Windows 10 gets new Release Preview ring and detailed change logs

Most users are aware that Microsoft regularly publishes updates to Windows 10 called "cumulative updates." Although that name has a nice ring to it, it doesn't describe exactly what those updates contain. The vast majority of software developers out there publish change logs when they update their wares, but for some reason, Microsoft has historically declined to do that for its latest OS.

That's now changing, though. The company has put up a dedicated page succintly named "Windows 10 update history." There, users can find a simple bulleted list detailing the main improvements for every Windows 10 update, both present and future. This should prove a boon for system administrators in particular, who have be extra cautious when deploying operating system updates.

Microsoft is also adding a new Windows Insider ring, called the Release Preview. This ring is targeted at users that want early access to Windows 10 updates, but in a more controlled manner when compared to the existing Slow and Fast update rings. The company says that despite being a prerelease branch, Release Preview builds should pose "minimal risk" for most devices. Any users electing to use this update ring can provide Microsoft with bug reports and feedback, too.

Comments closed
    • Bensam123
    • 4 years ago

    If only they weren’t forced on… One of my few gripes with W10, the lack of update customization and settings. Definitely two steps back.

    Guess for now I’ll just have to keep disabling and enabling the service to manually update. ~_~

      • cygnus1
      • 4 years ago

      But the point is, for the masses, manual is no longer a simple option available in the GUI. This is a good thing. If your Windows 10 computer is plugged into the internet, and you don’t know how to turn it off, it should be automatically updating. I haven’t had issues on any of the systems that I’ve set to prompt me to schedule the updates.

      Think about it this way… If MS listened to your complaint, we’d all be worse off with less educated users being less secure. But because you’re an advanced enough user, you’ve figured it out and you’re fine, so stop complaining already.

        • Airmantharp
        • 4 years ago

        I agree- as much as it sucks, forcing updates on those not inclined to control the process themselves is the best compromise. Power users will figure ways around it, but Microsoft caters to the public in general- and the public in general running unupdated systems represents a very real threat to everyone’s data security.

        This is about killing botnets.

          • DoomGuy64
          • 4 years ago

          I would think that if disabling it is still possible, then botnets would disable it. Hiding the option just hides it from the user. Having AV installed by default, and integrating it with security updates, would be a better idea. One thing windows does terrible is keeping the rest of your software up to date, unless it’s an “App”. Maybe they should also consider blocking java and flash by default, and installing it would require a warning prompt.

          • Welch
          • 4 years ago

          Agre… would be curious to see if they ever come out with a solution to allow those of us in the know to control individual updates like we could before.

            • VincentHanna
            • 4 years ago

            win+gpe enter
            windows components
            windows update

            You’re welcome.

        • w76
        • 4 years ago

        To a degree, that’s like saying because a baby can’t have steak, I can’t either, have to eat apple sauce. MS took a step in the right direction with Pro versions, but ideally Pro and corporate licensees would be able to see full details and choose without limitation what gets installed, and when (if ever). In this regard, linux GUI package management tools are even better, and that’s saying a lot.

          • VincentHanna
          • 4 years ago

          Yep.

          And because jethro can’t be trusted with oxycodone, you can’t keep a bottle in your first aid kit. People suck.

        • Bensam123
        • 4 years ago

        Less educated users don’t know how to turn off updates in the first place.

          • cygnus1
          • 4 years ago

          Really? The massive botnets that get created with malware using months and years old vulnerabilities would tend to argue with you…

            • Bensam123
            • 4 years ago

            I’m sure that has nothing to do with clicking on malwareporn.exe’s.

            If a user is smart enough to figure out how to turn off updates they’re smart enough to google ‘turn off windows 10 updates’ and look at what google gives them (literally it’s right there like a dictionary definition).

            If you feel the need to lock down your own computer and administer everyone elses, you should be able to do that. Taking options away from users will not fix users doing bad things.

            • kn00tcn
            • 4 years ago

            how many of those are incorrectly pirated to the point of breaking WU?

      • VincentHanna
      • 4 years ago

      You have a bunch of options under group policies:
      Prompt to update y/n
      Defer Upgrades for x number of weeks/months
      Auto download y/n
      Notify or schedule install automatically
      Select day of the week and time for ALL automatic updates.
      Allow wake from sleep to install updates.
      Disable auto-restart
      Disable updates on non-administrator accounts.

        • Bensam123
        • 4 years ago

        Yup, you have to go digging for them… Same with trying to turn off windows defender. There are a lot of options in the registry too and if you use Nix you have complete control over your OS!

          • VincentHanna
          • 4 years ago

          Dealing with the registry is not the same as a GPE enabled/disabled toggle or a dropdown menu that lets you schedule updates for the 2nd Friday of every month at 5:30pm and disabling the auto restart.

          Did you know that you can do most of the same things via powershell that you can do via ‘Nix’ as well? But of course, I’m not talking about that either.

            • Bensam123
            • 4 years ago

            Oh no? It’s not buried and also not user friendly? If it’s so easy to use they can keep it exactly the same way it was in W8 because it’s pretty straightforward, right?

