Logitech’s G920 racing wheel brings the race track to the desk

Need a racing wheel to go with Project Cars? Logitech's just-announced G920 could be just the ticket. This wheel has a spec list that wouldn't look out of place in a Ferrari showroom, and it boasts compatibility with both the PC and Xbox One.

On the outside, the G920's rim is wrapped with genuine leather, and its dual paddle shifters are hewn from stainless steel. It offers a two-and-a-half-turn lock-to-lock range, for a total of 900 degrees of rotation. Dual force-feedback motors communicate what's happening under your digital tires, and dual helical gears promise a smooth, slack-free steering feel. Logitech says its anti-backlash hardware prevents slop in the wheel, as well.

The G920 includes a set of stainless steel pedals for heel-and-toe action. An optional six-speed shifter is available for those who want to row their own gears. The wheel, pedals, and shifter are all compatible with Playseat simulation chairs, as well.

Racers will need to pony up $399.99 for the wheel and pedal set when the G920 hits showrooms in October. The six-speed shifter is an additional $59.99. Both are available for pre-order from Logitech today.

Comments closed
    • Krogoth
    • 5 years ago

    Sounds about right for high-end gaming peripherals.

    CH products used to command such prices for their high-end joysticks, yoke, throttle setups.

    • christos_thski
    • 5 years ago

    I don’t really get the merit of clutches/manuals on steering wheel sets. Do they really approach anything close to the effect of driving a manual? I think driving manual is all about the feedback and you’d need an elaborate sort of feedback mechanism on the pedals to reflect how the clutch/gears “lock” into position. Otherwise what’s the point, really? Might as well drive it as a serial gearbox or even fully automatic.

      • Flying Fox
      • 5 years ago

      You can stall the car or miss a shift when you enable the clutch for games/simulators that support it.

      • travbrad
      • 5 years ago

      Fully automatic can be very bad since you may end up shifting at inappropriate times which can unsettle the car at exactly the wrong moment. You can alleviate that problem even with paddle/sequential shifters though, and that’s what most major racing series use now anyway for obvious reasons (less mechanical failures and not having to take your hand off the wheel to shift).

      I’ve never had a wheel with a clutch though, so I’m not sure if it actually feels right or if you just basically press it down and shift. I’d be surprised if they actually felt right, since that would take a force feedback motor of some kind on the clutch pedal, and appropriate feedback from the game itself. Maybe someone with a clutch can enlighten us.

      • bowman
      • 5 years ago

      I disagree strongly. Driving manual in games is fine, and I would never play ETS 2 any other way.

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 5 years ago

    I wish they made inverted pedals. You can get a Fanatec shifter for $150. Wheel set 250, and Inverted pedals for $200. That’s a lot better than this for $460 with the shifter.

      • Entroper
      • 5 years ago

      You can invert the pedals.

    • Ninjitsu
    • 5 years ago

    Wow, that’s expensive. I wish the G27 didn’t cost ~$310 here, too. :/

    • Skid
    • 5 years ago

    So… it costs more than a G27. And the shifter is extra. Pedals look to be the same as the G27.
    At least it has fewer buttons.

    • Flying Fox
    • 5 years ago

    Before you all balk at the price, look at the Fanatec ones. Logitech is just trying to crack into that price/quality level. The older G27 is decent as a value-for-money choice, but could not compare to the Fanatec offerings at the time.

    BTW, alcantara > leather, supposedly, so the leather wrapping is actually no big deal.

      • Phr3dly
      • 5 years ago

      Day at the track: ~$200
      Track insurance: ~$200
      Tire wear: ~$200
      Brake pad wear: ~$200
      Other wear: $ ????

      I don’t have a G920, but if it can replicate a fraction of the experience, $460 is well worth it.

        • Flying Fox
        • 5 years ago

        Top end Fanatec’s and a proper racing seat will be at least $2K, but yes, it can be well worth it considering you will be spending more hours at the simulator games/software than on the actual track.

        Racers usually have both. πŸ™‚

        But seriously, $200 at the track? Must be your locale.

          • continuum
          • 5 years ago

          Track days here are about $150/day. Most I know don’t buy track insurance, but yeah, tire wear and brake wear is definitely a potentially significant cost, as is gas and lodging if you plan to run the whole weekend (or don’t want to get up at 4am to make it to the inspection and briefing…).

          • Srsly_Bro
          • 5 years ago

          +1 for Fanatec. Pay2Play

        • Wildchild
        • 5 years ago

        What Phr3dly said is spot on.

        I made the switch to a manual transmission six years ago and, every once in a while, I’ll get that itch to want to do something dumb. These racing wheels are a bargain compared to going to a track or getting a ticket and endangering other people around you.

          • Deanjo
          • 5 years ago

          Not to mention possibly wrecking your ride.

          • Flying Fox
          • 5 years ago

          Nobody told you to go to a difficult track when you are not prepared or skilled enough. Regular track days that contain drive-around or HPDE’s with figure-8’s are relatively safe if you don’t do crazy things like flooring the gas pedal when you are going through a hairpin turn.

          Besides, on some tracks, you need instructor approval that they allow you to drive unsupervised. It is not like going to the track automatically == damaging the car. You don’t have to push that hard, but you get to do things that you cannot legally do on normal roads. That can help you to learn how your car behaves when extreme circumstances happen, like unexpected skidding.

          I went to a track a few years back with my normal AT Mazda 3 (not the Mazdaspeed) just to get a feel, I did not push hard enough and I came back without a scratch. There may be perhaps some overexaggeration about “track”.

            • Wildchild
            • 5 years ago

            What does any of that have to do with my post?

    • ermo
    • 5 years ago

    As long as this means that Logitech will pour some resources into their Racing Wheel driver software, I’m happy.

    Still saving up to replace my G27 with a proper Fanatec CSW v2 setup.

      • Nevermind
      • 5 years ago

      Haha, Logitech updating software voluntarily?

    • auxy
    • 5 years ago

    $459.98 …

    ヽ( ゚ γƒ― 。)γƒŽ WHAT?

    • CampinCarl
    • 5 years ago

    So the G27 can usually be had for ~$200, including the 6-speed shifter. It’s built from solid materials…at least, at first glance, they seem on par with this new G920.

    So why is this new thing $200 more?

      • gigafinger
      • 5 years ago

      Corinthian Leather!

      [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UmnF0fv5dGg[/url<]

        • Nevermind
        • 5 years ago

        Gotta love that trucoat.

        • crabjokeman
        • 5 years ago

        Just like on my Cordoba!

      • wimpishsundew
      • 5 years ago

      I said the same thing about their speakers. Quality is down yet price is the same or higher.

      Their new gaming mice are top notch and worth the money though.

      • slowriot
      • 5 years ago

      Because you’re comparing market value versus MSRP. Nearly all Logitech stuff starts out priced fairly close to the MSRP and then comes down significantly over a year or so. I fully expect the same to happen with the G920.

        • wimpishsundew
        • 5 years ago

        Yes I expect the price to come down but it won’t be 50% unless there’s a big sale. That thing shouldn’t cost more than $200. I honestly wouldn’t pay more than $120 for one. I’m sure they can still be very profitable selling it at $120. The parts looks like it’s $30 tops made in China.

          • travbrad
          • 5 years ago

          $400 product from $30 worth of Chinese parts? Now announcing the iWheel.

      • ALiLPinkMonster
      • 5 years ago

      I would hope they’ve improved the feedback and made it more realistic than what the G27 offered. That’s all I can really think of.

      • albundy
      • 5 years ago

      my guess is cuz it’s new.

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