efforts.

    It is going to cost you to see your data again, whatever can be saved. I was quoted between $700 and $2900 as the minimum and maximum cost for data recovery.

    Is it too much? Spending $3,000.00 to recover my data? In my case, I think it is worth it, and if I had an extra $3,000.00 right now I would be mailing the drive this minute. My personal problem is that I am currently unemployed and the employment market in my area (Orlando Florida U.S.A.) is very poor. I have $8,000.00 in the bank and monthly expenses are realistically about $1,000.00. I have already spent $90.00 on a failed attempt to repair my drive. I am going to be spending at least $100.00 more some day.

    In my case I am going to think about it. I could go ahead and do it, but the costs could end up putting me on the street if a job does not come along in the next four months — which I do not see happening due to the job market. My other option is to put the drive in a box and wait until after I have a job so that I can pay for the attempt with confidence about my financial situation. I have spare parts to keep moving in the mean time, but some things I will have to go without for now.

    In any event, I am the newest member to a class action lawsuit against IBM.

    sharaharass@yahoo.com
    Jesse Molina

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I purchased an IBM Deskstar 75GXP 45 GB HDD (DTLA307045) on 4/9/2001. Approximately one year later, I began to notice problems with the drive. Symptoms started with the system freezing and I would have to use the tower reset button to recover. During POST, I would usually hear the following sound from the IBM drive:

    §[<http://www.geocities.com/bontemps4/drive_noise.mp3<]§ When I ran the IBM Drive Fitness Test, bad blocks/sectors would be found that the repair utility could not correct. I then would run the Erase Disk utility, partition, format, and reinstall operating systems and files. After this scenario occurred for a third time, I called IBM HDD tech support and was told that as long as running Erase Disk produced a code 0x00 afterwards, there was nothing wrong with the drive. Over a six-month period, I performed Erase Disk, partition, format, and reinstall of OS/files at least eight times. The system up times became shorter and shorter between these episodes. In fact, on the last reinstall, the system failed to boot enough times to install drivers before the hard drive began emitting the above sound. Also, there were times the hard disk emitted the following sound during boot: §[<http://www.geocities.com/bontemps4/drive_noise_3.mp3<]§ and the BIOS would not recognize the drive. I returned the original drive under warranty and received a replacement drive on 10/25/02. Before I did anything, I ran the IBM Drive Fitness Test on the drive. This drive also made the same intermittent grinding sounds as the first drive did. I sent a sound file to IBM tech support, and, although he stated that the sound was difficult to hear, he suggested that I try using the Erase Disk utility to see if that would address the problem. Although that worked on my old drive, it did not make any difference on the replacement drive. The replacement drive is now in transit to IBM for replacement.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    several people have expressed an interest in buying controller boards for these things. as it transpires, i have three 60 gig ibm deathstars right here; a brief history:

    one is from a raid (1) array that broke about a year ago when its identical twin died instantaneously. i ran it solo for a few weeks until i replaced it with two new maxtors, and it has sat unused since. as far as i know, there is nothing wrong with it. the other two were in another computer at work, and have worked flawlessly, but, about a month ago, working late at night, i heard the heads on one recalibrate (a bzzt sound). although they exhibited no other symptom of failure, i immediately powered down, and mirrored my data on another new maxtor. pulled ’em, and here they sit.

    so, as far as i know, one is living on borrowed time, but the other two are okay. all have been cooled properly (antec 1030 cases with supplemental fans), no tricks, tweaks or fancy stuff. etc. (mr mouse potato is actually pretty low tech.)

    all are marked model number IC35L060AVER07-0; all were manufactured july 2001; two were made in the phillipines for ibm; one was made in thailand by ibm. haven’t a clue if they’re 60gxp’s, 75 gxp’s, or whatever.

    if anyone wants to buy them, well, i’m not planning on using them for anything. imagine that … 500 bucks worth of harddrives that i was gonna toss in the trash. (and i’m not a wealthy man.)

    but i wouldn’t use an ibm harddrive for anything if they were giving them away free.

    mousepotato@nssdata.com

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Jesse here, post number 3.

    Unbelivable. Another IBM hard drive has just died on me. This one is a 60GB IBM 60GXP, model IC35L060AVER07-0. I have been attempting to do something with the 45GB 75GXP, but without luck. Next I am heading to eBay to look for a drive to attempt recovery of the 45GB 75GXP which had important data on it. The new 60GB 60GXP drive had no important data on it and was being used as a scratch drive. The scratch drive has acted strange before and gained a bad cluster or two, but this is the first time that it just flat out refused to be recognised by the BIOS.

