Rumor: Samsung Galaxy S7 specs detailed

The rumor mill is abuzz about Samsung's upcoming Galaxy S7 flagship phone, which is expected to show up at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. The latest tidbits of information about the phone's innards just popped up in the AnTuTu benchmark database.

The model that just showed up in the benches is the Exynos-powered SM-G930F. This information seems to substantiate previous rumors saying the Galaxy S7 will come with two different spec lists: one for the international market, powered by a Samsung-made Exynos 8 octa-core SoC, and the other for the US, with a Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 under the hood.

The SoCs will be accompanied by 4GB of RAM and 64GB of flash storage. A 12MP rear-facing camera will take pretty pictures to show off on the phone's 5.1-inch, 2560×1440 Super AMOLED display. Well-known leaker Evan Blass says we'll see the S7 in three versions: Galaxy S7, S7 Edge, and S7 Edge+. Additional rumors say that the display is pressure-sensitive, and that the phone's glass-backed body is made out of a magnesium alloy.

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    • ronch
    • 4 years ago

    Gotta love this specs race.

    Me, I’m holding on to my Asus Zenfone 6. Really, a dual core Atom for something that’s primarily just for placing calls and texting is way overkill. Games, yeah,that too, but pinball is just fine when waiting in the lounge.

    • mcarson09
    • 4 years ago

    Where’s the removable battery and the microsd slot?

    I’ve moved on to LG products because they still have both these features. The biggest selling point for the microsd is I like to keep my music on me and I don’t want to waste money steaming it on a tired data plan. I don’t want to start a carrier debate because I don’t want to stream the music I own and that I’ve ripped into FLAC PERIOD. As for the removable battery that feature allows for bigger third party batteries and user replaceable batteries. I really don’t care as much about having a new phone as I do about my contract being locked for two years to avoid the rate hikes that come with being off contract.

    • albundy
    • 4 years ago

    those aren’t flagship specs, those are standard specs. they removed the features that made them stand apart, features that were useful to me, so as of the S6 line, i removed their phones from my consideration on my next purchase. i could care less how many cores their processors have when the phone isnt functional to my needs.

      • lycium
      • 4 years ago

      > i could care less

      [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=om7O0MFkmpw[/url<]

    • BlackDove
    • 4 years ago

    The most important things for me in a phone are:

    Where is it made? My S6 Active is made in Korea.

    How good is the screen: Samsung currently has the best screens and the S6 does Adobe RGB and sRGB almost perfectly. Did they improve on it from the S6?

    Will they make an Active version of it? I need a waterproof phone.

    I wonder how the new Exynos 8 compares to the 7.

    • Kretschmer
    • 4 years ago

    All the specs in the world aren’t going to matter if your re-skinned UI is a dog. TouchWiz needs to be put out to pasture, already (or there should be a separate “stock android” SKU at price parity).

    Phones have gotten fast enough where I really don’t care about most of the specs. My concerns (in descending order):

    1) Price – is it reasonable? I buy phones without a subsidy.
    2) Software – did they mess up Android?
    3) Battery Life – how long between charges?
    4) Storage – is an SD card slot or Lots’o’Flash included in the affordable SKU?
    5) Camera – is it a potato? I’m not a national geographic photographer.

      • brucethemoose
      • 4 years ago

      [i<] Puts on tinfoil hat [/i<] Honestly, I think Touchwiz is part of some planned obsolescence scheme. Old Galaxies wouldn't feel slow for a long time if they ran stock Android, and that's bad for Samsung's bottom line. Apple accomplishes the same thing with bare-minimum memory capacities. The 4S would still be a perfectly usable phone today if it had 1GB of memory, but 512MB just doesn't cut it in iOS 9, and you can't roll it back.

        • ikjadoon
        • 4 years ago

        Eh, TouchWiz has had some good features that are ported by Google. Multi-window, Quick Settings, etc.

        Just without all the added bloat. Samsung has good ideas, but bad software engineers.

