Nvidia 361.75 drivers support Thunderbolt 3 external graphics

Nvidia has just released version 361.75 of its graphics drivers. Along with a handful of SLI profile updates, there's a new feature out of left field. The company has added beta support for external graphics cards over Thunderbolt 3 connections.

This new feature is supported on all GeForce cards in the 900 series, as well as the GeForce Titan X, GTX 750, and 750 Ti models. Besides the Thunderbolt 3 goodness, Nvidia added SLI profiles for Rise of the Tomb Raider, Tom Clancy's The Division, and Metal Gear Solid V multiplayer. The SLI profiles for Rainbow Six: Siege and Sébastien Loeb Rally Evo were updated, too.

Players can download the 361.75 drivers for Windows 10 here, or check out the full release notes. Those still hanging on to Windows 7 can click here instead.

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    • Laykun
    • 4 years ago

    Now we just need the 15″ Ultrabook to go with it and it’d be perfect. Or maybe even an ultra thin 17″, that might be interesting.

    • thedosbox
    • 4 years ago

    The Windows 10 link is incorrect, should be: [url<]http://us.download.nvidia.com/Windows/361.75/361.75-desktop-win10-64bit-international-whql.exe[/url<]

      • morphine
      • 4 years ago

      Doh, you’re correct. Typo, was missing an “h” at the start. Fixed now, thanks for the heads-up!

    • LSDX
    • 4 years ago

    Been waiting for this for years:
    – keeps the heat away from the CPU
    – no more need to look for small cards for small enclosures
    – as easy to swap/upgrade as switching an usb stick
    – no need to upgrade the PSU when the external card comes with its own
    – no space restrictions for larger passive cooling designs

    SLI might not work (as well) but I only had one SLI system. I prefer just waiting for the next gen (or later) of GPU instead.

    But for the moment, the solutions you can get right now (Magme PCIe extenders etc.) are way too expensive. Maybe this will be a game-changer.

      • Krogoth
      • 4 years ago

      CPUs don’t run into thermal issues unless you are aggressively overclocking and overvolting.

      External GPUs don’t solve any of the power and spacing issues. You have to worry about a separate enclosure.

      They are only attractive to laptops and DTR users who want an “upgradable” GPU.

      • Andrew Lauritzen
      • 4 years ago

      Besides the mildly easier swapping (how often do you swap GPUs really?), I don’t see the point in these. Total space/footprint is always going to be larger especially once you consider the extra cabling (power, etc). It’s always going to be more expensive as well.

      Honestly as I’ve argued elsewhere, the GPU is really *the* major heat, space and cost of modern gaming PCs – moving it out to a separate box makes almost no sense; you might as well put an entire PC in that other box.

      And do remember that these still have significantly less bandwidth than PCIE being plugged directly. Obviously may or may not be an issue depending on the game/resolution and so on, but it’s not as if it’s a “no compromise” situation.

    • docwho76
    • 4 years ago

    Guys, this is to support Razers 12 inch ultra-portable laptop with TB3 and a soon to be released external GPU accessory.

    [url<]http://www.razerzone.com/gaming-systems/razer-blade-stealth[/url<] [url<]http://www.razerzone.com/gaming-systems/razer-blade-stealth#razer-core-specs[/url<]

    • adisor19
    • 4 years ago

    This only means one thing :

    Apple is about to release refreshed macs with Nvidia GPUs inside with Skylake and Thunderbolt 3 support. Hopefully an updated Thunderbolt 3 display is also coming.

    Very nice.

    Adi

      • sweatshopking
      • 4 years ago

      Yes! It can only mean apple is about to use them! That’s why they’re in the windows 10 drivers, and such products have already been shown in the pc world! BECAUSE APPLE IS ABOUT TO ANNOUNCE THEM.

        • ikjadoon
        • 4 years ago

        It fits pretty well, though. If it uses TB3, it can use one connector for charging or charging+ duck.

          • sweatshopking
          • 4 years ago

          Of course it does. It doesn’t however mean apple is about to announce this, when pc makes already have demoed it.

          • Laykun
          • 4 years ago

          I think that’s what they refer to as a … coincidence?

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 4 years ago

        THAT’S ALL IT CAN MEAN

        • Deanjo
        • 4 years ago

        It was shown on a Mac long before it debuted on a PC there bud. Windows didn’t even have TB support when it was shown yet.

