Gartner, IDC find that PC shipments continue to decline

According to new research from both Gartner and IDC, worldwide PC shipments continued their decline in Q2 2015. The firms differ on the degree of the shrinkage. Gartner estimates that worldwide PC shipments fell 9.5%, while IDC's results show an 11.8% decline when compared to the same quarter a year ago. Both firms noted that PC shipments were down slightly more than expected, and they both expect continued declines for the rest of this year, with slow, steady growth set to resume in 2016 and beyond.

The firms do generally agree on the largest players in the PC market. Both show Lenovo on top worldwide with around 20% of the market, followed by HP and Dell. The big three companies account for approximately 55% of the market. All three of the biggest players' worldwide shipments declined when compared to this quarter last year.

PC shipments declined in the United States, as well, though the dip wasn't as dramatic. IDC believes that the US market shrank by 3.3% year-over-year, while Gartner pegs the decline at 5.8%. The two firms show that in the US, HP and Dell hold the top two spots, respectively, with Apple and Lenovo wrestling over third place.

Apple's results are a standout compared to the rest of the market. IDC found that the company's shipments grew 16% worldwide compared to this time last year, along with an 11.8% increase in US shipments.

Ben Funk

Sega nerd and guitar lover

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 5 years ago

    And just when AMD has decided to get back into the high end.

    Then again, Zen will probably earn money for AMD in the server market. AMD has always known this, which is why Bulldozer was meant to provide high core count and high scalability. It’s efficiency that really killed it. Better make sure it doesn’t happen again, Lisa.

    • trackerben
    • 5 years ago

    PC shipments are declining but usage levels likely remains much the same. This may point more to longer replacement cycles and not necessarily less PCs in use.

      • ronch
      • 5 years ago

      The installed base of PCs will likely remain pretty much the same because you really can’t do much without a proper PC, which will still be the center of one’s digital life (like, how would you copy movies to your tablet without a PC?), but people now have an alternative device to use. For instance, I seldom use my desktop anymore, not when I have a tablet to use to surf the internet while lying in bed after a long day.

        • trackerben
        • 5 years ago

        Same here, although I still keep PCs at home for occasional gaming and documents. PCs aren’t going away soon unless Apple starts packaging hybrids.

    • strangerguy
    • 5 years ago

    Besides the “good enough” effect, Intel and MS themselves are the main culprits to the decline. The both has always got the lion’s share of profits from the sale of an average PC, leaving scraps on the table for the OEMs where they have to sacrifice quality like lousy TNs, lousy keyboards etc which directly affects the end user experience despite whatever Intel chip that lies inside, and this eventually creates a vicious cycle where consumers don’t want to pay more for quality PCs because they don’t expect any to begin with.

    • Stochastic
    • 5 years ago

    Meanwhile, the Steam user base continues to grow with 125+ million active users.

    • TwoEars
    • 5 years ago

    The PC market is growing.

    PC’s just last longer between each upgrade.

    It’s a good thing.

      • Thresher
      • 5 years ago

      Especially when the key driver has always been performance. A two year old computer works just fine with about anything except the latest games.

      Intel hasn’t really done much on the processor front to make spending the cash on a new PC worthwhile and everyone seems to be waiting out Windows 8 to get to Windows 10.

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 5 years ago

        If you had a midrange or better system 2 years ago, it should still be running any game at 1080p with all the bells and whistles just fine.

        Now if you want 4k that’s another story.

    • wimpishsundew
    • 5 years ago

    My 3570K and Radeon 7850 lives on for another generation. There’s not much reason to upgrade. The one new PC game I was going to buy was Batman and I’m glad I decided not to pre-order. Playing games on my PS4/XB1 has been a safer bet for AAA titles so far.

      • Stochastic
      • 5 years ago

      I have the exact same setup. The 3570K I expect to last several more years, possibly the entirety of this console generation. The 7850 is starting to get a little long in the tooth though even with a ~20% overclock. 2GB of VRAM just isn’t that much anymore. I’m holding off until 16nm FinFET GPUs arrive before I upgrade.

