Nvidia brings 1080p60 Grid streaming to Shield devices

Nvidia is upping the visual fidelity of its Grid game-streaming service for Shield devices. The latest update for the Shield Hub Android app brings support for 1080p streaming at 60 FPS. Until today, the service was limited to 720p resolution at 60 FPS.

More than 35 games in the Grid catalog are said to support streaming at the new quality level, including Batman: Arkham Origins, Borderlands, and DiRT 3. You'll need a lot of bandwidth to take advantage of the richer visuals, though. Nvidia says 30Mbps is the minimum connection speed needed for 1080p streaming, and 50Mbps is recommended.

The latest Shield Hub client is available as a beta today for those who can't wait to try out the pretty visuals. A general release of the client is expected by the end of the month.

Nvidia is also bringing two new data centers online to improve Grid service in certain regions. One is up and running now in the southwestern United States, while a second will come online in central Europe later this month.

Comments closed
    • Krogoth
    • 5 years ago

    Shield and Grid gaming are just silly novelties.

    Hardcore PC gamers don’t care for portable gaming portables and portable gaming enthusiast find Shield to be too limited in its library and involves too many hardware requirements.

    • l33t-g4m3r
    • 5 years ago

    So, this is what they’re doing with all the money they’ve been extorting from overpriced Titan video cards. NV’s customers are funding their own enslavement.

      • Deanjo
      • 5 years ago

      Would you rather have a situation like AMD where it is used to pay off “one-time chargebacks”?

        • l33t-g4m3r
        • 5 years ago

        AMD’s not charging 1K+ for video cards, and yes I would rather. It’s not like I own AMD stock anyways. Cloud gaming is not something I want to fund, especially if publishers are trying to push it as the next medium for gaming.

          • Deanjo
          • 5 years ago

          [quote<] Cloud gaming is not something I want to fund[/quote<] I'm sorry are you an investor? Do you own stock? Did you even buy a Titan? No? Then quit your whining. Also IIRC the 295X2 MRSP is 1499.99 Unlike AMD, Nvidia does not have to cannibalize one area of development to fund another.

            • l33t-g4m3r
            • 5 years ago

            Anyone who buys a company product is investing in that company, and yes I did buy a 780. I don’t see how the 295 is relevant either, as AMD’s crossfire is useless, and the titans are the only cards with enough memory to back their performance. No, NV isn’t “cannibalizing”, but that’s semantics. Their Titan prices are so outrageous that they could take 50% of the profit and it wouldn’t be cannibalizing anything. It’s pure profit that they can waste on anything, and that’s how they’re funding Grid. I’m pretty sure Grid doesn’t pay for itself. They’re pulling funds from excess profit to fund Grid.

            • Deanjo
            • 5 years ago

            Well in that case I should be able to whine and cry that Nvidia is wasting resources on gamer product. I have no use for them so any of their development in that area is useless and not needed. I only want balls to the wall full on, full featured professional product.

            It’s just as valid as your whine.

            • l33t-g4m3r
            • 5 years ago

            No it’s not. You’re buying specific products tailored to your usage scenario.

            The ONLY valid complaint you could possibly have, is that the new Titans don’t support DP. That’s it. You don’t have a legitimate argument. You’re just arguing.

            Reminds me of the other day when you were defending windows against linux for something stupid, when you’re really a linux nut. You argue for the sake of arguing.

            • Deanjo
            • 5 years ago

            [quote<]No it's not. You're buying specific products tailored to your usage scenario. [/quote<] Lol, WTF do you think gaming cards are? There is no reason to go above integrated graphics for usage other than gaming. Wanna gaming machine, get a device that was built for it, a console. And BTW, Grid was first developed for enterprise. Gaming stemming from it is a direct development from the development of that professional arena. Professional development is feeding you, not the other way around.

            • Laykun
            • 5 years ago

            [quote<]Anyone who buys a company product is investing in that company[/quote<] Uh no they're not. [url<]http://lmgtfy.com/?q=investing+meaning[/url<]

            • sweatshopking
            • 5 years ago

            [url<]https://techreport.com/news/27014/radeon-r9-295-x2-gets-a-500-price-cut-to-999[/url<]

            • Deanjo
            • 5 years ago

            You can find them a lot cheaper now (nobody really wants them).

