What are your Windows 10 upgrade plans?

Windows 10 arrives about a month from now, and many of you have no doubt seen the little "reserve your copy of Windows 10" icon in your taskbars. Of course, Windows 10 will be a free upgrade for the first year after its release for owners of Windows 7 or 8.1, and there’s no need to "reserve" a copy to be eligible, but it feels just a little bit more special to be on a PR email list on a server in Redmond. Or something.

Still, this close to the release of a new version of Windows, it’s probably a good idea to start thinking about your upgrade plans if you haven’t already. Are you installing the new OS, warts and all, on July 29? Waiting a month or two to let some of the bugs get shaken out? Or are you sticking to your beloved Windows 7 or 8.1? Share your plans with us and other TR gerbils by voting in the poll below.

Comments closed
    • Goofus Maximus
    • 4 years ago

    Man! I said I was going to wait, but then my curiosity got the better of me, and I hit the upgrade button anyway! At least it went without a hitch, and I’m now living in WinTen-ville, USA.

    One weird thing I didn’t expect, was that I can now play old Direct Draw games smoothly, which chugged horribly on Windows 8.1. I can play Sacred Gold again, without having to deal with in-town slideshow-low fps.

    I get another learning curve. Settings especially, seem to be somewhat schizophrenic between the start settings and the control panel settings, and I never quite know whether any particular setting is hiding in one or the other. As in 8.1, right-clicking the Start button is your friend for finding stuff that is hidden everywhere else.

    • AdamDZ
    • 4 years ago

    Months of testing Windows 10 convinced me to move my life back to a Mac and keep a PC for gaming. Windows 10 is way too invasive for my liking. Unless that changes I’m not interested. I’ll convert all my 7 and 8 keys just incase but until DX12 games come out I’m sticking to Windows 7 for my gaming PC.

    • nafhan
    • 4 years ago

    I’d say mostly “waiting until the kinks get worked out”.

    I’ll probably upgrade my wife’s Windows 8 lappy on day one, because I can’t imagine this will be worse than 8. I’ll leave my Windows 7 gaming machine alone until I’m certain there are no kinks to be worked out, though (probably the 3 month point). Also, Impact on my Linux servers and dev machines* should be minimal!

    *a couple of those are virtualized in VB on Windows, though, and I may start running those in Hyper-V when I upgrade from 7. So, slight impact even there.

    • Bensam123
    • 4 years ago

    Going to wait about 3 months and see what happens as far as what they’re trying to shoe-horn people in on and so all the kinks and bugs get ironed out. Did the same thing with W8 and W7.

    • d0g_p00p
    • 4 years ago

    The smart part of my brain tells me to wait until SP1 but the geeky part of my brain just cannot wait to toss it on my new rig.

    I have been playing with the insider preview for a couple of months now and I have to say I’m impressed. Sure there are still some wonky UI issues but all in all its pretty dam

    • MarkD
    • 4 years ago

    Give up Media Center for free, now, or pay to give up Media Center later. Why would I “upgrade” at all? I may keep a windows PC to run Turbo Tax, but any new PCs I build will be running Linux.

    • Shouefref
    • 4 years ago

    Why would I run to a shop to buy a new product ONLY BECAUSE THERE IS A NEW PRODUCT?
    It’s one of those things which shows how refined the marketing and publicity by companies like MS and Apple are.
    Lot’s of people are whining about MS and think Apple is doing better and is more hip and all that kind of things. But if you ask me, they’re both exactly the same: getting lots of people deranged enough to give them the feeling that they HAVE TO buy their new products.
    I’m actually sick of always having to spend money and time on products which don’t make it better for me.
    Do you want better graphics? Okay, buy a new card.
    Do you want something to do in the cloud? Okay, do something in the cloud.
    But I have no use for it and won’t buy it, as is the same with lots of things.

      • Grape Flavor
      • 4 years ago

      Buy? It’s free. Unless of course you wait over a year to upgrade, in which case you have no one to blame but yourself.

        • VincentHanna
        • 4 years ago

        free + downloaded automatically + very pushy installation.

          • BIF
          • 4 years ago

          What do you mean by “very pushy installation”?

            • VincentHanna
            • 4 years ago

            They are using windows update to roll out the install.

            You’ve used windows update once or twice, yes?

      • BIF
      • 4 years ago

      I disagree with your premise in the context of Windows, but others have addressed that in this thread. (edit: Oops, maybe not)

      What I have noticed is that consumers have been exhibiting ever lower and lower thresholds of standards. For example, manufacturers have sold us on “new look” Pepsi and other products. “Collector can” Coca Cola. The product hasn’t changed; only the packaging has changed, and not in any materially functional way. They aren’t adding a convenient handle or anti-dribble feature to the bottle or can.

      And we’ve bought it! Every single time, we bought it. So did they train us into this behavior or did we train them to do this whenever they want to refresh sales?

    • Shouefref
    • 4 years ago

    There hasn’t been a reason to upgrade Windows since years, unless you’re forced to because new versions of old programs refuse to run on older Windows versions.
    Because of that, a new Windows version is nothing but a pain in the ass.
    We don’t need it anymore. Most people don’t want it anymore. Only sales persons try to tell is we have to have it. Using traditional arguments, like “the old version isn’t safe”. (So they have been selling us versions which weren’t safe? Could I get my money back, please?)
    Since some years upgrading is only upgrading for upgrading’s sakes, like ‘ l’art pour l’art ‘.
    And that costs time, money, and you almost always loose some functions and possibilities you like on the older version.

    • Zizy
    • 4 years ago

    Lacks answer: Have already upgraded to Windows 10.

    • Choz
    • 4 years ago

    I can’t wait to hand over my credit card details for OSaaS!

    Why should I only be allowed to pay once for something when I can pay forever instead!

      • Grape Flavor
      • 4 years ago

      uggghhh not this crap again

        • ronch
        • 4 years ago

        If they make it SaaS it’ll totally piss many people off, and will open the door for other companies to push an alternative OS. Honestly, I wish Linux distros would just get their act together. I mean, sure, many folks swear by it but I just tried the latest Kubuntu (15.04). Burned it on DVD and tried to boot from it. System hang. Doesn’t exactly inspire confidence. I first tried Kubuntu in October of 2010 and counted 30+ bugs. So after almost 5 years .. WTH. While Windows is not perfect, it’s pretty polished. Can’t say the same thing for Linux; they either work or they don’t, or have annoying, apparent bugs. So until a good OS comes along that I feel worth getting, I’ll stick with Win7. Win10 is nice but I just feel like it’s just Win8, which left a nasty aftertaste I couldn’t get rid of even after a bottle of mouthwash.

          • VincentHanna
          • 4 years ago

          [quote<]If they make it SaaS it'll totally piss many people off[/quote<] Since MSFT has said categorically what they mean by SaaS and that no, they aren't going to start charging annual subscription fees, those people would have not only a right to be upset, but at this point legal recourse if they tried to pull anything even remotely like that. Honestly, at this point you may as well stop even acknowledging these people because honestly you may as well be talking to a Geo-centrist/moon hoaxer. Whether or not they are in fact as deluded as they are pretending to be, they won't acknowledge reality, no matter how you present it to them.

    • Krogoth
    • 4 years ago

    Unless there’s some kind of killer app that “requires” Windows 10.

    There’s really no reason to upgrade.