        • wimpishsundew
        • 5 years ago

        The only video card I might buy this year is the Fury Nano and shrink my mid tower to Carbide 240 and add another 8GB of RAM. That’s assuming that the Fury Nano is reasonably priced.

        Else, I would wait until Finfet GPUs are available too. Then my PC can be near silent.

    • Jigar
    • 5 years ago

    Ubisoft isn’t happy with this news – [url<]http://wccftech.com/pc-successful-platform-ubisoft/[/url<]

      • wierdo
      • 5 years ago

      It just means the PCs aren’t getting obsolete as fast these days, I doubt that affects Ubisoft, Steam’s userbase is again seeing growth this year, so obviously the slowing upgrade cycle is just an indication of market saturation.

      In the past you could double your performance every few years with a CPU upgrade, but now a CPU from 5 years ago is almost as fast as one you get today.

        • Khali
        • 5 years ago

        Exactly this.^^^^

        Why upgrade when your current system is, or almost is, as fast as the new tech? I used to keep a PC for 6 to 8 years back in the 90’s and into the early 2000’s. By the time those years would go by it was obsolete and just wouldn’t do the job. Now I can see my current system going strong for 10 years at the current rate of new tech. Maybe toss in a new GPU every 5 to 6 years to keep up with that segment of the new tech.

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 5 years ago

        In fact, Ubisoft is probably very happy that PC is becoming a more stable platform with a target performance they can shoot for.

    • albundy
    • 5 years ago

    there really hasn’t been much reason to upgrade to a newer pc for years now. its not that new tech isn’t being released incrementally, its that those increments and far and wide. also, new tech releases haven’t had much impact on providing substantial reasons to upgrade. if people feel that there are no major performance gains, then they might hold out a bit longer.

      • odizzido
      • 5 years ago

      My CPU is six years old now. This is easily the longest I’ve stayed with the same CPU.

      I do plan(hope) to upgrade when skylake hits. Course if it’s meh or expensive I might just grab a haswell or something if I can find one a lot cheaper.

        • Concupiscence
        • 5 years ago

        I was thinking of building a Skylake box next year, but my wife and I are going to Hawaii instead. The FX-8320 will continue to be my driver for a while yet.

    • geekl33tgamer
    • 5 years ago

    OSX based devices seeing a big increase this year – What the heck is wrong with people?

      • UberGerbil
      • 5 years ago

      Shrug — a lot of people buy what everyone they know already has. Once upon a time that was PCs. These days, every coffee shop is full of glowing apples.

        • shaq_mobile
        • 5 years ago

        The build quality is great. I boot camped mine and never looked back!

      • End User
      • 5 years ago

      Why is that so hard to fathom?

      – OS X (a UNIX 03 registered product) is a great OS with a wide range of available software
      – Apple hardware is fantastic if it fits your needs and budget
      – The Apple ecosystem is very integrated between phone/tablet/laptop/desktop/TV/watch

      I’ve sunk a ton of $ into my home PC and server builds but my workhorse systems all have an Apple logo.

        • Thresher
        • 5 years ago

        The fact that this reply is being voted down shows how insular we tech enthusiasts are.

        There is a strain of geek that just doesn’t like the fact that Apple products simplify things for a large number of customers. Simple can’t mean better because it means less tweaking, less hardware selection, etc.

        I understand this and I’m not totally immune to this, but the fact is, using a computer SHOULD be stupid simple. The OS SHOULD get out of the way for applications. The equipment SHOULD appeal to the eye. Unfortunately, in the PC world, it often doesn’t. It’s crappy hardware in crappy designed cases with an OS that is constantly reminding you that it’s there and in the way.

        I find I just have less enthusiasm for the Wintel environment. I have a PC for gaming, but most people would just get a console. It’s an expensive hobby, but I don’t really use it for anything else anymore. I use the hell out of my MacBook Pro, my iMac, my iPad, my iPhone, and my Apple watch. The whole thing integrates almost seamlessly and I don’t have to worry about getting the right software, drivers, etc. to get it to all work together. This simply isn’t the case with Windows or even Linux.

          • divide_by_zero
          • 5 years ago

          Not sure why you’re getting down voted (ftfy). Maybe it’s all the SHOULDs about this and that, or your opinion that aesthetics matter.