    I have a total of four IBM hard drives, one the 45GB 75GXP, and three 60GB 60GXP. They are all going to be replaced. I can not afford to loose any more data. The last two are in an LVM volume in a Debian Gnu/Linux system that I use as a server. I can not afford to loose any of that data.

    I have taken pictures and movies of this ordeal. I will post them on my web server when I can.

    I do not know what I am going to do. It is 01:40am.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Hi. Jesse here again, author of the post below. I have been working on this disk drive for hours now. The drive no longer makes varried sounds, but makes a constant clicking noise when it first spins up, and then keeps clicking. I have let it go at that for 10, 20, 30 minutes, but it does not end like it would before. I do not know if I can get any data off of the drive now. I am seriously looking at eBay right now to see if I can find another drive to attempt a circuit board swap.

    I have collected a variety of information about this problem and here are some things that I have to share;

    IBM downloads for disk tools and utilities;
    §[<http://www.storage.ibm.com/hdd/support/download.htm<]§ IBM storage warranty information; §[<http://www.storage.ibm.com/warranty/index.htm<]§ The IBM 75GXP Class Action Lawsuit website; §[<http://www.sheller.com/ibmclassaction.htm<]§ There are several news threads about this hard disk failure issue. You may want to look around to find them. I really thought for a long time that this IBM hard drive failure thing was the result of stupid users who were overheating their disk drives, doing things that they should not do, or just blaming random things due to their lack of technical knowledge. Now that I find that my own disk drive has died, my mind has been changed. If you have an IBM 60GXP or 75GXP disk drive, please do yourself a favor and buy a new Seagate, Maxtor, or Western Digital drive and replace it right now. There will be almost no warning signs before you IBM disk drive dies. This disk had digital camera pictures from the last six months, personal research, my Netscape bookmarks file, my employment search history and leads files, my resume (oh hell, I just thought about this now), my mailstore files. You will feel like you were punched in the stomach and will want to throw up when this happens to you. Please, please, do not sell your disk on eBay unless you are selling parts to let people attempt to recovery. Do not make someone else face this. I do not know what I am going to do. Jesse sharaharass@yahoo.com

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Hi

    My name is Jesse. I just found this never ending thread of despair while looking up information on these IBM hard drive failures. I had currently own a single 45GB IBM 75GXP disk drive, and three 60GB IBM 60GXP drives. The three 60GXP drives have been working fine, but the 45GB 75GXP has been doing some funny things, and today I think it has died.

    All of my data is on it — the important stuff, and I am worried right now that it might all be gone. If I have to, I will send it to a company like Ontrack or something to see if they can get any data off of it. It may cost me $1K or so, but I have to see what I can get off of it. This data was important. Since I recently relocated across the country, I have not had my important data backed up in the last six months because I have not been able to set up my network. Add onto this that I am currently unemployed.

    I am a systems administrator by trade, Microsoft, BSD, Linux, Solaris, and a Cisco engineer too — I do network engineering.

    The drive that has died today is a 45GB IDE interface IBM 75GXP. It has had some bad sectors in the past that have eaten up files in random spots. It happened maybe three times, all in the last six months. The drive was manufactres in March of 2000, and it was first put into use by me around June of 2000.

    The drive is now not being recognised in POST by my motherboard BIOS (Soyo K7V Dragon Plus) because it is constantly clicking and doing stuff.

    I found the system this morning dead. The hard drive light was on, but the screen was black and nothing was going on. I had left it on overnight because I was working on things. There was no activity that would have caused anything unusual to happen with the computer, and the system is on a working UPS.

    Now the drive just clicks. The sounds themselves have varried, and if I wait 10 – 20 minutes, the drive stops making the sounds. One time, a few tries ago, I even got the drive to start booting, but it reported that system files count not be found, so it stopped the boot process. The OS in question upon the drive is Windows 2000, and it is NTFS formatted.

    Historically, I have used Quantum drives, but Quantum stopped making drives, so I bought IBM for their perfomance.

    The bad things about this is that I found these drives to work hot. Hot is bad because it increases failure rates in electronics.