    That’s really the biggest obstacle for Microsoft this time around. There are no mainstream killer apps and very few enterprise applications that need the improvements that come with Windows 10/Server 2015 R2 Ecology. Hardware side isn’t much better either. There aren’t any killer mainstream apps that render systems from almost a decade ago hopelessly out of date.

    Edit: You should have made the “Windows? Meh” into “Krogoth isn’t impressed with Windows 10”. 😉

      • Ikepuska
      • 4 years ago

      DX12?

        • Krogoth
        • 4 years ago

        DX12 doesn’t really offer much to the table and developers aren’t going to using in en mass until next generation consoles have a version of it.

          • Zizy
          • 4 years ago

          But the point of DX 12 is simply because current consoles have low level access and porting would be simpler that way.

        • ronch
        • 4 years ago

        Honestly, while I appreciate killer graphics, it doesn’t determine whether a game is enjoyable or not for me. Heck, some of my favorite games are still built on DX7 and DX8 (Thief 1 to 3, Deus Ex 2, Oblivion, et cetera). They run super on my HD7770, which I don’t have any plans to replace due to said reasons

    • ronch
    • 4 years ago

    Sticking with Windows 7 64-bit indefinitely. Totally not gonna touch any WIn8/9/10/11,000 that’s basically Win8 with a Service Pack and called the next version of Windows.

    I’d better start exploring Linux flavors again. Thing is, they either work or they don’t. Just tried booting off Kubuntu 15.04 which I burned on a DVD and my rig hangs up during boot. I know I’m gonna get flamed for this but Linux just isn’t ready for prime time, not when it hangs up during boot even to this day. Doesn’t inspire confidence, exactly. And no, I’m not gonna use the terminal to iron things out because these things should work right out of the box.

      • Klimax
      • 4 years ago

      Re Windows: You definitely don’t know a thing about 10. You may want to fix that.

        • ronch
        • 4 years ago

        On I’ve been looking at it from 200 feet away. But I’m OK with Win7. Why do people downthumb those who prefer to stick with what works for them?

          • rika13
          • 4 years ago

          Win 7 is out of mainstream support. That means no service packs, no new anything, just fixes for severe security issues. It is effectively walking dead, being forced into usability by the graces of Microsoft.

          Also DX12 is proof it is just Win 8 with an SP, they aren’t even trying to backport it to 8 like they tried (but were not able to do) with DX 11 and 7. While it was originally NT 6.4, Vista was NT 6.0, 7 was 6.1, 8 was 6.2 and 8.1u1 is 6.3, they changed it to NT 10 because it is that much changed.

            • ronch
            • 4 years ago

            Let’s face it: 7 is the new XP.

            • sweatshopking
            • 4 years ago

            sure. but xp sticking around forever was stupid. 7 sticking around forever is also stupid.

            • ronch
            • 4 years ago

            They’re not sticking around forever but I sure plan to use 7 for a long time. Come to think of it, Win7 is the Windows OS that I’ve used for the longest time so far. Been on it for 5 years now. My, time sure flies.

            • September
            • 4 years ago

            my Core i7 920 I built started on 7 RC and is on 7 Pro for now and forever. new machines may get 10.

    • Laykun
    • 4 years ago

    Windows 10 has been my excuse to move my OS to a full on SSD (currently using a SSD cache solution), so yeah, pretty excited to move it over day one.

    • MarkG509
    • 4 years ago

    I didn’t answer the poll, because my answer would be “All of the above”, though if you put a gun to my head, it would be the last choice. I have an air-gapped WinXP machine that I keep around because it runs a few Lotus 123 worksheets that aren’t worth rewriting, and attempting to import them to anything more modern (Excel, LibreOffice, Gnumeric) destroys them. I keep around a Win7 machine, that took-over for the XP machine, mostly just because it’s where I like (hate least) to do my taxes, and have been using it for that since Win7 first came out. I bought a Surface Pro when they first came out, but didn’t like it once the newness wore off, and gave it to my nephew. Everything I actually use are Linux boxes (mostly Mint with Mate). What’s left of Windoze for me are 2 VMs (Win8.1 and Win10) hosted on a Linux box. At this point, I’d have to say it’s very unlikely that MSFT could pull me back to Windows.

    • TopHatKiller
    • 4 years ago

    Survey results: I’m surprised the spread between “buy on day one” and “wait till kinks sorted out” is about the same. Do these people trust MS [i<]that[/i<] much? Or are they canny-clever little dicks enjoying the challenge of bughunts and planned eradication campaigns? Not 'buy' obviously... still can't get used to that.

      • sweatshopking
      • 4 years ago

      been running technical preview for months, and i’ll stay in the insider program. I have keys, i just like it.

        • TopHatKiller
        • 4 years ago

        You’re probably right – I haven’t seen much indication of catastrophic failures, crashes etc. Me, I just get hysterical and cry if i lose data I can’t afford to lose.

          • AdamDZ
          • 4 years ago

          Backups?

            • TopHatKiller
            • 4 years ago

            Of Course! But, you know, I’ve backed up. Then copied the backup, twice at least. Then moved at least one backup to a separate location. [In case of fire, flood, lightning etc] And then…
            something screws up…. in that moment before… I backed-up.
            Then: hysterical sobbing, unmanly behaviour.
            Thinking about it, I should really run corporate IT departments.

            • BIF
            • 4 years ago

            No you shouldn’t run corporate IT departments. Not if you take THAT many backups and upgrades still give you an ulcer!

      • brothergc
      • 4 years ago

      maybe their so fed up with windows 8.1 they are willing to try anything ? I know a few who are in this boat .

        • BIF
        • 4 years ago

        No, not true.

        The technical previewers seem to love Windows 10, and this is true for people in the creative arts industries too.

        Windows 8.1 is a very good OS. “Fed up” is so far from accurate, well it isn’t true and it isn’t funny.

      • VincentHanna
      • 4 years ago

      The problem is, that even since the windows 10 preview launched six months ago, windows 10 has been more stable/reliable/secure and less “buggy” than windows 8. So while yes, I’d absolutely love to “wait for the bugs to be worked out,” If the choice is between using the even more buggy windows 8/8.1 or while they “work out the bugs” or using windows 10, windows 10 wins by default.

        • BIF
        • 4 years ago

        I have not had any trouble with Windows 8 or 8.1, except for the occasional graphic driver crash in Firefox. But for “real work”, 8.1 has been no trouble at all.

    • DarkMikaru
    • 4 years ago

    I wanna know who the 18 people who say they are running Windows XP are so I can make a pilgrimage to there house, tie them to a chair and make them watch as I shatter that machine all over their office. ARE YOU KIDDING ME… Party is over people… it’s time to join the rest of us!!!

    Windows XP…. how is that even possible.

    • Cyco-Dude
    • 4 years ago

    microsoft will have to drag me to a new OS; i’m sticking with win7.

      • sweatshopking
      • 4 years ago

      Sucks to be you.

      • Laykun
      • 4 years ago

      Sir, may I interest you in some Win 98 SE, it seems like it’s right up your alley.

        • jackbomb
        • 4 years ago

        And if [i<]that's[/i<] too new, it'll even let you restart in MS-DOS mode!

          • Klimax
          • 4 years ago

          MS-DOS 6.22 or nothing!

    • nstuff
    • 4 years ago

    Still have to figure out what to do about Media Center. As has been posted many times, there just isn’t a perfect replacement for it with all features for cable-card encrypted HD channels use with full DVR and Media Guide.