            Of course lets not forget the prices of AMD’s in the bitcoin craze.

            • sweatshopking
            • 5 years ago

            Whether people buy them or not is irrelevant. They’re typically faster than a titan x, and not the price you quoted. Granted it comes at a massive power difference, but they’re still not $1500. I’d love one, just not for 1k.

            • Deanjo
            • 5 years ago

            They lowered the price. They still brought them out with a MRSP of $1500. Even at $999 that is Titan territory.

            • rechicero
            • 5 years ago

            The real price is $619-685: [url=http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&DEPA=0&Order=BESTMATCH&Description=r9295x2+r9+295×2&N=-1&isNodeId=1<] newegg [/url<], much lees than the Titans (not less than $1000)

            • Krogoth
            • 5 years ago

            Protip: Nobody really want ultra high-end GPUs except epenis crowd.

            Titan X isn’t exactly appealing either since it GPGPU capabilities were gimped.

      • southrncomfortjm
      • 5 years ago

      I guess there’s no chance that GRID proceeds fund GRID right? Cuz that wouldn’t make sense.

        • l33t-g4m3r
        • 5 years ago

        Except it doesn’t. Cloud gaming has never funded itself. It’s always funded from outside sources. Onlive is a good example of this.

        The only way Cloud gaming funds itself, is if they completely displace the current gaming model. No more consoles or PC’s, and everyone pays a subscription to the service. Otherwise, the expenses outweigh the small user base. It costs a lot to run those servers, plus staff. It’s far more efficient if the user owns the hardware.

        Now, if a company with money to burn wants to offer this service as a perk for their mobile hardware, that’s one thing, but I have a feeling that’s not the true objective.

          • southrncomfortjm
          • 5 years ago

          So, you have facts showing this? I mean, you can look at Nvidia financials and see exactly where Titan X proceeds are funding GRID? And therefore, if GRID didn’t exist, Titan X’s would only cost, oh, $600?

          Sounds to me like someone has Titan envy. Don’t worry, happens all the time. You’ll get used to it.

            • l33t-g4m3r
            • 5 years ago

            More like, do you have facts showing Grid funds itself? Because I know it doesn’t. There’s never been a cloud gaming service that funded itself.

            I don’t know EXACTLY where NV is pulling money to fund Grid, but they are doing it. I don’t have “Titan envy” either. Those cards are a joke anyways. So is SLI. NV is just catering to people with disposable income, which is fine with me, but I don’t like what their doing with the profits.

            Besides, If Grid didn’t exist, I bet we’d see more reasonable prices on NV’s cards across the board. Titans are just expensive because they can be, and they’re not really relevant to the average user. The mid-range cards are where the real gouging is at, and I don’t appreciate NV subsidizing a controversial service with those profits.

            • southrncomfortjm
            • 5 years ago

            Right. You know, but you don’t have facts. Got it.

            You should send in a complaint.

            • Deanjo
            • 5 years ago

            [quote<]Sounds to me like someone has Titan envy. Don't worry, happens all the time. You'll get used to it.[/quote<] [url<]http://cdn.meme.am/instances/500x/62141768.jpg[/url<]

            • l33t-g4m3r
            • 5 years ago

            Yup. I thought you were trolling. That just proves it.

            • Deanjo
            • 5 years ago

            The only thing proven is that you have a sense of entitlement for something you clearly shouldn’t have.

            • l33t-g4m3r
            • 5 years ago

            What? You make no sense. That’s what happens when you throw out intentionally vague insults that aren’t based in reality.

            I already told you I don’t care about the Titans. I was merely using the name and price point as an example. It’s a Halo product, which is padding NV’s profit margin, which is funding Grid. I don’t want a Titan here, BUDDY. I want NV to stop funding Grid.

