Asus’ CES monitor lineup has a little something for everyone

Looks like today is monitor day at CES. It's now Asus' turn to announce its refreshed lineup of displays.

Designo MX Series 34"

Asus is betting big on style for its Designo MX Series 34" ultra-wide curved monitor. This pretty puppy is almost devoid of a bezel and has a Qi-enabled charging pad integrated into its stand. Like most 34" screens, the Designo MX has an IPS panel with a 3440×1440 resolution, though there's no word on high or variable refresh rates. The monitor's curvature measures in at 2000R, just a tad less curvy than other screens of this type. A pair of built-in 8W speakers complement the gorgeous exterior.

ROG Swift PG348Q

For those looking to have something a bit more gamey, Asus offers the 34" ROG Swift PG348Q. Once again, we get a 3440×1440 IPS panel, but this time around with a sweet 100-Hz refresh rate. That rate can change, too, as the PG348Q offers support for Nvidia's G-Sync tech. As an added bonus, there's no need to go to the graphics card control panel to switch between refresh rates—the PG348Q has a dedicated button for that purpose.

MG28UQ

Asus also added a couple 4K options to its MG series of displays. The 28" MG28UQ offers a TN panel with 3840×2160 resolution and a 1-ms response time. Meanwhile, its younger brother, the 24" MG24UQ, packs an IPS panel that could offer higher color accuracy and better viewing angles than its sibling, though likely at the expense of response time. Both these displays also offer support for VESA Adaptive-Sync, better known as FreeSync.

And now for something off the left field. Asus' MB169C+ (which really sounds like a motherboard model) is a 15.6-inch "portable monitor." And it achieves that portability by weighing only 800g, being 8.5mm thick, and using a single USB Type-C connector for both data and power. Despite the diminutive size, this monitor still packs a 1080p IPS panel. This should be an interesting option to pair with a laptop, especially one with limited connectivity options.

Comments closed
    • deruberhanyok
    • 5 years ago

    Hmm, Asus is cooking up a competitor to the Predator X34, eh?

    • Duct Tape Dude
    • 5 years ago

    I’m paying close attention this year because there is a single panel in production that is 34″ 3440×1440 [b<]VA[/b<] with a 100Hz refresh rate (it's made by Samsung), but none of these monitors seem to fit that description...

      • TwoEars
      • 5 years ago

      The classic advantage of VA over IPS was that VA was faster, but now that you can get a 3440×1440 100Hz IPS panel I don’t really see much point of holding out for VA. VA also had a reputation for being blurry and laggy at higher refresh rates, but I don’t know if this samsung panel you mention has those problems.

      In any case, modern IPS panels (and TN panels for that matter) are great. No need to wait for VA version I don’t think.

        • Duct Tape Dude
        • 5 years ago

        True, but VA has darker blacks and less glow. I’d like to try it after seeing drfish’s experience with a flagship IPS.

          • Chrispy_
          • 5 years ago

          Yup.
          I’m a VA advocate and I’ve been waiting for a decent gaming VA option. low blacks and glow-free rich colours are more important to me than viewing angles and colour accuracy, even though I love my IPS compared to the TN junk I used to own.

          I still have a 1920×1200 VA screen in a decade-old Dell work laptop that sits on a shelf. It’s phenomenal how good it is compared to pretty much any screen on sale today – I’d go as far as to say that it’s OLED good.

            • Wirko
            • 5 years ago

            It’s CCFL good. (I’m typing this on a Dell 2405FPW with a Samsung 214T at the side, both CCFL and S-PVA.)

    • orik
    • 5 years ago

    The first wave of gsync monitors were also 3D vision capable but it seems the final nail in the coffin for that tech was when they started releasing gsync screens without it.

    At least the Oculus is almost here.

      • Redocbew
      • 5 years ago

      I was just thinking that. Doesn’t seem like 3D(outside of VR) ever really went anywhere.

    • anotherengineer
    • 5 years ago

    I will continue to wait for a 24″ screen either 2560×1440 or preferably 2560×1600, that is IPS or IPS-type, with true 8-bit color, freesync to 24hz, refresh rate to 100 Hz, preferably 120Hz and fully supports DP 1.3, fully adjustable stand, with VESA mounting for $450-$500 ish.

    I guess a 4k with those specs that will interpolate/scale 1080p perfectly for high fps gaming would also be acceptable also.

    Since I mean if a 4k PLS was supposed to be 400
    [url<]https://techreport.com/news/26586/intel-samsung-aim-to-deliver-4k-displays-for-399[/url<]

      • TwoEars
      • 5 years ago

      Don’t hold your breath.

      Just buy a 27-inch 2560×1440 display, they’re great. Pixel density is a tad higher than a classic 24-inch monitor with 1920×1200.

        • anotherengineer
        • 5 years ago

        Nah, I want more pixel density. I will wait until something like this has freesync at least.
        [url<]http://accessories.dell.com/sna/products/Gaming_Accessories/productdetail.aspx?c=ca&l=en&s=dhs&cs=cadhs1&sku=860-BBFK[/url<]

          • DancinJack
          • 5 years ago

          You better have damn good vision. 1440p+ at 24″ is really small.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 5 years ago

      I’m waiting for the exact same thing.

      Or heck, any 16:10 IPS freesync monitor.