    • brucethemoose
    • 4 years ago

    Seeing how HTC just isn’t gonna make a decent M7 successor, this might finally replace my aging iPhone 5.

    Touchwiz aside, is there anything bad about the Galaxy phones I should know about before diving in?

      • Beelzebubba9
      • 4 years ago

      Preface: I am a huge fan of stock Android.

      TouchWiz is reason enough to avoid them; and I’m not talking about the UI ‘improvements’ or the physical implementation of software buttons. I’m talking about how Samsung phones are atrocious at getting updates, especially if your phone is carrier locked, and how janky basic operations are because Samsung artificially limits how much RAM you can use causing applications to constantly reload when you switch to them. I can (sort of) understand this on an iPhone 6 with 1GB of RAM, but on an S6 with 3GB – half of it always free – it’s indefensible.

      On top of that there are just a ton of little UI/UX quirks that drive me nuts. Like how you get a warning any time you try and take the volume past 50% after a reboot (and you reboot often to clear up the janky UI since that’s the only ‘fix’). Why. Or when you click on a link out of the default SMS app you get a warning that your phone could be hijacked because Samsung still hasn’t patched that bug on my phone.

      That said, the S6 has probably the best hardware I’ve ever used in a phone, but after replacing mine with a Nexus 6P I will never buy another Samsung product again. With the Nexus phones being so good, and solid products coming out of Motorola and Sony – not to mention the iPhone 6S – there’s no reason to consider a Samsung phone unless you really, really want pen input on Android then get a Note.

    • ozzuneoj
    • 4 years ago

    A phone could have a 5Ghz 12 core SoC with 32GB of RAM and an 8K 6 inch screen and its still going to feel like you’re trying to manipulate neutered applications through a mail slot compared to using a real computer (laptop or desktop).

    I predict that the market for high end phones is going to slowly die off over the next few years once more people realize that the limitations of these devices are not their specifications (not since 2013)… its the fact that our bodies and minds aren’t meant to do so much on something so small, and the things that are done to make them more usable end up making them less useful.

    Simplified touch interfaces with large buttons and less options, simplified “mobile” sites with control taken away from the user (and in many cases, lots of content removed), interfaces designed to predict what you want to do, rather than give you precise enough input to actually DO what you want to do…

    The only way to eliminate the limitations of tiny devices like these is to strap a screen to your face, have access to full interfaces without features removed, and use some kind of powerful and flexible input device that can do as much or more than a keyboard and mouse… and at that point, we’re basically talking about turning everyone into VR zombies, unable to focus on the real world because the device they used to be able to slip into their pocket is now glued to their face all day.

    … and then everything will be soooo much more convenient. @_@

      • cygnus1
      • 4 years ago

      MS has you covered… Say hello to HoloLens!

      • Laykun
      • 4 years ago

      People buy high end phones because they are portrayed by advertising as status symbols, not just because they have high end specs. People will keep buying high end phones as they keep buying high end watches and high end cars. Certainly it pays to be more practicality focused, but when it comes down to it some people just want to have something others can’t as people seem to value that as an indicator of success or superiority. Also with Samsung’s latest phones and tablets there’s something to be said about the feel of the device in hand, they don’t just look premium, they feel it too, I don’t think you can ignore qualities like build quality.

        • Beelzebubba9
        • 4 years ago

        I buy high end phones because they work better than cheap ones and the cost difference is a fraction of one months rent. Seems silly to get a functionally worse product to save what amounts to 1/3 of a cup of coffee a day.

      • BlackDove
      • 4 years ago

      When i was a little kid using a huge desktop PC i envisioned a PC that i could take with me, that wasnt a laptop, and my smartphone is basically that for specific purposes like internet browsing and communicating(teamspeak, steam, skype, etc.).

      I find it confusing when people have smartphones and use them to do something silly like sit on facebook(although id never have or use facebook because i think its idiotic and sleazy).

