Antec refreshes its Kühlers with the H600 Pro and H1200 Pro

Antec has added a couple members to its family of Kühler H2O, er, coolers. Say hello to the H600 Pro and H1200 Pro closed-loop liquid coolers.

The Kühler H2O H1200 Pro is a 240-mm radiator whose overall dimensions are 10.8" by 4.7" by 1.1" (or 275 by 120 by 27 mm). The smaller H600 is half as wide as its bigger cousin but otherwise equally proportioned. Both radiators have 0.2-mm fin spacings, and the the included 120-mm fans (one on the H600, two on the H1200) can spin at up to 2,400 RPM.

Antec claims that both the fans and the radiator pump are built with an emphasis on quiet operation and durability. The pump has a winding-type, three-phase motor, and it's powered by a SATA power connector.

Comments closed
    • DayWalker
    • 4 years ago

    I bought an Antec Kühler 620 (single 120mm radiator) back in 2011. Worked great through several CPU upgrades, but then about a year ago I noticed a performance decline. I removed one of the hoses and discovered that it had gotten low on fluid. (No leaks; just evaporation). I drained it completely, added a reservoir to the loop, refilled with new fluid, and it worked like a champ once again.

    Some months later I added another 120mm radiator (from a dead Corsair H60) to the loop—just to see what would happen—and it is still working great. (Definite performance improvement as well.) If you enjoyed this story be sure to tell your children.

    • tanker27
    • 4 years ago

    Funny they call it a refresh when in fact 99% of all AIO coolers are made by the same company, Asetek.

      • Chrispy_
      • 4 years ago

      Not even close to true anymore; Asetek are the patent holders but most companies make their own AIO and either get sued by Asetek or have to licence the right to put the pump in the block.

      Some Corsairs and all NZXT AIO’s are Asetec, but Coolermaster, Silverstone, Antec and Thermaltake have been in trouble over the Asetek patent, which wouldn’t happen if they were licensed from Asetek or made by Asetek.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 4 years ago

      this guy^^^

      “when in fact 99% of all AIO coolers are made by the same company”

      bro, do you know what “fact” means?

      It’s like you say “fact” then make up a number immediately after.

      u srs bro?

        • tanker27
        • 4 years ago

        I guess you fail at idioms. /eyeroll

          • Srsly_Bro
          • 4 years ago

          I didn’t know English isn’t your native language. sorry, bro

    • SuperSpy
    • 4 years ago

    Odd choice of SATA power over MOLEX. I’d expect a lot more systems are short on SATA than MOLEX.

    Does it really need that (AFIAK optional) 3v rail?

      • Anovoca
      • 4 years ago

      Molex is an antiquated design that, frankly, should have been phased out the same time as IDE but hung around only because there really wasn’t a “need” to do so. The day I no longer have to spend 10 minutes manipulating four independently minded metal male plugs into four equally independently minded female plugs is a day I will rejoice.

        • ajira99
        • 4 years ago

        Molex may be antiquated, but just there are still plenty of industrial computer systems that use Molex, serial and VGA connections. It’s going to take time for them to be “phased out” completely at the consumer level. I still see some computer fans that come with Molex connectors; Antec should (ideally) throw in a cheap SATA-to-Molex adapter and call it a done deal.

          • Anovoca
          • 4 years ago

          Industrial systems also use proprietary form factors and design system specific PSUs. Show me an industrial system that has the expand-ability for a 240mm radiator let alone a simple 120mm fan. Again, you won’t, since most of the systems you are referring to use passive cooling or proprietary cooling methods and aren’t relevant to this conversation.

          [quote<] Antec should (ideally) throw in a cheap SATA-to-Molex adapter and call it a done deal. [/quote<] my experience says they probably will.

            • ajira99
            • 4 years ago

            Industrial systems don’t typically use AIO liquid coolers because rack cooling is the standard (fans are the cheaper solution albeit quite noisy). There are companies like LiquidCool Solutions that use liquid cooling for ruggedized systems in extreme environments. You can order workstations from boutique sellers (Dell, HP, GamePC, etc.) that would meet the definition of ‘industrial PC’ and exclude proprietary components. My point was that except for niche solutions, most of the technologies that consumers enjoy trickle down from industrial solutions including Molex. Heck, even my new SilverStone SX600-G has two Molex connectors (versus four SATA connectors).

        • morphine
        • 4 years ago

        I dunno, really. It’s next to impossible to accidentally dislodge a Molex connector, while SATA power/data cables, well… breathe on them and they get yanked out.

          • Thrashdog
          • 4 years ago

          On the other hand, I’ve had to repair dislodged Molex pins more often than seems reasonable, so SATA power does at least have that over the old 4-pin connector.

        • Takeshi7
        • 4 years ago

        Molex is also a lot easier to manipulate than a SATA power connector. the pins are nice and big, and it’s easy enough to strip out the individual wires if you need to.

          • Anovoca
          • 4 years ago

          Easier? Hardly. getting Molex pins to align properly is comparable in difficulty only to trying to put winter gloves on a fussy 2 year old. There is a reason why someone invented mittens (sata).

            • Takeshi7
            • 4 years ago

            If SATA power connectors are so much easier, I want to see you create a 12v, 5V, and 3.3V power supply by splicing a SATA power cable.

            That’s something I’ve done multiple times with Molex for electronics projects and it’s incredibly easy. Doing it with SATA would be an absolute nightmare.

        • Krogoth
        • 4 years ago

        Molex works well enough and there are still plenty of internal peripherals that use it. I actually think SATA power connectors are too small and fragile for their own good. It doesn’t take that much stress and fatigue for a SATA power connector to break and it is PITA to repair.

        I never had any issues with Molex connectors and repairing them is simple enough.

      • maxxcool
      • 4 years ago

      Molex = ps2 = 🙁

      • derFunkenstein
      • 4 years ago

      In systems with just SATA devices and a modular PSU, this would allow you to run without that molex cable, assuming (as you pointed out) you have one free. Might make running cables easier.

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