    I have seen so few drives go bad in my history of systems administration. I have found dead drives on the shelf that are not working, but they have been really few. The only drives that I have ever seen working, and then stop working, was an old full height Seagate Wren SCSI drive that died on me after being dropped on a table at a height of about 12cm. Now this IBM has died right before my eyes. I have been working with computers for about eight years now, since I was around 15 years old.

    I have never actually had a drive die on me within three years of it’s manufature. Scary.

    I am not sure what I am going to do with this thing. I am going to do everything that I can to save my data. If I could just get the thing to stop seeking and actually READ the data on the drive, I could get it off.

    Ping-ting, ping-ting, ping-ting, ping-ting, ping-ting, ping-ting,….

    Jesse

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I got a 40 gig 60gxp last june, it failed within 3 months, and got it RMA’d and the replacement has worked fine… until today, just spontaneously it starting making a high pitch ‘whirr’ noise, first I thought it was one of my case fans, but it turned out its the IBM. I turned off the machine for awhile, etc, still there, i’m gettin a lil worried now, no other problems however, gonna pick up a new drive and back up alot of info just in case, anyone else have their drive make this noise? Its a lil annoying.

    • champs
    • 17 years ago

    Hello, back to let you know that I’ve now lost another 75GXP, this time a “Made in Thailand by IBM” 45GB drive, date of manufacture: January 2001. This one makes the same sort of clicks I’m accustomed to before the eventual death of the drive.

    So to recap: purchased 3 drives, four of them (including replacements) have failed.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    J. DeAngelo Jr

    If there’s no serial numbers on the drive, like on a sticker or something, u can run SiSoft’s Sandra, which is a free utility that can be downloaded off the web. When u got it installed, go into Sandra, and then into “Drive Information”. You will see your drive’s serial number there :]

    Cya, cheebster.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Our business purchased two (2) 733 graphite machines in January 2001. Both have the IBM 75 GXP hard disk drives in them.

    The one machine started making a scratching / clicking / slurping sound about 4 months ago (May 2002). Norton found some bad blocks and marked them. That one is still going. FOR NOW.

    The other machine started doing the same thing. We eventually had to replace the hard drive (not through Apple) because it kept happening at 15 minute intervals that would lock up the machine for 5 minutes at a time.

    My Question is: Is there any type of replacement policy with IBM or Apple even though it is out of warranty with Apple?

    I called IBM the said to call Apple. I called Apple there was nothing they can do except to tell me to read the discussions or call a reseller.

    I know IBM has USUALLY has a 3 year replacement policy with most of its equipment, but since there is not a serial number with the drive they can’t help me. Apple has only a one year warranty on everything unless you purchase the extra 2 year AppleCare Protection for about the price of the new hard drive that we put into the system.

    Here is a perfectly worthless 60 GB drive that makes a good paperweight and its less then 2 years old. I’m very irritated that NO ONE will take responsibility for putting out a sub-standard product. Not IBM, Not APPLE which up to this point has had my utmost respect when it comes to customer support/satisfaction. Well, I feel neither supported or satisfied

    J. DeAngelo Jr
    jbdeangelojr@comcast.net
    Mac user / PC User
    Graphic Designer.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Linux users who are experiencing trouble with these
    drives can examine the SMART data and run SMART self-tests
    using the smartmontools test suite at:

    §[<http://smartmontools.sourceforge.net/<]§

    • champs
    • 17 years ago

    Hello, I’m back again (LocalYokel).

    I went about a year and a half on replacement drives with no problems, then without warning (unlike the other drives), my b[

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I have a 40 GB IBM 60GXP Deskstar that is showing errors. I bought it 10 months ago. I was busy on my Windows 2000 server machine and suddenly everything slowed down and halted. I tried to get to the task manager but the system was completely frozen. Then I rebooted and the BIOS gave me a S.M.A.R.T. error on the primary master (Yes, the IBM drive, the only drive I got in there). “Disk bad press F1 to continue” or something like that. The eventlog showed me the following errors:

    Event ID: 9
    Source: atapi
    Type: error
    Description: The device, \Device\Ide\IdePort0, did not respond within the timeout period.

    Event ID: 11
    Source: atapi
    Type: error
    Description: The driver detected a controller error on \Device\Ide\IdePort0.

    Event ID: 51
    Source: Disk
    Type: Warning
    Description: An error was detected on device \Device\Harddisk0\DR0 during a paging operation

    When I ran SMARTDefender from IBM it said: “An unidentified SMART threshold was exceeded. Any drives reporting a SMART failure should be considered likely to fail at any time. You should back up your data on any such drive a soon as possible.”