    • Firestarter
    • 4 years ago

    I’m not going to wait much more than a week, it’s not as if I use this PC for anything other than games anyway

    • vargis14
    • 4 years ago

    I am going to be doing a day one install on one of my 2 sandy bridge based i3-2125 3.3ghz Dual core 2c4t based that are both sporting AMD graphics cards. But the Guinea pig will be the better system of the 2 that has a HIS iCooler HD7750 GPU in it.

    My other I2 2125 system with a ASUS LP HD6570 will be the second install.
    Work out kinks I probably found in first install.

    Then once I get both of those systems running like they should I will make the leap with my old girl that just keeps on giving…My 5ghz+ capable i7-2600k rig cradling its 2 SLI’ed 4GB GTX770 Classifieds that has not run below 4.4ghz its whole entire life that has been 24/7 and IMHO “plus I may be a little biased since it is the best CPU I own, but Sandy Bridge was a sorta breakthrough”is the best mainstream CPU released in the last 10 years and I can foresee it living and functioning well for another 4 years if DX12 lowers CPU overhead so much and I never see me running a resolution Higher than the 34″ 3440-1440 LG 34UM95 can push out and my eyes can see. I do foresee a USB3 powered IPS 1080p 15.6” monitor with 10 point multitouch that I know will drop in price by the time I can afford one but I think this is totally awesome as a secondary monitor that you can use when needed and put away when not and having touch screen capability makes it even more desirable “BIGTIME” just being able to control stuff on the screen without having to maneuver your mouse is a slick adea. The plug and play options is awesome considering you can use it with any laptop/PC you own.
    Here is what I am talking about>>>>>>>> [url<]http://www.amazon.com/GeChic-Portable-Touchscreen-Monitor-Inputs/dp/B00DS18ZTG/ref=pd_sxp_redirect[/url<] and they make 1080p IPS in 10.1" and 13.3" also, I think they are bloody fasinating and would love to have one now:) I have to EDIT this since this one does not get it's image from USB3 🙁 but by the time I am ready i am sure there will be a product for me unless some VR headset besides the rift that will allow movie watching along with gaming takes it's place.

    • blitzy
    • 4 years ago

    What are the main benefits of switching to Windows 10? I don’t really need the new start menu, I actually like the full screen Start menu, just not the full screen metro apps. Most times hitting start and typing what I’m looking for is the fastest, so whether it’s full screen or part screen doesn’t matter much.

    The improved Alt+Tab previews sounds like it could be nice, aside from that there isn’t really anything I’ve heard that jumps out as must have it type features.

    Will probably upgrade after a month or two, will see what the general feeling of it is. Really its just a UI update and some changes to the integrated apps like IE.

    <edit> I bet anything that the downvote was from some start menu fanboy lol… sorry to offend your sensitive opinion on menu behaviours bruddah </edit>

    • tstartrekdude
    • 4 years ago

    Been using Windows 10 as my daily driver since last year, will continue to do so.

    • UnfriendlyFire
    • 4 years ago

    Until Intel properly supports Windows 10 (no graphics driver = unable to adjust display brightness), and Acer resolves a BSOD problem with Win 8, 8.1 and 10 that is triggered by hibernation or sleep mode.

    I’m still a bit pissed that Windows tech support told me that they couldn’t help me because their ISO website was down and I needed to reinstall Windows 7, and claimed that my retail key was actually an OEM key.

    • LostCat
    • 4 years ago

    Day one on every machine in my house. And the one I haven’t put back together yet, probably.

    • puppetworx
    • 4 years ago

    I’ll wait 4 to 8 weeks and then do a clean install.

    • Disco
    • 4 years ago

    Both my desktop (Win7) and laptop (Win8.1) have issues with coming out of hibernation, particularly the laptop (it doesn’t). Both are likely the result of the poor job I did cloning over the drives to new SSDs. I’m hoping that the upgrade to Win10 will fix my issues.

    Once I’m satisfied that people are generally happy with Win10, I’ll update the laptop first (probably a clean install) and see how it fares. I can’t afford any downtime on the desktop, so it will be a wait and see kind of approach. I quite like Win7, and with the Classic Shell ‘mod’ I’ve been able to live with win8.1 on the laptop.

    • Aquilino
    • 4 years ago

    Let me answer that with a question: What have Microsoft done to fix the old and ugly cleartype font smoothing?

    I think it’s very important because, you know, I tend to see a lot of letters while using the computer.

    • travbrad
    • 4 years ago

    I’ll wait a bit to see if there are any big disastrous bugs with it. DX12 is the only truly compelling thing about it for me, and there won’t suddenly be a bunch of DX12 games at launch.

    I’m running Windows 7 still though, so I’m probably less eager to dump my current OS than if I was running Windows 8.

    • odizzido
    • 4 years ago

    I am hoping I will be able to dual boot 7+10. If 10 looks good enough I will probably move windows 8 machines to 10 and continue to use 7 for a while on my own desktop.

    I am really hoping they add in a way to remove annoying side swipe stuff in 10….and put wireless network priorities back in……and backtrack on letting third parties completely handle mouse/touchpad support since some third parties are clearly not up to the task.

    • Kougar
    • 4 years ago

    Anything would be an improved user experience over Windows 8, so all the desktops are getting upgraded.

    In an ideal world I would still be using Windows 7 64bit, but too many things require 8 or 10 such as HyperV or DX12 functionality respectively, for me to continue using it. If no issues crop up after a few months then I’ll probably toss it onto the laptop as well. It’ll be nice to have everything in the house using a single OS again.

    • cheesyking
    • 4 years ago

    Personally, meh windows.

    For other’s who ask me I’m suggesting people with 7 stick with it at least until the end of the free upgrade period. For people on 8 I’d upgrade in a flash (OK maybe after a month for the initial bugs to get ironed out).

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 4 years ago

    I went from Ubuntu back to Windows because of WMC. Now that they have killed WMC I have no reason to stay. I’m thinking SteamOS.

      • Disco
      • 4 years ago

      Hold on. I use WMC to access my media files (on my desktop) from my xbox 360 in the next room. If I upgrade to Win10, will I be unable to do so? I’m not actually sure if the WMC on the xbox requires the desktop to run it as well. Anyone know this (or are there other options to access remote media from the xbox 360)?

        • Deanjo
        • 4 years ago

        [url<]http://www.ps3mediaserver.org/about/[/url<]

        • curtisb
        • 4 years ago

        For this purpose, Kodi. Just go Kodi. I put it in an Amazon Fire TV and it works great. I access all of my media from my home file server through UNCs connected in Kodi. You can also install it as an app on Windows/Linux/OS X. FWIW, I also have the SPMC fork of Kodi running on an Ouya…not that you can find one of those for purchase at a reasonable price right now, though.

        [url<]http://www.kodi.tv/[/url<]

        • Disco
        • 4 years ago

        Thanks guys for pointing me at those options. I figured there had to be something. This is why I love the TR community.

        dave

        • DragonDaddyBear
        • 4 years ago

        You are fine until Windows 7is no longer supported ( or Windows 8.1 with Pro). I plan on replacing it before the free update tiner runs out and rolling a dual boot.

        For media center, I will replace with Kodi and a Silicon Dust back end on a NAS. I backed their project on Kickstarter and I have high hopes for the Kodi plugin. [url<]https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1275320038/hdhomerun-dvr-the-dvr-re-imagined[/url<]

    • hasseb64
    • 4 years ago

    New build late this year, maybe it will get a Win10.
    Good to see that more than 40% will find bugs before I install my free copy.