            • Deanjo
            • 5 years ago

            [quote<]I want NV to stop funding Grid.[/quote<] There's your sense of entitlement coming into play. Who the hell are you to dictate where they spend their resources? You bought a card, and not even from them, you bought a card from one the vendors that use their product. You are not a stock owner, you are not a member of the board and you are not even the target audience of their endeavours. You benefit from the R&D that is done for their enterprise market. Your Geforce is a derivative of their R&D from Quadro/Tesla. GRID was brought first for the enterprise market for virtualized solutions, the gaming server aspect is a derivative of that R&D and isn't even sold to you. It's sold to customers that nvidia makes more than a puny $10 (if that) from your purchase. You think that the world revolves around gaming. Wake up, it doesn't. PC-Gaming is still a niche market of it's own. Let's see, nvidia makes peanuts off you, but pulls in far better margins on their pro product. Who do you think should take priority. You can't even say if they did stop development of GRID that it would all of a sudden make their gamer product any better. Whaaa, whaaa, whaaa! You might as well be griping that EA stop making sports games because you only like Peggle.

            • l33t-g4m3r
            • 5 years ago

            “the gaming server aspect” is normally sold to customers like Onlive. It doesn’t matter what NV charged Onlive, or that Geforces are a derivative of Quadros. Cloud based gaming is still a waste of money and resources. Grid = Onlive, except NV isn’t selling cards, they’re BUYING them. If someone at AMD did this, people would be fired. NV only gets away with it because they have money to burn, and that money came from overcharging their customers.

    • Chrispy_
    • 5 years ago

    I’m obviously missing something here, but why would someone with a $1500+ gaming rig, almost certainly using a nice 1080p144 or 1440p60 screen, and probably a proper gaming mouse, want to abandon their precision tuned gaming platform of choice to play on:

    a squinty tablet screen
    with laggy and imprecise touchscreen controls
    with the small but perceptible delay caused by streaming wirelessly

    I’ve tried a shield tablet using Grid and it felt about as horrible as Onlive did. Onlive died, thankfully, because it was terrible. Why are Nvidia pushing Grid so hard when the vast majority of games that might be run over Grid are so woefully suited to a tablet.

    As for the shield handheld, that’s even worse – who wants to play any PC game on a 5″ screen? The UI just plain doesn’t work, and that’s the least of the problems.

      • wimpishsundew
      • 5 years ago

      [quote<]I'm obviously missing something here, but why would someone with a $1500+ gaming rig, almost certainly using a nice 1080p144 or 1440p60 screen, and probably a proper gaming mouse, want to abandon their precision tuned gaming platform of choice to play on:[/quote<] Yes you are missing something here. This is a subscription service for people who don't want to spend $1500 on a desktop/DTR and maintain it. There are plenty of people who would rather pay $20 a month or $240 a year instead of $1500 upfront that only last 2-3 years before it's outdated. They save money and doesn't have to deal with the hassle of owning a huge brick. If there are 100s of millions of people buying consoles, why wouldn't you think game streaming be popular if it can offer the same performance? The problem with these streaming games is obvious, latency! and limited game selection. I would say the only games worth playing on it is strategy games like Civ 5 or Company of Heroes where latency is less of a problem. On top of that the multiplayer connections can be done via the same servers so lag is only between servers to player instead of players to players and therefore getting a better experience. Then you have problems like consistent high speed connections as most people don't have 30+ Mbps connections available. Even my 105 Mbps connection with Comcast is not really reliable because my latency is up and down all day. Game streaming is not ready for prime time yet. However, it will be the future when ISPs decide to stop being a prick and game streaming servers can be deployed locally throughout the country.

        • Chrispy_
        • 5 years ago

        Ah okay, I was unaware Grid was a system exactly like the massive failure that was Onlive.

        I thought it was just the streaming from a GTX-equipped desktop to a Shield tablet or handheld which is bad enough. Adding Internet latency to that is (as proven by every company who has ever tried) a recipe for unmitigated customer dissatisfaction.

        On low-latency fibre conections (best possible case example) it turns any game into a sluggish, unresponsive mess. On your average home connection it’s WAY worse than that, usually somewhere between “irritating” and “completely unplayable”

        I hope this is an expensive failure for Nvidia so that this ridiculous idea and SaaS gaming model dies and dies for good this time. Nothing good can come of it for us end-users.

          • wimpishsundew
          • 5 years ago

          I don’t view it as a failure. They’re one of the first ones to try it. They can work out the kinks before the internet infrastructure is ready for prime time. This is assuming that they keep doing this until that is possible.

          If the streaming service is under 10ms, I’m in. I don’t see this happening for another 5-10 years in the US. For countries like South Korea or Japan, it is probably possible already. They have really high population density and the highest broadband speed and accessibility in the world.

