Samsung will patch its software to restore Windows Update settings

Owners of Samsung PCs who use the company's own software update utility will soon be able to breathe easier. After the revelation that Samsung's software deliberately disabled Windows Update for reasons we still can't quite fathom, the company told VentureBeat that it'll be patching its software to restore recommended Windows Update settings (which is to say, on and automatic) to affected machines.

Based on Samsung's statements to VB, the patch will arrive "within a few days" through the same SW Update utility. After the initial story broke, Samsung claimed that it was disabling Windows Update to "[provide] users with the option to choose if and when they want to update the Windows software on their products." Whatever the misguided reasoning behind this choice, it's good to see Samsung set things right.

Comments closed
    • KarateBob
    • 7 years ago

    the installer doesnt install properly for many people
    also, there’s no firmware fix for non-sata non-evo840 flavors of the 840evo (msata/m.2, oem versions, etc)

    • watzupken
    • 7 years ago

    Good thing for me, I swapped out the original drive with an SSD and reinstalled the entire OS from scratch.
    Fixing this current issue is a given and they should act fast. For me, I think the more important question is, what other dodgy Samsung software are out there right now and when are they gonna come clean and fix them? There are quite a lot of Samsung products and user base, and I am sure this will not be the last.

    • HERETIC
    • 7 years ago

    KB3068708-KB2952664-KB3035583-KB3004375-KB3031432.
    Check services and see if you have “DIAGNOSTICS TRACKING” running

    • Duck
    • 7 years ago

    It’s not 2002 any more, no need for M$.

    • Duck
    • 7 years ago

    There is a fairly well known problem with their TVs breaking. I think it’s the power supply that goes. It’s probably been longer than I think since it was reported, but I wouldn’t buy Samsung without good reason now.

    • Meadows
    • 7 years ago

    I never said it’s acceptable.

    • Kretschmer
    • 7 years ago

    Can you give us any examples of the above?

    P.S. You forgot to spell Microsoft as “M$”.

    • watzupken
    • 7 years ago

    I feel this is a lazy and irresponsible way to handle the problem. Getting rid of a problem this way on the sly, opens the system up for cyber attacks. So you solve a problem, but cause many more.

    • HERETIC
    • 7 years ago

    Now if they could tune it to only block Microsoft’s Spyware
    and Adware they’d be doing something to benefit mankind……………………………

    • adisor19
    • 7 years ago

    That’s weasel speak that reminded me when the NSA tried to say that they didn’t bug Dual_EC_DRBG.

    • ronch
    • 7 years ago

    Had a [url=http://www.gsmarena.com/samsung_c3510_genoa-pictures-3068.php<]Samsung C3510[/url<]. Dunno if this was the phone you're talking about. Same issue.

    • ronch
    • 7 years ago

    You can patch software, but it’s hard to patch things up with folks whose trust you’ve broken.

    • Welch
    • 7 years ago

    Based on regression toward the mean… Samsung is headed for its greatest days yet!

    • morphine
    • 7 years ago

    I remember that one. Samsung SGH-E780, which was an [i<]awesome[/i<] phone, except for that stupid bug. But at least it was predictable, I knew exactly which couple of contacts would lead to which mistakes.

    • ludi
    • 7 years ago

    The problem with Samsung is that they do have a few good products mixed in with the rest, but once they get a hit, they can’t resist the urge to tinker.

    For example, the Samsung 830. Great product. Then they released the 840 and 850, and instead of leaving well enough alone and building them as incremental improvements to the 830, they decided to diversify and tinker. Ergo, both product lines are buggy.

    • UnfriendlyFire
    • 7 years ago

    Do you really expect an average consumer to manually check the update settings? Especially MULTIPLE times to override Samsung’s “Disable update feature at boot” bulls***?

    • just brew it!
    • 7 years ago

    Yup, as noted in my comment on the original story about the Windows Update issue, Samsung has probably earned themselves a lifetime ban from me. I was pretty annoyed about the 840 EVO thing, but was still willing to give them another chance. But the bad news just keeps on coming, and it is becoming clear to me that they don’t give a crap about quality.

    • NovusBogus
    • 7 years ago

    Egads, it would appear my beer-compass failed me last night. 😉

    • just brew it!
    • 7 years ago

    True story: Several years back (in the waning years of “feature phones” before smartphones completely took over), Samsung released a cell phone with some very interesting firmware issues. They sold a ton of ’em, based on the fact that I, and multiple other people my wife or I know, owned one (and experienced the same bugs). The most interesting one was what I call the “contact list randomizer” feature — about one time out of five, when calling someone from your contact list, it would randomly dial someone ELSE from your contact list. You eventually learned to watch the name/number that flashed up on the screen while connecting the call, with your finger poised over the End Call button.

    They never fixed that bug. How does something like that make it through testing, let alone go unpatched for years?

    So they can’t even do a simple feature phone UI without screwing it up.

    • watzupken
    • 7 years ago

    That is so true. I usually don’t avoid a certain brand until proven otherwise that they are not credible. Samsung apparently earned this boycott from me. I don’t like to jump to conclusion, but using this incident as an example, Samsung needs to be caught red handed before they grudgingly do something about it. This is very poor support from a consumer standpoint. I observed the same kind of behavior from them with the SSD performance issue and phone benchmark cheating. So no matter how fanciful their hardware are, I am not gonna purchase it. If Samsung is reading this, I think they need to go back to rethink their approach. Particularly when they are pushing for “Smart homes” where poor software and security may mean its gonna be really messed up for consumers.