      • sweatshopking
      • 4 years ago

      so far it’s pretty solid. been running it for months on 3 different machines and haven’t BSOD’d once. Bugs exist current build with start menu, and notification center, but as far as core goes, it’s pretty solid.

    • cygnus1
    • 4 years ago

    I plan to upgrade where I can at some point over the summer for all the family machines I support. I’ve been using the preview in VMs and on a spare laptop and it’s been running pretty well so far.

    • reeltrouble
    • 4 years ago

    I’ll upgrade the gaming box on day one but the three HTPC’s are staying 8.1 at least until Silicon Dust gets their DVR software up and running.

    • vadim
    • 4 years ago

    I’ll stay with Win 7 on my office workstation, but will upgrade my Win 8 home pc. I also have three other home PCs running Win XP, Win 98 and DOS. No upgrades for them for sure 😉

      • cygnus1
      • 4 years ago

      The XP machine you could probably load the Insider Preview before the final release and then it’ll get upgraded for free to RTM.

    • funko
    • 4 years ago

    I find trying out new OSes on day one.. fun. I dont have mission critical data/installs on any of my macines these days anymore since i’ve become more cloud reliant in both my professional and personal (and gaming) computing needs. I prefer Windows due to my gaming preferences (Origin player), otherwise I would be platform agnostic. Day 1 – full commitment on all my machines, and I’ll deal with any quirks as they come along and figure it out, just like most of us did for generations of windows. (i started during the dos 5 -> dos 6 days, and now a windows/ios/android enthusiast)

    • just brew it!
    • 4 years ago

    I voted “sticking with 7/8.1” but that does not really tell the whole story.

    I run Windows 7 in a VM, but spend most of my time natively in Linux. I will set up a Windows 10 VM (or physical system) eventually, but don’t plan to do so any time soon. So my plans are really a nebulous blend of the “sticking with 7/8.1”, “waiting for the kinks to be worked out”, and “Meh” options.

    It does look like I will be skipping 8.1 entirely, given that I haven’t installed it yet…

    • nanoflower
    • 4 years ago

    I’ll download it soon after it comes out but I think I’ll wait a bit to install it. I currently have Windows 8.1 Pro installed and there’s no need to upgrade it at this point so why not wait for the kinks (if any) to be worked out. After a month or two I’ll do the upgrade to Win10.

    • Jigar
    • 4 years ago

    Back up will done on 28th July, on 29th July will be giving window 10 a run for atleast 1 week, if i like it will keep it or else will revert back to window 7.

      • SomeOtherGeek
      • 4 years ago

      Yea, Reflect is awesome about that!

    • Chrispy_
    • 4 years ago

    I’ve leave my W7 machine as W7 but I’m treating W10 as a service pack to my Windows 8.1 box.

    It’s a little less de-tabletted from my ongoing test of the technical preview, but it’s barely anything more than a point release and quite frankly I’m disappointed at why Microsoft is taking so long to get some fundamental UI fixes in place that should have been ironed out before Windows 8 released in October 2012.

    • Unknown-Error
    • 4 years ago

    Voted for – [i<]I've reserved my upgrade, and I'll install it on day one[/i<] Currently have dual-boot Win7 & Win8.1. Permanently dumped WinXP at the end of last year. Will keep the Win7 as it is but will upgrade Win8.1 to Win10. On a side note, I don't know why, but all my attempts at multiboot Windows & Linux have ended up in failure. One of the boot options won't work :/

      • Deanjo
      • 4 years ago

      [quote<]On a side note, I don't know why, but all my attempts at multiboot Windows & Linux have ended up in failure. One of the boot options won't work :/[/quote<] Install windows first, then linux (and on a second drive). Doing it the other way around is the difficult way. If you try to install them on the same drive, be prepared for some Windows updates that will not apply (buggy windows updates that refuse to install if it does not see a windows bootloader).

      • Smeghead
      • 4 years ago

      Instead of dual-booting, if you have enough RAM available I’d suggest you look at running a virtual machine instead. Chances are that dual-booting is pointless for most people these days.

      These days, the performance hit from virtualisation is somewhere in the low single-digit percent, which isn’t anything you’re ever going to notice. So long as you’re not trying to do something outrageously heavyweight (CAD or the likes) and you just need Linux for coding or whatever, just fire up a VM of your favourite distribution and have at it.

      Better still, jumping from one OS to another is vastly simplified. Need Linux for a quick spell? Just start the VM; there’s no need to reboot.

      It also makes trying stuff out far easier. I’ve been poking at the windows 10 preview builds from a VM, and I’ll likely be moving from Windows 7 as a result within a couple of months of release. I like the feel of 10 far better than I ever did 8, and it cost me pretty much nothing in terms of config or whatever to try them out. When I was done with the preview, I just deleted the VM.

      Similarly, I’ve been in the habit of trying out different Linux distributions (as various new window managers have arrived) in a VM. I install the OS, play with it for a while, then trash it once I’m done, all without having to touch anything on the host machine.

      VMware player works well under Windows and costs nowt for personal use. Virtualbox is also free, but I’ve had good results from VMware under all three of the major OSes.

      • just brew it!
      • 4 years ago

      Dual-boot has always been a bit dodgy, and seems to have only gotten worse (UEFI and Secure Boot certainly didn’t help matters). If you really want to dual-boot my advice is to use a pair of SSDs in hot swap drive bays, and partially eject the drive containing the OS you’re not using.

      Virtualization is your best bet provided can live with generally reduced performance (and crappy 3D acceleration support in particular) on one of the OSes. Install the OS that needs to have better performance as the native OS, and install the other one(s) virtually, using either VMware Player or VirtualBox (both are free for personal use, with VirtualBox even being fully Open Source if you don’t need USB pass-through support for anything beyond USB 1.1).

        • Mr Bill
        • 4 years ago

        Dual-boot has been gradually poisoned over the years. Partly it has been a matter of MS trying to lock in customer loyalty and partly its a matter of OS security to prevent another OS from mucking up the file system. I gave up dual booting on the same drive after Win2K-Pro. I second the advice to have separate drives you can boot from when needed.

    • nerdrage
    • 4 years ago

    I’ll upgrade according to the following formula:
    MAX(Win10 release, Skylake release, Z107 release) + 2 months

    • Ninjitsu
    • 4 years ago

    So I’m waiting for the following information:

    How will retail copies of Windows 7 be handled? Can I retain that install of Windows 10 even after I’ve switched hardware (motherboard, etc?). If not, I’m not so sure I want to upgrade just yet. Maybe will wait till the very last moment, or maybe not at all. Windows 7 will work fine till 2020.

    Then there’s also the secondary question of whether I want to move on from Windows 7 at all yet – does Windows 10 provide any noticeable advantage over Windows 7? Does it just introduce more bloat that I don’t want? Frankly the only thing that’s worthwhile is DX12…and by the time there are actual games out, I may have to leave home for a while. Is there a point?

    Finally I’ve noticed that Windows 8.x wants to keep syncing things to the cloud, whether you asked for it or not (tried installing Skype on someone’s Surface Pro 2, was utterly confused by what all it wanted to backup and sync). If Windows 10 continues this trend, I may skip it (or at least – skip the free upgrade and retain my Windows 7 license).

      • mcnabney
      • 4 years ago

      There are some cool recovery options with 10. Might run a little leaner. Further breaks compatibility with some older apps/games. WMC is gone. Oh, and getting the world on 10 has all the hackers salivating. Gamers will absolutely need it for DX12.