    So I think that this IBM GXP drive should be replaced. But first I will have to make sure that it isn’t the new VIA driver that is causing this …

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I began using Maxtor drives when I built my first Pile in 98. I’ve had bought a 5 gig, it died within a year and Maxtor replaced it, I bought a 10 gig for the OS and the 5 as a dump for pic. The 19 gig died, Maxtor replaced it, the 2nd 10 died just after the warranty and I bought another 10, it died last spring. So, The local shop I brought my pile to a few time said install an IBM, they’re the most stable. A 1 gig that is in the IBM my parents bought, it’s still running in my kids Pile. What the heck, I bought a 60GXP 40 gig. It’s been running fine since this spring, 6 + mos.
    I’m told that IBM is having probs and is no longer building drives to last, and their warranty has changed, although I don’t know what has. All I know is that the shop no longer sells IBM. I hear their selling Quantum, I also heard that Maxtor bought out Quantum, I can see a prob there. What I can’t figure is that the shop I have learned to trust is selling a product from a company that is notorious for crappy drives. Let’s see if the 60 GXP is as solid as they said it was. I was going to buy a 2nd drive to ghost to it, I’m not so sure now.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I have a Deskstar model IC35L040AVVN07-0 40Gb drive that lasted two months and have lost photos. This drive is under warranty but I dont want another IBM after reading what it on the www about IBM HDD’s. It was in a case attached to the USB and was storage only with no OS.

    I will do some more researching before I buy another drive.

    Allan Scott
    Queensland
    Australia

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Well two years ago I bought two IBM 75-GXP series drives (a 45 gb and a 15 gb). The 15 gb started to act weird then one day it didn’t come up. So, I ran the IBM Drive fitness test and it couldn’t fix the drive. About 6 months later my 45 gb start the infamous clicking sound problem. I also ran the IBM DFT on it and it fixed the problem, but I still had a unsettled feeling so I went out and bought a new drive (not an IBM). A couple of months went by and I saw that the new 60-gxp series was coming out. I was still a fan of IBM’s drive performance so I went out and bought a 60 gb 60-gxp series drive. Having a motherboard that supported raid I wanted to get another one. Almost 6 month from when I purchased the last 60 gb Fry’s was having a special for the same 60 gb for a 100 bucks. I ran out and bought one. Setting up this drive in raid was simple and they ran together beautifully. Last week after 6 months of this drive running in Raid one failed. It will not be detected from the Bios and IBM’s DFT will not fix it. Having the latest DFT utility I ran it again on the 15gb and it repaired it. So, that is two drives almost failing and one drive failing completely. I won’t use those two drives in any system as a primary drive any more. I’m just hoping that this last drive (60 gb) will come up still.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I have two 40GB 75 GXP models that work perfectly and have been working perfectly for over a year now. I also have used similar 75 GXP disks on other machines I have built and all of those have worked fine too. My stupid friend had his drive crash and now he is blaming his problems on me. What an idiot. He asked for advice when buying a drive and obviously since I have not had any problems with IBM drives that is what I recommended. The nerve of him to blame this on me is outrageous. Especially since working with life critical data he should be using a very professional process of backing up his data but the stupid a-hole was not. Some people just never learn. Idiot’s.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Bought my first IBM drive a couple years back a 18 GB 7200 had no problems with it. Gave it to my father he still uses it with no problems. Recived a 12 GB IBM Drive I have no problems with it. I bought a 75GB Deskstar last year I have no problems with it. I bought a 80 GB Deskstar about 4 months ago I have no problems with it. I’m not sure if I’m lucky or just taking good care of the drives. I been in the computer bussiness for quite a few years I’ve seen alot of Western Digitals, Samsung, Seagate, Maxtor Drive fail.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Ah shit! I have a 60gb GXP drive in my home system and its worked so reliably for about a year now I just ordered a 2nd GXP, this time 100gb. I hope I remain one of the lucky ones who has no problems at all with their GXPs.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I have a 60gb 60gxp in my system running windows XP and it seems to be doing the 10minute boot thing as well as it just randomly corrupted alot of files at the start of this whole thing friday morning. After you pull it through the whole boot process it doesn’t seem to have any problems. I haven’t tried booting any colder than ATX off though so I don’t know if that fixes it, but atx off doesn’t. Scandisk is giving me some humurous results about a whole crapload of orphaned files (looks like mainly fonts at least at the end) but that might just be related to me doing a couple of restore points.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    My 3-month old 120GXP (120GB) is already dying. No wonder IBM is getting out of the hard drive business. They still don’t have their problems under control, even on their newest drives. My drive now clicks, thunks, and seeks all on it’s own when I’m not even using it. It spins down every now and then and then stops responding (It’s NOT power management.. the drive just becomes unresponsive.)
    My 120GB is in an external firewire box with a cooling fan — It runs totally cool at room temp so there’s no possibility of heat-related problems. I ONLY USE THIS DRIVE FOR BACKUPS 2 HOURS A WEEK!!!!! I then unplug it from the wall. Mind you, I don’t even transport or move this drive.
    This is totally unacceptable. A refurb will surely do the same. I need to be able to depend on my backups or they are worthless. I’ve been burned by Maxtor’s in the past, and my 6 IBM 8GB drives were great in their day, which is what I based this choice on. I guess I’ll go back to Western digital, as my 100GB is quiet, fast, and reliable.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I have problem. After run speed disk SMART atribute raw read error down to 86 point. Disk is bad or not?

