Asus’ ROG Sica cuts the gaming mouse to the bare essentials

A mouse isn't just a mouse these days. As with running shoes or golf clubs, we now have an abundance of different takes on the humble rodent, each increasingly attuned to the needs of the various stripes of gamers out there. Asus' new ROG Sica mouse looks kind of like a set of forged blades for golfers: everything you need and nothing you don't.

The Sica's minimalist layout, with only left, right, and scroll-wheel buttons, is even more pared-down than the EVGA Torq X5 we recently reviewed. Asus says the ambidextrous shape is designed specifically for fingertip-grippers, and the matte upper finish and rubberized sides look like just the ticket for a sure hold.

Interestingly, the Sica uses socketed Omron switches that can be replaced for a different click feel. The socketed design could also increase the useful life of the mouse. Should the switches fail in the course of normal use, they look easy enough to replace, and a pack of new ones is only a few bucks.

For tracking duties, the Sica taps a Pixart PMW3310 optical sensor with a 5000-DPI max resolution and 50-DPI adjustment increments. According to Asus, the sensor tracks reliably at speeds up to 130 inches per second and accelerations up to 30 Gs.

Pricing hasn't been announced, but Asus' other ROG mouse, the Gladius, is $80 on Newegg right now. It's probably fair to say the Sica won't be cheap when it hits stores.

Comments closed
    • vargis14
    • 5 years ago

    Could not be happier with my Razer Imperator replacement a cheap $40 Logitech G402.
    I feel it performs better than the Razer has onboard memory plenty of buttons and 5 DPI settings. Plus it marches my 3 year old blue backlit Razer B widow ult Keyboard that is a plus since my whole desk and monitor match great as well.

    I already reinforced the wire coming out of the mouse with a tiny wrapping of gorilla tape that is not noticeable. I did the same thing on the USB plud side since that is what made my Razer fail, a bad tiny wire tight where the cord goes into the mouse. Since those 2 points get the most kinking I reinforced them so if I do get a wire break it will be at a point where I can repair it.
    But at $40 I just might buy a new one and have the repaired one as a backup or use it on another machine since it tracks on just about anything but glass.

    • brothergc
    • 5 years ago

    19 dollor keyboard and a 12 dollor mouse and I game just as good as if I spent way more . Been their and IMO just not worth spending the extra cash

      • travbrad
      • 5 years ago

      I spend a bit more on keyboards only because they last a lot longer in my experience, not for any gaming reasons. I don’t even particularly care if it’s mechanical or not. I just want it to last awhile.

      The last couple $10-30 keyboards I had were both dead or unusable within a year or so.

    • Chrispy_
    • 5 years ago

    Gaming essentials:

    Forget buttons,
    Forget accurate sensors.
    Forget ergonomics.

    What is [b<]ABSOLUTELY ESSENTIAL[/b<] is a large, backlit company logo with stylized graphics, because it's utterly impossible without paying $80 for a mouse that has one of those.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 5 years ago

    What’s this “golf” of which you speak?

    • maxxcool
    • 5 years ago

    it is still 80$… /nope/

      • flip-mode
      • 5 years ago

      Blasphemous computer geek! I’m with you! Same with those $80 mechanical keyboards. Silk toilet paper. If you want a great mouse for less check out the Amazon Essentials optical mouse for something like $12. It’s dandy.

    • slowriot
    • 5 years ago

    I don’t get it. It has no thumb buttons. Who would want a mouse without thumb buttons? Especially for games. Even in an FPS like CS:GO thumb buttons can be bound to useful functions.

    If you’re going to leave them out you better drop the price significantly. Otherwise… why go with this over the competition? Because you expect the switches to break at some point?

      • Schnitzel
      • 5 years ago

      Yeah, this is pointless when the Corsair M65 can be had for as low as $57

    • anotherengineer
    • 5 years ago

    ROG
    Republic of Geologists
    Republic of Gynecologists
    Republic of Grizzlies

      • SomeOtherGeek
      • 5 years ago

      Republic of Gummy Bears

      • TwoEars
      • 5 years ago

      I honestly think it’s “Really Old Gamer” since only old gamers with a job can afford the ROG products.

      And for the record I own a ROG Swift, backed Pillars on kickstarter and can’t wait until W3 is out. I’ll be in my man cave if you need me.

    • Goofus Maximus
    • 5 years ago

    My one complaint about Logitech mice is the switches going bad after a year or so of use. Replaceable switches sound great to me, so long as the switches are standardized, so that the manufacturing supply sticks around when the mouse design is EOL’d

    • sweatshopking
    • 5 years ago

    400dpi logitech or microsoft and i’m good. i don’t really [i<] get [/i<] gaming mice and keyboards. why do you need 5000 dpi?

      • Deanjo
      • 5 years ago

      Ya for once I agree with you. For most things it is more than enough for my uses. Only occasionally to I flip up the res to something higher ( usually no more than 800 for such as when I want to do some fine detail in GIMP).

        • sweatshopking
        • 5 years ago

        FOR ONCE?!?!!? We’ve agreed like tons of times.

          • Deanjo
          • 5 years ago

          See! We disagree!!!