    • Meadows
    • 7 years ago

    All of them, if you keep on going long enough.

    • NTMBK
    • 7 years ago

    Atlantis

    • nico1982
    • 7 years ago

    Come on, Korea is also east of Japan. It is just that is closer going west 😛

    • jihadjoe
    • 7 years ago

    California!

    • sweatshopking
    • 7 years ago

    Asian companies east of Japan?!?!??! Like which countries would that be?!?!

    • AJSB
    • 7 years ago

    Oooh goodie…now that Samsung is a “generous” mood, can we request that it makes and turns available to download a patch for the flaky firmware of the M9T HDD that people use as primary drive for OS so it stop that annoying and unfrequent chirping and/or beeping noises ?
    TIA,
    AJSB

    • mFvwv0zduc
    • 7 years ago

    That’s shocking. For one I know I will never buy Samsung SSD drive. I bought it once for my friend (Samsung Evo 250GB), and I had to visit him twice already to patch firmware and restore performance, after his complaining about Windows slowing down.
    I am still using OCZ-VERTEX3 112GB as my system drive and it’s just working fine. It’s been serving me well for last 3 years or so.

    • Meadows
    • 7 years ago

    Did they prevent users from running Windows Update manually? If you could run it manually, then [i<]technically[/i<] they didn't "block" updates.

    • UnfriendlyFire
    • 7 years ago

    I got Acer to mail me a replacement laptop (using overnight mailing) after my previous one needed to be repaired for the third time.

    By emailing the state’s attorney general office.

    Two weeks later, their lvl2 tech support sounded nervous when they called me asking about my problem.

    • NovusBogus
    • 7 years ago

    That’s typical of Asian companies–good at getting a product on shelves, not so good after that. Most consumers don’t care about support though, only price and features.

    Everything that has and will happen with smartphones follows what happened with televisions.

    edit: To clarify, I’m referring to those east of Japan. Japanese corporations actually do understand support, but they fail marketing forever and aren’t great on the price-war front either.

    • trackerben
    • 7 years ago

    Some of their less complex media appliances are quite good. Samsung’s people are trying to be a world-class quality brand. But they simply aren’t organized to integrate ecosystem products at levels on par with the real tech champions. To be fair, few firms are. But Samsung had the conceit that they could publicly spar with the likes of Apple and Microsoft and not risk their reputation.

    • K-L-Waster
    • 7 years ago

    Frankly, I’ve stopped waiting – bought a Crucial M500 on sale last weekend (yeah, it’s old, but $200 CDN off made it a steal overall) and have switched over completely.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 7 years ago

    Not exactly. The fix for the fix just refreshes the older data from time to time. That seems to imply that the NAND itself is faulty in ways they can’t really fix. They’re stuck re-writing it from time to time.

    • TopHatKiller
    • 7 years ago

    They don’t have to Mr.Beer! You mark my words: – it’s all a conspiracy, Samsung are planning to buy MS… just as Qualcomm and fifty others are planning to by AMD… soon, Intel and Nv will be on the evil conglomerates list of purchases … and in another day or so..
    There will be One!

    [Fortunately, I am the One – I’m behind it all. Yep, I’ll own everything.
    That at least is a more likely explanation]
    Cheers!

    • aceuk
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]I'm still waiting for a fixed firmware installer for the 840 Evo[/quote<] I thought the 840 EVO had been fixed? Samsung Magician 4.6 and the EXT0DB6Q firmware were released back in April.

    • watzupken
    • 7 years ago

    I feel Samsung has been increasingly getting a lot of negative publicity over these past few years. This incident just reinforced the fact that Samsung’s after sales software support is just poor.

    • KarateBob
    • 7 years ago

    Have they patched their SwiftKey backdoor exploit yet?

    • KarateBob
    • 7 years ago

    All 40,000-50,000 of them? [url<]http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2014/09/samsung-has-more-employees-than-google-apple-and-microsoft-combined/[/url<] Koreas economy would be hit hard.

    • KarateBob
    • 7 years ago

    I’m still waiting for a fixed firmware installer for the 840 Evo, or any sort of firmware update for the 840.

    Samsung has no integrity.

    • mkk
    • 7 years ago

    I’m sure they’ve had a lot of customers complain about Windows Update over tthe last year so I’m not surprised to see at least one company try to manage it somehow.

    • UnfriendlyFire
    • 7 years ago

    [url<]http://www.businessinsider.com/samsung-laptops-block-microsoft-windows-software-updates-2015-6?op=1[/url<] Funny, Samsung denied that they blocked Windows updates, according to a spokesperson who told Business Insider: "It is not true that we are blocking a Windows 8.1 operating system update on our computers. As part of our commitment to consumer satisfaction, we are providing our users with the option to choose if and when they want to update the Windows software on their products. We take product security very seriously and we encourage any Samsung customer with product questions or concerns to contact us directly at 0330 726 7864." Considering the fact that Samsung was denying any wrongdoing beforehand, I don't think they should be trusted. At least for their software/firmware side.

    • just brew it!
    • 7 years ago

    Seems to me a more important question would be: When and how do they plan to patch their firmware/software development teams?

    • jihadjoe
    • 7 years ago

    They should’ve been banned from writing software the moment they came out with TouchWiz.

    • K-L-Waster
    • 7 years ago

    Between this and the never ending series of issues with their SSDs and the way they’ve gamed phone benchmarks, I think Samsung really needs to go back to doing basic electronics and leave anything involving computers and software to companies that have responsible adults in charge.

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