          However, you’re spot on about the integration of various Apple devices. I personally haven’t taken the plunge into the Apple ecosystem, but my wife certainly has. Credit where credit is due – sharing, syncing, and backing up between devices in the Apple world is dead simple and functional for most users in a manor that we Wintel or Linux guys won’t be matching any time soon.

          • shaq_mobile
          • 5 years ago

          I recommend Apple to everyone I don’t want to do tech support for.

          For people who will do lots of office work, I recommend pc still.

          The build quality is undeniable and the simplicity is great. All the IT people I work with have apples and use a grip of VMs to do their actual work.

          Now, more so than ever, there are tons of viable options. Competition is better than ever. I’m glad. Pc laptops are so garbage. I love windows 7 but… I have problems with so many ultra books.

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 5 years ago

        If you want a laptop with a 16:10 screen I believe Apple is the only company producing them at this point.

        I wonder what the major Windows PC vendors think when they look at Apple’s margins and their own and decide what to do. Hey look this company puts effort and care into delivering something that’s actually good instead of sticking 768p screen on there, and they sell their laptops for about 2x what we do. Think we should figure it out?

          • NovusBogus
          • 5 years ago

          Apple: Products built for morons
          PC OEMs: Products built by morons

            • geekl33tgamer
            • 5 years ago

            Never a truer word spoken Novus. 😉

            • AdamDZ
            • 5 years ago

            I bet my IQ is far higher than yours and I use Macs.

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 5 years ago

            Haha

        • geekl33tgamer
        • 5 years ago

        You’re their model customer. Their “fantastic” hardware is no different to that of Windows PC’s these days, and by your own admission you’ve paid a lot of money for the privilege.

        I’ll skip on the [s<]tightly controlled[/s<] locked down OS and eco-system if it's all right with you. The phones are ok, but there's nothing Mac can't do that Windows can and it will be a dam site cheaper to buy into.

          • End User
          • 5 years ago

          I’m hugging my 1.3GHz MacBook right now. 🙂

            • geekl33tgamer
            • 5 years ago

            I hear they throttle if you do that, and may overheat. Style over function is a ***** isn’t it? 😉

            • End User
            • 5 years ago

            It will throttle if I hug it for more than 10.11 seconds.

          • Thresher
          • 5 years ago

          Thanks for proving my point about geeks.

      • AdamDZ
      • 5 years ago

      What the heck is wrong with Microsoft you should ask. OSX is a lot more pleasant to use than Windows 8, it has accessible, familiar interface, less malware, and simple easy apps that work well. Apple iapps and AppStore are far better than anything MS offers. OS X also works well with iOS. Then you have free OS updates, no serial numbers to worry about and OS X is a lot less intrusive than Windows 8. A lot of people moved to Mac due to the massive fuckup Windows 8 was and 10 will not bring them back. I myself moved entirely back to Mac after testing Windows 10 for months. I’m only keeping two PCs, one for gaming and one in case I need to do something Windows specific. Microsoft has no clue what people want.

      You read something like this: “”Let apps use my advertising ID for experiences across apps” and start wondering wtf is going on.

        • geekl33tgamer
        • 5 years ago

        No, what I actually read was “OSX is better because someone told me it was”. If Microsoft have no clue what people want, it’s better than Apple manipulating you into thinking you need something.

        The latter of which Apple are very good at doing if you ever stopped to notice.

      • odizzido
      • 5 years ago

      Windows laptops have been terrible for a while now. Still sitting on a 2011 model here and nothing on the market is better than mine for that I want.

      • blastdoor
      • 5 years ago

      My impression from other articles is that Gartner and IDC have very different forecasts regarding Mac sales. It will be interesting to see what numbers Apple releases.

    • Neutronbeam
    • 5 years ago

    I’m thinkin’ Win 10 probably ain’t gonna punch those numbers up any.

      • Price0331
      • 5 years ago

      I’m thinking a lot of people don’t even know it is coming. To them it is just another little notification in the bottom right of their screens.

        • NovusBogus
        • 5 years ago

        Most people don’t care, either–for most Windows users the OS is just a means to an end.