      I never envisioned a high end camera like the one my S6 Active has on a phone though. I do also have a Canon G15 but i dont take it with me anywhere really. My waterproof phone fits in my jeans easily.

      Now, i think VR has its applications, but further distracting and isolating people from reality.

      And idk about your assessment on the screens. This is plenty big and comfortable to view, and the OLED screen is literally the most accurate monitor i have owned, and can do Adobe RGB or sRGB nearly perfectly.

      The main problem i have with the amount of smartphones being sold actually has to do with how good they are. Unfortunately, they CAN replace a PC for a lot of people, and as a result the PC market suffers further.

      Personally, i love my smartphone, but i still need a desktop with a powerful x86 CPU, tons of RAM and a huge GPU to do things that require hundreds of times the computing power that a smartphone posseses.

      • One Sick Puppy
      • 4 years ago

      That’s me you’re describing. I stopped putting apps on my iPhone a long time ago. I wish it did only the little that I need it to do – calendar, messages, phone, music, camera. An inexpensive, slim and light iPod Touch with phone capabilities would make me happy.

      I can’t even use a tablet cuz they’re irritating to use.

      • September
      • 4 years ago

      Bring back the 4″ iPhones! No really, I’m serious – it’s all we need.

        • adisor19
        • 4 years ago

        Seconded.

        Adi

    • Chrispy_
    • 4 years ago

    Worthless to a lot of people unless Samsung stop trying to reinvent Android….

    The only Samsung phones that work properly are the ones that have been reflashed to an AOSP build without Touchwiz.

      • NeelyCam
      • 4 years ago

      I looked into that for my S5 (the constant “check battery cover” popups are killing me), but sadly AT&T doesn’t want me to do that, even after my contract expires.

      I’m switching to Cricket

      • ImSpartacus
      • 4 years ago

      Really? It’s been a while since I’ve used a device from sammy, but my galaxy s 3 is pretty tame. I put a different launcher on it, but I could’ve lived with the stock launcher.

      It might’ve changed since then, but I thought the trend was that launchers were getting less and less intrusive.

        • Beelzebubba9
        • 4 years ago

        The UI skin is not as terrible as the programming optimizations under the hood, which themselves aren’t as bad as having updates to your platform delayed 6-12 moths while they flounder somewhere between Samsung and the carrier’s validation teams.

        I bought a Galaxy S6 earlier this year thinking I’d give Samsung a shot and replaced it with a Nexus 6P less than 6 months later. Using them side by side really illustrates how janky and poorly designed TouchWiz is compared to stock Android and it’s infuriating.

        • StuffMaster
        • 4 years ago

        On Android 5.0 they redid the settings screens to be more “material” or whatever, one change I definitely don’t like. Memory management seems lousy, but with Nova Launcher I’m mostly happy.

      • revparadigm
      • 4 years ago

      Yep I have done that with my T-Mobile Note 4. With Cyanogen mod I would say it has to be at least 30% faster in all things. I am presently using a heavily tweaked Touchwiz with all the bloat removed, even with that the Note 4 feels like a new phone. Samsung is just plain ole dumb when it comes to this aspect.

    • wingless
    • 4 years ago

    Phones have specs that outpace computers from a few years ago. Vintage computing is going to look pretty interesting in another 10 years.

      • ludi
      • 4 years ago

      The specs, perhaps, in a superficial way…but the usage case is a completely different design target. One of my friends has a media console in his living room for his phone, which includes a Bluetooth keyboard and an external monitor via HDMI. I always giggle when I watch him using it because it doesn’t behave or perform much better than the 100MHz Windows 95 system I had back in my first year of college.

        • jdevers
        • 4 years ago

        You should try to feed x.264 video to that Win 95 system and see how that turns out.

        I get what you mean in that it is cumbersome, but he is using a device entirely outside of its expected profile so of course it will be cumbersome.