        [url<]http://www.extremetech.com/computing/92160-external-thunderbolt-graphics-card-for-macs-will-not-blow-you-away[/url<]

          • sweatshopking
          • 4 years ago

          The best part of your link is where it says that they’re basically just updating an existing pc product to have thunderbolt.

      • willmore
      • 4 years ago

      Does Apple use vendor provided drivers? I was under the impression that Apple wrote their own graphical stack entirely.

        • sweatshopking
        • 4 years ago

        THEY DO. WHICH IS WHY IT SUCKS SO BADLY.

          • Deanjo
          • 4 years ago

          Apple does not write their own drivers. Apple implements their own oGL stack. The rest of the driver itself is written by the vendor. Vendors such as nvidia also provide their own updated graphics driver available for download.

          Get your facts straight.

            • sweatshopking
            • 4 years ago

            Sorry, i was confused since I knew the terrible OpenGL stack they’re responsible for, and the fact you can’t download drivers from nvidias page for osx in the driver search. Plus, getting access to decent driver kexts was always a nightmare on my hackintosh. My apologies.

            • Deanjo
            • 4 years ago

            [url<]http://www.nvidia.com/download/driverResults.aspx/92173/en-us[/url<] Search finds them easily enough. You must be holding your Surface wrong.

            • sweatshopking
            • 4 years ago

            They’re not listed among the windows and Linux drivers as you well know.

            • Deanjo
            • 4 years ago

            You must be blind or again you are holding your surface wrong.

            [url<]http://s12.postimg.org/fo6qz66v1/image.jpg[/url<]

            • sweatshopking
            • 4 years ago

            Maybe they just don’t display them on non-osx systems, smart butt. And I dont have a surface. My wife does, and I’m not man enough to tell her to let me use it. Stop being so bitter. Remember we love each other.
            [url<]http://postimg.org/image/flalrpxg3/[/url<]

            • Deanjo
            • 4 years ago

            Nope, they display in Windows as well.

            [url<]http://s29.postimg.org/wel46akbr/Screen_Shot_2016_01_28_at_3_56_47_PM.png[/url<] There there is also that link to the Cuda drivers that will fetch them for you as well. Maybe you should get your wife to show you how to use a browser.

            • sweatshopking
            • 4 years ago

            You’re being unusually catty (even for you) about this, and i’m not loving it.

            They don’t show up on my windows 10 opera browser rig in the main search menu, nor do they show up in edge, as already posted with an image. i’m not going to bother further replying to you, since they can be found, but they’re not listed on either of my two devices (phone and desktop) without additional work.

            edit: OH WAIT. FIGURED IT OUT. YOU’RE LINKING QUADRO DRIVERS, NOT GEFORCE DRIVERS AND THEN PRETENDING THEY’RE THE SAME THING. WELL PLAYED, SON. I GUESS THAT MAKES PERFECT SENSE.
            gosh, so snide when you’re even wrong. Geforce drivers DO NOT LIST OSX IN THE DOWNLOAD PAGE.
            Seriously, deanjo, why didn’t you just say “quadro drivers are there, but geforce aren’t” rather than being such a pita? seriously, brah. not your best work.

            • the
            • 4 years ago

            Umm… you can [url=http://www.nvidia.com/download/driverResults.aspx/96651/en-us<]download nVidia drivers[/url<] separately from OS X updates.

            • sweatshopking
            • 4 years ago

            Sure you can, osx just isn’t listed in the geforce download section, only in the quadro.

      • geekl33tgamer
      • 4 years ago

      The drivers were for Windows. 🙂

    • Ninjitsu
    • 4 years ago

    Well, smart move I think. If they’re going to lose the [s<]iGPU[/s<] low end mobile dGPU market to Intel, might as well compensate via this route. EDIT: Sorry, I hadn't meant integrated graphics.

      • Airmantharp
      • 4 years ago

      They’ve already lost the iGPU market, just by Intel deciding to actually show up.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 4 years ago

        That, and Nvidia doesn’t make iGPUs anymore, since they can’t produce chipsets for modern Intel CPUs.

          • Klimax
          • 4 years ago

          And it wouldn’t have access to some options like IGP/APU have.

        • Ninjitsu
        • 4 years ago

        Corrected original post. Was way too sleepy when I made that.