            • sweatshopking
            • 5 years ago

            lolirl <3

      • tstartrekdude
      • 5 years ago

      It depends on the game but some work well with high DPI. I use 3200 in League of legends and am pretty sure that is around average, nothing in the game is that small that you have to click on but you make a lot of very fast mouse movements and combinations of movements all the time. In something like CS:GO the norm is around 600 or lower, there you want to be pixel perfect all the time.

      As for the keyboards, a nice backlit mechanical keyboard is a joy to type on and easier on the hands if you are playing for a long time. The marketing might be gaming but really they are just nice keyboards.

        • slowriot
        • 5 years ago

        Pretty much this. There’s some uses in certain games for the very high DPI settings. Though most people use a lower setting when accuracy is necessary. My mouse is capable of a ridiculous 8400 DPI but spends its life at 800.

        Keyboards… they just tend to be better made. Though many of the mechanical keyboards marketed towards gamers have issues in my opinion. Lots of USB n-key rollover implementations cause issues in non-Windows OS, this has kept me away from certain models. Anti-ghosting implementations that also can cause issues in non-Windows OSes. Requires carefully reading user reviews (most formal reviews of keyboards don’t cover this stuff well).

        Trying to find a keyboard that is… tenkeyless, has Cherry MX Red switches, avoiding the USB NKRO solutions, and doesn’t cost obscene money is getting hard. About a year ago I picked up a Cooler Master Quickfire Rapid TKL for about $60 on Amazon. Same keyboard is currently $120.

          • tstartrekdude
          • 5 years ago

          We have the same keyboard, high five dude.

      • chµck
      • 5 years ago

      I recall reading that you want your mice sensor resolution to be at least 2x what you plan to set it at for better accuracy.

      • Freon
      • 5 years ago

      1600+ seems to be a sweet spot for me. MX518 was 1600, think my G400 replacement was 3200dpi. I noticed a jump when things slowly progressed from 400, 800, 1600, but since then I’m not sure it matters.

      • Ifalna
      • 5 years ago

      5000DPI I also don’t get.
      I typically work at 1600DPI and switch to 300 for precision stuff.
      I use claw grip and prefer not having to move my arm at all when operating a computer.

      • travbrad
      • 5 years ago

      I do like being able to quickly switch DPI with a button for games like Battlefield or Planetside 2 where I am hopping in and out of tanks, aircraft, etc. I also like to have a couple side buttons for voicechat. Most of the mice that have those features are labelled “gaming” mice, or are as expensive as a “gaming” mouse anyway.

      I agree about the crazy high DPIs though. They probably have much greater precision than our muscles and brain are even capable of. I’ve had a 400dpi, 1600dpi, 8000dpi, and now 6500dpi mouse. The only time I noticed a difference in precision was going from the 400dpi to the 1600dpi, and even that could have been placebo.

      Maybe those top elite “professional” players can tell the difference but I certainly can’t.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 5 years ago

      DPI is the bad measure. What you want is the “perfect sensor” that doesn’t try to predict movement.

      • Chrispy_
      • 5 years ago

      So, feel free to check my math, but I’m saying an optimistic 180° headshot is a 10 pixel target (the size of this O on a 1080p screen) with a 90° FOV, meaning that the target fills half a degree of vision. Such a shot requires you to position the mouse with an accuracy of:

      [list<][*<]1/60th" for someone with a low sensitivity of 12" per 360° turn[/*<][*<]1/360th" for someone with a medium sensitivity of 2" per 360° turn (this is about what I use)[/*<][*<]1/2160th" for someone with a high sensitivity of 3 full 360° turns per inch[/*<][/list<] I think that should cover most people, so [i<]ignoring mouse dpi altogether, and assuming an infinite dpi mouse[/i<], these are the sort of accuracies you need to be able to move your mouse to: [list<][*<]1/60th" low sensitivity = fine grain of sand[/*<][*<]1/360th" medium sensitivity = width of human hair[/*<][*<]1/2160th" high sensitivity = 11 microns, the size of a red blood cell(!)[/*<][/list<] I think we can agree that low is acheivable for most people, medium is possible with a good low-friction surface and fingertip adjustments using claw-grip, and that high is just outright impossible, you're going to need to scope or zoom or OTF dpi-adjust to get a headshot out of that.... Anyway, what actual mouse DPI do you need in order to pull of these theoretical l337-5killz headshots at these sensitivities? Pretty easy actually: [list<][*<]low sensitivity = 60dpi[/*<][*<]medium sensitivity = 360dpi[/*<][*<]OMG 10µm accuracy superhuman = 2160dpi[/*<][/list<] [b<]Superman needs a 2000dpi mouse. The rest of us need game developers who can write code well enough to not f*** up the mouse input.[/b<] Thank you for listening. For what it's worth I have a 5700dpi mouse and I set it to 400dpi because that's already plenty for my 360°-in-2" that I've spent the last two decades building up muscle memory for.

      • vargis14
      • 5 years ago

      Mine uses 4000 dpi with 5 lower settings that do come in handy when you can switch on the fly. But I never used higher the like 2800 DPI on 1080p until I got this 34″ 3440-1440 monitor now 4000 DPI is necessary to get from one side of the screen to the other without having to move my mouse more than 4 ” across my mousepad.

      At 640DPI the lowest setting I have set for my G402 I would have to move my mouse well over 2ft just to get from one side of the monitor to the other. If I had to do it over and over in a hurry the mouse feet would catch on fire 🙂

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