          • ludi
          • 4 years ago

          I’m aware of that, yes; I was being sardonic. The underlying point being that phones can have impressive-sounding hardware but everything they do is optimized for a 3-5″ touchscreen environment. The specs can sound amazing but the output is difficult to compare to a desktop environment because each platform is targeted at an entirely different use case.

            • Generic
            • 4 years ago

            Here’s hoping Microsoft can change that by making Continuum something people actually want in a phone.

            It seems like it’d give Intel and ARM a level playing field (small hardware / big screen performance).

    • tipoo
    • 4 years ago

    I was hoping to see the Exynos with Samsungs new custom cores make it to the NA market. The Snapdragon 820 is definitely an improvement from the 810, but I still feel they aimed too low if you look at Twister cores compared to the 820s (edit: corrected) Kyro cores.

    [url<]http://www.anandtech.com/show/9837/snapdragon-820-preview/2[/url<] [url<]http://www.anandtech.com/show/9686/the-apple-iphone-6s-and-iphone-6s-plus-review/4[/url<] Just compare the tables on those two pages, and you can already sort of predict where the benchmark pages are going to go, can't you?

      • brucethemoose
      • 4 years ago

      The 820 uses a custom core (Kyro), not an A72 right?

      I don’t think they’re aiming excessively low… Apple’s cores just make everything look bad. It’s like they’re a generation ahead of everyone else.

        • the
        • 4 years ago

        A generation now, it was looking like Apple could be two generations ahead not too long ago. The evolution of Cyclone to Twister hasn’t radically altered much in the design. Solid tweaks here and there. The A6 was a very, very, very impressive SoC for its time and way ahead of the rest of the ARM players when released. The Android market was stuck using 32 bit cores for nearly year and they compromised thermals and batter life in an attempt to compete. Apple in the mean time has been rather conservative with their performance gains as they’ve been focusing on battery life and thermals.

        I have a nagging feeling that Apple is set to make another big leap with their SoC designs soon.I still feel that there is room to add SMT considering the width of the core and [i<]potential[/i<] power savings vs. waking up another core. Beyond that I predict Apple being aggressive by adding WideIO sometime soon too.

          • brucethemoose
          • 4 years ago

          Apple sticks to small memory capacities anyway, so they’re in the perfect position to implement Wide I/O first.

          • tipoo
          • 4 years ago

          The A6 didn’t introduce 64 bit, the A7 did. As I recall the A6 was very good, but pretty close to Krait cores of the time, while A7 is where things really skyrocketed away from the Android players.

          • blastdoor
          • 4 years ago

          Yeah, it’s interesting to watch these things evolve.

          If Apple only intended to use its custom CPU cores in phones, it’s not really clear that they need to push forward very quickly from here. Arguably the iPhone is over-specced from that perspective and a better use of process shrinks might be focused on integrating the modem into the SOC, improving the ISP, or adding some other fixed-function customized circuitry.

          But if Apple intends to use this core more broadly, then continuing to push this CPU forward quickly might make sense, but it really depends on what those other uses are. Right now the iPad Pro could probably benefit from more CPU power, but it’s not clear how successful that product is going to be (there has to be enough volume to support the investment).

          If Apple were to put it in the Mac (my pet theory), then there’s definitely a good reason to push forward.

          I don’t really know for sure what the automotive application would require. I know pattern recognition is a big deal there, which tends towards SIMD/GPU stuff. But I could imagine that CPU might still be pretty important — maybe just as important as a PC/Mac….

          So, anyway…. I’ll bet Apple continues to push forward here faster than they would if the iPhone was the only use for this CPU. But that’s speculative, since those other uses have yet to be seen at scale.

      • RazrLeaf
      • 4 years ago

      I concur. I was hoping for Exynos too, but at least that makes it easy for me to identify if an unlocked phone is native to NA, or just a compatible international model.

      • ikjadoon
      • 4 years ago

      Nice links. I’ve wondered what exactly the performance gulf was between A9 and Qualcomm’s stuff.

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