    • 223 Fan
    • 4 years ago

    Great Scott! nVidia steals AMDs lunch money. Again.

      • maxxcool
      • 4 years ago

      Meh. AMD can do it too.. once they get some R&D money… and buy back some engineers… and turn a profit…

        • Deanjo
        • 4 years ago

        And when their driver team is on summer break!

          • maxxcool
          • 4 years ago

          /smirk!/

          • NeelyCam
          • 4 years ago

          Oh. I thought the driver team only worked during the school summer break

            • Deanjo
            • 4 years ago

            That’s probably true since summer is like 3 days in Canada.

      • Neutronbeam
      • 4 years ago

      Great Scott Wasson! FTFY.

    • maxxcool
    • 4 years ago

    I gotta say I like where this is going.. Being able to jam in a (200-400$) ExtGpu capable of ultra-rez FPS would pretty much end my desktop purchases except for the 8 hard drive media box lan server.

      • geekl33tgamer
      • 4 years ago

      I can see in the future these external GPU enclosures housing the GPU at first, then over time they will also allow the enclosure to accommodate a few SSD’s, perhaps additional networking, some USB’s and even sound – all connected to the main system using one single cable.

      That’s great, only you’ve literally just ended up with a SFF enclosure missing a CPU. You watch, I bet that happens…

    • tipoo
    • 4 years ago

    Wait, so is this a driver for the internal GPU, that supports plug and play for an external GPU, or is this independent of whatever you have internally (i.e on integrated Intel graphics), and the driver would just exist and chill until it sees the external GPU, then works on that?

      • psuedonymous
      • 4 years ago

      Unfortunately even the full release notes do not clarify if this enables hotswapping of GPUs (similar to how Optimus works) or if it is the same as the current case with outboard GPUs where a restart is required.

      • Ninjitsu
      • 4 years ago

      This is likely so that an Nvidia GPU in an external enclosure will plug and play with the host (integrated or displayed). At least, that’s what I understood.

    • chuckula
    • 4 years ago

    With more support coming for external GPUs, a future review of those GPU enclosure thingies might be interestly.

      • Airmantharp
      • 4 years ago

      I agree, so +1; and at some point, having a laptop with a decent CPU and RAM setup (gonna need to support a ‘high-clocked while docked’ setting) might actually be a feasible gaming solution with one of these setups in the ‘dock’.

      • Neutronbeam
      • 4 years ago

      You received a thumbs-up from me…also known here as an up-chuckula!

      • 223 Fan
      • 4 years ago

      It will be interesting to see how this evolves and if it displaces some traditional desktops. In the short term Intel gains if this takes hold because they sell T3 chipsets and any new systems will have Intel CPUs in them. In that scenario a Brix/NUC with quad core i3/i5/i7 + T3 is good enough for games and will be for… ever probably. VR will demand GPU power, not CPU. Which means long term PC upgrade cycles lengthen, not shorten. All speculation, of course.

        • Airmantharp
        • 4 years ago

        Until AMD releases more than hype for their CPU line, that Intel CPUs and chipsets will be present is an unfortunate given.

      • Krogoth
      • 4 years ago

      External GPU solutions are going to niches at best.

      They are going cater towards gamers who prefer laptops or prosumers that need a portable, but powerful workstation.

      It is cool tech, but it will never catch on with the masses.

        • The Egg
        • 4 years ago

        I don’t know if it would be possible to be [b<]more[/b<] wrong. Internal desktop-only GPUs requiring an upgraded PSU will never catch on with the masses (Note: TR readers are not "the masses"). External GPUs could be plugged into virtually any system as easy as connecting an Xbox/PS4, and would open up aftermarket GPU sales to the huge mobile/laptop market which is almost completely untapped. You could slap an external GPU box on any i3+ with a Thunderbolt 3 connector, and have a gaming rig. It's almost bewildering that external GPU solutions haven't been heavily pursued for at least 10 years.

          • maxxcool
          • 4 years ago

          We are the niche market…

          • Krogoth
          • 4 years ago

          Not going to happen.

          Consoles are attractive to developers because they have a predictable hardware platform, once you start adding in external GPUs. That goes out the window and those consoles become “crippled” low-end HTPCs. It will create a massive headache of support and compatibility issues. In other words, it will never catch on with gaming consoles.