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    *[lokiis@hotmail.com

    Thanks
    Lokii

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I purchased 2 IC35L040AVER07-0 (Deskstar 60GXP, 40 GB) running firmware ER40A46A about a year ago. The first died several months after purchase; I RMAd it and the replacement died just a couple weeks ago.

    The second drive is just now beginning to give me problems….if I try to warmboot the comptuer (restart without complete powerdown), it takes about 10 minutes to boot to Windows XP, and even then the HD light is constantly on. Cold boot works as normal. When I remove the IBM drive (it is a slave drive just holding data), warm boot works as normal. I have run IBM’s Windows-based SMART utility (http://www.storage.ibm.com/hdd/support/download.htm) and Drive Fitness Test (DFT); both report no problems with the drive.

    As other posters point out, at this point RMAing the drive seems like a waste of time. Given the obvious high failure rate of these drives, IBM should do the moral (and good business) act of offering a refund for these drives. I have been very happy dealing with IBM over the years save this hard drive situation…it would be a shame for them to lose customers over one incident.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    help, it is clucking like a chicken stuck in repeat mode.

    I have two ibm 75GPX 30GB’s set up in RAID 0.
    I have had them since Sept 2000.
    Problems started with lots of freezes 1 yr ago and this month I shut down and it took two hours of clucking for the PC to boot.

    What should I replace them with?
    How do I do it and set up RAID (this time I want to set up mirroring and get bigger HD’s)
    Can I send the soon to be dead HD’s to IBM?

    Thanks
    Vicky

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Well, my IBM drives came in my Dual G4 system from Apple. The first one died on me rather quickly–it just flat out died. wouldn’t do anything. The replacement I got (after having lost all my data) right out of the box already had the click-grind-grind-grind symptoms. It read as bad sectors when it was doing this. Since then, it has gradually increased as far as where on the drive it will do this. I’m going to be sure to replace this drive with something OTHER than an IBM this time.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I bought GXP 75 15 gb drive. In first instal Windows I heard “swistttt” :). This is cdrom i think but after instal system, “swisttt” again. And this is IBM, after one week disk down. DOS for me now is multitasking ;). I copy in DOS files but disk in background propably delete them 🙂 at the same time. IBM SUCKSSSSSS.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    The idea of cooling makes sense. My drive has workek well for half a year or so.
    When my processor died I dumped my old PC but took the HD out (Why throw away a healthy 60 Gb drive).
    My biggest mistake was probably putting it in a removable bracker first thus limitting cooling capacity…

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Yesterday, my second IBM DTLA307030 drive died. It had been replaced once before (although I suspect it was merely mended with IBM DFT) about a month ago. I’m pressing charges against the company that provided the drive and repairs my PC. These assholes were trying to void my warranty once before (presumably for installing a CD-RW drive that I bought in another store), although no such agreement had been issued with the invoice. They even waited a whole month to find the exact same model to replace the defected one (or so they say) instead of offering me a maxtor, wd or a seagate as a replacement.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    *[

    • droopy1592
    • 17 years ago

    Please, stop the GXP bashing. It’s unfair categorization.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I bought a 45GB 75GXP which died after 5 months with a “won’t start car type” clicking noise. ibm replaced it with a 60GB 75gxp, in about 20days. i hoped that was the end..

