Microsoft plans phased rollout for Windows 10 upgraders

Windows 10 won't be coming to everybody who wants it on July 29, as Microsoft's official launch date might imply. Instead, the company will be conducting a more gradual rollout. A new post on the Windows blog by VP Terry Myerson details the exact schedule for the release that would-be upgraders can expect, and the reality is more nuanced than a monolithic launch date might lead one to believe.

As it turns out, the new OS will first be deployed to members of the Windows Insider Program—those who have been testing Win10 in its prerelease form. Microsoft will then use feedback gathered from this first wave to "listen, learn and update the experience for all Windows 10 users." Regular folk who have reserved the operating system will then be notified in gradually increasing numbers from there on out.

The Windows reservation widget that so many of us have probably noticed in our system trays of late isn't just for putting one's name on the list, either. It appears that Microsoft will be gathering information about the quality of upgraders' experiences and conducting readiness checks on PCs still in line for the upgrade in order to ensure a smooth experience.

Users might be warned about incompatible apps or devices before the upgrade, but it appears that those with incompatibilities will still be able to install Windows 10, for the most part—they'll just be helped to find "alternative compatible solutions in the Windows Store after [they] upgrade."

Comments closed
    • TheMonkeyKing
    • 4 years ago

    To heck with that…I want my Exploding Kittens noaw! Warrrooow!

    • Firestarter
    • 4 years ago

    I’m going to throw caution into the wind and upgrade as soon as they let me. The worst they can do is mess everything up after which I’ll do a clean install anyway

    • MrDweezil
    • 4 years ago

    This is the first sane Windows 10 release announcement in a while. I know they want this to be a big deal, but rolling out an OS sounds like it would be stressful enough without adding to it by making it a “launch event” where everyone’s existing machines attempt to download and update on day 1. For a while there it really seemed like they were trying to have this blow up in their faces as spectacularly as possible.

    • Ryhadar
    • 4 years ago

    I’m looking forward to 10. I’ve got a mix of Windows 7 and windows 8.1 machines at home and lately it’s just been annoying having to manage both OSes. Windows 7 has been a great OS in the ~7 years I’ve been running it so I’m sad to see it go but it’s for the better (lest we have another XP on our hands).

      • wierdo
      • 4 years ago

      I’m wary about losing the ability to transfer my license from one PC to another, under win 8 I just re-image the drive and re-apply my key, but with Win 10 as a service I’m stuck with that license on one PC, building a brand new one means I have to go and get a second license for it now.

      Otherwise I’d be interested in jumping on the Win 10 bandwagon. I might have to eventually because of DX12, we’ll see.

        • tanker27
        • 4 years ago

        I don’t think you have to worry. ‘IF’ you buy a full blown copy just like any WIN release you can transfer that to a new PC or upgraded one. In the very least you may have to call MS if you get the activation code or do it online. Not that big of a hassle.

        Now the ‘free’ upgrade well that’s a different story, yeah, you may be locked into the PC you downloaded it on.

        As time moves forward I am sure there will be ways around it like there have been in the past.

          • Ninjitsu
          • 4 years ago

          I think anyone should call MS and talk to them [i<]before[/i<] upgrading, to be frank. Or just watch the internet go up in flames if people realise they can't transfer anymore.

            • VincentHanna
            • 4 years ago

            * lemme modify that.

            You should talk to MSFT before [i<] reserving a copy [/i<] of 10, because once you are on the list, you will be basically forced to upgrade, whether you wish to upgrade or not, once the new OS is downloaded and waiting (you can put it off indefinitely, but it'll require constant vigilance, and will be annoying as hell).

          • VincentHanna
          • 4 years ago

          I think he is wise to worry, and wait for either A) official word from the MSFT Gods or B) the opportunity to do his own testing with the final OS.

