Telecom industry seeks to stay the FCC’s net neutrality rules

Major Internet service providers and other telecom companies in the United States haven't been happy with the Federal Communications Commission since its decision to reclassify them as common carriers under Title II of the Telecommunications Act of 1934. Computerworld reports that seven ISPs and telecom trade groups have already filed suit against the FCC regarding its decision, but according to an article by Ars Technica, industry groups want more immediate relief. Ars writes that several telecom industry groups have also requested stays from Title II reclassification from the FCC. Stays would nullify the rules while the courts work things out.

One such petition comes by way of the American Cable Association and the National Cable and Telecommunications Association, while another joint action comes from broadband group USTelecom and wireless industry group CTIA. Despite the separate petitions, the complaints and relief sought by each group are quite similar.

All of the petitioners emphasize that they don't want to stop the FCC's "net neutrality" rules against paid prioritization, throttling, or blocking of sites for the time being (though the USTelecom petition expressly notes that the group's request only for a partial stay is not a concession that these rules are lawful). Rather, they claim that their classification as providers of "information services" under the Telecommunications Act of 1996 protects them from the imposition of Title II common carrier rules (which, according to the 1996 law, can only be applied to providers of "telecommunications services"), and that being forced to operate under Title II regulation is both unlawful and harmful to the businesses they represent—hence, the need for an immediate stay.

It seems likely the courts will be ruling on these petitions as well as the industry's lawsuits. Ars' article says that requests for stays from the FCC must be filed with the agency before they can be heard by the courts. If the FCC fails to act on these petitions or denies the requests, the industry groups could then seek relief from the judicial system.

Comments closed
    • MadManOriginal
    • 5 years ago

    Relief…FROM LOWER PROFITS. Comcast reported good quarterly results today.

    • VincentHanna
    • 5 years ago

    We don’t mind the rules and things that you actually imposed on us, we are simply trying to defend ourselves from other rules that nobody anywhere is even attempting to impose on us… we love net neutrality, honest.

    • tanker27
    • 5 years ago

    SURPRISE!

    /snark

    • DPete27
    • 5 years ago

    What does this “Title II” classification actually do to them (in layman’s terms) that’s got their panties in such a bunch?

      • tanker27
      • 5 years ago

      Really its quite large. However Title II is specifically Common carrier and you can read up on it, in layman’s terms, at wikipedia: [url<]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_carrier[/url<]

      • mcnabney
      • 5 years ago

      In simplest terms, it forbids them from jacking with the service in any number of ways.

      It doesn’t impact pricing or where they choose to build/support their services.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 5 years ago

        It could include pricing among other things, but the FCC specifically chose to forbear (not include) that.

      • VincentHanna
      • 5 years ago

      Since the FCC specifically pre-empted all the nasty bits, nothing. Nothing whatsoever. It could, in theory, be used to take away all their equipment, nationalize it, and then lease it back to them creating a system not unlike the national telephone system we have now, where you can select any long-distance provider you wish… but to get that through the bipartisan panel that runs the FCC would be nigh on impossible at this point…

      The only changes that occur from the reclassification are that
      1) holding the internet hostage is not allowed
      2) prioritizing services that you like over competitors is not allowed
      3)States are now prohibited from actively protecting local cable monopolies

      That’s it. Everything else is fear mongering and hand wringing.

        • tanker27
        • 5 years ago

        [quote<]...... not unlike the national telephone system we have now, where you can select any long-distance provider you wish [/quote<] Which is a dying model (but has slowed) since now your long distance provider is your cell provider. [url<]http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/business/2014/07/09/homes-still-dropping-landlines-but-rate-has-slowed.html[/url<]

        • Suspenders
        • 5 years ago

        Excellent summary.

      • HisDivineOrder
      • 5 years ago

      They’re not used to being told, “No.” They have lived in a perfect paradise where they had all the advantages of being Title II, but without any of the complicated business of being restricted in some manner. They could carve up the country between the few of them and do whatever they like, however they like, and act like they have competition because they’re– FREE MARKET!

      Except they’re not. Title II doesn’t fix that, per se, but it does at least start the ball rolling toward the common acceptance of the fact that they are NOT free market at work.