          CPUs are still is king in a number of games (clockspeed). External GPUs also have additional latency which affects frame-timing (Thunderbolt is slower latency-wise than local PCIe lanes).

          Not many people are going with the hassle of handling two separate boxes (small computer) + (external GPU) or a laptop/DTR with an external GPU box.

          There aren’t really that advantages to this other than giving laptop/DTRs upgradable “GPUs” at the cost of having to haul around another piece of hardware.

          It is going to be a niche at best.

            • Deanjo
            • 4 years ago

            [quote<]CPUs are still is king in a number of games (clockspeed). External GPUs also have additional latency which affects frame-timing (Thunderbolt is slower latency-wise than local PCIe lanes). [/quote<] At only being 1.5 microsecond per hop on a MSI-based interrupt that is next to negligible if only one device is on the chain (and maybe even faster than internal if traditional legacy interrupts are used there).

            • ImSpartacus
            • 4 years ago

            Do you have a source for that?

            I recall that asus’s ces gpu chassis supported both thunderbolt as well as a proprietary external pcie because thunderbolt introduced an undesirable amount if latency. I need to find that video.

            • Deanjo
            • 4 years ago

            [url<]https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/HardwareDrivers/Conceptual/ThunderboltDevGuide/Basics01/Basics01.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP40011138-CH5-SW1[/url<] [quote<]Tolerating PCI Latency Devices on a Thunderbolt bus exhibit higher latency than devices on internal slots—about 1.5 microseconds of round-trip latency per hop. This means that putting a device at the end of a Thunderbolt chain can add up to 9 microseconds of round-trip latency. Most devices and drivers handle this additional communication latency with no particular difficulty. In some cases, however, your driver or device firmware must be tweaked to tolerate that latency.[/quote<]

            • Andrew Lauritzen
            • 4 years ago

            Note that that’s effectively the lowest level “packet-like” latency of the bus, not the amount of latency that will be added to the entire rendering process which may be significantly higher. There are usually a number of “back and forth” transactions during rendering a frame in modern games (and even more at a fine-grained level) – it’s not as if you’re just shipping one massive chunk of work/bandwidth for the whole frame and only adding that latency once.

            That said I don’t necessarily expect it to be a huge deal, but it does need testing. Bandwidth is probably where this will be more seriously constrained if people plan to put high end video cards in there.

            • Krogoth
            • 4 years ago

            That’s assuming that there’s no heavy traffic on the Thunderbolt lanes and controller itself. An external GPU will throw a heavy burden on them making it a bit slower. Granted, Thunderbolt is much faster than USB.

            GPUs are very sensitive to latency and those microseconds do add up on the user experience. External GPU are slower in time-framing then their internal counterparts. I would imagine it will be a 1-5% difference in practice though.

          • Andrew Lauritzen
          • 4 years ago

          This is completely uninteresting for desktop machines… it’s always going to be cheaper and better to just put the GPU inside the box there.

          I do expect this to have some level of interest for laptops, not because it makes any technical or financial sense (it still doesn’t), but because of the perceived simplicity of it after buying a laptop for other uses. Even if it’s not really true, people just want to believe that their laptop hardware is “the majority” of a gaming system and they just need to “add on” one small component to unleash the incredible power of their 15W poorly-cooled monster i7… which in reality runs slower than the cheapest desktop i3’s, let alone i5s – not because it’s bad but becaus that’s not what it was designed for).

          On technical grounds I’ll continue to argue the silliness of this, but I do expect it to gain a little bit of traction in the laptop space where people are mostly ignorant of the technical realities 🙂

        • ImSpartacus
        • 4 years ago

        What about for VR?

        In general, mature vr is going to demand a lot of pixels to be pushed (both high res and high refresh). There’s simply no way that any mobile device can meet those requirements for a pretty long time.

        And the curious thing is that vr only requires a smallish headset, not a gigantic external monitor. So it’s not inconceivable that you could take an external gpu and a vr headset in your backpack to be used with your laptop/phone/tablet.

      • Meadows
      • 4 years ago

      Purportedly, at least.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 4 years ago

      They have to actually ship first. Silverstone and MSI have shown them off at trade shows but you could never actually buy one.

      edit: you can buy exactly one box: [url<]https://bizon-tech.com/us/egpu/[/url<] And it's a mod of an Akitio Thunder2 PCIe.

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