    • baobrain
    • 5 years ago

    Man, is it too much to wish for a 1440p 144Hz IPS freesync monitor that isn’t outrageously expensive? I really can’t stand the colors on TN after so many years of using IPS.

    Edit 1: spelling

    Edit 2: more spelling

      • EndlessWaves
      • 5 years ago

      Some of the better TN panels do have pretty minimal top to bottom colour gradients.

        • Chrispy_
        • 5 years ago

        Agreed, but even a good TN doesn’t have the colour gamut. A good TN has the same “average” gamut of a bad IPS, but even a [i<]half[/i<]-decent IPS has much wider gamut meaning richer, more vibrant colours and a generally nicer image. You don't notice it until you have two side by side and suddenly smack your forehead in shock at how bad the low-gamut image (which you thought was fine) now looks.

          • EndlessWaves
          • 5 years ago

          Colour gamut is a function of the backlight rather than the panel isn’t it?

          A wider gamut has all sorts of technical problems right now, and very little content that can actually use it. Many games just assume sRGB so anything wider and those vibrant colours are incorrect and not the impression the game artists are trying to create.

      • Roo5ter
      • 5 years ago

      YOU SILLY PEOPLE AND YOUR COLOR VISION!

      • brucethemoose
      • 5 years ago

      You mean cheaper than the Asus MG278Q?

      Unfortunately, yes 🙁

      • juzz86
      • 5 years ago

      The BenQ XL2730Z, once calibrated, is an exceptional monitor.

      – IPS fanboy

      • TwoEars
      • 5 years ago

      Shouldn’t it be “of TN” instead of “on TN”?

      That was a joke.

      • ImSpartacus
      • 5 years ago

      I think the idea is that you’d need a pretty pricey gpu setup to get up towards 144 fps at that resolution, so you can probably afford to spend more on the monitor as well.

      • Kretschmer
      • 5 years ago

      That already existed last year: the MG279Q. $550 online.

    • TwoEars
    • 5 years ago

    Are these 3440×1440 panels really a good idea for gaming? Aren’t they too wide? Is the gaming experience really better compared to 2560×1440?

      • Mopar63
      • 5 years ago

      Once I moved to ultra-wide I find gaming on regular monitors restrictive 🙂

      • EndlessWaves
      • 5 years ago

      EDIT: Nevermind, misread the second as 2560×1080.

      • slowriot
      • 5 years ago

      When the game works correctly right away… yes, it’s amazing. There are few games that work flawlessly out of the box. There’s a fairly large (and growing) community that is trying to address games which have trouble with the 21:9 aspect ratio (via game tweaks and programs like Flawless Widescreen). Some games… it’s just not going to happen. i.e. lots of shooters force you into 16:9 and you’re stuck with black bars or playing in windowed mode. Some games *cough* Fallout 4 *cough* require quite a bit of tweaking, some mods, external app and even then… ugh.

      So… it is absolutely a mixed bag right now and I wouldn’t recommend it to my friends who can barely configure a games graphics settings. But I think it’s going to get a lot better though. Any new major AAA title will have to have it in mind and engines like Unity and Unreal support it. The 21:9 aspect ratio seems to be gaining a lot of fans quickly. Once you’ve played Witcher 3 or GTA V or Project Cars on one its very easy to get hooked to the experience, at least I did.

      Oh and its fantastic to work on… I went from 3x 24″ monitors to a single 34″ and wouldn’t go back.

        • TwoEars
        • 5 years ago

        Thanks. I’m currently using the first ROG Swift 27-incher with the TN display which I bought on release day. It’s working great but I’m thinking maybe later this year when 14nm GPUs hit the market it could be time for a monitor upgrade as well. Judging from these screenshots I just found W3 does indeed look amazing in 21:9 aspect ratio.

        [url<]http://cdn.overclock.net/d/dc/dc990e67_witcher3_2015_05_18_18_41_38_569.png[/url<] I wouldn't be bothered with black bars in older titles, that's fine. My current graphic cards wouldn't be able to handle 3440x1440 though. I'm running 2x670 with a OC'd 4970k and they can run W3 at 60-70 fps no problem, but I don't think pushing them any more than that would be a good idea. They're on their last legs and running out of memory too. But when 14nm rolls around... who knows. Maybe a new 14nm card and a 21:9 IPS display. Better put some cash aside...

      • jihadjoe
      • 5 years ago

      Depends on the type of game, but for driving sims 21:9 is awesome. Good level of immersion and no nasty bezels in the way.

        • TwoEars
        • 5 years ago

        Yeah, I’ve never been able to stand the bezels and I’ve always stuck to a single monitor setup for that very reason, although I suppose that for racing games you can imagine that they’re roof pillars. lol.

      • ImSpartacus
      • 5 years ago

      It’s outstanding for productivity work and then the additional fov in video games is nice as well.

      All around, it’s probably the variety of monitor that enthusiasts should lust for. I know I do…

      • Chrispy_
      • 5 years ago

      You can test this for yourself by creating a custom resolution or just dragging out a window to the desired aspect ratio

      Some games gain from the extra width, others end up suffering for it.

      What you have to remember is that almost all games are created to work at 16:9 and any support for other aspect ratios is usually an afterthought. Games with lots of UI are the ones that usually fall down hard, whilst something with minimal UI (like racing sims, space sims, many FPS games – basically anything with headlook or mouselook) will usually benefit from extra peripheral vision.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This