    • slaimus
    • 4 years ago

    I will upgrade my Windows 8.1 machines since I expect it to be the same as 8.0 to 8.1, where nothing has to change.

    I will hold off on all of my Windows 7 machines since many of them are older/slower and run without desktop composition. It looks like Windows 10 will force that on you like Windows 8, and I don’t want to have to deal with WDDM driver teething issues with older hardware.

    • Meadows
    • 4 years ago

    I’ve reserved my upgrade but I’m not sure if I’ll actually pull the trigger, or at least not right away.

    • albundy
    • 4 years ago

    Thanks, but I’ll stick with Windows 9.

      • alloyD
      • 4 years ago

      …x

        • auxy
        • 4 years ago

        [url<]http://i.imgur.com/qWYp0X0.png[/url<]

          • alloyD
          • 4 years ago

          I’m a firm believer in redundancy – a concept in which I firmly believe.

    • tazpa
    • 4 years ago

    I’m not waiting for the bugs to be solved, I’m waiting to find out what kind of leash this “free” stuff will include.

    • SoM
    • 4 years ago

    from my understanding, after downloading you’ll be prompted if you wish to install, so i’ll download it on day1 but won’t install right away

    • cobalt
    • 4 years ago

    I’m running some things like WMC that means I’m sticking with 7 on my HTPCs, so those have to stay, at least until I either cut the cord entirely or may SiliconDust gets an encrypted cablecard DVR workable in some non-WMC solution. (I don’t love WMC, but it’s at least an integrated solution with good remote control support / high WAF.)

    For the desktop, I could upgrade — I abhored 8 enough that I never even looked into 8.1, but it sounds like 10 might actually be usable as a desktop OS. Still, I tend not to fix things that aren’t broken, and I don’t have much time to think about an upgrade, so maybe I’ll build a new system in the next year and just start fresh with 10 then.

    • slowriot
    • 4 years ago

    I’ll wait. I’m in no rush to upgrade. I’ve reduced all my Windows usage down to gaming at this point and until DirectX 12 titles start showing up I see no point in bothering.

    • tipoo
    • 4 years ago

    I’d like to say that I’ve learned my lesson and will wait for kinks to get worked out, but I’m a sucker for new OS upgrades. Day 1, baby. From what I saw of the preview though, there’s still some work to be done…And it’s only a month away.

    • James296
    • 4 years ago

    I’m trying it out right now and I’ll definitely be upgrading when I go to do my new build.

    • srg86
    • 4 years ago

    I’m still confused about the clean install situation.

      • tipoo
      • 4 years ago

      You can clean install. More specific question?

        • srg86
        • 4 years ago

        From the free upgrade?

          • Zyphos
          • 4 years ago

          Yes. [url=http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2015/06/yes-youll-be-able-to-do-clean-installs-of-the-free-windows-10-upgrade/<]Arstechnica's coverage[/url<], [url=https://twitter.com/GabeAul/status/605900073277325312<] and without a product key.[/url<]

    • End User
    • 4 years ago

    I’ll buy full copies of Windows 10 and install them on new boot SSDs for both my gaming rig and my secondary PC. I’ll keep my current Windows 8.1 boot SSDs as backup boot options.

    • stdRaichu
    • 4 years ago

    Combo option of sticking with windows 7 until I see how 10’s kinks fare.

    Remains to be seen for me how onerous I’m going to find the w10 UI and whether it can still be cajoled into something that doesn’t resemble a start menu filled with flibbulating jolly ranchers. Similarly whether all the folderol like that stupid voice-activated cobblers or the “search everything with bing” can be uninstalled/disabled.

    </mandatory grump about young whippersnappers ruining lawn>

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 4 years ago

    I have an XP VM so i went with XP.

    • snook
    • 4 years ago

    day one for sure.

    • Prestige Worldwide
    • 4 years ago

    Day one on one machine.

    Wait for kinks to be fixed on the other.

    • anotherengineer
    • 4 years ago

    Probably upgrade, but also probably wait until the 1 yr offer is about to run out. If I upgrade vid card or ssd I would rather do it on 7 before upgrading to 10, to avoid possible licensing issues.

    • Crackhead Johny
    • 4 years ago

    I have reserved my upgrade but am waiting and considering Steam OS as it occurs to me that gaming is all use my PC for anyway… well OK and some writing, I assume I can do in Goggle docs.

    • Fieryphoenix
    • 4 years ago

    I am going to wait until the HD Homerun Prime DVR app is released, then I am going to see if it is an acceptable replacement for Windows Media Center as my household DVR. If it is, then I will upgrade.

    • SetzerG
    • 4 years ago

    I’m waiting until Microsoft releases information on the following two questions.

    1.)If I build a new computer a few years down the road, can I use my existing Windows 10 copy, or do I need to shell out for a new one? If I can use the original one, can it be an OEM copy, or do I need the retail one?

    2.)Can I use Windows 10 now and 10 or 20 years from now as well? Will Microsoft switch everyone to subscription and force monthly/yearly payments or upgrades later in the Win10 lifecycle?

      • Grape Flavor
      • 4 years ago

      There’s no subscription.

        • Waco
        • 4 years ago

        There are also no keys…which makes me fear for the day the activation servers aren’t there any more (not that I’d want to use it in 10/20 years but that’s not the point).

          • VincentHanna
          • 4 years ago

          There are keys. Your current key is listed under Settings > Updates and Security > Activation. Windows 10 isn’t free, nor is it meant to be free.

      • sweatshopking
      • 4 years ago

      New computers need new licenses. Luckily, you’re getting this one for free, so if you have to buy one in a few years, you’re still up.

      No subscription, as grape said. I REALLY don’t understand whats confusing about this.

    • jjj
    • 4 years ago

    Depends on next year’s hardware.
    Intel is stuck on 4 cores and AMD seems set on 8 cores only with Zen but that’s too little and i’m not paying 300$ for less than 12-16 cores. Intel can do 4 cores with 8MB L3 without GPU in 60mm2 so smaller than the Exynos 7420 at 78mm2 and i refuse to pay for a huge GPU i got no use for just because Intel doesn’t want to give us more computing power.
    If there is no decent hardware i’m going ARM and that’s that. The ecosystem is not nearly mature enough but i can’t knowingly get ripped off.
    A72 is just 1.15mm2 on 16FF+ so maybe someone makes a many cores server board ( like 32 and a big L3 cache) and i can have fun with that.

    • cataphract
    • 4 years ago

    I only use Windows on a secondary machine that has an analog tuner not supported on Linux. I won’t be upgrading from Windows 7 because I use Windows Media Center.

    • Waco
    • 4 years ago

    I want to upgrade, but the tying of the OS to the hardware seems like a massive mistake. Dead mobo? TIME FOR NEW WINDOWS!

    Upgrading your motherboard? TIME FOR NEW WINDOWS!

    I surely hope it doesn’t play out that way, MS has been reasonably lenient in the past about OEM copies with similar licensing models.

      • Ari Atari
      • 4 years ago

      Ya, there needs to be a difference between replacing a broken part with upgrading, which isn’t a distinction made by just looking for an identical hardware ID. It’d be like “‘Oh no, my car engine bit the dust!’ ‘Well, if you replace it, it’s a different car now.'” and yes, even though the engine is the main thing that makes the car go, the other 95% is still identical and the replacement would look exactly like the original part when it was new. It just seems silly to me.