          So far, everything seems pretty same ol’ same ol’ to me as well, SaaS is, imo, just shareholder pandering at this point, but its silly to assume anything… especially considering all the cow-pies they’ve flung at us poor users in the past 2-3 years. Then to add to the list of things I am personally worried about, I don’t want to “convert” any of my keys from 7 to 10, so I’m wary of signing up for the official release until that is clarified as well.

          That said, I may simply hang out inside the insider program. Being able to whine about MSFT breaking stuff and pulling features I like has a certain level of appeal to me, as does testing out new beta features and influencing their designs.

    • tanker27
    • 4 years ago

    Curious the blog didn’t mention MSDN license holders. I wonder if they are counted as ‘Windows Insiders’. They’ve never delayed a release of any SW to MSDN before but there is always a first time for everything.

      • sweatshopking
      • 4 years ago

      i assume we’ll get iso’s asap.

    • Shouefref
    • 4 years ago

    I don’t want W10 to replace my W7. It’s my experience that OS upgrades can slow down your pc. W95 to W98 went well, but there’s a reason why some people call W98 W95.2.

    I guess I’ll have to take a look in the configuration to avoid my pc to upgrade automatically.

      • ET3D
      • 4 years ago

      I think you’re confusing that with Windows 95 OSR 2, which was an OEM-only release between 95 and 98 and introduced FAT32.

      Anyway, I’m not sure what that has to do with the current upgrade.

      • tanker27
      • 4 years ago

      Who “upgrades” anyways. That’s just asking for trouble. You should always do a clean install of any new OS. I don’t care what anyone says, doing an in-place upgrade is asking for trouble down the road.

        • auxy
        • 4 years ago

        +3!

        It works fine in the FOSS world, but doing an in-place upgrade of Windows is just a bad idea. I’ve rarely done it myself, but I’ve seen it done dozens of times and it usually doesn’t end well.

          • Noigel
          • 4 years ago

          Completely agree. Do you think there will be a method to clean install from this reservation?

          Also I’m not happy with Microsoft choosing when they will upgrade me either… choices like this start to be taken away when the product becomes “free.” Oh, it’s free we’ll roll you out sometime in Q3 of 2016…

            • nanoflower
            • 4 years ago

            You do realize that’s not what they are planning on doing. Instead it’s likely they are looking for two things. The first being do the Windows Insiders run into any show stoppers as they upgrade. Those they can fix before their regular customers are upgraded. The second thing is that they can also limit the load on their servers by limiting the number of people downloading the OS at any given time. Most of us have seen just what happens with Steam when one of their big sales starts and I can only imagine it will be much worse for Microsoft if they allowed everyone to download the OS at once. By delaying upgrades they can balance the # of people downloading to what bandwidth/servers they have available.

            • VincentHanna
            • 4 years ago

            [quote<]The second thing is that they can also limit the load on their servers by limiting the number of people downloading the OS at any given time[/quote<] MSFT has also rolled out p2p software updates... so in addition to staggering the release as you suggest, MSFT has also created the worlds largest (legal?) bot-net ever attempted for the purposes of distributing updates faster. Meaning in addition to [s<]guinea-pigging[/s<] pioneering the update process itself, they will also be facilitating it for subsequent users. As of the current preview release, you may choose to opt out of the p2p system. Depending on the settings, some Aussie users (and anyone else on a data-cap) could potentially become quite grumpy with MSFT if they aren't watching their data next month.

            • VincentHanna
            • 4 years ago

            From the reservation? No. You’ll need the installer on a key drive to do a clean install, however, I do think you will be able to create a key-drive (even for non-enterprise folks) and clean install, using an “upgrade” key, unlike some previous versions… but you’ll have to download it from the website.

            Also, I’m pretty sure that anyone who wants to upgrade will be able to before ~September… but if you want to upgrade sooner, just join the insider program.

        • ludi
        • 4 years ago

        Really? Because I have HTPC which says otherwise. It was originally built around a Skt939 Opteron and Win7 Home 64-bit. At some point I used Clonezilla Live to transfer Windows from an HDD to an SSD.