    however now the 60gb has died the same death.. lucky i have a maxtor 40gb parallel to the ibm as a slave, where i store all my data, so almost nothing of importance is lost.

    however, i’m tired of installing system over and over again. with ibm joining hands with crashy windows, my life seems to have become much more difficult to live.

    i’m going to call up ibm asking for a replacement, as it’s just 1 year 1 month of their 3 years warranty. i wonder did they provide this 3 year warranty knowing that they are selling crach prone drives? with an average of 5 months life of each drive, i’m now sure that i’ll be paying lots more postage… the net price of the drive is increasing everytime it crashes, i really don;t know how many more times it will be cost effective to ask for rma. i’m really at the point of giving up – please save yourself and don’t go for the 3 year catchy warranty logo… it will just ensure that you will pay for another hdd as postage in those 3 years.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    well my IBM 60 GB seems to be allmost dead (luckily I could backup allmost all data using linux). It started havin those heavy seek attempts reading some sectors right after I did some drive optimization with Norton Speeddisk on a nearly filled drive with a large ammount of small files (took several hours). So I guess this stress was too much for the drive. Now I wounder if I should just lowlevel-format the disk and use it for minor storage needs, or to send it to IBM and possibly get an even worse drive back as the disk worked fine for allmost 1 year.

    greetz kidan

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Just found this site and I too have been a victim of the dreaded IBM drive failure fiasco!!!! First drive was a 40Gb 60GXP which lasted 5 months. It was promptly exchanged for another 60GXP which, yes you guessed it failed last week!! Exactly 5 months again!!!

    Got it replaced this time for a 40Gb 120GXP which ive been informed is problem free unlike the 60GXP’s!! Problem is this one occasionally makes a strange faint scratching whining sound every 10-15 min or so for about 2 seconds!! Not a click of death sound but it dont sound too good!! Maybe this one is already on its way out after 7 days!!! Anyone else got this problem?????????????

    Anyway, time will tell!!! Hope it goes before December then I wont have to send it back to IBM myself!!!!! Just get it swapped from the supplier, AGAIN!!!!!!

    Anything longer than 5 months use is a bonus now to me!!! The one good thing about IBM drives is they make you backup your work regularly because you never quite know when you push that power button if all your data is gone!!!

    On a positive note, they do look quite nice with their shiny silver exteriors and make excellent doorstops or will brighten up any desk as a paper weight!!! Its good to know that your hard earned cash hasn’t been completely wasted!!!

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    blk black

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Had two 75 GXP (30Gig) drives in ABIT KT7-RAID, worked great for about 14months then terrible grrr grrr noise at startup, rebooted…. nothing…..tried a bit later…booted up…..

    Rebooted again and the same grrr grr noise but no recovery from it

    Sent the drives back to IBM ….they sent replacements 75GXPs….first died in 2 weeks of usage (but thinking about it, it was knackered to start off with, has my ASUS A7V266-E, sound would stutter while disk access took place), the second drive on the died acouple of months later (on ABIT KT7A)…..going through sending them back again….

    I think they’re a waste of time, when i get the next replacements back, i’m going to leave then unopened in their sealed packets and sell them……any offers…

    • J-Frog
    • 17 years ago

    Quote from Storagereview forum:

    “The basic problems with 75GXP drives:
    ============================
    1) Faulty contact with PCB and disk enclosure (DE). The best solution
    in this case is soldering the contact pad on the back side of the PCB.
    2) This drives has MANY firmware revision with stupid (oooppsss!) bugs –
    in some cases while drive process a WRITE command it damage one
    or more SA modules in firmware zone (!). Of course, after this
    drive can`t to initialize and BIOSes (and utils too) report the “Drive
    not detected”. This bug corrected on the last firmware updates.
    3) Incorrect functioning of S.M.A.R.T. off-line test. The way to skip
    problem – disable S.M.A.R.T. operation.”