      However, biased off of previous experience, you should only have to call up to reactivate. It’s something like Microsoft wants the right to force you to buy a new copy, but they also understand that the idea of a “computer” in the DIY sense is hard to pin down, so they just don’t enforce their own rule.

        • Waco
        • 4 years ago

        They should regulate it based on the number of copies currently in use. Tying it down to ANY specific hardware just seems stupid.

    • BillyBuerger
    • 4 years ago

    I guess I’m in the first option but I don’t plan on “reserving” a copy. I already have the preview on my laptop and home desktop. I plan on doing a clean install once the final is available. But I’m not reserving a copy as I want to see what my options are for the upgrade license. Sounds like I might have to re-install Win8 first, sign up for the upgrade, then wipe it and do a clean install on Win10. But who knows. So yes, I’ll be install win10 out of the gate. I’m just waiting to see how I will go about that.

      • snook
      • 4 years ago

      how is the preview working for you? I’ve downloaded it, but not installed yet.

        • BillyBuerger
        • 4 years ago

        Overall very well. I’ve been on it since very early on and have had very little actual problems this whole time. There is still an issue where depending on your options, sometimes the start menu doesn’t work at all. But overall, it feels like what Win7 was to Vista. Vista wasn’t bad for all the crap it got. But it was still kinda half new, half old. I don’t have a problem with Win8 overall but it’s maybe even more half new, half old. For instance, I almost never using the settings app (or any modern apps) and use control panel for any system stuff. But in Win10 they finally moved most of the control panel stuff into the Settings app and made it more control panel like. So yeah, overall it’s mostly just making Windows 8 more usable.

          • snook
          • 4 years ago

          cool, thanks for responding. I think Ill put it on this laptop on my next day off.

        • mattshwink
        • 4 years ago

        I have been using it since the end of January. Got a new laptop, and installed Win 10 preview fresh.

        I do use a CAC (PIV) card to login to work from, and the only browser it seems to work on from Windows 10 is IE11 (Chrome and Firefox have not worked, where they have from Windows 7). Spartan does not work either.

        Only other issue I had to fake out Turbotax (online version) back in March.

        Everything else has been great, no issues at all.

          • w76
          • 4 years ago

          I’ve had the same problem with browsers for some odd reason! I’ve got to disagree with you and BillyBuerger, on a laptop I’ve been using as a file server and win10 testbed, it’s been the discovery of one unstable feature or issue after another. Only recently noticed how lobotomized the networking system in Win10 is, from a GUI perspective. For example, connect to a network that’s private and accidentally call it public and want to change it back? Straight forward in Win7. Have to almost stumble upon it in Win10. And I’ve had to hack the registry to let it log in without prompting for a password.

          Not to mention problems updating, inability to hibernate, some odd firewall issues (which I only resolved by disabling the firewall entirely) and networking file sharing issues. (It’s not just enough to share files, you’ve got to rub all the permissions in all the right places in just the right way)

          I’m thrilled to see 40% of TR will be beta-testers for me after “launch” until it’s finally stable enough to risk on a machine I use to make a living.

    • Kairu43
    • 4 years ago

    I selected the wait option because that’s the closest to my plan for my main pc. My basic windows tablet, living-room pc, and a windows 7 era (budget)laptop will likely get the upgrade very shortly after release. I’ll make sure that some older software still runs and then move my main pc over if I feel comfortable enough. Yes, I downloaded an early version of the Windows 10 preview, no I never got around to experimenting with it. From what I’ve read though, I’m not expecting major issues. I’d be much happier upgrading my machines if I could use one iso instead of downloading the OS repeatedly, so I’m hoping that’s an option. I guess my chosen staggered upgrade path makes me “cautiously optimistic”.

    • JosiahBradley
    • 4 years ago

    I only use Windows for gaming so I guess I’ll install the insider copy on my gaming rig when it comes out. For everything else I use Linux. And yes I’ve used 7/8/8.1/10 already and still stick to my trusty Linux boxen.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 4 years ago

    Both our PCs already run Windows 8.1 and have the upgrade reserved. It’s Windows, for better or worse, and if you’re going to do the PC gaming on high-dollar hardware thing I see little alternative.

    • timon37
    • 4 years ago

    Hurray for GNU/Linux! And maybe Haiku;p

      • Concupiscence
      • 4 years ago

      Oh, you just had to bring up Haiku and make me sad. Damn.

      Anyway, Windows 10 is… inevitable, I guess. I’ll see how it looks and acts 6 months after release and let my [s<]sacrificial lamb[/s<] spare computer run it, then look at putting it elsewhere. It will probably have a lot going for it in the end, but it's so nakedly self-serving on Microsoft's part that I can't get excited about it.

    • KikassAssassin
    • 4 years ago

    I’ll probably be upgrading my desktop (which is currently running 7) immediately, and holding off a bit on my laptop (which is on 8.1) to make sure the kinks get worked out, so I at least have one stable Windows PC if things get FUBAR at launch. I’m doing it in that order because my laptop is a Macbook, and I’ll want to make sure there aren’t any issues with Windows 10 in Bootcamp before I upgrade.

    • Deanjo
    • 4 years ago

    Doubt it, I’m actually thinking of moving my last windows install to a VM stored on the NAS since there really isn’t onr thing that I require anymore that needs windows (I currently only boot up the windows install to do updates once a month and that is about it and with MS removing the options on updating it would be just a PITA).

    • tanker27
    • 4 years ago

    Since I am a MSDN holder I’ll install it soon after release, probablly not day one as I have to budget time for it. It will be a a clean install and not just an upgrade. I really don’t see a reason to wait since I am already a 8.1 user.

    • geekl33tgamer
    • 4 years ago

    I quite like the design changes in 8/8.1 over 7, but as users on this site made abundantly clear on earlier topics about Windows 10, I am apparently wrong.

    So naturally I will be getting 10 as soon as it’s out, and don’t see there being to many issues.

    I’ll now continue to pour over the inevitable posts that will appear saying that XP is all anyone ever needs, or Linux is better any everything anyway. I bet most of the vocal (ahem) majority never used Windows 8 or the tech preview of 10 anyway. The OS is solid once you get off your high ground over the tiles interface.

    Come at me down voters.

    Edit: Spelling 🙁

    • meerkt
    • 4 years ago

    I’ll wait at least a year after release, then see if anything forces me to switch. There’s little I hate more in computing than reinstalling an OS.

    Can the Insider program activation thing, after being installed in a VM, work later on a real computer? I’m looking for a way to “reserve” without installing anything, without fishy call-home/downloader Microsoft services, without using the MS store…

    • kuttan
    • 4 years ago

    Windows? Meh

    • flip-mode
    • 4 years ago

    I’ll do it. I’m quite fond of Windows 8.1. As someone else said, this is basically Windows 8.2.

      • juzz86
      • 4 years ago

      +1

      I put the Preview on a few weeks ago, and it’s a solid improvement – the Start menu works pretty well, to be honest. Only had to reinstall graphics and (third-party) sound drivers, no other issues migrating across from 8.1 Pro. Looking forward to being able to do a clean install!

    • ImSpartacus
    • 4 years ago

    I’ll wait until the last few days of the free upgrade year.

    Hopefully most of the kinks will be worked out after that first year.

    Windows 7 does what I need right now.

      • jessterman21
      • 4 years ago

      this

    • ludi
    • 4 years ago

    Windows 10, a.k.a. Windows 8.2, de-tablet edition.

    Based on the last couple technical previews, it seems like it’s in pretty good shape for desktop use. Given that it’s essentially a large service pack to Windows 8.1, I’m not expecting huge issues.