        My first in-place upgrade was from Win7 Home to Win8 Pro, which went fine. When 8.1 came along, it would not install due to a missing feature in the Opteron, so I scrapped out the AMD barebones and ATi video, then moved the hard drive and all other peripherals into a Dell Optiplex 780 (all-Intel hardware with a Core2 Q9450). After Windows reconfigured I still had to reinstall the driver for the WiFi card. After that it was normal again and I upgraded to Win 8.1. Still running fine today, although it helps that this is a ‘stable’ system, I don’t add or remove a lot of software from it.

        In-place upgrades in the post-Vista world are a world different from the bad old days, although obviously the biggest hurdle one could encounter would be trying to jump a hard drive across the AHCI threshold.

        • BIF
        • 4 years ago

        I did an upgrade in place on my laptop, which is an audio workstation. First from 7 to 8, then from 8 to 8.1. No problems. I think Microsoft has finally fixed that.

      • rika13
      • 4 years ago

      I would expect W10 to be faster, considering they are making it for cell phones, which have much less power, and DX12.

      • fhohj
      • 4 years ago

      This hasn’t really been true since Vista. Vista was a step up, and now they’re all based on the rewrite for Vista. 7 – 8 was a more efficient release. I don’t know if 10 will be heavier than 8 but I can’t see it being too big because of the already mentioned mobile aspect.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 4 years ago

        Vista was worse, but more because it was put on PCs that it shouldn’t have been. 7 and especially 8 are more efficient resource-wise.

      • auxy
      • 4 years ago

      The funny part about what you said is that Windows 10 is really just Windows 8.2. (*‘∀‘)

        • f0d
        • 4 years ago

        whats wrong with that?
        seems like they worked on the only thing that was wrong with windows 8 – the UI

        windows 7 is just vista.1 – W7 still a great OS even though its pretty much just the same as vista

          • auxy
          • 4 years ago

          Nothing wrong with it. Just read OP’s post with what I said in mind. (*´ω`*)

            • f0d
            • 4 years ago

            maybe he has a really old pc that can barely run windows 7?

            i havnt really checked the requirements – are they the same?

            • sweatshopking
            • 4 years ago

            they’re reduced.

            • f0d
            • 4 years ago

            wow really? thats pretty awesome
            in which way may i ask? here are the min requirements for w7

            1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor
            1 gigabyte (GB) RAM (32-bit) or 2 GB RAM (64-bit)
            16 GB available hard disk space (32-bit) or 20 GB (64-bit)
            DirectX 9 graphics device with WDDM 1.0 or higher driver

            w10 still runs on 1ghz processor and 1gb of ram?

            • way2strong
            • 4 years ago

            Not sure about the final, but [url=http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/preview-faq-system-requirements-pc<]posted minimum specs[/url<] for the preview are the same as the windows 7 specs you posted with one added: A Microsoft account and Internet access

          • Ninjitsu
          • 4 years ago

          The UI can make or break a consumer OS – or any consumer facing software for that matter. Windows 8.x spends too much time trying to be a giant app rather than an OS running the show quietly in the background.

            • f0d
            • 4 years ago

            i totally agree that the UI in windows 8 was horrible

            thats why i mentioned the thing they worked the most on was the UI – which was the major problem with w8

      • cphite
      • 4 years ago

      That might be a valid point going from W7 to W10 – hard to really say without seeing it done by a few people. But I wouldn’t worry (much) about going from W8/8.1 to W10. The upgrade from W8 to W8.1 went very smoothly for most folks, and W10 is really just W8.2

      That being said, I would hope people know to take good backups and/or an image before any OS upgrade.

      • VincentHanna
      • 4 years ago

      Windows 10 will not slow down your computer if you are running 7. You may or may not enjoy the window dressing, but the engine is much, much improved.

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