      That has them worried. Title II means people see them for what they really are and if you’ve got most of the worst companies in America in your consortium, you really don’t want every Tom, Dick, and Harry knowing or seeing anything clearly.

    • kuttan
    • 5 years ago

    Does anyone can put a stop to internet.org ?? To me I really felt the initiative ridiculous. The FB CEO defence to this project says that, its better to have some level of access to Internet than those people who not even have acces to internet at all. Internet is an essential thing in our modern life. But access to only FB and a few non relevant junk sites is an essential factor of a person life ?? Only and too much exposure to FB or any social media is much worse for mental health than no internet all. On last century nobody in the world have Internet access does that caused any problem to people ?? What’s the relevance and importance of FB like social media to have highest priority??

    If they really wanted to help people who can’t afford internet access , give them a data pack monthly for free. Like 500Mb every month for free. So that people can you use the Internet the way they like not just FB and other junk sites only.

      • Ninjitsu
      • 5 years ago

      This isn’t about internet.org. And yes, in India, people raised enough of a stink that companies withdrew for PR reasons.

    • SonicSilicon
    • 5 years ago

    “Dear FCC,
    Your new rules intrigue us. Moreso if they would only apply to our competition.”
    Why can’t lawyers at least try to be more constructive while consuming time and money? Are they truly induced by the law to defend every aspect to the very end?

    • BoBzeBuilder
    • 5 years ago

    Telecom Industry will eventually win by pouring in enough money to buy the judges and politicians they need.

      • superjawes
      • 5 years ago

      That would seem to be the case, but I do believe that there is more money on the content side–which is the real reason that ISPs are getting the reclassification to begin with. Netflix, Google, and Amazon are financial juggernauts, and they are for the type of fules that the FCC is adopting.

      So yeah, the telecoms will pour in money, but the content providers will, too, and I think the latter have more money.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 5 years ago

      Politicians, yeah…but please call it a ‘campaign contribution’ not a bribe. Judges, I guess in states where judges are elected the same goes, but that’s what appeals are for. Most likely this will end up in the Supreme Court.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 5 years ago

      A good politician is… one that when bought, [b<]stays[/b<] bought. There are few good politicians.

        • Suspenders
        • 5 years ago

        Hahaha, I do love that quote 🙂

    • Ninjitsu
    • 5 years ago

    Well, all the best to you guys. We still have to see what the TRAI decides for us.

      • Jigar
      • 5 years ago

      They just exposed all our email addresses, someone’s love letter as well 😀

    • Krogoth
    • 5 years ago

    This is a case that was made by lawyers and only serves their interests.

    The real winners of this whole ordeal.

      • sweatshopking
      • 5 years ago

      #GRAMMAR

        • MadManOriginal
        • 5 years ago

        You scared the craps out of me with your posts.

          • sweatshopking
          • 5 years ago

          WUT Y?

            • MadManOriginal
            • 5 years ago

            Play on caps+crap=craps.

            • NeelyCam
            • 5 years ago

            Too clever

        • Deanjo
        • 5 years ago

        WE WANTED MUCH MORE BETTEREST GRAMMAR!!!

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 5 years ago

        When did you start hashtagging. You know that’s my thing….

          • moose17145
          • 5 years ago

          Back in my day it was called a Pound Sign.

      • balanarahul
      • 5 years ago

      [quote<] This is a case made by and for layers.[/quote<] FTFY.

      • Krogoth
      • 5 years ago

      [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gvYfRiJQIX8[/url<]

    • sweatshopking
    • 5 years ago

    guize, these companies deserve the right to make money as they want. #toomuchgovernment #stopwhiningandmakeyourown #capitalismalwaysworks

      • Deanjo
      • 5 years ago

      My condolences on the passing of your caps lock.

        • sweatshopking
        • 5 years ago

        THERE ARE OTHER WAYS TO GET MINUSED, BRAH

          • Srsly_Bro
          • 5 years ago

          For not using caps lock i minused you. That’s one way.

      • A_Pickle
      • 5 years ago

      #capitalismnevertried

        • blastdoor
        • 5 years ago

        Neither was communism. Or any other absurdly simplistic model of the real world that serves as the basis of a quasi-religion for people who can’t handle reality.

          • Wirko
          • 5 years ago

          Religions fit this description too.
          /r&p

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