      • Milo Burke
      • 4 years ago

      Funny, I haven’t seen the request to reserve my upgrade on my work desktop, home desktop, or my laptop. I feel left out…

      I’ll probably upgrade 2-4 weeks after it comes out. I suspect there will be a flurry of bug fixes during that time, and I’ll be mostly good to go afterward.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 4 years ago

        How are your copies of Windows licensed? If I understand it correctly, MSDN and volume licenses won’t see it, assuming you’d still have an MSDN or volume license agreement in place to cover it.

        My wife’s PC was built with the $40 upgrade from Windows 7 (which itself was an OEM version of Win 7 Home; she now has 8.1 Pro because the upgrade was Pro).

        Mine was built with a retail download 8.1 license, and upgraded to Pro because in some weird way, you can “upgrade” 8.1 to 8.1 Pro using my second $40 8.0 Pro upgrade key. You can’t install 8.1 Pro straight away, but the upgrade process takes like 10 minutes.

        Both of these got the reservation icon. My work PC is Windows 7 Pro installed with a volume license. No upgrade icon.

          • Milo Burke
          • 4 years ago

          Work PC is Windows 7 from Dell Outlet, OS installed on a blank SSD.

          Laptop is Windows 8.1 Asus from Best Buy.

          And home desktop was OEM Windows 7, got the upgrade to 8 for $15 from Microsoft, did a fresh install to 8 and then patched to 8.1.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 4 years ago

            Seems like you should be seeing it on all 3 machines. That’s kind of odd.

            • Milo Burke
            • 4 years ago

            Will you be making it to the barbecue, my friend?

            • derFunkenstein
            • 4 years ago

            Probably not this year. I want to go but August is a difficult month to get away. :-/

            • Milo Burke
            • 4 years ago

            What if I ask nicely?

            • derFunkenstein
            • 4 years ago

            I really can’t. I work with school districts and August/September are typically long hours with vacation blackouts and last-minute weekend projects.

            • Noigel
            • 4 years ago

            Are all your machines on a domain? Domain-added PCs supposedly don’t get the icon. This makes me happy because I didn’t want a ton of people at work asking about the new confusing icon or if they should reserve their Win10 copy…

        • Voldenuit
        • 4 years ago

        Me either.

        Using a technet key.

        However, a colleague who has a technet key from the same timeframe as me [i<]did[/i<] see the notice. Weird.

      • ImSpartacus
      • 4 years ago

      In all honesty, Windows 7 was just a giant service pack for Windows Vista, but we conveniently forget that Vista isn’t that bad.

      So maybe all Windows 8 needs is a service pack, eh?

      • Grape Flavor
      • 4 years ago

      Windows 8 was pretty much just Windows 7.1, tablet-ized edition in the first place, so that sounds pretty okay to me.

    • GrimDanfango
    • 4 years ago

    Where’s the other option?:

    – I’m resigned to the eventual grim inevitablity of being forced to switch to an OS that will track my every move, just to get continuing DirectX support, while I’d much rather just carry on clinging to 7 instead.

      • geekl33tgamer
      • 4 years ago

      The log-every-keystroke feedback feature is not in the final release.

        • sweatshopking
        • 4 years ago

        facts don’t matter.

          • geekl33tgamer
          • 4 years ago

          That figures. There was me thinking this site was full of smart people who can actually read a press release.

          • GrimDanfango
          • 4 years ago

          Sure, I don’t know what it’s really like. I only know that no company gives away something entirely for free, unless *you* are the product they’re selling to other companies. I find it highly doubtful that whatever features are or aren’t in Windows 10, that they won’t have found *some* way to commoditize the end-user. How exactly would they make money otherwise?

          Me, I’d much prefer to be a consumer rather than a product.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 4 years ago

            That’s why it’s not entirely free. The next PC you build you need to pay for it. The only way it’s “free” is if you already paid for a license for the PC you’re upgrading. Swap out motherboards and it’ll be time to pony up.

            Generally I agree with the “don’t want to be the product” point of view. I just don’t really think Windows is one of those cases.

            • GrimDanfango
            • 4 years ago

            Well, I certainly hope it turns out to be the case… as unfortunately, I still don’t see that Linux is in a position to seriously challenge it as the primary PC gaming platform just yet.

            Forgive me if I err on the side of cynicism until it’s proven to be the case though 🙂

            • derFunkenstein
            • 4 years ago

            No complaints from me. I understand the point of view that Microsoft has done little to challenge the idea of them being untrustworthy.

            • auxy
            • 4 years ago

            I don’t know why you got downvoted — you might have been misinformed, but as derFunkenstein said I get the point of view, and I think a bit of cynicism in this case is healthy, and I [i<]like[/i<] Microsoft! (*‘∀‘) Linux is great for regular users at this point -- reasonably fast and capable of most basic computing tasks with relative simplicity -- but there is no indication it will ever be ready for prime-time as a gaming OS. The drivers and various related subsystems (X/wayland, Mesa, OpenAL/OSS, etc) are just not in any acceptable state, and nothing indicates that they will be anytime soon. People like to point to individual projects or applications which "run better than Windows!" but ignore that this is on specific hardware and software configurations, often with a significant amount of custom code... (ノー`)

            • derFunkenstein
            • 4 years ago

            I’m looking at the Mac as a barometer of when Linux will be ready to run. The underlying subsystems are mature, perform well, and maintained impeccably by Apple. Core Audio is a better low-latency sound API than anything on Windows. OpenGL support lags quite a bit (on 4.1 with a couple of 4.2 extensions supported according to OpenGL Extension Viewer in Yosemite), but Metal is kind of promising.

            Yet the Mac as a gaming platform is still slower with the same hardware than Windows (probably back to the OpenGL version). And on top of that, the selection still isn’t close when it comes to big-budget studios (which happen to be the ones that want to use all that CPU/GPU power). If gaming is an uphill struggle on the Mac, then on Linux with 1/10 of the desktop share, it looks pretty bleak right now.

            • Ninjitsu
            • 4 years ago

            Except the barrier of entry (financially) to Linux gaming is much, much lower than on Macs, for end users.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 4 years ago

            The barrier is 0 for the people who have already paid for a Mac – that’s the group that I’m looking at. If 10x the number of users can’t get parity with Windows, there’s no way Linux will.

            • Ninjitsu
            • 4 years ago

            Well, yeah, but [i<]potentially[/i<] everyone on Windows can switch to Linux - the technology allows it. On the other hand, I don't think the Mac crowd is one that [i<]identifies[/i<] itself as a gaming crowd - neither is the hardware particularly gaming friendly*. So I'm not sure if it's a good measure of when Linux is ready. If Linux had 10% of the consumer OS market share, people would be paying attention for sure. *Irony here is that common folk associate Apple with "great graphics". EDIT: On Steam, OS X = 3.23%, Linux = 0.88%

            • derFunkenstein
            • 4 years ago

            I don’t think the general PC market “identifies” itself as a gaming crowd, and if that’s true then the Linux market gets an exclamation point tacked onto it. It’s all chicken-and-eggs here. No eggs, no chickens hatch. No big budget multi-million-copy-selling games, no mass exodus.

            • Ikepuska
            • 4 years ago

            Which is why there’s so much rampant speculation that Valve plans to use something like Half-Life 3 to lure people onto SteamOS by doing timed exclusive or somesuch.
            Personally I have no idea if that’s in the cards, but the idea is interesting at least, and they’ve proven the ability to do it with their very efficient ports of the Source engine to Linux platforms.