          • pranav0091
          • 5 years ago

          [quote<]On low-latency fibre conections (best possible case example) it turns any game into a sluggish, unresponsive mess. On your average home connection it's WAY worse than that, usually somewhere between "irritating" and "completely unplayable" [/quote<] You haven't even seen how GRID works, and still pass such enlightening reviews on its performance ? Thats nice, please tell me more... If you dont like the idea, fine, dont use it. But to pretend to know more than you actually do, thats intellectual dishonesty. I'd suggest you look up "unresponsive" and "mess" again. <I work at Nvidia, but speak for myself.>

          • southrncomfortjm
          • 5 years ago

          Have you tried it? Or did you try Onlive? Or are you just parroting other complaints?

          I actually really enjoyed Onlive using my Nexus 7 using a 360 controller. I played Borderlands, Darksiders and Saints Row 3 using that service and, for the most part, it worked fine.

          Is it ever going to compare to sitting in front of your monitor? No, but its not supposed to. Just like a smartphone isn’t supposed to replace your desktop either, but it does the job well enough that you can get by until you get back home.

          And for future reference, since you seem to be uniformed, GRID is the internet based service, Nvidia Gamestream is the intra-net service so you can stream your own games to your laptop/tablet. That service works exceptionally well and is all but lag free. I use that when I want to be upstairs rather than in the basement. I’ve also used it, along with a VPN to play some games remotely, basically imitating GRID or Online, with pretty good success.

          Any technology that succeeds adds to our options. I don’t see any reason why anyone should want GRID to fail. Never know what other stuff could come from it.

            • Chrispy_
            • 5 years ago

            I used Onlive to a server with 35-50ms of latency, which is pretty good, seeing how local servers have a latency of 20-30ms.
            I’ve also tried Nvidia Gamestream and Steam’s streaming service, both of which are local and orders of magnitude better than what is possible with Onlive/Grid.

            Onlive added 100-150ms of real-world lag, which is both impressive, given the multiple stages involved, and fine for really casual gamers (10-20APM RTS players, auto-aiming slow-paced third-person stuff – but completely unplayable for anyone who appreciates input response at better than 6-10fps.

            Local streaming is better, I see a future for that, but even then the added input lag caused by the encode/decode is noticeable. It’s fine for casual sofa gaming but I wouldn’t want to play any FPS that requires aiming, or a twitchy arcade game, or worse still, a driving game where reaction speed and fast feedback is absolutely critical. If you read any kinaesthetics blogs you’ll often come back to the Microsoft research to do with perceived input lag vs input refresh and the 50-100 miliseconds of typical touchscreen interface lag makes the conversion of this system to tablets even more farcical.

          • Laykun
          • 5 years ago

          Yep I tried nvidia grid at GDC, it was an absolutely horrible feeling experience, the latency was far far too great (this was on a shield console).

          • l33t-g4m3r
          • 5 years ago

          Yup. I actually hope ISP’s never fix their infrastructure, precisely because I want game streaming to die a horrible death, and that everyone involved will lose massive amounts of money and get fired. Game streaming is evil.

          I think a better idea would be to crowd source game streaming. People aren’t always playing games, and they could get paid to stream out. Win\Win. Everyone’s happy, and streaming doesn’t kill off PC’s.

            • nyqua.xyla
            • 5 years ago

            I’m not sure why you are worried that game streaming would kill off PCs. It’s just yet another cloud-based option. Just like Youtube/Netflix did not kill off your ability to store videos locally, similarly GRID does not stop you from storing and playing the game locally. Nor would it do so, in the future, because…

            Because, remember that NVIDIA still makes plenty of money from selling GPUs to consumers. Why on earth would they aim to shut down that business unit?
            As I see it, their aim with GRID looks to be even further expanding their consumer base (to people who don’t buy gaming PCs/cards; but may still enjoy a casual gaming service), not to displace their existing GPU consumers.

    • xeridea
    • 5 years ago

    You can also get 1080p60 using 0Mbps with no extra lag for free.

      • Deanjo
      • 5 years ago

      Only if you are using VGA. ;D

      • southrncomfortjm
      • 5 years ago

      Wait, where? Normally I’d have to buy a PC for that. Who is giving them away for free?

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