    1. Usually reason for not being detected by BIOS (heads don’t calibrate)
    2. Cause of unnecessary load/unload cycles which make the screech-click sound (screech=unload, click=load), write head writing at the wrong time and switching on unnecessarily, causing bad sectors. Drive grinds (scratches) when it is trying to read a bad sector. Grind (scratch) sound caused by signal sent into voice coil for read retries.
    3. Sometimes locks drive up (BSOD), usually triggers above problems.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Had a 60GXP (60 G) disk. Died after aprox 30 days use. Tried everything to get it to work, banging, ice, changing controller chip from a working 60GXP, mounting to other PC’s etc. Problem was that it would freeze just before finishing the boot secuence on whatever Win PC i attached it to. My solution was to use a linux boot disk courtesey of §[<http://www.toms.net/rb/.<]§ I used linux copy and disk commands to copy all of the rem good data to a working slave disk. The problem seemed to be that the bad corrupted was causing Windows (tryed 98SE, 2000 and XP Pro) to hang so i though i'd try linux which only has basic low level read only support for NTFS which i used on the disk. It worked as i could mount the disk in linux and copy without error!

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I purchased a gateway system two years ago with a DTLA-307045 (45 Gb) and it ran well for those two years. From day one it would randomly make a grinding clicking noise, as if the heads were being very loud as they searched for data. Then I strated losing data, bad sectors, and it ended up wiping out my system several times in two weeks. I got all my data off and exchanged it through Gateway. The replacement (identicle model) lasted two weeks as a games drive and download drive (light load), then it started clicking sporadically, and eventually worked up to a constant clicking resulting an the drive failing to be recognized by two seperate drive controllers.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Got a 120GXP 120GB model#:IC35L120AVVA07 in July, it was dead by, well, today Oct. 8, 2002. I had it in an external firewire case and running on my Apple Pismo Laptop. At first it would show up intermitently, then got noisy once in a while. I thought initially that maybe the enclosure was bad and replace the Firewire cable. Well, this morning it was barely spinning up and not won’t even. I’m not sure where to go next but I’ll have a local service guy try to grab my data. I don’t know whether to stick with IBM or not at this point as this was my first ‘deskstar’. The 6gb travelstar in my laptop lasted two years, but I do use that laptop EVERY DAY ALL DAY so I wasn’t to upset when it got started to give me problems. I am quite skeptical about IBM at the moment, I hate being a beta tester!

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    *[http://setiathome.ssl.berkeley.edu<]§ What is a good manufacturer for working hard drives?

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    i have a 60GXP in my server. gets hit HARD all the time. i bought one of the hdd cooling packs where theres 2 fans in the front and one mounted underneith. i’m hoping thats whats kept the drive running so far w/ no probs (knock on wood) for 10mos, but i have a feeling i’m going to replace it w/ a larger maxtor drive asap to avoid data loss =/

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    i just had a 60 gig 60gxp fail on me. I went out and got a maxtor 60 gig 7200 rpm drive. Works like a charm. I was able to get the ibm working again with ibm’s dft tools but there is no way imma stick that thing in my box again. Dont buy ibm hard drives.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    I’m an IT manager for a small business up in Canada, we bought and built 6 machines. 4 of them were 75GXP’s DTLA-307030 (30GB’s). A month after they were all setup, one of the machines failed to boot, i used IBM’s disk util to ‘fix’ the drive, but it actually formatted it and i lost my data. Luckily i had a one week backup so i restored to the same drive. 3 days later the same thing happened to that drive. I removed it and changed it with a maxtor. One of the other machines stopped booting a month later. It had to be RMA’d. 4 months later another drive began grinding when the HDD was seeking. We were running an access DB on it so it would grind heavily.. i didn’t wait for it to die.

    I removed all the 75GXP’s and replaced them with maxtor Diamond Max Plus drives and i haven’t had one problem since.

    I now have 4 75GXP 30GB sitting in my drawer.. i can’t use them, and there is no point RMA’ing them since i would trust the replacement in my system’s anyway.

    Someone suggested that i just sell them.. yeah right.. and force some other chap to go through the same experience as me? that would be un-ethical..

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    hi guys.

    i own a IC35 40GB raid 0 – system.
    this results in 80 gb ibm-trusted working – space.

    i made some strange experience with these drives. they work without a failure and there was no scratching sound since i bought them.. but they sometimes make a beeping – like sound.

    only one time. it lasts about 1 or two seconds; windows 2k runs and runs and runs, even after this sound.

    i downloaded a mp3 – file of a scratch- of -death and now i can surely say, that i do not have this sound on my little babies.

    but: does someone else have had these beep – like sounds??

    i lost trust in those hds, even if they work fine for me.

    • Anonymous
    • 17 years ago

    Hi, I bought three GXP 75 46 gb drives. Two of them made in Hungary, both dead after aprox 6 months of use.

    One of the drives gave plenty