            • BIF
            • 4 years ago

            Not. gonna. happen.

            Corporations won’t go to Linux. Not for the end-user community they won’t.

            • yuhong
            • 4 years ago

            Yea, the majority of Windows revenue comes from OEMs, not retail. Also notice the enterprise edition will require software assurance to upgrade.

            • paternal_techie
            • 4 years ago

            This! Most people try to compare Google , Microsoft, and Apple when the fact is they’re completely different companies.

            Apple makes their money from 30% margins on all hardware sales and more chunks of money from apps and media sold via their perspective stores. Jobs didn’t even what apps on iOS. He wanted webapps. The push from jail breakers created a billion $ business for them. They give away their software for free because it makes the hardware obsolete every two OS pushes

            Google and Facebook make their money from you. You are the product and your information powers their algorithm and machine learning and they make sales and ad impressions based off this and in return you get more free products to keep the cycle going. Ie Google Now, Gmail, Android, and Google plus.

            Microsoft is in a very difficult position. Most people only buy windows when they buy new computers. Their customers are large slow moving entities that buy volume licensing deals that fuel the billion dollar silos like office and server side products. Their customers are HP, Dell, and the fortune 1000 not you. Balmer tried to sell directly to you and he failed miserably with the surface and windows phone. They have spent over $2 billion and counting and have less market share on mobile than they did before they began.

            Windows 10 is free because Microsoft wants to keep the share that were going to lose other wise. Win10 is win8.2 but they can not call it that and can not sell. Their customers could not sell it. The only reason that windows 8.1 market share increased is because of XP EOL in 2014.

            So if you can not sell it what else can do but give it away free try to copy your competitors. The good the bad and the ugly.

            • geekl33tgamer
            • 4 years ago

            Unbelievable. Immediate negativity based on a false ideology of Microsoft’s motives for the upgrade. I give up.

            • slowriot
            • 4 years ago

            What? You give up? Were you on some type of mission? Reactions like your’s come from an emotional place. See what derFunk and auxy said? Those are reasonable posts. They educate under the assumption GrimDanfango didn’t have all the information. They don’t make assumptions that everyone reads as much on Windows 10 as you do, or take SSK’s worthless reply and run with it. Stop being so dang emotionally attached to something you have no responsibility.

            • geekl33tgamer
            • 4 years ago

            Emotionally attached – What the f***?

            • derFunkenstein
            • 4 years ago

            [quote<]Emotionally attached - What the f***?[/quote<] I think this is an actual real-world example of irony. Not in an Alanis Morissette kind of way, either.

            • geekl33tgamer
            • 4 years ago

            That was the intention.

            • GrimDanfango
            • 4 years ago

            What was the intention?

            • GrimDanfango
            • 4 years ago

            I freely admit to not having all the information too. I’m very much taking this at face value… it’s just that at face value, it screams “come and be exploited for our continued financial stability!” to me.
            I am therefore most wary of jumping in blindly and celebrating Microsoft’s incredible generosity.

            • sweatshopking
            • 4 years ago

            What’s worthless about my post? If this was the first time this had been discussed TO DEATH ON THIS VERY SITE you might have a point. It isn’t. It’s been discussed dozens of times and people have REPEATEDLY insisted on continuing on with this fud about subscriptions and tracking. Maybe not grim, but others certainly have. I’ve explained it 10 times on 10 different pages, yet people insist on these ridiculous positions.

            Could I have been nicer? Sure. I wasn’t really addressing grim, more the fud that’s insisting on persisting.

            • BIF
            • 4 years ago

            I still think subscriptions are coming… 🙂

            • TheFinalNode
            • 4 years ago

            At this point, it’s hard to apply the “innocent until proven guilty” concept to these companies. If we can’t see the source code running on our computers, we have no way of verifying the integrity of the software.

            • Klimax
            • 4 years ago

            And how many packages of OSS have you personally audited so far? And what are your credentials and what is your knowledge from programming? Are you security expert? What programming language you know? C? C++ and which version? 03? 11? And how many auditors do you trust and why?

            Also somebody forgot small fun like Canonical/Amazon…

            • BIF
            • 4 years ago

            I don’t trust ANY auditors. -3 for that!

            • _ppi
            • 4 years ago

            If vast majority people switch over to Win10, M$ will win without selling a single bit of user data. I can come up with three simple reasons:

            a) M$will be able to pull the support plug on Win7+8 sooner and thus save on employees and/or have them work on something new and actually generating new profits

            b) Developers will like Windows more, because it would be single unfragmented platform (or much less fragmented – see Android vs iOS). That means more and better apps for Windows, that would cement its position on desktop/notebook and (for M$) hopefully strenghten tablet/phone.

            c) Having people install apps from M$ store means less clueless people installing stuff with trojans = less bad press = more $$$

            d) Current devices will last only so long, and we will have to buy new license (in a new product) anyway.

            Edit: Personally, I plan to wait couple months so that the worst bugs are ironed out and then swap from Win7 by x-mass time.

            • sweatshopking
            • 4 years ago

            Yes.

            • Klimax
            • 4 years ago

            a) is wrong. Would require MS to renege on published support terms. Definitely not happening. Even if W10 had 99% adoption.

            d) more or less case already anyway. See OEM license…

            ===

            BTW: You have problem with keyboard. It keeps replacing MS with some kind of nonsense.

            • Zizy
            • 4 years ago

            A is wrong for another reason – there is no upgrade to W10 for enterprise. Therefore the ones that matter for most of these fixes and support will not be upgraded.
            His speculation isn’t completely wrong. Sure, MS will have to support Windows till the expected date, fix any critical bugs and so on. But support teams could be much smaller if not many people used the product, while less critical bug fixes aren’t needed.

            • BIF
            • 4 years ago

            A) is wrong, but not THAT wrong! In fact, it may be more RIGHT than wrong!

            Here’s why: By moving a greater percentage of the user community off of 7 and 8/8.1 SOONER, Microsoft can consider rebalancing their teams more and sooner to give even greater weight to “new stuff” than they may have been able to do with prior versions of Windows.

            No, they can’t remove support for old versions sooner than published commitments, but this strategy could offer greater flexibility when making workforce plans.

            That’s big.

          • Grape Flavor
          • 4 years ago

          “facts don’t matter”

          Yeah, really. I don’t know what’s the point of even trying to engage with some of these people. You can tell them something that is 100% confirmed fact about Windows 10 and they just jam their fingers in their ears and go “NUH UH NUH UH WINDOWS 10 IS THE DEVIL I JUST KNOW IT” and downvote you for your troubles.

          The sad fact is that on many subjects people simply believe what they want to believe and they’re not going to let pesky reality get in the way of that mission. Vaxxers, Creationists, etc, etc. It doesn’t matter if it’s completely verifiably bogus, they cling to it like their hands were dipped in superglue. It’s maddening.

          This post is going to make people mad, isn’t it?

        • VincentHanna
        • 4 years ago

        Even if it only has the same privacy options as 8 and 8.1, which we also know is not true, it would still be 10 times more invasive than 7.

      • ronch
      • 4 years ago

      Android does the same for us. Google watches everything I do and logs every key I press. Welcome to the Google Age.

        • rxc6
        • 4 years ago

        I would say that I trust MS way more than Google. MS is still charging for the product. With Google you are the product. MS doesn’t need a key logger in the final version, while Google makes money off knowing everything about you.

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