            Doing the same things with powershell that you can do with nix has nothing to do with the comparison. I was pointing out that you need to know specific commands and where specifically to go buried in the OS to fix something. That’s not Windows, that’s Nix shit and one of the reasons almost no one uses it. It’s not user friendly.

            Having my OS restart whenever it feels like it because it’s forcing updates on me when I don’t want them does not make me a happy camper as I’m sure it doesn’t for most people.

            As I mentioned to Cyg, the people that are defending the forced updates seem like anal retentive admins. What you want to do to your PCs and your network are your business, but that shouldn’t be forced on other people. If they want to turn off antivirus and updates easily, they should be allowed to do it.

    • Deanjo
    • 4 years ago

    [quote<]This should prove a boon for system administrators in particular, who have be extra cautious when deploying operating system updates.[/quote<] Lol how anyone can figure that with great "details" like: Improved security in the Windows kernel. Fixed security issues that could allow remote code execution when malware is run on a target system. Fixed additional issues with the Windows UX, Windows 10 Mobile, Internet Explorer 11, Microsoft Edge, and taskbar. Fixed additional security issues with .NET Framework, Windows Journal, Active Directory Federation Services, NPS Radius Server, kernel-mode drivers, and WebDAV. Just as vague and useless as ever. They might as well just put: "Moved code around, sprinkled fairy dust, kissed booboo and made Windows all better."

      • dragontamer5788
      • 4 years ago

      [url<]https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/3135173[/url<] I mean, it isn't even that hard to get more details. It looks like the "detail change log" is just a high level overview.

        • Deanjo
        • 4 years ago

        Would it be so damn hard to drop some meaningful text right in the update? Seriously, in day and age of being to store the entire Library of Congress on home NAS an extra few bytes of detailed text that doesn’t involve 4 clicks to get at shouldn’t be hard.

        [quote<] This security update resolves a vulnerability in Microsoft Windows. The vulnerability could cause denial of service on a Network Policy Server (NPS) if an attacker sends specially crafted username strings to the NPS, which could prevent RADIUS authentication on the NPS. This security update is rated Important for all supported editions of Windows Server 2008 (excluding Itanium), and Windows Server 2008 R2 (excluding Itanium), and all supported editions of Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2. For more information, see the Affected Software section. The security update addresses the vulnerability by changing how NPS parses username queries when implementing RADIUS. For more information about the vulnerability, see the Vulnerability Information section. [/quote<]

          • way2strong
          • 4 years ago

          Mate, you must have a [b<]very[/b<] impressive NAS. [url=https://blogs.loc.gov/loc/2009/02/how-big-is-the-library-of-congress/<]I can't touch the LOC[/url<].

            • Deanjo
            • 4 years ago

            Not really.

            [quote<]A 2000 study by information scientists Peter Lyman and Hal Varian suggested that the amount of uncompressed textual data represented by the 26 million books then in the collection was 10 terabytes[/quote<] Current estimates put it around the 15-16 terabyte uncompressed.

            • jdevers
            • 4 years ago

            Plus that kind of information compresses very well using simple tools.

            • Deanjo
            • 4 years ago

            Exactly. Text data is one of the highest compressible types of data.

            • Zizy
            • 4 years ago

            Reasonable enough. 26 million books = about 2.6 billion A4 pages = about 10 trillion characters = 10TB.
            But this is just pure text – no diagrams, images etc in technical books, let alone other stuff they hoard.

            So this is huge underestimation of the actual full LOC size.

            • way2strong
            • 4 years ago

            [quote<]For instance, we can as of this moment [2009] say that the approximate amount of our collections that are digitized and freely and publicly available on the Internet is about 74 terabytes.[/quote<] That's from the link I posted above. Plus the LoC has much more than just books.

          • Zizy
          • 4 years ago

          Who would read that? For one bug it doesn’t look so bad – read the first line, figure out it doesn’t really concern you and ignore the rest. Imagine 10 such bugs. Read 1 line to figure out this fix is irrelevant to you, scroll 1 page to read the next line and scroll another page, repeat this for 9 out of 10 fixes and proclaim MS to be a bunch of morons.

          Simple line gives you all the relevant information if you don’t care.
          [quote<]3133043 MS16-021: Security update for NPS RADIUS Server to address denial of service: February 9, 2016[/quote<] If you do care, all the additional information you require is just a click away. But out of the face of those that don't care about this particular fix.

            • Deanjo
            • 4 years ago

            There are so many friendly ways that detailed change logs could be handled without having to navigate through multiple web pages. Putting vague descriptions is completely useless for everyone so just skip that completely. Just have a simple “Detailed view” checkbox that has the relevant info

            MS Patch # , MS-Sec #, CVE addressed, Detailed description.

            Hell even go one simple step further and pop all that information into a text file, or an applied updates local db afterwards for easy future reference without having to bounce around all over a net (only to find the links MIA after a few years).

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This