      • UberGerbil
      • 5 years ago

      Gartner thinks it will actually [i<]hurt[/i<] in the short term: [quote="Gartner analyst Ranjit Atwal"<]The release of Windows 10 on 29th July will contribute to a slowing professional demand for mobile PCs and premium ultramobiles in 2015, as lifetimes extend by three months. However, as suppliers and buyers adjust to new prices, Windows 10 could boost replacements during 2016.[/quote<]I'm not sure I buy that: people who were going to put off buying a new PC until the fall were probably going to do so regardless of Win10. Summer just isn't a big time for PC sales, and Win10 will be out in time for the back-to-school surge. In fact, if bad Win10 installs on wonky machines screws things up, there may be people shopping for new hardware with a clean install in August, earlier than expected.

    • arobert
    • 5 years ago

    but they don’t track custom PC building. I know that is not going to be a huge market but I would like to see if that changes anything. Problem is there is no way to track(at least to my knowledge), maybe you are just upgrading parts or maybe you are starting a new build.

      • xeridea
      • 5 years ago

      Good point. After my first Dell P3 800 back in 2000, I got an Athlon XP 2100+ system, and swapped out parts over the years. I still use the original case… I have had 4 motherboards and 6 cpus since then. They could go by motherboard and/or cpu sales possibly, though it would be imperfect.

      • shaurz
      • 5 years ago

      You could just count the number of motherboards sold. That might be an “upgrade” or “new PC” depending on how you see it.

      • ludi
      • 5 years ago

      It’s hard to track, but realistically it’s never been a significant portion of the market. Take a look at the numbers cited by the article: worldwide PC shipments are on the order of 70 million units in a single quarter.

      Sure, somewhere out there is a hobby upgrader who went through the equivalent of five builds in the past three years. In that same time span, one Fortune 500 company somewhere upgraded 75,000 laptops and desktops.

        • Ninjitsu
        • 5 years ago

        Well I don’t know, I hear this a lot but the DIY market manages to sustain Asus, Gigabyte, MSI, EVGA, PowerColor, Galaxy, ECS, Biostar, and some portion of AMD and Nvidia, among others (Thermaltake, Corsair, Lian Li…).

        It can’t be [i<]that[/i<] insignificant. EDIT: SSD makers too.

          • ludi
          • 5 years ago

          Again, it is difficult to figure out how the numbers divide out, but most of the companies you are citing have a very healthy business in building motherboards for OEM machines. For example, Dell does not have a dedicated Dell OEM, they buy OEM motherboards manufactured by other companies such as Asus. It will only have a Dell logo and part number, but it came from a factory run by a company such as Asus. Granted, Asus might sell e.g. 200k motherboards in a year to custom builders, which looks like a big number.. But in that same time, they might produce a seven- or eight-figure number of motherboards for Tier 1 and Tier 2 OEMs.

    • superjawes
    • 5 years ago

    If the PC is dead, how am I posting this?

    Checkmate, analysts!

      • chuckula
      • 5 years ago

      The PC could be undead.
      ZOMBIES!

      • Leader952
      • 5 years ago

      The PC is not dead nor will it ever be.

      What is really happening is that the growth rate is stagnating or even declining.

      The yearly market for PC’s is in the 300+ million range but currently Gartner & IDC is right that as of now PC shipments continue to decline.

      • ronch
      • 5 years ago

      Yeah, who ever uses smartphones and tablets anyway?? Those are just toys!

      • jaisonx12
      • 5 years ago

      They probably aren’t factoring in the people who decide to build custom PCs so that they don’t have to deal with overpriced proprietary mobos and power supplies when they go bad out of warranty or if they want to upgrade said parts to the latest hardware.

    • chuckula
    • 5 years ago

    [quote<]Apple's results are a standout compared to the rest of the market. IDC found that the company's shipments grew 16% worldwide compared to this time last year, along with an 11.8% increase in US shipments.[/quote<] Yet more proof that Apple should dump the underperforming Mac line in favor of high-growth* iPads. * I use absolute value bars so that pesky "-" sign isn't an issue.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This